HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

KOMITI HAPORI│

Communities Committee

 

 

31 August 2022

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Wednesday 7 September 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

The meeting will be live streamed on Council’s Facebook page. Members of the public wishing to speak to items on the agenda are asked to contact: democraticservicesteam@huttcity.govt.nz

 

 

Membership

 

 

                                Deputy Mayor T Lewis (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr G Barratt

Cr J Briggs

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

Cr D Hislop

Cr C Milne

Cr A Mitchell

Cr N Shaw (Deputy Chair)

Cr L Sutton

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY

 

 


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

COMMUNITIES COMMITTEE
Membership:	13
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Reports to:	Council

 

  OVERVIEW:

This Committee assists Council to ensure healthy, vibrant and resilient communities through development and management of relevant plans, strategies and functions.

The Committee is aligned with the Neighbourhoods & Communities Directorate.

Its areas of focus are:

§   Urban design and spatial planning

§   Major Neighbourhoods & Communities projects (e.g. Naenae Pool)

§   Arts and culture

§   Parks and reserves

§   Sport and recreation

§   Community funding

§   Community development

§   Community facilities and services

§   Community safety

§   Emergency management

PURPOSE:

To develop, implement, monitor and review strategies, policies, plans and functions associated with community, social and cultural activities. This includes making the city a desirable, safe and attractive place, providing facilities and recreational opportunities that support quality living and healthy lifestyles, and supporting the cultural wellbeing of residents.

DELEGATIONS FOR THE COMMITTEES AREAS OF FOCUS:

§  All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities including the activities outlined below.

§  Develop required strategies and policies. Recommend draft and final versions to Council for adoption where they have a city-wide or strategic focus.

§  Implement, monitor and review strategies and policies.

§  Oversee the implementation of major projects provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§  Oversee budgetary decisions provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§  Oversee the development and implementation of plans and functions associated with community, social and cultural activities.

§  Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s Neighbourhoods & Communities Directorate.

§  Advocate in conjunction with relevant community organisations on matters related to the health and social/cultural wellbeing of communities.

§  Recommend to Council the acquisition or disposal of assets, unless the acquisition or disposal is provided for specifically in the LTP.

§  Approve and oversee monitoring around Community Funding Strategy grants.

§  Matters arising from the activities of Community Houses, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas.

§  Conduct any consultation processes required on issues before the Committee.

§  Approval and forwarding of submissions.

§  Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

§  The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee. When exercised, the report/minutes of the meeting require a resolution noting that the committee has performed the responsibilities of another committee and the reason/s.

§  If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Communities Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee and/or Climate Change & Sustainability Committee, then the Communities Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committees. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

Additional Parks and Reserves Delegations:

§  Adopt, and agree amendments to, open space or reserve management plans.

§  Make any decisions under open space or reserve management plans that are not otherwise delegated.

§  Grant leases, licences, rights of way and easements in terms of Council policy for Council owned properties that are either open space under the District Plan or reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. This delegation, except the granting of leases and licences to Council owned community houses/centres in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, is sub-delegated to the community boards in those areas.

§  Official naming of parks, reserves and sports grounds within the provisions of Council’s Naming Policy, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas, except where the sites have a high profile, city-wide importance due to their size and location and/or cross ward or community boundaries.

§  Removal and/or planting of street trees within the provisions of Council’s Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas.

    


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Hapori |Communities Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers,

2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Wednesday 7 September 2022 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       Opening formalities - Karakia Timatanga (22/1765)

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

2.       APOLOGIES

Cr Hislop

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have     

5.       Annual Report on the Homelessness Strategy (22/2055)

Report No. CCCCC2022/4/170 by the Principal Advisor                                       7

CHAIR’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

 

 

6.       Communities of Interest Update - Welcoming Communities/Rangatahi Update (22/2025)

Report No. CCCCC2022/4/169 by the Programmes and Innovations Manager  13

CHAIR’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

7.       Community Funding - Mouri Ora Fund 2022-2023 (22/2072)

Report No. CCCCC2022/4/172 by the Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts                                                                                                                                19

CHAIR’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

8.       Director's Report - Neighbourhoods and Communities (22/1957)

Report No. CCCCC2022/4/171 by the Director, Neighbourhoods and Communities          43

CHAIR’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

9.       Information Items

a)      Boulcott Memorial Research Project (22/2088)

Memorandum dated 17 August 2022 by the Museums Director                 57

CHAIR’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the memorandum be endorsed.”

 

b)      Naenae projects - progress update (22/2085)

Memorandum dated 16 August 2022 by the Project Manager (Naenae)     60

CHAIR’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the memorandum be endorsed.”

 

c)       Communities Committee Forward Programme 2023 (22/2007)

Report No. CCCCC2022/4/152 by the Democracy Advisor                       87

CHAIR’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

10.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

11.     Closing formalities - Karakia Whakamutunga (22/1766)

Unuhia!

Unuhia!

Unuhia i te uru-tapu-nui

Kia wātea, kia māmā

Te ngākau, te tinana, te wairua i te ara takatū

Koia rā e Rongo whakairihia ake ki runga

Kia wātea, kia wātea!

Ae rā, kua wātea!

Hau, pai mārire.

Release us from the supreme sacredness of our tasks

To be clear and free
in heart, body and soul in our continuing journey

Oh Rongo, raise these words up high

so that we be cleansed and be free,

Yes indeed, we are free!

Good and peaceful

 

 

 

Annie Doornebosch

Democracy Advisor

 

 


                                                                                       1                                                07 September 2022

A black and white sign

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceCommunities Committee

12 August 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/2055)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2022/4/170

 

Annual Report on the Homelessness Strategy

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide an update on the work of Council and partners under the Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Homelessness Strategy between 1 July 2021 and 30 June 2022. This includes data and information from the organisations contracted to deliver the three actions funded by Council. This is the third annual update on the three actions funded by Council.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)     receives and notes the report;

(2)     notes the report is the third annual update on Council’s actions in response to homelessness as part of the Lower Hutt Homelessness Strategy; and

(3)     notes that officers will report to the Committee again in the new Triennium with an outline of our plan for a Review of the Homelessness Strategy. 

 

Background

2.    As part of the strategic approach to responding to homelessness in Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt, Council provides funding to deliver on three key actions: 

·    Early intervention to prevent homelessness,

·    Increased access to settled homes in the rented sector, and

·    Providing housing advice and advocacy.

 

3.    Longer-term funding to support the actions was agreed as part of the Long-Term Plan 2021–2031.  Council currently provides $570,000 per year for services responding to homelessness and housing hardship.

 

4.    Annual funding from Council is provided to the following three organisations (referred to hereafter as Kaupapa partners):

Table 1

Organisation

Service

Per annum contract value ($)

Tākiri Mai te Ata Whānau Ora Collective

Homelessness prevention – early intervention for households at risk of homelessness in the private rented sector or Kāinga Ora homes

 $370,000

 Includes flexi-    fund.

Tuatahi Centre

Access to settled accommodation for households at risk of homelessness

 $110,000

Community Law Wellington and Hutt Valley

Housing Advice and Advocacy – a legal housing advice and advocacy service for households with housing problems

 $90,000

Discussion

5.   The context of homelessness is a complex one.  This occurs at many levels.  Individuals have complex needs; Whanau are multi-faceted; policy decisions have unintended consequences; and wide social situations (housing supply; the pandemic) impact strongly.  These are covered in more detail below.

 

Impacts of COVID-19 and economic hardship:

6.    Both the risks and the impacts of homelessness have escalated during the pandemic, challenging both whanau and those working to support them. As outlined by one of our Kaupapa partners: 

“…the housing crisis and its impact on whanau has been exacerbated by COVID-19 to the point where whanau have next to no solutions for permanent, healthy, long-term housing.  Emergency housing is becoming social housing long term as most whanau cannot afford the private rental market, and there is nearly no social housing for them to move to.” 

7.    A key impact for whānau has come from the effects of lockdown on employment and income, with some industry sectors (such as hospitality) being heavily affected. Takiri Mai te Ata saw a marked increase in the number of referrals for whānau requiring emergency and transitional housing during the lockdown periods.  

8.    COVID-19 has had a range of impacts on the Kaupapa partners we work with and the whānau they support. Organisational challenges have come from providing services remotely, dealing with staffing issues from isolation or illness, and ensuring safety when able to see ‘clients’ in person again.  

The impacts of high rent on wellbeing

9.    All partners have reported that they are seeing a number of whānau who are living in poor quality housing while still struggling to pay high market rents.  This is of particular concern - the physical and mental health of whānau, and their overall wellbeing, is severely affected by living in these situations.

Policy impacts

10.  Central policy changes have affected housing for all. The Healthy Homes Standards (in effect July 2021), and the Residential Tenancies Amendment Act 2020 (in effect February 2021), are both seen as positive overall. Yet there has also been negative unintended consequences that have come from these changes; especially given the timing of these has in some cases coincided with the impacts of COVID-19 and effects of lockdown.

11.  One way in which this manifested was through some whānau being given a 90-day notice to vacate due to Healthy Homes Standards renovations at the time of COVID-19 ‘Red’ alert levels. They were unable to view or move into new rental accommodation until the alert levels were dropped. The landlord would not agree to an extension on the end date of the notice. The whānau were also unable to work and afford essential items due to their circumstances. The combination of these factors put a lot of stress on the whānau.

Housing supply

12.  There is a continuing high-level of need for emergency and temporary housing in the city, with issues including the lack of supply of suitable accommodation locally, the use of hotels as accommodation for people with a range of needs and for lengthy periods of time, and the lack of support for whānau in these situations. 

Council Actions – July 2021 to June 2022

13.  Our three Council-funded actions are focused on preventing homelessness. We recognise that these actions alone will not eradicate homelessness in Te Awa Kairangi. Significant institutional and systemic issues, coupled with the housing market, make this task far beyond the scope and resources of this Strategy. However, we have achieved demonstrable impact working through our Kaupapa partners ; as below. 

Tuatahi Centre – Access to settled accommodation

14.  This service aims to provide homes for 50 households per annum and to ensure that 85% of households retain their accommodation. Tuatahi Centre accesses a range of support services depending on the needs of the whānau.

15.  The Tuatahi Centre achieved the provision of homes for 92 households in the 2021-2022 financial year.  The total households assisted exceeds the target of 50 households per annum.  Of the number of individuals supported by Tuatahi centre, over half of them were tamariki. The majority of the whānau identified as Māori or Pacific People.

16.  The major causes of homelessness were tenancy ending/eviction and financial hardship. For the whānau that Tuatahi support, financial hardship is driven by the high costs of rent and exacerbated by additional costs such as loans which incur high interest rates. 

17.  Whānau were living in a range of situations when referred to the Tuatahi Centre.  The majority were living in other private rented housing and were at risk of homelessness because the rent was unaffordable or because the tenancy was ending for other reasons.  A high proportion of whānau were also living in emergency housing which can be an unstable and stressful experience.

Community Law Wellington and Hutt Valley - Legal Housing Advice and Advocacy

18.  The Housing Advice and Advocacy Legal Service provides free legal advice on matters such as: evictions, unsafe housing, rent increases, bond disputes, applications to and representation at, the Tenancy Tribunal, disputes with private landlords, Kāinga Ora, and the Ministry of Social Development (MSD).

 

19.  Community Law Wellington and Hutt Valley provided legal advice to 127 households in the 2021-2022 financial year.  The total number of households assisted is well above the target of 80 households per annum.

 

20.  Legal advice is most frequently sought on inadequate housing, primarily for cold, damp, and unsafe houses.  The significant majority of whānau accessing Community Law’s support are living in private rentals.  Community Law has been working closely with Tākiri Mai te Ata Whānau Ora Collective Homelessness Prevention Service to provide advocacy for whānau living in properties that are of unsatisfactory condition.

21.  Community Law has advised that the majority of people are either unwaged or working part-time, meaning they could not otherwise afford to access legal advice and support.

Tākiri Mai te Ata- Homeless Prevention Service

22.  This service supports whānau living in private rentals or Kāinga Ora homes that are at risk of becoming homeless without early intervention.

 

23.  Tākiri Mai te Ata supported 75 households in the 2021-2022 financial year.  This sits below a previously-created target of 80 households (which was borne out of a target of 280 households assisted over three years; 80, 100, 100).  This target for 2021-2022 has since been revised (in a September 2021 contract) to 75. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24.  Takiri Mai te Ata have described the reasons which clients seek support from their services, primarily:

 

·    Financial issues,

·    debt, and

·    rent arrears.

25.  The other major category is relationship breakdown of some type, including family harm. This is in line with a considerable amount of research on homelessness. Issues with landlords or their agents as well at the end of tenancies are other categories of note.

26.  Tākiri Mai te Ata has access to a flexi-fund provided by Council used to provide financial assistance to overcome the immediate barriers that are putting a whānau at risk of homelessness.  Overall, the flexi-fund has been used to assist 40 households with the major focus being on clearing rent arrears as well as paying other debts including power bills. The flexi-fund is proving to be an important tool that helps the service deal with some of the immediate financial issues for households.

27.  An annual target of 80 households was set when the service was established. Officers are continuing to work with Tākiri Mai te Ata to assess the service targets in relation to the intensity and levels of need found in practice. Officers recognise that the original target was high given the amount of support required to help each whānau retain their accommodation and the indication is that the target will need to be reduced. We have agreed with Tākiri Mai te Ata to keep the target under review.

Wider response

28.  We have close relationships with our Kaupapa partners and have maintained regular contact to ensure they are receiving the support they need by providing information and enabling services to be adapted.  The three Kaupapa partners have also been part of initial discussions on Council’s housing plan.

29.  Officers are continuing to be part of the response to homelessness in the city.  Our role, as part of a network of agencies, helps improve our understanding of homelessness and housing hardship in the city and will inform Council’s future role in the response.

30.  Council is a member of the Lower Hutt Housing and Homelessness Network, which includes non-governmental organisations, as well as representatives from health, Ministry of Social Development, and Department of Corrections.

31.  The mission of this network is to ‘provide the best services possible to end homelessness in Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt’ and its primary focus is to provide networking and information sharing opportunities for those working in Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt in the homelessness and housing space. The network has also begun identifying needs for additional services and ways of improving the services available to households in the city.

 

Year Four of the Homelessness Strategy funding (current financial year)

32.  Officers will continue working with our Kaupapa partners to support them with managing the three contracts, adapting them as required, and improving our understanding of homelessness in the city.

33.  We will maintain a role in responding to homelessness through the Housing and Homeless Network and the research group.

34.  We will also engage the new Council on our Homelessness Strategy; we are undertaking a continuous improvement lens on this work, and regularly engaging with our Kaupapa partners.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

35.  There are no climate change impact considerations for these matters.

Consultation

36.  This report relates to work on which Council has previously engaged with communities in the city, and consultation is therefore not required.

Legal Considerations

37.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial Considerations

38.  There are no new financial considerations for Council in relation to the homelessness work.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Paul Sullivan

Principal Advisor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kiri Waldegrave

Acting Head of Strategy and Planning

 

 

 

Approved By: Jarred Griffiths

Director Strategy and Engagement

 


                                                                                       1                                                07 September 2022

A black and white sign

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceCommunities Committee

11 August 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/2025)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2022/4/169

 

Communities of Interest Update - Welcoming Communities/Rangatahi Update

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To update the Committee on work in progress across our Communities of Interest and seek agreement to participate in the Welcoming Communities programme.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   agrees to participate in the Welcoming Communities programme; and

 

(2)   notes the progress on our new approach to supporting improved outcomes for rangatahi.

 

Background

2.    One of the six priorities in Tō tātou mahere ā-ngahurutanga 2021-2031/ Council’s Long Term Plan 2021-31 is Tūhono Hapori/Connecting Communities - investing to connect and empower neighbourhoods and communities so they can thrive. Council is seeking to reset the way it engages and works with residents, better connecting them to Council, and to each other. The Long Term Plan (“LTP”) states ‘we plan to work in and with communities to identify and build on existing strengths and create self-sustaining networks with a focus on connectedness, safety, community participation, resilience and wellbeing’.

3.    The Connected Communities team has been providing updates on Communities of Interest as this work progresses, and this papers updates on a further two – new migrants and rangatahi.

 

 

New migrants - Welcoming Communities

4.    Immigration New Zealand in partnership with the Office of Ethnic Communities and the Human Rights Commission is leading the Welcoming Communities (Te Waharoa ki ngā Hapori) programme.  

5.    Newcomers settle in communities – so it is the local councils, working with their communities that are best placed to lead and implement Welcoming Communities. Previous settlement initiatives have focused solely on supporting newcomers, whereas Welcoming Communities actively seeks to mobilise and involve local residents in welcoming activities. This new approach creates bridges between the receiving community and newcomers.

6.    The programme is founded on the principle that communities who make newcomers feel welcome are likely to enjoy greater social outcomes and stronger economic growth. In this environment, everyone can participate in the economic, civic, cultural and social life of the community. The programme also supports three aspects of community well-being – social, economic and cultural – as identified in the Local Government Act.

7.    At present there are 26 councils participating in this programme. Immigration New Zealand provides funding, accreditation, information, networking, programme evaluation and guidance to support councils to create places where everyone can belong.

8.    Expressions of Interest for councils and communities wishing to join this programme must be submitted by 11 November 2022.

9.    The application requires us to provide evidence that we are a community that is diverse enough to require this programme, and over the last four months we have been re-connecting with stakeholders in order to inform the application and identify partners to help implement the programme.  Applications also require endorsement by Council, which is why we are seeking that through this report.

10.  We will also be discussing the application and process with mana whenua.

11.  If we are successful and are accepted as a Welcoming Community, we will be required to deliver a Welcome Plan that is focused on eight key outcome areas (also known as the Welcoming Communities Standard):

·      Inclusive Leadership

·      Welcoming Communications

·      Equitable Access

·      Connected and Inclusive Communities

·      Economic Development, Business and Employment

·      Civic Engagement and Participation

·      Welcoming Public Spaces

·      Culture and Identity

 

12.  Further to developing a Welcome Plan, if we are successful in this application, we receive $50k for three years to employ a ‘Welcoming Communities’ person. Their role will include:

·      forming a Welcoming Communities Stakeholder group

·      creating the Welcome Plan

·      embedding Welcoming Communities actions and approaches across Council

·      mobilising and involving local residents in welcoming activities

 

13.  From our observations, in most cases this role is employed directly by participating councils, with the manager overseeing and coordinating the involvement of a range of community groups.

14.  It is up to each community to consider what Welcoming Plan activities are needed to meet the outcomes. The activities may be led in various ways:

·      Council only

·      Council in collaboration with community stakeholders, or

·      community stakeholders – could have local or central government support

 

15.  The costs associated with delivering the Welcoming Communities programme are to be taken out of existing budgets as the work aligns with our communities of interest, and existing work which is planned across different business units. We will also look to apply for other funding where available.

16.  There is a risk that our Welcoming Community stakeholders and partners may anticipate more Council investment into the initiative than is currently budgeted.

Rangatahi programme

17.  One of the key principles of the organisational redesign in 2021 was better integration of services and programmes. It had been identified that many of the programmes delivered and supported by Council were not aligned or coordinated and resulted in both duplication and gaps in service. There was also little understanding of the reach, impact or return on investment for many programmes.

18.  The redesign brought together a number of teams involved in delivering programmes across Council to form the Programmes and Innovation team in Connected Communities. This team is now responsible for overseeing one coordinated programme of activities to support wellbeing (Council wide). 

19.  One of the early focus areas has been rangatahi as this was identified as an area with both strengths and gaps, and an area where there are currently issues (including youth violence and crime).

 

20.  We have been providing a good level of service for small groups of youth in two neighbourhoods (Naenae and Taita) through the Clubhouse Network, but our activity has been sporadic across the rest of the city.

21.  In order to consider how we can best support and enable rangatahi across the city to thrive, we have undertaken the following work:

·      a number of workshops with staff

·      conversations with other youth providers (government and community)

·      discussion with our rangatahi

·      discussion with Council’s te tira Māori team (to consider the outcomes sought by our mana whenua partners)

22.  Through this we have designed a programme which aligns with our overall strategic approach, in particular taking a Te Ao Māori approach, shifting to more community-led activity and working to harness the collective impact of all those working with the same communities. 

23.  The programme is called ‘Te Wao’, which is derived from the phrase ‘Te Wao nui a Tāne’ (“The Great Forest of Tāne”), reflecting the cultural significance of environment, sustainability and the cycle of life. It talks to the desire to establish an environment that is conducive to the growth and development of young people, ensuring the space we co-create is sustainable for future generations. 

24.  Through the program we eventually aim to:

·      Provide a rangatahi programme offer in Naenae five days a week and to seven other neighbourhoods at least three times per week.

 

·      Deliver a programme of activities which focus on literacy and STEM, arts and culture, physical and mental health, diversity and inclusion and sustainability.

 

·      Have a rangatahi lead designated among staff at each of our neighbourhood hubs who will coordinate the programme delivery on-site and capture the voice of rangatahi to help shape future programmes and partnerships.

 

·      Ensure our approach to Youth work is rooted in Te Ao Māori, that meets the aspirations of Mana Whenua for rangatahi in Te Awa Kairangi

 

·      Establish partnerships with other youth organisations to contribute to programme activity including youth counselling services. We have connected in with other local youth organisations such as BGI, Vibe, Tuatahi, Youth Inspire, Talent Rise, Morehu Taiohi and Ignite Sport to identify synergies and collaborate on programmes and share resource and knowledge.

 

·      Partnerships with schools in Te Awa Kairangi to strengthen the holistic approach towards Youth wellbeing as organisations or people connected to working with rangatahi.

 

·      Maintain our presence on the steering group of the Te Awakairangi Youth Development Network (TAYDN). Pou Tiaki (Rangatahi) are also attending sessions held by TAYDN, this has enabled greater connections with other youth workers in Te Awa Kairangi. Being part of this network will provide them with mentoring and training as youth workers. It has also provided opportunities to find synergies to work together across agencies to give a more holistic approach to Youth Development in Te Awakairangi. This will be beneficial in addressing the current issues we are facing around youth violence in the CBD and the Bunny Street bus hub in particular.

 

·      Connect our staff linking in nationally with other organisations/people working with rangatahi (for example: Youth Leadership Symposium: The Youth Wellbeing Conference, Ara Taiohi, Life Unlimited, Nukuora) to build further connections, learn and problem solve what else can be done to further improve the state of youth wellbeing in Te Awa Kairangi and nationally.

 

·      Have greater involvement of volunteers in the future through our community-led approach and partnerships with other community groups

 

25.  In the short term our focus is on transitioning our offer in Naenae and strengthening our presence in Taita and Stokes Valley; also building our connections with other youth providers to harness our collective impact.

26.  Council recently entered a partnership with Ignite Sport which will see us work with them on programming and a potential youth hub in Gracefield. 

Clubhouse Network

27.  The Clubhouse Network, a US-based international movement which Council has been involved in for the last 10 years, lays a good foundation for this new programme. The new programme builds on the strengths of this kaupapa, broadening the scope to include a wider range of strategic priority areas, while being rooted in Te Ao Māori.  The new programme will increase the reach and impact of our rangatahi work, working within previous Clubhouse budgets.

28.  We have been talking with the Executive Director of the Clubhouse Network over the last six months to look at how we can continue with aspects of the Clubhouse kaupapa and share learnings from our new programme, which they are open to exploring.

Options

29.  The Committee can agree or disagree to the proposal to participate in the Welcoming Communities programme.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

30.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

31.  Sustainability is one of the areas of focus of the new programme and we will look to align this with actions in the Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai, ‘Our race against time’ Ka whati te tai, ka pao te tōrea!’.

Consultation

32.  As well as youth-focused organisations outlined in this paper, we have engaged with members of the Refugee and Stakeholder forum and we have had an initial conversation with Ngati Toa and plan to meet have a conversation with Taranaki Whānui in September.

Legal Considerations

33.  There are no legal considerations

Financial Considerations

34.  If we are accepted as a Welcoming Community, $50,000 is provided per year for three years towards the Welcoming Communities Coordinator, which would be a part time role. 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Samuel Chan

Programmes and Innovations Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Melanie Laban

Head of Connected Communities

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 


                                                                                       1                                                07 September 2022

A black and white sign

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceCommunities Committee

15 August 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/2072)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2022/4/172

 

Community Funding - Mouri Ora Fund 2022-2023

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to make recommendations for allocation of the Mouri Ora Fund 2022/2023.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   notes that there is $595,223 available to be allocated under the Mouri Ora Fund 2022/2023;

(2)   agrees to the recommended allocations of $578,713 outlined in paragraph 16 of the report; and

(3)   agrees to the recommendation that the unallocated funds of $16,510 are allocated at the Chief Executive’s discretion (and reported back to this Committee) as opportunities arise through ongoing work with Communities of Interest.  

 

Background

2.    One of the six priorities of the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021/2031 is Tūhono Hapori - Connecting communities: investing to connect and empower neighbourhoods and communities so they can thrive and remain connected, healthy, inclusive, safe and resilient. 

 

3.    The Future Approach to Community Funding was adopted by Council in July 2021.  The approach iterated the intentional shift from transactional contracting to relational partnering as articulated through these principles, approaches and priorities:

 

·      Meaningfully embracing and incorporating Te Ao Māori in our policies and fulfilling responsibilities under the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi;

·      Working together for impact (partnering, not just funding);

·      Learning together;

·      Engagement and relationship building;

·      Being a good funder;

·      Community-led; and

·      Equity

 

4.    Organisations connected with the Kai Collective are responsible for applying for their Business as Usual (BAU) funding, membership of the Collective ensures a more coordinated approach and commitment towards the move to a more resilient kai system. 

 

5.    Our relationship with the Kai Collective is an example of how we can and will increasingly look at investing our funding.  Supporting Communities of Interest to work collectively, harnessing their impact to improve and enhance community wellbeing.  Future examples could include Youth and Cycle Collectives.

 

6.    Groups that were funded through the Mouri Ora Fund 2021-2022 in late November 2021 are only part way through their 12 month funding agreements.  Their 12 month reports are not due until end of December 2022.

 

7.    The Community Funding Advisor has informally met with all of the above groups and is confident they are all on track to deliver their agreed outcomes.  A report on this is attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

 

8.    Under the 2022/2023 financial year there is budgetary provision of $713K made through the Annual Plan.  Funding can be used towards operational costs for the organisation, to continue their programmes within the Hutt Valley. 

9.    There were a total 46 applications made to the Mouri Ora Fund 2022-2023.  Forty-five eligible requests totaling $1,154,737M.  This is very similar to the number of eligible applications received for the financial year 2021-2022 (46) although the amount requested for 2022-2023 is less.

 

10.  Of the $713K available for allocation, in 2021-2022 Council agreed to three groups being granted multiyear funding.  2022-2023 will be their second year of the Three Year Funding Agreement.  Those groups are: Age Concern $28,657; Taikiri Mai Te Whanau Ora Collective (Pataka Kai) $49,120; and Moera Community House $40,000K.  There is therefore $595,223K available for allocation 2022-2023.  

 

11.  The Mouri Ora Fund is promoted through Council’s website and was promoted through Council’s Online Grant’s system, which has a database of around 630 made up of community organisations and individuals who have previously applied for funding.  The fund was also advertised through the Hutt News, social media and was also circulated to other funders to promote through their own networks.

 

Discussion

 

12.    Community priorities approved by this Council:

 

·     Community led: locally owned initiatives, goals and detailed outcomes; and

·     Equity: recognising different people with different levels of advantage require different approaches and resources to achieve equitable wellbeing outcomes.

 

13.  All applications were scored through a matrix system that was used by the Council’s Community Funding Advisor and Council’s Principal Advisor Research and Evaluation.  Criteria included:

  

a)      Clearly making a difference - benefiting a diverse group, a priority group;

b)       Had community ownership – community led, local group with local volunteers, employee, service provided result of need identified community;

c)       Demonstrated collaborative approaches – working with others, included working with those who will benefit from the programme and activity as well as working with other organisations; 

d)      Show well managed organisations - financial reporting, organisation structure, charities commission up to date, evaluation; and

e)       COVID – basic needs of housing, food and safety were strong drivers in the assessment.

  

14.  The recommendations outlined in paragraph 16 of the report have been approved by Council’s Corporate Leadership Team.  More detail regarding the project/purpose of the funding is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

 

15.  Recommendations outlined in paragraph 16 are against a total allocation available under the Mouri Ora Fund 2022-2023 available budget of $595,223k.  Officers are recommending a total spend of $578,713.  Unallocated funds total $16,510. 

16.     Officer’s recommendations are as follows:

 

Kai



Pomare Taita Community Trust

$50,000

3 years

Stokes Valley Food Bank

$25,000

1 year

Blueprint Community Trust (Petone Depot)

$9,750

1 year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wellbeing


Team Naenae Trust

$10,000

1 year

Saint David's Anglican Parish of Naenae-Epuni (for Te Puna Manawa Drop-in Centre, Hillary Court, Naenae)

$20,000

3 years

Citizens Advice Bureau Lower Hutt

$36,000

2 years

Citizens Advice Bureau Petone

$31,380

1 year

English Language Partners

$6,526

1 year

Dress for Success

$10,000

1 year

 

 

Whanau



Toku Reo Charitable Trust Board

 

$21,888

3 years

Anglican Social Services (Hutt Valley) Trust Board (The Family Centre)

$20,000

1 year

Birthright Hutt Valley Trust

$23,069

3 years

 

 

Seniors


The Wellington City Mission (Anglican) Trust Board

$23,805

3 years

Wesley Community Action

$65,000

3 years

Voice Arts Trust

 

$3,500

1 year

 

 

Safety




Porirua Living Without Violence Te Noho Kore Inc

$8,000

1 year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Youth & Tamariki



Ignite Sport Trust

$25,000
3 years

Trade School Industries Charitable Trust

$20,000

1 year

Youth Inspire

$50,791

1 year

Naenae Charitable Youth Trust

$25,000

1 year

YMCA of Greater Wellington Inc

$15,000

1 year


Big Brothers Big Sisters Wellington

$7,500

1 year

Capital Zone Basketball Trust

$7,500

3 years

Arohanui Strings

$10,000

1 year

Naku Enei

$20,000

1 year

Greenstone Doors

$7,500

1 year

 

 

Disabilities


Thumbs Up

(Disabilities)

$4,809

1 year

Recreate

(Disabilities)

$15,000

1 year

Hearth Trust

(Disabilities)

$8,000 

1 year

 

17.  More details about the recommendations are included as Appendix 1 attached to the report.  The unallocated budget of $16,510 is to be allocated at the Chief Executive’s discretion (and reported back to this Committee) as opportunities arises through the work with Communities of Interest.

 

18.  Based on recommendations within this report, the following groups align better with other Council community funding and their applications will be transferred to that fund:

 

Hindu Council (Engagement Fund)

Special Olympics (Engagement Fund)

Puoru Kakan Okamanga (Kakano Fund)

Folau Alofa Charitable Trust (Kakano Fund)

Muscular Dystrophy Assocation of NZ (Engagement Fund)

Hutt Maternity Action Trust (Creative Communities Fund)

 

 

 

19.  Council often receives funding requests from health focused national organisations.  More priority is given to local groups with a permanent presence in Lower Hutt who may not have access to central government funding.

 

20.  Based on recommendations in this paper, the following groups (and/or specific projects) will not receive funding from the Mouri Ora Fund and will be contacted by the Community Funding Advisor to be directed to other possible avenues of funding:

 

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Vulnerable Support Services

Reach Out

Graeme Dingle Foundation

Women of Worth Charitable Co Ltd

Southend Business Group

Dementia Wellington Charitable Trust

Epilepsy New Zealand

Kids Camp New Zealand

Bowel Cancer

Hutt Community Radio and Archives

Samoan Church Wainuiomata

 

Consultation

21.  Relevant officers were consulted on during the assessments of the applications.

Risks

22.  There are no notable risks.

Financial Implications

23.  There are no financial implications.

Legal Implications

 

24.  Funds must be used only for the purpose for which they were sought and/or approved.   

 

25.  Funds must be used within 12 months of the recipient being notified of their successful application.

 

26.  Recipients are required to inform Council immediately if any difficulties arise which may compromise the service or project.

 

27.  A complaint must be laid with the Police if any funds received under this scheme are stolen or misappropriated.  Council must be notified of all such complaints to the Police.

 

28.  The recipient must allow an audit on the use of Council’s funds should Council wish to undertake such an audit.

 

29.  The recipient must recognise the support of Council in appropriate publicity material, annual reports and similar publications.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

 

30.  In line with Council’s sustainability work, applicants to this fund were asked what practical steps their organisation or project had taken to address environmental concerns. 

 

31.  The purpose of this was to then enable further conversation to occur with successful applicants around environmental impacts and how this can be related to the work they do in their context. 

 

32.  A relevant environmental impacts action plan will be established with successful applicants, if requested, as a condition to receiving this funding and will likely be used as criteria for future funding.

 

Communication and Engagement

 

33.  Funding decisions will be provided to Council’s Communications Team to share with the wider community through our usual channels.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Mouri Ora Fund Recommendations 2022-2023

26

2

Mouri Ora Funding Six Monthly catch-up 2021-2022

30

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Debbie Hunter

Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Melanie Laban

Head of Connected Communities

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 

 

Approved By: Jo Miller

Chief Executive

 


Attachment 1

Mouri Ora Fund Recommendations 2022-2023

 

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Attachment 2

Mouri Ora Funding Six Monthly catch-up 2021-2022

 

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                                                                                       1                                                07 September 2022

A black and white sign

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceCommunities Committee

03 August 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1957)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2022/4/171

 

Director's Report - Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To update the Committee on work across the Neighbourhoods and Communities team.

Recommendation

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

Highlights and overview

2.   The highlight for this report has to be the Te Awa Kairangi Kai Collective and Hutt City Council winning the Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities EXCELLENCE Award for Social Wellbeing at the Local Government New Zealand Excellence Awards. 

3.   It was great to have members of the Collective at the event to accept the award. This is a great testament to our new approach to working with the community, and to the work of our staff Barry Gall and Joni Araiti who have been worked closely with the collective for the last year. It demonstrates what can be achieved when we walk alongside community organisations in genuine partnership.

4.   We are also pleased to announce the appointment of Eddie Edmonds as our new Healthy Families Hutt Valley Manager. Eddie will be familiar to many as he was previously in the team as Lead Māori Systems Innovator. He will re-start with us in mid-September with a focus on engaging with mana whenua and recruiting a team.

 

 

 

 

5.   Parts of our team have had to pivot in recent weeks to work with colleagues across the business to respond to extreme weather events, including the Stokes Valley slips. This has required a significant welfare response and also the support of teams in our Neighbourhood Hubs and in Parks and Reserves.  Our current approach to engaging and working with communities includes a focus on building resilience, particularly through having more and stronger Neighbourhood Support networks. In the coming months we will reflect further on what we have seen locally and around the country this winter to help plan for future events. 

 

COVID

6.   COVID and winter illnesses continue to impact staff numbers across our community facilities and services, although to a lesser extent than last reported. We are managing on a day-by-day basis. Koraunui neighbourhood hub did need to reduce opening hours for 1 week but generally all facilities are running smoothly.

7.   COVID continues to have a significant impact on visitation to our facilities. For the 4th Quarter, April – June 2022, visitor counts are 51.5% of the same months in 2019. (2022: 211,237 vs 2019: 409,826). Things may be starting to improve as visitors for the three months of March-May 2022 were 45% of 2019.

8.   The full year visitor count for 2021/2022 is 781,052 which is 49% of 2018/2019: 1,590,492.

 

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9.   Library loans for April to June 2022 are just under 74% of April-June 2019. The full year count of all loans for 2021/2022 is 827,940 which is 79% of 2018/2019 (1,042,398).

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10. An interesting observation is that while visitors have fallen to about 50% of pre-covid, library loans have only fallen to about 80%. There could be a number of factors at play here including the reduction of public programming, the reluctance of people to linger in public places and the rise of eBook use.  The percentage of loans which are electronic rather than physical continues to grow. In 2018/2019 digital loans made up 4.5% of total loans vs 16% in 2021/2022.

Community Hall bookings

11. Bookings of community halls for the 4th Quarter, April – June 2022 are 57% of the same period in 2019. (2021/2022: 2,552 hours vs 2018/2019: 4,440 hours).

 

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12. Bookings for the full financial year are also, coincidentally, 57% of 2018/2019 (2021/2022: 12,492 hours vs 2018/2019: 21,790 hours).

Neighbourhoods

Epuni

13. Common Unity has gone through a transition phase with the departure of their previous Manager who had been in the role since the group’s inception. A new Manager has now been appointed and we will be looking at re-establishing this relationship in the near future.

14. The Epuni Kaitiaki group (The group) have changed their name to The Epuni Fairfield Community Group and recently held their inaugural AGM at Epuni School, which was an opportunity for the community to connect with each other, share kai and hear from speakers on the topic ‘Conditions that create thriving communities’.

15. The group has also employed two part time Activators and they will be facilitating a series of “Table Talks” to gain important feedback from the community which will be used in an updated Road Map going forward. The goal of the roadmap was to make sure that the 700+ new Kainga Ora residents moving into Epuni were warmly welcomed, with longer term outcomes of brighter futures, enhanced community resilience and wellbeing in Epuni. 

16. Stage 1 of the Kainga Ora development on Cambridge Terrace is complete which has meant 28 new homes on the precinct. Stage 3 is underway and is due for completion by mid-2024. This will result in an additional 106 new homes. Stage 2 is still in the planning phase in terms of how that land may be utilised.

Naenae

17. Our Community Facilitator continues to harness the collective impact of social service providers through fortnightly catchups with those located in the town centre - Kokiri Naenae Hub, Oasis Church, Pacific Health and Te Puna Manawa.  The focus of these meetings is to understand how we can work together better to serve our community. Once this core group has done some initial work, they will look to bring other local groups into the conversation.

18. Kokiri Naenae Hub are working with He Puawai Trust (newly formed Trust from the Kai Collective) to provide Kai Kits to the community and local volunteers are now also helping put these together onsite for distribution. Kokiri are continuing to provide hot meals to the community weekly as well as any social support that may be required.

19. Te Puna Manawa are now providing breakfast every Monday for our tamariki and rangatahi before they head off to school. This has become very popular. They are also working with the wider group to understand what additional support they could provide for rangatahi.  

 

20. Oasis Church Kai cupboard is going really well and is looking at upgrades due to the amount of kai that gets dropped off for community and also the amount they have been provided.  They also have hot meals delivered to whanau as required.  Oasis Church is now also working with He Puawai Trust as they look at stepping into growing produce for their community. The Trust is currently helping educate the new 10 employees that the church has in preparation of a new small urban farm moving forward.

21. The Naenae Neighbourhood hub and library reopened on 16 July following repairs and maintenance. The reopening was timed to coincide with the Naenae market and community day which included live performances and food stalls and promotion of the designs for the new pool and the former Post Office. Staff report that people are loving the lighter, brighter environment.

22. The asphalt track and a pedestrian bridge connecting Naenae Road, Seddon Street and Waddington Drive was completed in early July 2022.   

Wainuiomata

23. Our key focus for the last couple of months has been deepening our understanding of community and council mahi already underway and establishing relationships.  We have also started our bi-monthly Neighbourhood meetings which brings together all of the officers leading mahi in Wainuiomata so we can view and work across this holistically across all our work areas.  This includes officers involved in the Queen Street redevelopment project who we are working with on communications around the project.

Taita

24. The weekly Walter Nash Stadium Sports and Library programme continues to be provided to approximately 45 students from Taita Central School.

Petone and Moera

25. Work continues on the Neighbourhood Hubs CAPEX programme. After a slow initial response to community engagement on the Petone facility, the engagement period was extended and the approach changed to ensure there was good input and representation. We expect to receive a final report soon.

26. We continue to work with Studio C on designs and costings for Moera Library. Given recent increases in the cost of construction we expect some value engineering may be required.

 

 

 

 

 

Services and activities to support wellbeing

Sport, Recreation and Play

27. Hutt City Council has signed the Terms of Reference for the Wellington Region Spaces and Places Steering Group. This group will lead our and provide strategic oversight of the Wellington Region Spaces and Places Framework encompassing facilities and spaces that are graded at regional and national level. Hutt City Council has requested the framework captures our commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and it recognises our commitment to work alongside mana whenua.

28. During this reporting period the delivery of in school play programmes has been less impacted from the COVID Protection Framework restrictions. However, this has been offset by an increased number of students and teachers contracting the flu. Over the course of the past six weeks six schools have participated in Pukutākaro and two schools in Build and Play.

29. The annual Regional Cross Country Zone event has taken place with 100 students taking part in the event and this event being supported by Sport Recreation and Play staff.

30. The Sport Recreation and Play team support Lower Hutt Primary Schools Sports Association with administrative, resourcing and event management services through a Memorandum of Understanding. We are currently reviewing the content of this document with a view of enabling Lower Hutt Primary Schools Sports Association to play a stronger lead in this relationship.

31. The Sport Recreation and Play team are continuing to provide recreational services to the community through engaging agencies that support the delivery of yoga, pilates and dance. The attendance rates for the yoga and pilates programmes appear to be back to pre-COVID numbers. The dance programmes have shown significant increases in numbers, particularly in the Pasifika community.

32. The school Rangatahi Leadership Programme is a programme that utilises sports to support the development of leadership skills and life skills for students. The programme is facilitated at Walter Nash Centre or onsite at the school. We are currently working with 32 young people in this space. This work complements the Ignite Sport programme, who have been at full capacity for some time.

33. We currently have 45 children and young people engaging with our Home-Schooling Programme. This is a programme that provides the opportunity for children and young people who are being schooled at home to connect and develop their social skills through recreation and physical activity.

34. The in-school sport programme, a programme that helps introduce and develop students sport and physical activity skills, has engaged 372 young people during this period.

 

 

Accessibility

35. At the previous Communities Committee meeting, members of the Wheels and Canes accessibility group spoke and gave a summary of key actions they would like to see Council take going forward to improve accessibility across Te Awa Kairangi Ki Tai. We have outlined these actions below, and a progress update since the last meeting.  This included actions such as:

 

Action Requested

Progress

Upgrade of accessible car parks near Naenae centre

 

This has been raised with Naenae Project Manager who will factor upgrades into any new/changed parks related to that project and to the Transport team for existing parks.

Fix pedestrian crossing next to Hutt Hospital

 

This has been raised with the transport team (Kent Thaw, Bob Hu) who are in the process of prioritising different community requests for upgrades to roads/footpaths. They will attend the next Wheels and Canes meeting and prioritise these requests alongside the group.

 

Employ CCS Disability Action to carry out a Street Accessibility Audit in partnership with MRCagney (NZ) Limited

The Transport team is currently running a survey on the conditions of all the streets, footpaths and intersections across Lower Hutt. We will look at this before committing to engaging a 3rd party to undertake Street Accessibility Audits.

 

Review the Hutt City Inclusiveness Plan and re-establish the Accessibility Advisory Group.

We have created an internal group to plan the review of the accessibility plan. We will continue to connect with disability groups and involve them in the review.

Have a representative from the Naenae Pool and Post Office projects (Whakatupu Te Ngaengae) attend the next Wheels and Canes meeting

Andrew Quinn attended the Wheels and Canes meeting in August and has given an update on the Naenae Pool and Post Office projects, and how accessibility has been considered in the planning of the Naenae pool. Feedback will be factored into the finalised design.

 

Community Funding Panels 

36. Following Council’s decision in May 2022, the Community Funding Panels made subsequent decisions on how to distribute the remaining unallocated funds.  Northern, Western and Eastern Community Funding Panels decided to continue with their own led projects. The Central Community Funding Panel agreed to fully allocate their funding through a one-off contestable fund. The outcome of this is attached as Appendix 1.

37. The Northern Community Funding Panel recently purchased and distributed fruit trees to schools within their ward who expressed interest. These have now been planted and will in due course hopefully provide an abundance of fruit across our school communities.

 

Aquatics

 

38. Overall, in Aquatics the patronage is starting to increase.  While we are still away from being back to level with this time last year, it is encouraging to see the gradual increase.  It is pleasing to see the numbers through the Aquatic Facilities getting stronger, even with Omicron still in the community and the ever-increasing presence of the winter flu.

 

Huia

Stokes Valley

Month

2021

2022

2021

2022

April

49,838

33,024

8,792

5,405

May

53,503

37,858

9,177

5,512

June

50,570

39,420

7,229

6,104

July

28,842*

21,527*

3,943

6,612

*Note – July for Huia Pool has the maintenance periods for both the Hydro pool and main/learners pools in it – hence the significantly lower numbers.  However, based on 2022 to 2021 comparisons July 2022 is $7K down and June 2022 was down $11K so, show a good increase by the month in 2022.

39. Staff numbers in operations continue to be an issue with the winter flu taking over as the number one cause of sickness within our teams.  However, we have been able to deliver services with minimal disruption across all areas of Aquatics.

 Swim City

 

40. June was a fantastic recovery month for Swim City with 419 new client bookings. Swim City issued 274 Make up vouchers with 77 being redeemed. These have proved very popular and with the high demand we have extended the redemption period.  We are still seeing a high level of sickness through both staff and clients as we move through the winter period.

 

 

41. Through July Swim City offered an Adult deep-water experience during the holidays.  Adults learning to swim in the Hydro pool at 1.4m depth had two sessions in deep water to experience the Main pools 3m depth.  The Adults were taken through vital water safety skills, which were identified as a major contributor to the 2021/22 summer drowning rates. This proved very popular with 24 adults taking on the challenge.

Huia Pool + Fitness and Stokes Valley Pool + Fitness

 

42. Both indoor swimming pools have had their annual maintenance closures, where critical works and preventative maintenance have been performed to ensure our two indoor facilities continue to be able to operate effectively and efficiently.  While maintenance is hard for the public eye to see, our contractors have worked incredibly hard to overhaul pumps, fix leaks and future proof the facilities while we work towards Naenae Pool returning to the network and relieving some of the pressure – especially at Huia Pool.

43. Huia Pools movable floor has been serviced and assessed and is in good condition, with only one hydraulic pump needing to be replaced.  This should get the floor through to the 2025/26 year when its replacement is due.

44. The school holidays were a busy period for both pools and it was great to see so many children enjoying the water again.  While the numbers compared to 2021 do not show as promising, they are showing a track of recovery as we continue to build back from the Omicron outbreak.

Arts and culture

45. The Dowse has opened Pāua: A New Zealand Jewellery Story. This will be featured in a number of upcoming media outlets. We are moving into a new cycle of exhibition changeovers for the spring/summer period.

46. Little Theatre is now fully operational following a series of issues (asbestos removal from foyer, roof leaks and a burst water pipe in the War Memorial Library) related to historic deferred maintenance that have resulted in closures and disruption of service. Any remaining issues with this facility will be identified as part of the upcoming asset management review and planning process.  

47. Petone Settlers Museum has had a reduced visitation over recent months due to weather, staff illness and general COVID impacts. However, visitors have greatly appreciated the new displays.   

48. We are in contract negotiations for the Boulcott Memorial Research Project. Once underway the research should be completed by February/March 2023.

49. The Dowse Collection Store Redevelopment is progressing as planned. Recent issues with the energy efficiency project has resulted in potential changes to the scheduling of certain works but this should not impact the timeframe for the redevelopment.

 

Parks and Reserves​ 

Deer Culling

50. Between March and July 2022 deer control was undertaken at various Hutt City Council reserves and some adjoining properties that provided safe control opportunities.  The work was undertaken by Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) staff and external contractors over a total of 334 hours in the field.  This work was funded from GWRC and Council operational budgets.  Hutt City’s contribution was $20,000.

51. The control work resulted in 66 deer and 10 pigs being removed using a combination of:

·    ground hunting with indicator dogs during the day

·    drone assisted night shooting; and

·    hunting using thermal imaging equipment at night.

 

Autumn 2020

Autumn 2021

Autumn 2022

deer

25

56

66

pig

1

1

10

goat

 

1

0

hours

 

 

334

 

52. The deer control programme is now established and significant numbers of animals are being removed.  Council and GWRC officers agree that the Council contribution should increase to enable the control efforts to increase.  The intention is to undertake spring and autumn ground hunting with additional night shooting each year.  The spring control is additional.

53. The cost of deer culling in 2022/23 is expected to be approximately $35,000 ($20,000 + $15,000).  For 2022/23 this will be funded from existing operational budget managed by the Parks and Reserves Business Unit. 

54. The best outcome for local biodiversity is to eliminate the wild deer population within the Hutt City Territorial Boundary.  There is no intention to support recreational deer hunting on land managed by Council.

Williams Park redevelopment of ex-Caretaker’s House site

55. Initial engineering advice has been obtained.  A landscape architect is preparing a site plan.  Officers are working with the Eastbourne Community Board Chairperson to identify people that could be invited to form small group who will follow a Community Led Design process to:

·    Develop a landscape design brief; and

·    Provide comments on a draft concept plan for the site that can be implemented within a budget of $460,000 including fees, consenting and contingency.

56. Final approval of the design will be sought from the Eastbourne Community Board and the Communities Committee in early 2023.  This is consistent with the Williams Park Reserve Management plan and resolutions made in the process of adopting the Reserve Management Plan in 2021.

Hutt Valley Tennis Association at Mitchell Park

57. Hutt Valley Tennis Association have advanced designs and updated cost estimates for the indoor court project.  In early August 2022, the Association received final quotes for the structure and groundworks.  They will now proceed with submitting resource and building consent applications. 

58. Council officers have provided the Hutt Valley Tennis Association with a letter of intent outlining Council’s commitment to the Mitchell Park indoor tennis project.  This is consistent with Council decisions to:

·    contribute $500,000 towards the project; and

·    sell a portion of Mitchell Park and pass on net sale proceeds to the Association for the project.

Manor Park Cycle Trail

59. Construction of the second and final stage of the Manor Park Cycle Trail is expected to be completed in September 2022.  An official opening is being planned with a date yet to be confirmed.  The new trail will link the north end of Golf Road to the Silverstream Bridge.

60.  Wellington Water has now obtained consent for a new pipe bridge downstream from the Silverstream Bridge.  The consent conditions require a pedestrian and cycle facility to be included in the bridge design and construction.  When this facility opens the public will be able to connect to eastern side of the Hutt River without using the Silverstream Bridge. 

Safety

City Safety

61. We continue to have a number of great wins through our CCTV suite.  Our observations have resulted in early apprehension of offenders, including a car being identified by the CCTV Operator as stolen as a result of the operator being able to identify the driver as a person of interest previously. There have been ongoing issues with some critical cameras which is being addressed with urgency.

 

 

 

 

62. The youth crime dynamic continues to develop. Bunny Street Bus stop area has been an ongoing hotspot for anti-social activity and two recent assaults have brought this back into the spotlight.  On 17 August 2022, the Mayor hosted a meeting of community leaders and key partners to discuss a collective response to the issue. This was attended by local MPs Ginny Anderson and Chris Bishop, Police, Queensgate management and GWRC (Metlink). The meeting agreed to a range of short and long term measures to improve public safety which could be investigated including:

·    Increased Police presence in the area

·    Upgrade 4 existing CCTV cameras in the area to provide 360 degree range, 24/7

·    Work with community organisations with good youth engagement to increase presence the precinct

·    Restricting access to free wifi from local businesses on Bunny Street as it is may be attracting people to congregate in the area

·    Changes to urban design and bus infrastructure

 

63. A Training Day was completed with Community Patrols, CCTV Volunteers, and New Zealand Police.  The training covered communication and risk and how, as a collective, we work more effectively together.  

64. The Greater Wellington Regional Neighbourhood Support Trust continues to recruit for a Coordinator to lead work in Lower Hutt. They hope to make an appointment in the next month and we anticipate the new Coordinator will be able to attend Council later in the year as part of their induction.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Central Community Funding Panel – 17 August 2022 - Approved Allocated Funding

56

    

 

 

 

 

Author: Kelly Crandle

Head of Parks and Reserves

 

Author: Melanie Laban

Head of Connected Communities

 

 

Author: Joann Ransom

Head of Neighbourhood Hubs and Library Services

 

 

Author: Lauren Hudson

Head of Aquatics

 

 

 

Author: Karl Chitham

Museums Director

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 


Attachment 1

Central Community Funding Panel – 17 August 2022 - Approved Allocated Funding

 

 

 

Central Community Funding Panel Approved Allocated Funding

At their meeting held on Wednesday 17 August 2022

 

No

Organisation

Description

$Allocated

1

Avalon Intermediate School

Purchase of student resources/necessities for Pacific Language week

$1,371

2

Hutt Water Polo Club Inc

Purchase of gear and equipment

$8,870

3

Lower Hutt Childcare Centre

Purchase and installation of safe fall surf

$9,500

4

Anglican and Social Services - The Family Centre Hutt Valley

Purchase of digitizing equipment

$10,000

5

Dyer Street School

For the purchase of stage curtains for school hall

$20,232

6

Birthright Hutt Valley Trust

Purchase of shelving, storage boxes, heater

$1,054

7

Toku Reo Charitable Trust

Purchase of gaming computer and installation

$1,841

8

Lower Hutt Women’s Centre

Purchase of a new zip and laptop

$3,553

9

Hutt Community Radio and Audio Archives Charitable Trust

Purchase of digital audio console

$14,230

10

Lower Hutt Tennis Club

Purchase and installation for acrylic sports court surfacing of one indoor turf

$9,375

11

Hutt City FM Incorporated

Purchase of equipment to enable completion of their community radio station

$4,089

12

Avalon School

Purchase of sports uniforms and equipment

$6,000

13

Mix Inc

Purchase of computer equipment

$7,103

14

Women of Worth Charitable Company Ltd

Purchase of CRM database and equipment

$18,500

15

Avalon Intermediate School

Purchase of x2 airtime permanent outdoor basketball hoops

$8,688

16

Hutt Valley High School

Installation and purchase of safety doors for the Hutt Valley High School’s Sports pavilion

$7,400

17

Dress for Success Wellington

Purchase of furniture and equipment

$14,220

18

Hutt District Cricket Club Inc

Purchase of new cricket balls and the supply and installation of PVC covers around the outdoor bowling nets

$10,000

19

Hutt Cricket Academy Inc

Purchase of a new bowling machine and to fix existing indoor netting

$10,000

20

Te Omanga Hospice

Purchase of a new clinical vehicle

$27,922

21

Keep Hutt Valley Beautiful Trust

Purchase of a second hand vehicle and purchase of new equipment

$10,000

22

SeniorNet Hutt City Inc

For the purchase of new computers and software

$5,052

 

 

TOTAL ALLOCATED

$209,000

 

 


MEMORANDUM                                                  1                                                07 September 2022

A black and white sign

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceCommunities Committee

17 August 2022

 

 

File: (22/2088)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2022/4/49

 

Boulcott Memorial Research Project

 

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1. To update the Committee on the Boulcott Memorial Research Project.

 

Recommendations

That the Committee receives and notes the information in the report.

 

Background

2.      The 2021/22 workplan for the Arts and Culture team included a project to research the events known as the Battle of Boulcott’s Farm to ensure that the historical account is accurate. 

3.    This work was deprioritised while the team was under-capacity due to COVID and has recently resumed. 

4.    Much of the history underpinning the memorial is unknown or disputed, and it makes little reference to Māori. The research project that has been proposed involves mana whenua and the wider community, and the outcomes align with the goals Council has set itself in the recently approved heritage policy Taonga tuku iho (Goals 1, 2, 3 and 5).

5.    A Council working group has been formed to support the project, comprising Deputy Mayor Tui Lewis, Kaitatari Tumuaki Māori Matiu Jennings and the Head of Arts and Culture Karl Chitham. The group has proposed high-level objectives and contributed to a brief for the project to be used for an external Expressions of Interest (EOI) tender process. The tender process was undertaken in May 2022 where two strong proposals were received. The working group chose to move forward with a proposal from Victoria University of Wellington. Contract negotiations are currently underway with the project hoping to be completed by March/April 2023.

Project Description

6.    For some years it has been identified by members of the Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt community that the current memorial does not accurately reflect those parties that were involved in the event it relates to. 

 

7.    The memorial currently commemorates, “eight British soldiers of the 58th and 99th regiments who were killed in action or died of wounds received during a Ngāti Hāua-te-rangi raid on the military post at Boulcott’s Farm on 16 May 1846. It also records the names of two colonial troops who were accidentally killed around this time.”

 

8.    It has been suggested that the memorial should communicate the larger story of this site and the above event considering Māori and Pākehā narratives and acknowledging all groups involved in the event. This  includes Ngāti Hāua, Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Rangatahi, Ngāti Tama and Te Āti Awa who have all indicated an interest in having a more comprehensive and accurate narrative communicated on or in relation to the site.

 

9.    The purpose of this project is to:

·    research, through primary and secondary sources, the various narratives (Māori and Pākehā) related to the historic events commemorated by the Boulcott Memorial.

·    From this research, write a report (for Hutt City Council) that outlines recommendations for outcomes on how this research might be made accessible to the community.

 

10.  Objectives:

·    To research and collate a more accurate record of the site, events and stakeholders represented by the Boulcott Memorial

·    To make this information more accessible to communities and stakeholders

·    To ensure stakeholders, and in particular iwi and hapū, are engaged with in a meaningful way and can tell their narratives authentically and accurately

·    To have a set of recommendations to assist Hutt City Council in future decisions related to Boulcott Memorial.

Options

11.    No options are required at this time.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

12.   The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide

Consultation

13.    This is outlined in the report.

Legal Considerations

14.    Any legal considerations will be identified by the research.

Financial Considerations

15.   There are no financial matters to consider. Costs associated with recommendations from the report (for example changes to the Memorial) will be put forward to future LTP/AP processes.

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Karl Chitham

Museums Director

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 


MEMORANDUM                                                  1                                                07 September 2022

A black and white sign

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceOur Reference          22/2085

TO:                      Chair and Members

Communities Committee

FROM:                Andrew Quinn

DATE:                16 August 2022

SUBJECT:           Naenae projects - progress update

 

 

Recommendations

That the Committee receives the memorandum and notes the following progress that has been made on the Naenae projects:

 

(1)   approval of the resource consent application for the Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre;

(2)   off-site procurement, design activity and building consent processing is proceeding in line with the programme agreed with co-funder Crown Infrastructure Partners;

(3)   commencement of the groundworks in July 2022 and the completion of the first stage of ground remediation;

(4)   procurement of the major components for the building are progressing to plan and local suppliers are involved in the tendering process;

(5)   design activity for the refurbishment of the old Naenae Post Office continues and an application for a change of use to a community centre is being processed by Council planners;  

(6)   tenders for the refurbishment of the Old Naenae Post Office will be sought in September 2022;

(7)   the cost for the Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre continues to be reviewed at regular intervals and remains within the $68M budget cap; and

(8)   Council has been successful in its application to the Local Government Funding Agency’s Green, Social and Sustainability Lending Programme for the Naenae pool and fitness centre project

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    To provide an update to the Committee on the progress and management of the Naenae Project (pool and town centre development) since the last meeting held on 6 July 2022.

Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre

2.    Since the last report in July 2022, there continues to be favourable progress on the Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre. Following the completion of design development in April 2022 and a two-stage tender process, a construction contract has been awarded to Apollo Projects to build the new pool.

3.    Apollo are an experienced builder of aquatic sports facilities having worked on numerous projects throughout New Zealand with Architecture HDT including Taiora: QEII Recreation and Sport Centre and the Linwood Pool both in Christchurch; and the Kiwa Pool in Gisborne. 

4.    The construction contract contains social procurement outcomes such as the use of local suppliers for the build and the design includes all the environmental efficiencies that will contribute to a reduction of the carbon emissions when compared to the Naenae Olympic Pool. The design will also provide for 22% less energy usage (kWh/year), even though the building is now 20% bigger than before.

5.    Work has now commenced on site and the first stage of earthworks and ground remediation is complete.

6.    The application for resource consent has now been approved and conditions agreed. The submission and approval of building consent applications is being staged to suit the construction timeline and is proceeding to plan.

7.    As advised previously the design for the pool now features two hydro-slides or zoom tubes and two bulkheads for the main pool. The latest images of the pool and of the various aquatic sports mode set ups are at Appendix 1 attached to the report.    

Naenae Town Centre development

8.    Development activity for the conversion of the old Naenae Post Office to a community centre continues on a co-design basis with the Community Advisory Group and the team are currently progressing design plans ready for tender and for building consent.

9.    Meantime our application for a change of use has been lodged with Council planners. The building is listed as a Category 1 historic place by Heritage New Zealand and whilst our proposal to modify the building is sympathetic to their expectations, there is an ongoing conversation with the Council appointed heritage consultant over some aspects of the design. Once this has been resolved, processing of the application can resume.

10.  The removal of asbestos and soft strip of redundant ceilings and wall linings will commence in early September 2022. Tenders for the construction contract will be sought mid-October in September 2022.

11.  Updated images for the community centre are attached to this paper at Appendix 2 attached to the report.       

Risk

12.  The cost of the Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre continues to be reviewed at regular intervals and remains within the $68M budget cap.

13.  The ten (10) top-rated risks for the Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre project are reported to this Committee and included at Appendix 3 attached to the report.

14.  There are no major changes in the risk profile to report, although the risk of disruption to worksite productivity due to COVID sickness remains high.

15.  We continue to monitor construction market conditions, specifically the availability of construction materials and have already taken delivery of some of the materials that will be required for later stages of the build. 

Financial Considerations

16.  The project team reviewed and updated the current financial profile of the project against the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 (specifically for the 2022/2023 Annual Plan). As reported above, the project is still tracking well to the capital expenditure budget of $68M.

17.  Crown Infrastructure Partners (CIP) are providing co-funding of $27M through the COVID response and recovery fund. Following completion of the site establishment and the commencement of construction; Council will be able to drawdown the second milestone payment of $1.35M in August 2022. 

18.  Council has been successful in its application to the Local Government Funding Agency’s Green, Social and Sustainability Lending Programme for the Naenae pool and fitness centre project.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

19.  The Naenae Olympic Pool was a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The old Pool ran on natural gas and produced 546T of carbon emissions from its electricity and gas-powered pool heating and ventilation systems.

20.  Council plan to use solely electricity from the national grid, thus reducing emissions by around 45% to around 275T. The Naenae project team is also working with Crown Agency Callaghan Innovation who is assisting the development of the desired sustainability features.

21.  Design features that will reduce energy consumption in the Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre include:

 

·    High level of maintenance and serviceability of services and structure

·    A building that is resilient to the impacts of a changing climate and natural disasters

·    Metering and monitoring of energy and water use

·    Re-cycling of demolition waste products and ability to separate operational waste

·    High quality indoor air quality; high standards of acoustic, lighting, visual and thermal comfort

·    50% reduction in carbon emissions compared to the previous pool and reduced energy consumption

·    EV parks with charging points and secure bike stands

·    The use of Glu-laminated timber for the main pool hall structures

·    High efficiency heat recovery air-handling units providing dehumidification and air-conditioning

·    A reduction in heat gain by using sun-shading or smaller windows which means in turn lower costs to cool the building in summer. Also, high efficiency window and glazing suites using low-E glass and thermally broken framing.

·    Centralised heating, cooling and electrical systems. 

·    Energy efficient LED luminaires

·    Stainless steel tank construction – less embodied carbon than concrete base/walls

 

22  In addition to these initiatives, the project team has reduced the amount of demolition material that would otherwise go to landfill; up to 70% by weight of waste material has been either recycled or re-purposed into the new pool.

23  Concrete from the pool and bleachers has been crushed on site and will be re-used to fill the pool void. Recycling contributes towards the Green Star rating. Items of heritage and memorabilia have been salvaged and stored safely for recycling and community distribution.   

 

Legal Considerations

24   There are no legal considerations to report.

 

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Images of Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre

64

2

Images of Naenae Community Centre

75

3

Naenae Pool risk register (top ten)

86

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Andrew Quinn

Project Manager (Naenae)

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Images of Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre

 

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Attachment 2

Images of Naenae Community Centre

 

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Attachment 3

Naenae Pool risk register (top ten)

 

Timeline

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                                                                                       1                                                07 September 2022

A black and white sign

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceCommunities Committee

10 August 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/2007)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2022/4/152

 

Communities Committee Forward Programme 2023

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Communities Committee Forward Programme 2023 be received and noted.

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    To provide the Communities Committee (the Committee) with a Forward Programme of work planned for 2023.

Background

2.    The Terms of Reference for the Committee requires the Committee to develop, implement, monitor and review strategies, policies, plans and functions associated with community, social and cultural activities.  This includes making the city a desirable, safe and attractive place, providing facilities and recreational opportunities that support quality living and healthy lifestyles, and supporting the cultural wellbeing of residents.

3.    The Forward Programme for 2023 provides a planning tool for both members and officers to coordinate programmes of work for the year.  The programme is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

Executive Summary

 

4.    The Forward Programme is a working document and is subject to change on a regular basis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Communities Committee Forward Programme 2023

89

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Annie Doornebosch

Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Communities Committee Forward Programme 2023

 

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