HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

 

POARI HAPORI O WAINUIOMATA

Wainuiomata Community Board

 

 

15 June 2022

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata,

on:

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 22 June 2022 commencing at 6.30pm

 

Meetings are held under the Orange Traffic Light setting

 

Members of the public wishing to speak to an item on the agenda are asked to contact democraticservicesteam@huttcity.govt.nz

 

 

 

Membership

 

Gabriel Tupou (Chair)

Dawn McKinley

Terry Stallworth

Gary Sue

Sisi Tuala-Le’afa

Jodie Winterburn

Cr Keri Brown

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


COMMUNITY BOARDS FUNCTIONS AND DELEGATIONS

This document records the delegation of Council functions, responsibilities, duties, and powers to Community Boards.

The Community Boards have been established under section 49 of the Local Government Act 2002 to represent, and act as an advocate for, the interests of their community.

The delegations are expressed in general terms. The delegations shall be exercised with proper regard for the Council’s strategic direction, policies, plans, Standing Orders and its interpretation of its statutory obligations. The delegations are to be read together with the following propositions.

These delegations are based on the following principles:

·                Issues relevant to a specific community should be decided as closely as possible to that community. Where an issue has city-wide implications, ie any effects of the decision cross a ward or community boundary or have consequences for the city as a whole, the matter will be decided by Council after seeking a recommendation from the relevant Community Board or (any ambiguity around the interpretation of “city-wide” will be determined by the Mayor and Chief Executive in consultation with the relevant Chair);

·                Efficient decision-making should be paramount;

·                Conflicts of interest should be avoided and risks minimised;

·                To ensure processes are free from bias and pre-determination Community Boards should not adjudicate on issues on which they have advocated or wish to advocate to Council;

·                Community Boards should proactively and constructively engage with residents on local matters that affect the community they represent and raise with Council issues raised with them by their community and advocate on behalf of their community.

These delegations:

(a)         do not delegate any function, duty or power which a statute (for example section 53(3) and clause 32(1) of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002) prohibits from being delegated;

(b)         are subject to and do not affect any delegation which the Council has already made or subsequently makes to any other committee, Council officer or other member of staff;

(c)         are subject to any other statutory requirements that may apply to a particular delegation;

(d)         are subject to any notice issued by the Council, from time to time, to a Community Board that a particular issue must be referred to Council for decision;

(e)         reflect that decisions with significant financial implications should be made by Council (or a committee with delegated authority);

(f)           promote centralisation of those functions where the appropriate expertise must be ensured; and

(g)         reflect that all statutory and legal requirements must be met.


DELEGATIONS

Decide:

·              Naming new roads and alterations to street names (in the Community Board’s area) within the provisions of Council’s Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027.

·              Official naming of parks, reserves and sports grounds within the provisions of Council’s Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027. Note 1

·              Removal and/or planting of street trees within the provisions of Council’s Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan. Note 2

·              The granting of leases and licences in terms of Council policy to voluntary organisations for Council owned properties in their local area, for example, halls, but not including the granting of leases and licences to community houses and centres.

·              The granting of rights-of-way and other easements over local purpose reserves and granting of leases or licences on local purpose reserves.

·              The granting of leases and licences for new activities in terms of Council policy to community and commercial organisations over recreation reserves subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and land managed as reserve subject to the provisions of the Local Government 2002, in their local area. (Note: renewal of existing leases and licences will be reported once a year to Council’s City Development Committee).

·              The allocation of funding from the Community Engagement Fund in accordance with Council’s adopted guidelines.

·              Expenditure of funds allocated by the Council to the Board from the Miscellaneous Budget to cover expenditure associated with the activities of the Board. The Chair to approve expenditure, in consultation with the Board, and forward appropriate documentation to the Committee Advisor for authorisation. Boards must not exceed their annual expenditure from the Miscellaneous Budget.

·              The allocation of funding for the training and development of Community Board or members, including formal training courses, attendance at seminars or attendance at relevant conferences.

CONSIDER AND MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS TO COUNCIL ON:

·              Particular issues notified from time to time by Council to the Community Board.

·              Roading issues considered by the Mayor and Chief Executive to be strategic due to their significance on a city-wide basis, including links to the State Highway, or where their effects cross ward or community boundaries.

 


 

1  This excludes sites that are considered high profile, significant on a city-wide basis due to their size and location, or where the              site crosses ward or community boundaries.

2  The Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan is available from Council’s Parks and Gardens Division.


·              Parks, reserves and sports ground naming for sites that have a high profile, city-wide importance due to their size and location and/or cross ward or community boundaries.

·              Representatives to any Council committee, subcommittee, subordinate decision-making body, working group, or ad hoc group on which a Community Board representative is required by Council.

·              The setting, amending or revoking of speed limits in accordance with the Hutt City Council Bylaw 2005 Speed Limits, including the hearing of any submissions.

 

GENERAL FUNCTIONS

Provide their local community’s input on:

·              Council’s Long Term Plan and/or Annual Plan.

·              Council’s policies, programmes (including the District Roading Programme) and bylaws.

·              Changes or variations to the District Plan.

·              Resource management issues which it believes are relevant to its local community, through advocacy.

·              The disposal or acquisition of significant assets.

·              Road safety including road safety education within its area.

·              Any other issues a Board believes is relevant to its local area.

·              Review Local Community Plans as required.

Reports may be prepared by the Board and presented to Council Committees, along with an officer’s recommendation, for consideration.

Any submissions lodged by a Board or Committee require formal endorsement by way of resolution.

Co-ordinate with Council staff:

·              Local community consultation on city-wide issues on which the Council has called for consultation.

Maintain:

·              An overview of roadworks, water supply, sewerage, stormwater drainage, waste management and traffic management for its local area.

·              An overview of parks, recreational facilities and community activities within its local area.

Develop:

·              Community Response Plans in close consultation with the Wellington Region Emergency Management Office, emergency organisations, the community, residents’ associations, other community groups, and local businesses. The Community Response Plans will be reviewed on an annual basis.

Grant:

·              Local community awards.

Promote:

·              Recreational facilities and opportunities in its area with a view to ensure maximum usage.


·              Arts and crafts in its area.

Appoint:

·              A liaison member or, where appropriate, representatives to ad hoc bodies, which are involved in community activities within the Board’s area, on which a community representative is sought.

Endorse:

·         Amendments to the Eastbourne Community Trust Deed (Eastbourne Community Board only).


 

appendix 1 – community engagement fund

criteria

 

The fund is for local activities and events that directly benefit the local community. 

 

To be eligible for funding the organisation must be a charitable trust or an incorporated society and the activity must take place within the Hutt. 

 

Each of the city’s seven wards receive funding according to the number of residents within its boundaries. For each resident there is an allocation of 40 cents. 

The ward allocations are listed below:

Ward

Amount

Eastbourne

$2,366

Petone

$6,250

Wainuiomata

$8,607

Central

$9,320

Eastern

$8,461

Northern

$7,644

Western

$6,201

Applications must support the Local Community Plan, if there is one, and also core Council business as identified in the Long Term Plan.

Decisions

Each Community Board decides the funding applications within its area. Boards are free to distribute their funding in a single large allocation or spread it over a number of smaller ones.

What can be funded

·         purchase of office equipment

·         food and catering costs

·         community festivals

·         youth group events and projects run by the elderly or citizens associations

·         art projects that are not part of the core curriculum

·         advertising, promotion costs

What won’t be funded

Activities that:

·         promote an organisation’s religious, ethical, commercial or political views

·         involve buying land or buildings or carrying out maintenance on buildings 

·         duplicate services that are already covered by Council or by government agencies eg, health or education providers

·         have already begun or have already finished

·         involve the redistribution of funds to others at the applicant’s discretion

·         involve fundraising or legal costs

·         involve capital investments or trust funds

·         go towards prize money

·         are operational costs eg, salaries, wages, rent, power

Funding rules

Successful applicants must:

·         use funds only for the approved purpose and in accordance with any terms and conditions set by Council

·         use funds by June 30 of the following year

·         let Council’s funding officer know immediately if any difficulty or potential difficulty arises that may compromise the service or project

·         lay a complaint with Police if any funds are stolen or misappropriated, and then notify Council

·         allow Council to audit the use of the funds should it wish to do so

·         recognise Council’s  support in all publicity material, annual reports and similar publications

·         complete an Accountability Report no later than six weeks after completing the project. This should outline how the funds were used and how the community benefited

·         make a presentation to the funding group showing how the event met its objectives.

Council’s Community Funding Advisor is available to support and assist community groups when making applications through the Council’s online grants system.

 

 

    


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Poari Hapori o Wainuiomata

Wainuiomata Community Board

 

Meeting to be held in the Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata on

 Wednesday 22 June 2022 commencing at 6.30pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES

No apologies have been received.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       Mayor's Address (22/1335)

Verbal address by Mayor Barry

4.       Presentation

Update from the Waiu Park Charitable Trust (22/1011)

A verbal update from members of the Waiu Park Charitable Trust

5.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.  

6.       Minutes

Meeting minutes Wainuiomata Community Board, 13 April 2022                         9

7.       Reports referred for Board input before being considered by Subcommittee of Council

a)      Arakura Local Area Traffic Management (22/1338)

Report No. WCB2022/3/109 by the Traffic Engineer                                  12

b)      Traffic Resolutions - Route 160 Bus Stop Configuration Review (22/1353)

Report No. WCB2022/3/110 by the Traffic Engineering Manager              36

c)       Wainuiomata Town Centre Upgrade - P10, P120 and Mobility Parking Restriction (22/1524)

Report No. WCB2022/3/129 by the Traffic Engineer                                  45

8.       Wainuiomata Community Board
Community Engagement Fund - Round 2
2021-2022
(22/1340)

Report No. WCB2022/3/108 by the Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts                                                                                                                                61

9.       Democracy Advisor's Report (22/1326)

Report No. WCB2022/3/105 by the Democracy Advisor                                     64         

10.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

Judy Randall

Democracy Advisor

 

 


                                                                       1                                                 13 April 2022

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Poari Hapori o Wainuiomata
Wainuiomata Community Board

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom on

 Wednesday 13 April 2022 commencing at 6.38pm

 

                 

PRESENT:

Mr G Tupou (Chair)

Mr T Stallworth

(via audio-visual link)

Mr G Sue

Cr K Brown

 

APOLOGIES:                  Ms D McKinley, Mrs J Winterburn and Ms S Tuala-Le’afa[1] (for lateness)

 

IN ATTENDANCE:         Mr J Kingsbury, Head of Traffic

  (via audio-visual link)        Mr B Hu, Traffic Engineering Manager
Ms M Skinnon, Neighbourhood Facilitator

Ms K Stannard, Head of Democracy Services
Ms J Randall, Democracy Advisor

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

1.       APOLOGIES

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mr Sue)                                            Minute No. WCB 22201

“That the apologies received from Ms D McKinley and Mrs J Winterburn be accepted and leave of absence be granted and the apology for lateness received from Ms S Tuala-Le’afa be accepted.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Ms M Skinnon, Council’s Neighbourhood Facilitator, updated the Board on her role. She advised she had been appointed as a conduit between Council and the community and as an advocate for the community. She added she was looking forward to supporting the work of the Board.

 

In response to questions from members, Ms Skinnon confirmed any community initiatives, funding or projects for the Wainuiomata community fell within her purview. She said a Neighbourhood Facilitator had also been appointed to the Naenae community.

 

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS  

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

 

4.       Minutes

Resolved: (Mr Sue/Cr Brown)                                             Minute No. WCB 22202

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Wainuiomata Community Board held on
Wednesday, 9 February 2022, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

  

5.

Democracy Advisor's Report (22/701)

Report No. WCB2022/2/61 by the Democracy Advisor

 

The Chair suggested that the Board purchase a wreath from its miscellaneous budget for placing at the Wainuiomata War Memorial on ANZAC Day.

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mr Stallworth)                                 Minute No. WCB 22203

“That the Board:

 

(1)   receives the report;

 

(2)   notes the Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027 attached as Appendix 1 to the report;

(3)   notes the amendment to the Community Boards - Functions and Delegations as approved by Council on 23 March 2022 attached as Appendix 2 to the report; and

(4)   agrees to the purchase of a wreath to be laid at the Wainuiomata War Memorial on ANZAC Day, Monday 25 April 2022.”

6.

Chair's report (22/709)

Report No. WCB2022/2/62 by the Democracy Advisor

 

The Chair elaborated on the report.

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mr Sue)                                             Minute No. WCB 22204

“That the Board receives and notes the Chair’s report.”

7.       Information Item

 

Arakura Local Area Traffic Management (22/764)

Memorandum dated 28 March 2022 by the Traffic Engineering Manager

 

The Traffic Engineering Manager elaborated on the report. He advised Council would be engaging with the public on the proposed changes to traffic management via Council’s ‘Have Your Say’ webpage. He highlighted he would use social media posts and local newspapers to advertise the consultation. He added immediate residents would receive a letter-drop with information on the proposed changes and ways to give feedback. He confirmed the consultation process would take place from 26 April 2022 for three weeks with installation of the speed cushions tentatively scheduled for between September and December 2022.

In response to questions from members, the Traffic Engineering Manager explained the traffic management changes had been triggered by increased safety risks and more development in Wainuiomata. He noted the distance between the speed cushions had been optimised at 300m to avoid traffic speeding up and slowing down in between. He added the cushions were made in a way that would not impact public transport but would slow smaller vehicles travelling at excessive speed.

The Head of Transport advised that safety was now a key focus for Council’s Transport team.

The Chair noted the consultation was an opportunity for the Board to encourage residents to submit feedback.

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mr Sue)                                   Minute No. WCB 22205

“That the Board receives and notes the memorandum.”

8.       QUESTIONS

There were no questions.

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 7.12 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

G Tupou

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 22nd day of June 2022


                                                                                       1                                                             22 June 2022

Wainuiomata Community Board

01 June 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1338)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2022/3/109

 

Arakura Local Area Traffic Management

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To seek the Wainuiomata Community Board’s endorsement for installation of Local Area Traffic Management devices in the Arakura area.

Recommendations

That the Traffic Subcommittee recommends that Council:

(1)   receives and notes this report; and

(2)   endorses the implementation of up to 13 sets of the proposed speed cushions in the Arakura area under 2.2(b)(xi) of the Traffic Bylaw

For the reasons that reducing the likelihood of unnecessary speeding, improving safety for all street users, encouraging sustainable travel mode choices (ie cyclists and pedestrians), reducing traffic volumes, especially heavy vehicles, and providing an improved streetscape amenity.

 

Background

2.    Members of the local community raised concerns in relation to vehicle operating speeds and anti-social driving behaviour which have resulted in safety issues in the vicinity of the Arakura residential area, Wainuiomata.

3.    The increase in additional residential developments in the Arakura area will cause travel demand to grow at a rapid rate, resulting in greater safety issues caused by speed and high traffic volumes.

4.    ‘Traffic calming’ measures are proposed to be implemented following the Local Area Traffic Management (LATM) scheme to encourage a safer residential environment.

5.    The installation of the LATM scheme is expected to alleviate the residential street environment by:

a)    Reducing the likelihood of unnecessary speeding,

b)    improving safety for all street users, encouraging sustainable travel mode choices (i.e., cyclists and pedestrians),

c)    reducing traffic volumes, especially heavy vehicles, and

d)    providing an improved streetscape amenity.

6.   The LATM scheme design was completed and optimised for both maximising benefits to the community and minimising the level of compromise experienced by residents.

7.   The following diagram illustrates the proposed LATM speed cushion treatment locations.

 

Discussion

8.    There have been 62 crashes in the Arakura area in the past 10 years, of which 11 were minor injury crashes, 48 were non-injury crashes and three were serious crashes. The crash locations can be found in Appendix 1 to the report.

9.    Council officers have investigated the speed and historical crash data with the evidence confirming that ‘traffic calming’ measures are required in the Arakura residential area from a network wide approach.

10. The detailed locations and designs for the proposed speed cushions are shown in Appendix 2 to the report.

11. For the 13 sets of speed cushions designed, a staged installation strategy with monitoring will be adopted to ensure the optimum number of speed cushions are implemented.

Options

12. The options include:

a)    Approve up to 13 sets of the proposed speed cushions as recommended in Appendix 2;

b)    Reject selected speed cushions if there are any significant concerns;

c)    Provide comments to the Traffic Subcommittee to assist in its decision making regarding the proposed speed cushions.

13. Council officers recommend option a.  Officers will be able to install the speed cushions in a staged approach. If the monitoring results show that the intended results are achieved with the installation of the first portion of speed cushions, then further speed cushions will not be installed.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

14. This decision will have a positive impact on the changing climate as the speed cushions will reduce the speeding of vehicles and hence reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

15. The speed cushions will encourage sustainable travel mode choices and will cause a positive mode shift towards cycling, walking and public transport.

16. A reduction in traffic volumes, especially in heavy vehicles is also expected, which will contribute positively to the environment and climate.

Consultation

17. Council officers have engaged with the following key stakeholders and communities:

a)    Local schools, businesses and churches

b)    Wainuiomata Marae

c)    Wainuiomata Community Board

d)    Residents of Arakura

a)    Other Wainuiomata road users

b)    Emergency services: Police, Fire, Ambulance

c)    Wainuiomata Library

d)    Waste Management

e)    Metlink (buses)

18. To gather feedback from the community on the specific locations of speed treatments, the following public consultation channels were used:

a)      Digital online platform: the proposed treatments and proposed location with visuals and maps were displayed on the BTT (Bang the Table) page and Facebook posts. One larger map and several smaller graphics with specific addresses were captioned to show in more detail which residents are closest to each treatment.

b)      In-Person Display: the digital engagement was supplemented with other activities to reach those who prefer a traditional engagement approach, such as older residents or those who don’t have easy access to a device or internet. A large-scale map of the area with proposed locations of the speed cushions was displayed and post-its were provided for the community to provide feedback. Council officers have worked closely with the hub staff to assist in collating the feedback.

c)       Newsletter: consistent information was shared through the Wainuiomata News in order to gain wider area awareness.

d)    Email address for further comments or questions: the haveyoursay@huttcity.govt.nz email address was shared in the landing page of the BTT site and people were invited to contact Council with any other questions or comments.

e)    Physical Letter: public consultation letters were delivered to directly affected residents. There were a total of 800 letters hand delivered to residents. Letters and emails were also sent to local schools, kindergartens, churches and marae at the same time and encouraged them to share the project within their communities.

19.  Public consultation was undertaken from 13 April to 16 May 2022.

20.  Consultation Results: the overall consultation and comments results are analysed and summarised below.

a)    A total of 127 responses were received from both the online survey and emails. 70 supported the speed cushions, eight were neutral and 49 were not in favour. The response percentage is shown in the pie chart below.

 

b)    The categorised reasons for neutral and unsupportive responses are analysed and shown in the donut chart below.

 

 

21.  Responses to Feedback: all feedback was reviewed and grouped into specific categories, and responses were prepared to address the concerns raised in that feedback. The detailed responses are presented in Appendix 3 to the report and the key themes are listed below:

a)    Slowing down traffic

i.     It is estimated that every speed cushion will likely delay the average driver by only 10 seconds.

ii.    Considering the safety for the community, the slight delay in travel time is acceptable.

b)    Not effective

i.     The design is proven to be effective with minimal impact on day-to-day users by the recent implementation of similar speed cushions on Taita Drive, near Ricoh Sport Centre.

c)    Impact on Emergency / Bus

i.     The specific cushion is designed to have minimal impact on buses, emergency vehicles and cyclists.

ii.    This is also verified by the recent implementation of similar speed cushions on Taita Drive, near Ricoh Sport Centre.

d)    Impact on Driveway Access

i.   All commented locations / designs have been reviewed.

ii.  Designs are revised at two specific locations: 30 Wellington Road and 85 Wellington Road.

iii. The affected residents were consulted again to achieve support for the revised speed cushions. The revised locations for speed cushions for these addresses are presented in Appendix 4 to the report.

Legal Considerations

22. The speed cushions are proposed to be installed as traffic calming measures for local area traffic management by Council resolution under 2.2(b)(xi) of the Traffic Bylaw and they are dealt with within the Traffic Control Devices Rule.

Financial Considerations

23.  These proposed speed cushions will be funded from Council’s Low-Cost Low-Risk Programme and co-funded by Waka Kotahi.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Arakura LATM Crash Analysis Summary

19

2

Appendix 2 - Locations & Designs of Proposed Speed Cushions

20

3

Appendix 3 - Arakura LATM Responses to Feedbacks

31

4

Appendix 4 - Arakura LATM Revised Speed Cushion Locations

35

    

 

 

Author: Anita Manda

Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Arakura LATM Crash Analysis Summary

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Locations & Designs of Proposed Speed Cushions

 












Attachment 3

Appendix 3 - Arakura LATM Responses to Feedbacks

 





Attachment 4

Appendix 4 - Arakura LATM Revised Speed Cushion Locations

 



                                                                                       1                                                             22 June 2022

Wainuiomata Community Board

03 June 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1353)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2022/3/110

 

Traffic Resolutions - Route 160 Bus Stop Configuration Review

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek the Wainuiomata Community Board’s endorsement of changes being proposed to local Route 160 bus stops to improve safety and accessibility in line with Waka Kotahi’s ‘Guidelines for Public Transport Infrastructure and Facilities’.


Recommendations

That the Traffic Subcommittee recommends that Council:

 

(1)   notes and receives the information; and

(2)   endorses the proposed changes attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

For the reasons that the proposed bus stop layout changes will ensure that the bus box is of sufficient length to accommodate buses; no stopping restrictions will prevent other vehicles from blocking full access to the bus stop; and passengers will be able to board and alight safely and easily.

 

Background

2.    Greater Wellington Regional Council’s (GWRC) Te Mahere Waka Whenua Tūmatanui o te Rohe o Pōneke (Wellington Regional Public Transport Plan 2021 - 2031) has outlined three strategic focus areas:

a)  Mode shift;

b)  Decarbonise public transport vehicle fleet; and

c)  Improve customer experience.

3.    As part of improving the customer experience, GWRC has committed to prioritising the safety and maintenance of the public transport network to encourage safe behaviour. The associated key measure is a 40% reduction in serious injuries on the public transport network by 2030 which can be achieved by prioritising safety through continuous improvement to both infrastructure and operations.

4.    As part of GWRC’s Bus Stop Review programme, GWRC officers have been working collaboratively with HCC officers on improvements to all bus stops within the Lower Hutt Area.

5.    The review of bus route 160 (Queensgate to Homedale) was completed as part of an earlier programme. The traffic resolution for the proposed changes to the Route 160 bus stop configuration was endorsed by the Wainuiomata Community Board on 13 August 2021 and was approved by the Traffic Subcommittee on 19 August 2021.

6.    Following a formalised bus stop review procedure endorsed by Council through the Traffic Subcommittee on 4 April 2022, Council officers were tasked with reviewing the Route 160 bus stop changes against this revised procedure.

7.    This report reviewed all 66 traffic resolutions approved in 2022 for the purpose of seeking further improvements to the proposed changes of the Route 160 bus stop configuration (if any).

Discussion                                              

8.    Appendix 1 to the report summarises the recorded public consultation comments as well as the review comments from GWRC and HCC officers.

9.    Out of the 66 bus stops on Route 160, 42 bus stops received no negative comments and therefore further review is not applicable for these bus stops.

10.  The 24 bus stops that received one or more negative comments have been revisited by engineers from both GWRC and HCC. After being reassessed, it was determined there would be no change to 21 of the bus stops.

11.  The following three bus stop locations are proposed to be changed.

a)   Bus stop 8964, the original proposal stop on Wellington Road required losing four parking spaces. A new option with a revised design has been developed which minimises the parking loss to two.

b)   Bus stop 9985, the original proposed stop on Fitzherbert Road was too close to the adjacent stops, considering the new development around The Strand which is connecting both Fitzherbert Road and Wainuiomata Road. This pair of stops will be optimised based on the catchment analysis. The proposed changes are not applicable anymore, and therefore removed from the proposal.

c)   Bus stop 8143, the original proposed stop on Waiwhetu Road raised concerns regarding mobility parking in front of Our Lady of the Rosary Catholic Church. The design is revised to retain the mobility parking.

12.  The above review and analysis confirmed the robustness of the proposed changes of Route 160 bus stop configuration.

13.  The bus stop 8964 design, shown in Appendix 2 to the report, is the only change to the Traffic Resolution which is seeking the Board’s endorsement.

Options

14.  The options include:

a)  endorse the proposed changes to bus stop 8964;

b)  reject the proposed changes to bus stop 8964; and/or

c)  provide comment to the Traffic Subcommittee to assist in their decision regarding the proposed changes to bus stop 8964.

15.  Officers recommend options a. and c. as the proposed changes go toward achieving the goals of the Regional Public Transport Plan.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

17.  Transport infrastructure and facilities that provide good access, safety and personal security at all stages of the journey, particularly for people with impairments, will help remove barriers to the use of public transport.  The more barriers removed by Council will make the choice to use public transport easier and will support moves to reduce car dependency and therefore the corresponding carbon emissions.

18.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.

Consultation

19.  GWRC undertook consultation with all affected residents within proximity of the bus stop.

20.  Consultation occurred from 25 May 2022 to 3 June 2022.

Legal Considerations

21.  The proposed changes in restrictions are made pursuant to the provisions of the Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017

Financial Considerations

22.  These changes can be and will be funded from Council’s 2022/23 transport budgets.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Route 160 Bus Stop Consultation Review

41

2

Appendix 2 - Proprosed changes for Bus Stop #8964 Wellington Road

44

    

 

 

Author: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Route 160 Bus Stop Consultation Review

 




Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Proprosed changes for Bus Stop #8964 Wellington Road

 


                                                                                       1                                                             22 June 2022

Wainuiomata Community Board

14 June 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1524)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2022/3/129

 

Wainuiomata Town Centre Upgrade - P10, P120 and Mobility Parking Restriction

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To seek the Board’s endorsement for the resolution of the Wainuiomata Town Centre Upgrade Parking layout and proposed Restrictions Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017, as shown in the Appendices to the report.

Recommendations

That the Traffic Subcommittee recommends that Council:

(1)     approves the installation of 73 carparks in the new layout as shown in Appendices 1-8 attached to the report;

(2)     approves the installation of six disabled parking spaces defined by Mobility Parking Symbol and time restriction;

(3)     approves the installations of 63 time-restricted P120 car parks, (8am – 6pm Monday to Saturday (excluding Public Holidays);

(4)     approves the installation of four time-restricted P10 car parks, (8am – 6pm Monday to Saturday (excluding Public Holidays));

(5)     approves the installation of parking restriction road signs pursuant to the provisions of section 7.1 of the Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017, and section 6.4 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004;

(6)     rescinds any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls described in this resolution; and

(7)     notes that this resolution will take effect when the traffic control devices that evidence the restrictions described in this resolution are in place.

For the reason that the parking restrictions will assist in effectively managing the operation of the Wainuiomata Town Centre Upgrade parking resource for both shoppers and visitors, while meeting the requirements of Council’s Parking Policy 2017.

 

Background

2.    As a result of the Wainuiomata Town Centre Upgrade, parking spaces are reduced from 88 to 73, however with the opening of the new street, Te Ara Raukura there are now 62 extra car parks added on this street.

3.    Te Ara Raukura is currently owned by Progressive and will be vested to Council by the end of 2022. This new street links Queen Street with The Strand and creates an alternative exit out of Queen Street.           

Discussion

4.    The parking restrictions will help discourage inconsiderate parking behaviour, as well as preserving spaces associated with emergency egress, assembly and vehicle access points.

5.    The new layout will provide six disabled carparks, two more than are currently provided.

6.    Currently there are five P15 car parks in front of the Tuatahi Centre. In the new layout there are three P10 car parks outside Dominos and one outside Clive’s Chemist. 

7.    The ‘mobility’ parking restrictions will improve parking availability for mobility impaired users in close proximity to the town centre.

8.     The white parking bay markings more clearly demark the parking spaces, discouraging inefficient parking of vehicles, and maximising the utilisation of the available parking space.

9.     The proposal is in keeping with Council’s Parking Policy 2017 and aligns with its current long-term strategies:

(a)     a liveable and thriving city –supporting place-making, amenity, and economic growth.

(b)     a city that has equity of access – supporting work to create a walkable and people-friendly city accessible to all.

(c)     a high level of customer service – delivering a quality experience for shoppers and visitors.

10.   The current parking layout is supported by the majority of shop owners and aligns with the parking requirements in the complex.

Options

11.  The options are:

(a)     to reject the proposed parking layout and parking restrictions;

(b)     to accept the proposed parking layout and parking restrictions as they appear in appendices;

(c)      provide comments to Council to assist in its decision regarding the proposed changes to the proposed parking layout and parking restrictions as they appear in the appendices.

12.   Officers recommend option (b) or (c) as the parking restrictions assist with the efficient and equitable management of the space resulting in an increased level of service for current and future users of the shopping complex and surrounding facilities.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

13.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

14.  As part of the Wainuiomata Town Centre Upgrade, consultation was carried out by the Project Team.

15.  The consultation occurred from 6 April 2021 to 6 May 2021 and included the following:

a)    meetings with key stakeholders including Wainuiomata RSA; Wainuiomata Marae; Progressive Enterprises;

b)    meetings with the business community in conjunction with Love Wainuiomata;

c)    a display at Wainuiomata Library including feedback forms;

d)    an online survey:  hutt.city/designwainui

e)    a presentation to the Wainuiomata Community Board at its meeting on 14 April 2021; and

f)     a meeting with the community during the 10-year plan consultation at the Wainuiomata Hub on 15 April 2021.

16.  There were 330 respondents to the survey with the following numbers of comments about parking:  two comments in the under 30 age group, 20 in the 30-59 age group, six in the over 60 age group and seven comments from people living outside Wainuiomata.   There were 35 comments (10.6%) in total out of 330 responses received.

 

17.  Comments associated with the layout of short-term parking adding in one P10 in this section were:

a)    No 26 – Town and Country – would like to see two P10 carparks

b)    No 22 Viti Barbers– Support

c)    No 20-21 Clive Chemist– Support

d)    No 19 Dawn Bake Bakery – Don’t support – would rather they are P15 and would like to see five short term carparks in this area

e)    No 18 Ziggy’s Dairy – Don’t Support – would rather they are P15 all along the south side of Queen Street from Te Ara Raukura to Fitzherbert St

f)     No 17 Creative Meats - Don’t support – would prefer P10 outside their business as well

g)    No 16 Price Busters – Support

 

18.  All the rest of the businesses along this section support the P10 layout.

Legal Considerations

19.  The parking restrictions are proposed to be made pursuant to the provisions of section 7.1 of the Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017, and section 6.4 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004:

a)    Time Restricted Parking, Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw, clause 7.1, No person being the driver or the person in charge of any vehicle may drive, stop, stand or park, or otherwise use that vehicle in a manner that is contrary to any prohibition, limitation or restriction imposed from time to time by resolution of Council in relation to a time restricted parking area.

b)    Mobility Parking Space - 2.2 (b)(ii) Council may by resolution - (b) set aside, designate or reserve any road, part of a road or any piece of land owned or controlled by Council, as operation mobility parking spaces.

c)    the disabled parking symbol specified in Part 3 Schedule 2 of the TCD Rule (M3-5) should be marked.

d)    Road Signs – TCD Manual, Part 13, 6.1.2 - Signs (including supplementary signs) incorporating arrows to indicate the direction and extent of a parking restriction ‘must be installed parallel to, or at an angle of not more than 45 degrees from, the side of the roadway to which they relate’ (subclause 12.5(3) TCD Rule).

e)    There is a limit to the number of signs that can be installed on the same pole or in the same location on the same building, wall or fence. The limit, described in the TCD Rule, is:

f)     not more than two parking signs (or three parking signs, provided one of them is a clearway or special vehicle lane sign); or

g)    one parking sign and one pedestrian sign. A supplementary plate for this purpose is considered to be part of the sign it supplements. A sign incorporating the letter ‘P’ denotes a parking restriction applying between 8 am and 6 pm on all days except public holidays, unless otherwise specified. Signs relating to the restriction or prohibition of parking on a length of road must be installed:

h)    at the start and end of the length of the restriction (section of affected roadway)

i)     at or near both sides of an intervening intersection along its length (except for clearways, where signs need only be installed beyond each intervening intersection)

j)     at distances of not more than 100 m between any two signs. Care should be given to the placing of sign-posts to ensure they do not impact on the opening of car doors – for instance, placing signs in the middle of a disabled parking space may prevent the vehicle’s door being opened or affect access to any mobility device required.

k)     Enforcement 3.4 - With any type of parking regulation, enforcement must be undertaken to effectively manage the parking system. Without ongoing enforcement, road users will become complacent, and the measures put in place to manage congestion and parking issues will not be effective.

l)      Legislation and bylaws - 3.4.1 - Councils have the right to set bylaws under the Transport Act 1962 or Local Government Act 1974 and 2002. A council may appoint parking enforcement officers under section 7 of the Transport Act 1962 and their powers to enforce are given by section 72(1) (k). General parking noncompliance and other restrictions (such as clearways) can also be enforced by the New Zealand Police. When road users do not comply with the bylaw requirements, parking enforcement officers issue parking offence notices (imposing standard parking fines) and may have the vehicle towed away. In some cases, offences or non-payment of the fine can result in court hearings. Enforcement of bylaws should lead to better overall compliance of the parking and traffic system. There is a need for appropriate levels of enforcement to ensure fair and effective turnover of limited parking spaces and safe and efficient movement of traffic.

Financial Considerations

20.   These changes can be funded from the Wainuiomata Town Centre Upgrade project budget.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix - 1 - Aerial Overview, Master Plan

53

2

Appendix - 2 - 5 Parking Spaces, North Side

54

3

Appendix - 3 - 11 Parking Spaces, North East Side

55

4

Appendix - 4 - 9 Parking Spaces, North Side

56

5

Appendix - 5 - 18 Parking Spaces, South Side

57

6

Appendix - 6 - 3 Parking Spaces, South Side

58

7

Appendix - 7 - 6 Parking Spaces, South Side

59

8

Appendix - 8 - 21 Parking Spaces, South Side

60

    

 

 

 

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

Reviewed By: Claire Allan

Placemaking Advisor

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix - 1 - Aerial Overview, Master Plan

 


Attachment 2

Appendix - 2 - 5 Parking Spaces, North Side

 


Attachment 3

Appendix - 3 - 11 Parking Spaces, North East Side

 


Attachment 4

Appendix - 4 - 9 Parking Spaces, North Side

 


Attachment 5

Appendix - 5 - 18 Parking Spaces, South Side

 


Attachment 6

Appendix - 6 - 3 Parking Spaces, South Side

 


Attachment 7

Appendix - 7 - 6 Parking Spaces, South Side

 


Attachment 8

Appendix - 8 - 21 Parking Spaces, South Side

 

 


                                                                                       1                                                             22 June 2022

Wainuiomata Community Board

02 June 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1340)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2022/3/108

 

Wainuiomata Community Board
Community Engagement Fund - Round 2
2021-2022

 

Purpose of Report

1.       For the Wainuiomata Community Board to assess and determine the funding to be granted through Round 2 of the Wainuiomata Community Board (the Board) Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022.

Recommendations

That the Board:

(1)     notes the Board Delegations, Guidelines and Criteria 2020-2023 for the Community Engagement Fund on the first pages of the agenda;

(2)     notes that this is the second round of funding through the Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022 for the Wainuiomata Ward;

(3)     notes the Community Engagement Fund closed on Wednesday 1 June 2022 and four applications had been received;

(4)     determines the funding to be granted through the Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022 for the Wainuiomata Ward;

(5)     agrees that the applications received under the Community Engagement Fund were considered according to the merits of the application criteria and priorities of the fund; and

(6)     agrees that the organisations granted funding will be required to attend a meeting of the Wainuiomata Community Board once the project has been completed.

Background

2.       Council agreed through the 2016/2017 Annual Plan to contribute $48,850 for the Community Board/Community Funding Panel Community Engagement Fund. 

3.       The Board is allocated $8,607 per annum.  This is for local activities and events that directly benefit the communities concerned.

4.       The fund was advertised through the elected members, as well as through Council’s online grants system.

5.       Organisations were required to make an application through Council’s website.  

6.       The Board at its meeting held in November 2021 allocated $2,000.  There is $6,607 available to be allocated in this round.  This fund needs to be fully allocated by end of June 2022.  Unallocated funds cannot be carried over.

         

Discussion

7.       Four applications were received under Round 2 of the Board’s Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022. 

 

8.       One application is deemed ineligible because the organisation is not based in Lower Hutt.

 

9.       The three eligible applications to be considered are as follows:

 

No

Organisation

Description

$Request

1

Wainuiomata Community Garden Group Projects

For the purchase of seeds, seedlings, compost, fertiliser, sprays, weed eater and for the purchase of appropriate maintenance equipment and products.

$2,200

2

Acting Out NZ Incorporated

For the purchase of sound equipment and for stage materials.

$1,805

3

Wainuiomata Community Patrol

For the purchase of new uniforms, equipment for the car, and a bbq for sausage sizzle fundraisers.

$2,757

 

 

TOTAL REQUESTED

$6,762

 

10.     All applications were scored through a matrix system and assessed by members. 

 

11.     Eligible Community Engagement Fund applications presented in this round request a total of $6,762.

 

Options

12.     If the Board chooses not to fully allocate the funding, no unspent funding can be carried over to the new financial year 2022-2023.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

13.     The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Legal Considerations

14.     There are no legal considerations to be considered.

Financial Considerations

15.     The funds need to be fully allocated by the end of June 2022.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

 

Author: Debbie Hunter

Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts

 

 

 

Approved By: Melanie Laban

Head of Connected Communities

 


                                                                                       1                                                             22 June 2022

Wainuiomata Community Board

01 June 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1326)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2022/3/105

 

Democracy Advisor's Report

 

 

 

1.    The purpose of the report is to update the Board on items of interest.

 

Recommendation

That the Board notes and receives the report.

 

 

Consultation and community engagement


Tupua Horo Nuku – Eastern Bays Shared Path

 

2.    Tupua Horo Nuku - Eastern Bays Shared Path construction is expected to begin in August 2022, with work in the southern bays (Ma-Koromiko/Windy Point and Sunshine Bay). The work will be highly visible to people in the area and will have an impact on the community through traffic management, including the use of 24/7 lane closures on Marine Drive.

 

       In the lead up to the work and during construction, officers will be informing the community through the use of:

 

-     Advertising in the Eastbourne Herald and Hutt News

-     Printed newsletters distributed to homes (quarterly)

-     Emailed updates which anybody can subscribe to

-     Social media posts

-     Direct contact with key stakeholders

 

Officers are planning to hold a Community Information Session in the first week of August both in person and live streamed. There will be ongoing engagement with key groups in the community on the development of some of the project’s design and management plans.

 

Eastern Bays Speed Review

3.    Council is seeking feedback on a proposed speed limit reduction and the locations of pedestrian crossings on Marine Drive. This is to improve road safety for all road users and provide a more consistent traffic environment. The short 70km/h speed limit section along this road is considered inconsistent and there have been a high number of speed-related crashes. Engagement will open 30 May 2022 until 20 June 2022: Eastern Bays Speed Review and Pedestrian Crossings | Have your say - Hutt City Council

 

East-West Cycleway 7-26 June 2022

4.    An East-West cycleway between Waterloo Station and the CBD is being designed to align with other major infrastructure improvements in Lower Hutt like Riverlink. It is part of a wider cycle network that is Council’s commitment to creating a city that is safe and connected and aims to encourage more of the community to cycle and use active travel modes. Council is seeking feedback on the cycleway. You can have your say from 7-26 June 2022: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/waterloo-station-to-lower-hutt-cbd-connection

 

Streets for people

5.    A micro-mobility programme has been developed to provide a strategic walking and cycling network with connections throughout Lower Hutt. This project will accelerate and extend improvements in the gap areas of Wainuiomata and Naenae town centres, Taita and Avalon. The programme aims to provide improved walkability/accessibility and bikeability in these areas. More information on consultation will be available later this year.

 

Wainuiomata Cleanfill closure

 

6.    The Wainuiomata cleanfill is now closed. Remediation work has been underway for some time, with planting on some sections of the cleanfill already complete. Further planting will be undertaken later this year and in time, the whole site will be covered in native bush. Alternative cleanfill sites are available at Kiwipoint, Ngauranga, and at Fergusson Drive in Upper Hutt.

 

Integrated Transport Strategy

 

7.    Council has approved Whiria te muka tangata, whārikihia te Kaupapa, its Integrated Transport Strategy, setting out the city’s vision and direction for future transport developments.  It will be used to guide Council’s decision-making on changes to the transport system and individual transport projects that come under it.   With increased traffic congestion the plan will tackle congestion and encourage cycling, walking, and other active ways of getting around. All transport projects from Tupua Horo Nuku, the Eastern Bays Shared Path, to a micromobility programme will be guided by the Integrated Transport Strategy: Integrated transport strategy | Hutt City Council

 

 

2021/22 Administration and Training Budgets

 

8.    A breakdown of expenditure is attached as Appendix 1 to the report. The Board is allocated $8,000.00 GST exclusive per annum, comprised of:

 

-      Miscellaneous Administration        $5,000

-      Training                                            $3,000

9.    The following is the Board’s expenditure to 31 May 2022:

 

 

Miscellaneous budget

$5,000.00

Expenditure

-    Advertising

-    Catering

-    Wainuiomata Awards

-    Flowers

-    Anzac wreath     

                   

 

$648.00

$102.26

     $553.37

     $77.39

$130.43

 

Total expenditure

$1,511.45

 

Balance remaining

$3,488.55

 

There has been expenditure of $36.36 from the Board’s $3,000 Training Budget.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Expenditure to May 2022

67

   

 

Author: Judy Randall

Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Expenditure to May 2022

 

 



[1] Ms S Tuala Le’afa was not in attendance at the meeting.