HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

TE KAUNIHERA O TE AWA KAIRANGI

 

17 May 2022

 

 

 

Order Paper for Council meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Tuesday 24 May 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

The meeting will be livestreamed on Council’s Facebook page.
Members of the public wishing to speak to an item on the agenda are asked to contact
democraticservicesteam@huttcity.govt.nz

 

 

Membership

 

 

Mayor C Barry (Chair)

Deputy Mayor T Lewis

Cr G Barratt

Cr J Briggs

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

Cr D Hislop

Cr C Milne

Cr A Mitchell

Cr S Rasheed

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES
 

 

 

 


COUNCIL

 

Membership:

13

Meeting Cycle:

Council meets on an eight weekly basis (Extraordinary Meetings can be called following a resolution of Council; or on the requisition of the Chair or one third of the total membership of Council)

Quorum:

Half of the members

POWER TO (BEING A POWER THAT IS NOT CAPABLE OF BEING DELEGATED)1:

§  Make a rate.

§  Make bylaws.

§  Borrow money other than in accordance with the Long Term Plan (LTP).

§  Purchase or dispose of assets other than in accordance with the LTP.

§  Purchase or dispose of Council land and property other than in accordance with the LTP.

§  Adopt the LTP, Annual Plan and Annual Report.

§  Adopt policies required to be adopted and consulted on under the Local Government Act 2002 in association with the LTP or developed for the purpose of the Local Governance Statement.

§  Appoint the Chief Executive.

§  Exercise any powers and duties conferred or imposed on the local authority by the Local Government Act 1974, the Public Works Act 1981, or the Resource Management Act 1991, that are unable to be delegated.

§  Undertake all other actions which are by law not capable of being delegated.

§  The power to adopt a Remuneration and Employment Policy for Council employees.

 

DECIDE ON:

Policy & Bylaw issues:

§  Adoption of all policy required by legislation.

§  Adoption of strategies, and policies with a city-wide or strategic focus.

§  Approval of draft bylaws prior to consultation.

§  Adoption of new or amended bylaws.

District Plan:

§  Approval to call for submissions on any Proposed District Plan, Plan Changes and Variations.

 

1       Work required prior to the making of any of these decisions may be delegated.

§  Prior to public notification, approval of recommendations of District Plan Hearings Subcommittees on any Proposed Plan, Plan Changes (including private Plan Changes) and Variations.

§  The withdrawal of Plan Changes in accordance with clause 8D, Part 1, Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

§  Approval, to make operative, District Plan and Plan Changes (in accordance with clause 17, Part 1, Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991).

§  Acceptance, adoption or rejection of private Plan Changes.

Representation, electoral and governance matters:

§  The method of voting for the Triennial elections.

§  Representation reviews.

§  Council’s Code of Conduct for elected members.

§  Local Governance Statement.

§  Elected members’ remuneration.

§  The outcome of any extraordinary vacancies on Council.

§  Any other matters for which a local authority decision is required under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

§  Appointment and discharge of members of committees when not appointed by the Mayor.

§  Adoption of Terms of Reference for Council Committees, Subcommittees and Working Groups, and oversight of those delegations.

§  Council‘s delegations to officers, community boards and community funding panels.

Delegations and employment of the Chief Executive:

§  Appointment of the Chief Executive of Hutt City Council.

§  Review and negotiation of the contract, performance agreement and remuneration of the Chief Executive.

Meetings and committees:

§  Standing Orders for Council and its committees.

§  Council’s annual meeting schedule.

Long Term and Annual Plans:

       The adoption of the budgetary parameters for the LTP and Annual Plans.

       Determination of rating levels and policies required as part of the LTP.

       Adoption of Consultation Documents, proposed and final LTPs and proposed and final Annual Plans.

Council Controlled Organisations:

       The establishment and disposal of any Council Controlled Organisation or Council Controlled Trading Organisation.

       Approval of annual Statements of Corporate Intent for Council Controlled Organisations and Council Controlled Trading Organisations.

 


 

Community Engagement and Advocacy:

§  Receive reports from the Council’s Advisory Groups.

§  Monitor engagement with the city’s communities.

 

Operational Matters:

§  Civil Defence Emergency Management matters requiring Council’s input.

§  Road closing and road stopping matters.

§  Approval of overseas travel for elected members.

§  All other matters for which final authority is not delegated.

 

Appoint:

§  The non-elected members of the Standing Committees, including extraordinary vacancies of non- elected representatives.

§  The Directors of Council Controlled Organisations and Council Controlled Trading Organisations.

§  Council’s nominee on any Trust.

§  Council representatives on any outside organisations (where applicable and time permits, recommendations for the appointment may be sought from the appropriate Standing Committee and/or outside organisations).

§  Council’s Electoral Officer, Principal Rural Fire Officer and any other appointments required by statute.

§  The recipients of the annual Civic Honours awards.

 

    


TE KAUNIHERA O TE AWA KAIRANGI | HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Ordinary meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Tuesday 24 May 2022 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES - Karakia Timatanga     

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with
 a sharpened air. 

A touch of frost, a promise of a
glorious day.

 

2.       APOLOGIES

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

4.       Mayoral Statement (22/1140)

5.       Chief Executive's Statement (22/1141)

6.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

7.       Committee Minutes with Recommended Items

a)      Komiti Iti Ahumoni I Tūraru | Audit and Risk Subcommittee

19 April 2022                                                                                                 12

Recommended Item

Item 5)       Review of Sensitive Expenditure Policy and Guidelines (22/574)          14

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the minutes be endorsed.”

b)      Komiti Iti Ara Waka | Traffic Subcommittee

21 April 2022                                                                                                 45

Recommended Item

Item 5)       Proposed Electric Vehicle Parking Restrictions at five locations (22/761)          47

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the minutes be endorsed.”

 

c)       Komiti Hapori | Communities Committee

27 April 2022                                                                                                 56

Recommended Item

Item 5)       Local Community Projects Fund (22/862)                                58

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the minutes be endorsed.”

 

d)      Komiti Ratonga Rangatōpū me te Rautaki |Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee

28 April 2022                                                                                                 68

Recommended Items

Item 5a)     Water Supply Bylaw Review 2022 (22/556)                             69

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the minutes be endorsed.”

 

Item 5b)     Proposed Private District Plan Change 54: Boulcott's Farm Heritage Golf Club - Rezoning to General Residential Activity Area (22/658)        70

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the minutes be endorsed.”

 

Item 5c)     New Zealand Local Government Funding Agency Green, Social and Sustainability Lending Programme (22/762)                                                   71

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the minutes be endorsed.”

 

Item 5d)     Intensification Planning Instrument: Financial Contributions Assessment (22/982)                                                                                                    72

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the minutes be endorsed.”

 

8.       Miscellaneous

a)      Integrated Transport Strategy (22/1177)

Memorandum dated 12 May 2022 by the Head of Transport                    152

Mayor’s Recommendation:

That the recommendations contained in the memorandum be endorsed.”

 

b)      Restrictions installed under Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004 (22/1016)

Report No. HCC2022/2/90 by the Traffic Engineer                                  202

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

c)       Council performance overview for third quarter ending 31 March 2022 (22/1126)

Report No. HCC2022/2/91 by the Group Chief Financial Officer            207

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

9.       Minutes

Meeting minutes Hutt City Council, 23 March 2022                                            263

Meeting minutes Hutt City Council, 4 April 2022                                               297


 

10.     Committee Minutes without Recommended Items

a)      Hearings Subcommittee

7 March 2022                                                                                               299

 

b)      Komiti Ratonga o Te Awa Kairangi | Hutt Valley Services Committee

11 March 2022                                                                                              357

 

c)       Komiti Ngā Wai Hangarua | Wellington Water Committee

18 March 2022                                                                                              365

 

d)      Komiti Iti Mahere ā-Ngahurutanga / Mahere ā-Tau | Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee

4 April 2022                                                                                                 382

 

e)      Komiti Hanganga | Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

3 May 2022                                                                                                   390

 

f)       Komiti Kaupapa Taiao | Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

5 May 2022                                                                                                   400

 

g)      Komiti Ratonga o Te Awa Kairangi | Hutt Valley Services Committee

6 May 2022                                                                                                   408

 

11.     Sealing Authority (22/1008)

Report No. HCC2022/2/18 by the Legal Co-ordinator                                       414

Mayor’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”


 

12.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

 

13.     EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

MAYOR'S RECOMMENDATION:

 

“That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely:

14.     2022 Civic Honours Awards (22/889)

15.     2022 Youth Services Awards (22/1110)

16.     committee minutes without recommended item

                   Komiti Iti Ahumoni I Tūraru | Audit and Risk Subcommittee

                   19 April 2022

17.     Minutes

          Meeting minutes Hutt City Council, 21 December 2021 (Mayor and Councillors only)

18.     Governance Matter (22/1124)

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:


 

 

(A)

(B)

(C)

 

 

 

General subject of the matter to be considered.

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter.

Ground under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022 Civic Honours Awards.

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons. (s7(2)(a)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

 

 

2022 Youth Services Awards.

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons. (s7(2)(a)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

 

 

Minutes of Audit and Risk Subcommittee dated 19 April 2022: Cyber Security

The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage (s7(2)(j)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Minutes of Council dated 21 December 2021: ReMakery Project and Governance Matter

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities (s7(2)(h)).

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons. (s7(2)(a)).

 

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

 

 

Governance Matter.

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons. (s7(2)(a)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

 

 

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as specified in Column (B) above.”

 

 

 

Kate Glanville

SENIOR DEMOCRACY ADVISOR


1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Iti Ahumoni I Tūraru|Audit and Risk Subcommittee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom on

 Tuesday 19 April 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

PRESENT:
(via audio-visual link)

Ms S Tindal (Independent Chair)

Mayor C Barry (Deputy Chair)

 

Cr J Briggs

Cr S Edwards

 

Cr A Mitchell

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  Cr Rasheed and Cr Shaw

 

IN ATTENDANCE:        Ms J Miller, Chief Executive

(via audio-visual link)      Ms A Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

Mr J Griffiths, Director of Strategy and Engagement

Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development 

Ms J Livschitz, Group Chief Financial Officer

Mr J Kingsbury, Head of Transport

Mr P Baker, IT Operations Manager

Ms K Crandle, Head of Parks and Reserves

Ms N Reddy, Risk and Assurance Manager

Mr B Wu, Financial Accounting Manager

Ms A Leong, Finance Project Manager

Ms H Stringer, Financial Transaction Services Manager

Mr A Quinn, Project Manager (Naenae)

Ms K Stannard, Head of Democratic Services

Ms T Lealofi, Democracy Advisor

Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker

 

 

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

1.       APOLOGIES

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Mitchell)                                           Minute No. ARSC 22201

“That the apologies received from Cr Rasheed and Cr Shaw be accepted and leave of absence be granted.”

 


 

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

There was no public comment.

3.       COVID-19 UPDATE

          The Chief Executive provided an update on COVID-19 attached as pages 9-10 of the minutes.

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive confirmed the dates for the next Communities Committee and the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee meetings as 27 April and 28 April 2022 respectively.  She advised that due to the ongoing COVID-19 situation, the available external workforce to recruit was limited.  She highlighted that operations were continuing as best they could.  She noted recruitment for pool staff included retaining personnel beyond casual contracts.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS 

          There were no conflict of interest declarations.


 

5.       Recommendation to Council – 24 May 2022

Review of Sensitive Expenditure Policy and Guidelines (22/574)

The Group Chief Financial Officer elaborated on the report.  She acknowledged the work of the Financial Accounting Manager. She added that the Chief Executive for Urban Plus Limited (UPL), along with the Board of UPL, had initiated revoking the extra clauses contained in its policies.  She highlighted that the change now enabled Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) to follow Council ‘s group policies going forward.

In response to a question from a member, the Group Chief Financial Officer confirmed the wording of the document would be amended to provide clear guidance regarding approval of the elected members’ expenses.

ReCOMMENDED: (Ms Tindal/Cr Briggs)                                    Minute No. ARSC 22202

“That the Subcommittee recommends that Council:

(1)   notes and receives the information contained in the report; 

(2)   approves the updated Sensitive Expenditure Policy attached as Appendix 1 to the report;

(3)   approves the updated Sensitive Expenditure Guidelines attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

(4)   notes that the updated Sensitive Expenditure Policy and Guidelines are for the Council Group; and

(5)   notes that there will no longer be any deviation from the policy by any of the Council Controlled Organisations, in particular Urban Plus Limited.”

 

6.

Holidays Act Compliance (22/746)

Report No. ARSC2022/2/62 by the Finance Project Manager

 

The Group Chief Financial Officer elaborated on the report.  She noted that the delayed “go-live” date for the new payroll system had added to the costs of the project.  She stressed that the costs would be covered by the contingency fund that had been previously set aside.

 

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Edwards)                                           Minute No. ARSC 22203

“That the Subcommittee notes and receives the report.”

 

7.

Payroll tax compliance evaluation (22/791)

Report No. ARSC2022/2/9 by the Finance Project Manager

 

The Group Chief Financial Officer elaborated on the report. 

The Financial Transaction Services Manager elaborated on the key findings and recommendations.

The Chair advised that other local authorities were also installing the same payroll system and that it would be good practice to share learnings. 

In response to questions from members, the Group Chief Financial Officer agreed to report back to members post meeting regarding details of the historical trauma insurance item.  She confirmed that officers were investigating how the new payroll system could be audited preferably prior to it going live.  She acknowledged the contract with the provider contained a clause such that the new system complied with all relevant New Zealand legislation.  She advised that it was crucial the payroll team applied the new system consistently.

 

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Mitchell)                                          Minute No. ARSC 22204

“That the Subcommittee:

(1)      notes and receives the report and the Pay As You Earn (PAYE) Compliance Evaluation Report attached as Appendix 1 to the report; and

(2)      notes the resulting planned actions in Appendix 2 attached to the report.”

 

8.

RiverLink Update (22/795)

Report No. ARSC2022/2/63 by the Project Manager Riverlink

 

The Chair advised members that she had asked officers through the Chief Executive to develop a template for the Project Risk Register to ensure all projects were being assessed in the same way.

 

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Edwards)                                           Minute No. ARSC 22205

“That the Subcommittee:

 

(1) receives and notes the information contained in the report; and

(2) notes the Project Risk Register attached as Appendix 1 to the report.”

 

9.

Update on Petone Wharf (22/799)

Report No. ARSC2022/2/10 by the Head of Parks and Reserves

 

Cr Briggs spoke in support of the motion.  He noted there was community uncertainty regarding the future of the Petone Wharf.  He was pleased the Petone Community Board was involved in the planning process.  He asked that public communications be managed proactively as it was difficult to see the prominent landmark closed to the public.

 

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Briggs)                                              Minute No. ARSC 22206

“That the Subcommittee:

(1)   notes and receives the information;

(2)   notes the Project Risk Register attached as Appendix 1 to the report; 

(3)   notes that a Draft Conservation Plan has been produced for the Petone Wharf to provide greater clarity on heritage values and inform the resource consent application; and

(4)   notes the financial implications and changes to the budget spread.”

 

10.

Tupua Horo Nuku Project Update (22/805)

Report No. ARSC2022/2/65 by the Head of Transport

 

In response to a question from a member, the Head of Transport confirmed officers conducted monthly meetings with the Petone-Melling cycleway project team. He added the increasing costs of the Tupua Horo Nuku Project were reflective of the nationwide construction industry situation.  He confirmed that by joining the Alliance with Te Ara Tupua, it was hoped economies of scale would assist in reducing cost overruns for the Tupua Horo Nuku project. 

 

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Mitchell)                                            Minute No. ARSC 22207

“That the Subcommittee:

(1) notes the key risks and updates on the Tupua Horo Nuku project;

(2) notes the increasing construction costs to deliver the Tupua Horo Nuku project and that discussions are on-going with Crown Infrastructure Partners (CIP) and Waka Kotahi to seek additional funding;

(3) notes the project budgets (both capital expenditure and revenue) approved by Council in the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 following public consultation and updated for Council decisions made in the preparation of the draft Annual Plan 2022-23, as detailed in the “Financial Considerations” section of the report; and

(4) notes that Council will be required to approve any increase in funding requirements which exceeds the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 budgeted position and that the impact of the significance of increases on requirements for Council to consult on changes will be considered alongside the outcome of discussions with funding partners.”

 

11.     Information Items

a)

Naenae projects - progress update (22/790)

Memorandum dated 30 March 2022 by the Project Manager (Naenae)

 

The Project Manager (Naenae) elaborated on the report. He explained the demolition of the former Naenae pool would be completed by the end of April 2022.  He noted the focus was shifting to the set-up phase and the procurement process, with a mix of local and international procurement being proposed.  He added the co-design process for the former Post Office building was progressing with a third workshop between the advisory group and the community having just been completed. 

In response to questions from members, the Project Manager (Naenae) advised a Key Performance Indicator for the project was that 80% of procurement was sourced locally.  He added that it was anticipated the contractors, Apollo, would be involved in the procurement process to familiarise them with the local systems and processes.

 

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Mitchell)                                  Minute No. ARSC 22208

“That the Subcommittee notes and receives the memorandum.”


 

b)

Audit and Risk Subcommittee Forward Programme 2022 (22/608)

Report No. ARSC2022/2/64 by the Democracy Advisor

 

The Chief Executive advised of a new programme of work that was not showing in the Forward Programme.  She reminded members of her verbal report regarding the findings of the Building Consent Accreditation audit from International Accreditation New Zealand (IANZ). to the previous Subcommittee meeting.  She noted this was report through the Audit and Risk Subcommittee minutes to the Council meeting on 23 March 2022.  She confirmed that the required Action Plan had been submitted to IANZ on time and that IANZ had accepted the Action Plan.  She further added that officers were progressing with having all the required documentation to IANZ by the specified deadline of 29 April 2022.  She advised that she would provide a detailed report to the next subcommittee meeting on the Action Plan, acceptance of the Action Plan, the evidence and documentation and how officers would manage the risk. 

The Chief Executive said that a report would be considered by the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee on 3 May 2022 on the statutory timeframes under the Resource Management Act and the Land Information Memorandum applications. 

 

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Cr Edwards)                           Minute No. ARSC 22209

“That the Subcommittee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.”

12.     QUESTIONS

          There were no questions.


 

13.     EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

Resolved: (Ms Tindal/Mayor Barry)                                         Minute No. ARSC 22210

“That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely:

14.     Cyber Security (22/792)

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

(A)

(B)

(C)

 

 

 

General subject of the matter to be considered.

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter.

Ground under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution.

 

 

 

Cyber Security

The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage (s7(2)(j)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as specified in Column (B) above.”

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the public meeting closed at 2.46pm.  The non-public portion of the meeting closed at 2.56pm.

 

 

 

 

 

S Tindal

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 24th day of May 2022


 

 

Audit and Risk Subcommittee 19 April 2022

 

Further to my update to the Subcommittee on 15 February 2022 where I provided information on our response to being in the "red traffic light" setting, this report provides further information on how we are managing to live and work with Covid.

 

Over the quarter around 20% of our permanent workforce contracted Covid, many more were required to isolate due to having a family member with Covid or being a close contact. There were 38 exposure events across our sites. Staff in our administration buildings worked in bubbles or teams as per our updated business continuity plans. Staff in public-facing roles especially in our libraries, pools and hubs had the highest rate of staff absence and were particularly hard hit by Covid.

 

We managed our facilities to keep most open throughout the quarter as we applied our business continuity plan. As particular facilities were closed or offered reduced opening hours including summer pools, Stokes Valley Pool, Moera library and hubs, other facilities could remain open. Wherever practicable staff were moved around facilities and roles to keep key services and functions open, e.g., front counter at Laings Road. There is a full report to the Communities Committee on the impact of Covid on our facilities.

 

Visitor numbers to our libraries, hubs, museums, and pools continued to track down due to concern with exposure, and less programming of events and activities as these moved online. This resulted in a revenue loss of approximately $1.675M as at 31 March the majority of which is from pools ($1.038M) with parking and parking enforcement at $375K lost revenue. We will report these financial impacts through to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee.

 

Some services like recycling collection and roading work were disrupted. Rubbish services and priority maintenance work continued. Capital projects suffered delays due to world-wide shipping delays on products and increased costs and shortages of materials. Contractors across the region were impacted with staffing shortages due to Covid.

 

We participated in the Regional Leadership Group who co-ordinated the Covid response across all councils supported by health partners and MSD.

 

Working locally with 2DHB and the PHO we supported testing, the booster roll-out and vaccinations for young people. We worked locally responding to requests for welfare support to families isolating. Demand for food parcels and welfare packs rose.

 

Te Rūnanganui o Te Āti Awa ki te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui worked in partnership with marae across the Hutt Valley to deliver services including vaccinations, testing and other health initiatives. We assisted with this by putting in a road at the Rūnanga to enable the health effort including vaccinations and distribution of tests. We also continued our work to support the Hutt Valley Emergency Kai Collective to distribute food.

 

The anti-mandate protest at Parliament spread to Wainuiomata Marae. We supported the efforts there to keep the protestors away. This included being on site, putting blocks in place to prevent access to nearby streets and support with communications including a combined press release which can be viewed here.

 

On 5 April in line with government announcements we removed Vaccine Passes at our sites and facilities and paused the requirement for staff to be vaccinated following a further risk assessment and taking into account high vaccination rates. Our policies, protection framework and guidance for leaders and staff were updated to reflect these decisions. Health and safety measures and wellbeing initiatives continued to be a high priority and, again, these changes were welcomed by staff and the community.

 

As at the date of this report we are at the “orange” traffic light setting. The key change at for us is that there are no capacity limits or distancing requirements at venues. We expect that planning for events may ramp up as a result of this decision, but the level of activity at sites will be constrained in the short term due to the capacity of our front-line staff.

 

Hospitality and event businesses are welcoming the easing of restrictions. We are working on a paper to Council for 18 May regarding support for hospitality businesses and other sectors significantly affected by Covid-19.

As I noted further reporting on the impacts of Covid are provided to the Communities Committee and Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee.

 

Ngā mihi nui

Jo Miller

Chief Executive


Attachment 2

Appendix 1 - Sensitive Expenditure Policy

 







Attachment 3

Appendix 2 - Sensitive Expenditure Guidelines

 


















1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Iti Ara Waka | Traffic Subcommittee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom on,

 Thursday 21 April 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

 

PRESENT:

Cr B Dyer (Chair)

Cr G Barratt

(via audio-visual link)

Cr J Briggs (Deputy Chair)

Cr K Brown

 

Cr A Mitchell

 

 

 

APOLOGIES:                          Cr N Shaw

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE:                Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and

(via audio-visual link)             Development

                                                  Mr J Kingsbury, Head of Transport

                                                  Mr J Scherzer, Head of Climate and Solid Waste

                                                  Mr R Soni, Traffic Engineer

                                                  Mr B Hu, Traffic Engineering Manager

                                                  Mr J Linders, Advisor Energy and Carbon – Climate and Solid Waste

                                                  Ms A Manda, Traffic Engineer

                                                  Ms T Lealofi, Democracy Advisor

                                                  Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker

                                  

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

 

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES – KARAKIA TIMATANGA

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

 

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

 

 

 

 

2.       APOLOGIES

RESOLVED:  (Cr Dyer/Cr Brown)                                           Minute No. TSC 22201

“That the apology received from Cr N Shaw be accepted and leave of absence be granted.”  

 

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

          Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.

 

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS      

          There were no conflict of interest declarations.

5.  RECOMMENDATION TO TE KAUNIHERA O TE AWA KAIRANGI |  COUNCIL - 24 May 2022

Proposed Electric Vehicle Parking Restrictions at five locations (22/761)

Under public comment, Cr Dyer read a statement from the Co-ordinator of the Moera Community House.  The statement detailed the Moera Community House’s objection to the location of the proposed charging station being outside Moera Community House.  The reason for the objection was because they did not want to lose two carparks next to the disabled carpark as it would result in difficulties for less abled members of the public to access the Moera Community House’s programmes.

The Head of Climate and Solid Waste elaborated on the report.  He advised of a correction to the table under paragraph 12, page 8 of his report whereby the number of 75kWh DC chargers in Wainuiomata should read “two”, not “one”.  He added that it would be one unit with two charging outlets.

The Head of Climate and Solid Waste advised Council’s Long Term Plan specified a roll-out of 20 electric vehicle charging stations.  He advised that there were already two located at Seaview Marina and three about to be installed in Stokes Valley.  He added the remaining 15 direct current charging outlets would be installed across the four sites outlined in the officer’s report.  He noted that this would be in addition to the 10 alternating current outlets that Meridian Energy Ltd (Meridian) was installing.  He noted there were also eight charging outlets on private land at the Seaview Marina.  He explained it was not financially feasible to install charging stations at the Ricoh Centre or at the Maungaraki Shopping Centre, due to a lack of adequate power supply and the excessive cost involved in upgrading the existing power supplies.  He noted Meridian had already installed two alternating current charging outlets at the Ricoh Centre. 

In response to matters raised under public comment, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste explained that no feedback had been received from the Moera Community House. He highlighted that the proposed charging station would not affect the number of existing disabled carparks. 

The Advisor Energy and Carbon – Climate and Solid Waste advised that it could be possible to move the proposed Moera charging station further south.  He highlighted this would incur costs which had not been budgetted.

In response to questions from members, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste confirmed the location of the Wainuiomata charging station was behind the hall and not in conflict with retail carparks.  He advised charging station carparks would generally be self-policed noting initially Council’s Parking Team may conduct a proactive visit or respond to a complaint of the carparks being blocked.

In response to further questions from members, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste advised the consolidation of charging stations to five sites occurred for cost reasons mainly driven by Wellington Electricity projected costs to upgrade electrical supplies.  He acknowledged this had resulted in less coverage for the city.  He explained that all charging station carparks utilised existing carparks and were not wide accessible carparks.  He noted some were adjacent to accessibility carparks and that all charging stations could be activated remotely using the Meridian app noting that vehicles still required to be physically plugged in.

In response to further questions from members, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste advised a good relationship had developed with Meridian and that sharing of usage data would occur in the future.  He further advised officers were in talks with Meridian regarding having the same charges per kilowatt.  He highlighted that currently all installed charging stations were free as the app had not yet been launched.  He acknowledged that some charging station sites may have slightly more charging outlets than first proposed. He confirmed Meridian was funding its own unit installation costs.

In response to a question from a member regarding revenue projections, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste advised the latest information was contained within the 2020 business case report and that once the app was operational, more data would be available to possibly update those predictions.  He noted the national rebate scheme for the purchase of new electric vehicles and the increasing popularity of electric vehicle ownership would also increase demand for charging outlets. 

MOVED:  (Cr Dyer/Cr Briggs)

That recommendations (1)-(5) contained in the officer’s report be approved.

AMENDMENT MOVED:  (Cr Barratt/Cr Dyer)

That officers speak to the Moera Community House to explain the rationale behind the new stations and to enter into discussion with them regarding where new disabled carparks were necessary.

Cr Briggs spoke against the amendment.  He considered the Amendment was an operational matter.

In response to a point of clarification from a member, the Head of Transport advised that discussions would be occurring with the Moera Community House as a matter of course.

Cr Barratt asked that officers hold discussions with the Moera Community House in a timely manner.

The amendment was declared LOST on the voices.

Cr Mitchell expressed disappointment with the reduced distribution coverage of the charging stations.  He understood the reasoning for this and supported the original motion.  He asked officers to assess the accessibility aspects of the charging stations including cutting kerbing to provide easier access to the footpath from a charging station carpark. 

Cr Dyer expressed support for the original motion.  He supported the roll-out of the charging stations noting the benefits of the two different speeds of chargers.  He asked officers to commence roll-out of phase two as soon as practicable. 

 

ReCOMMENDED:  (Cr Dyer/Cr Briggs)                                     Minute No. TSC 22202

“That the Traffic Subcommittee recommends that Council

(1)      notes that Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations are proposed to be installed at the following locations:

 

           (a)          Fairway Drive (Avalon Playground);

           (b)          Randwick Crescent (Moera Library);

           (c)          Bowers Street (Koraunui Stokes Valley Community Hub);

           (d)          the Walter Nash carpark adjacent to Taine/Tocker walkway (Walter Nash Stadium); and

           (e)          Queen Street (Wainuiomata Community Hub);

(2)   approves P120 EV Parking Restrictions, applicable at ‘all times’ for the sites as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(3)   approves the installation of road signs under the provisions of sections 2.2 and 2.3 of the Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017 and section 6.4 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004 and Traffic Control Device Manual, part 13, para graph 3.3.1(At All Times) and paragraph 4.4.1 (Time Limits ie P120) parking signs and markings – general and parking management;

(4)   approves the straightening of three car parks on Bowers Street (Stokes Valley Community Hub), as perpendicular carparks are preferred for EV charging, in order to allow vehicles to either nose in or reverse in so that cables can reach the vehicle’s charging inlet; and

(5)   rescinds any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they conflict with the traffic controls described in this resolution.”

For the reasons that the proposed restrictions would facilitate the effective operation of the proposed EV charging stations, improve parking turnover and availability of the EV parks, benefitting both local businesses and their customers. The proposed changes have garnered support from the community and would support Council’s Parking Policy (2017).

 

6.

INFORMATION ITEMS

a)

Bus Stop Review Procedures (22/830)

Memorandum dated 4 April 2022 by the Traffic Engineering Manager

 

Mr Raymond Malcolm, Service Delivery Advisor (Bus and Ferry Operations) from Greater Wellington Regional Council was in attendence for the item.

Speaking under public comment, Mr B Spedding and Ms V Horrocks representing the Eastbourne Community Board (‘the Board’) raised the Board’s concerns with the Bus Stop Design Guidelines.  Mr Spedding advised that the Board considered that the guidelines appeared to not permit any deviations to bus stop design as safety could be compromised or cost implications could arise.  He explained the many different situations existing in the Eastern Bays areas including trees in carriageways, narrow footpaths, no cycle lanes and narrow carriageways. He also explained the Board requested flexibility of bus stop design to take into account local environment issues. 

In response to questions from members, Mr Spedding advised that road corridor width was one of many issues that concerned the Board.  He also advised he had not investigated how Wellington City Council’s bus stop review was dealing with the local environment constraints in Wellington suburbs.  He added that currently some bus stops in the Eastern Bays area had special platforms designed to assist with accessibility where the buses could not align with the road kerb. 

The Head of Transport elaborated on the report.  In response to matters raised under public comment he advised all bus stops were designed on a case-by-case basis with officers acknowledging the unique local environment of the Eastern Bays. 

The Traffic Engineering Manager advised that the report focussed on procedures for the bus stop review rather than the actual bus stop designs.  He confirmed all bus stops were assessed individually and that the guidelines were national Waka Kotahi designs and were not requirements.

In response to questions from members, Mr Malcolm advised that ideally bus stops required a 15m lead-in entry, a 15m long stop and a 9m exitway.  He added that there were several instances in Wellington City where this was not achieveable and he believed the same would be true of some Eastern Bays bus stops.  He confirmed individual solutions may be necessary and that initally the standard design would be assessed for suitability and then modified if required for each bus stop.  He agreed to inform the appropriate Greater Wellington Regional Council officers of the concerns raised by members, and advised he was standing in for the officer reponsible for this programme (Ms Emma Tonks), as she was currently on leave. 

In response to questions from a member, Mr Malcolm advised he was aware there may have been miscommunication regarding the programme in Wainuiomata and that he understood all dimensions of bus stops were being reviewed. 

The Traffic Engineering Manager added that the review of bus stops in Wainuiomata had been completed in accordance with the procedure outlined in the officer’s report with some designs being modified, by taking advantage of existing accessways and intersections to reduce the number of carparks required to be taken.

Cr Briggs thanked officers for undertaking the review of the procedure and stressed the need for community support with this bus stop programme so as to avoid undermining the public transport system.  He encouraged officers from the two councils to continue their collaborations.

Cr Dyer acknowledged the often contentious situations regarding placement of and designs of bus stops and the fine balancing required between all parties.

 

Resolved:  (Cr Dyer/Cr Mitchell)                                   Minute No. TSC 22203

“That the Traffic Subcommittee receives and notes this memorandum.”

 


b)

Traffic Subcommittee Forward Programme 2022 (22/760)

Report No. TSC2022/2/72 by the Democracy Advisor

 

In response to a question from a member, Cr Dyer explained the Beltway item had been divided into two parts with the on-street parking portion yet to be reported on. 

In response to a question from a member, the Traffic Engineering Manager added that the current phase included the defects period and that a final ‘sign-off’ report in September 2022 would also report on the matter. 

 

Resolved:  (Cr Dyer/Cr Mitchell)                                   Minute No. TSC 22204

“That the Subcommittee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.”

7.       QUESTIONS

There were no questions.

 

 


 

8.       CLOSING FORMALITIES - Karakia WHAKAMUTUNGA

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 3.05 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

Cr B Dyer

CHAIR

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 24th day of May 2022


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Proposed sites

 




1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Hapori | Communities Committee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom on

 Wednesday 27 April 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Deputy Mayor T Lewis (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

(via audio visual link)

Cr G Barratt

Cr J Briggs

 

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

 

Cr D Hislop

Cr A Mitchell

 

Cr N Shaw (Deputy Chair)

Cr L Sutton

 

APOLOGIES:                  Cr S Rasheed

 

NON ATTENDANCE:    Cr K Brown, Cr C Milne

 

IN ATTENDANCE:        Ms A Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

(via audio visual link)       Ms M Laban, Head of Connected Communities

Ms K Crandle, Head of Parks and Reserves (part meeting)

Mr A Quinn, Project Manager (Naenae)

Mr S Chan, Programmes and Innovations Manager

Mr B Hu, Traffic Engineering Manager (part meeting)

Ms K Glanville, Senior Democracy Advisor

Ms A Doornebosch, Democracy Advisor

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

 

1.       Opening formalities - Karakia Timatanga

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

2.

APOLOGIES

 

Resolved:  (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Dyer)                             Minute No. CCCCC 22201

 

"That the apology received from Cr Rasheed be accepted and leave of absence be granted."

Mayor Barry left the meeting at 2.05pm and rejoined the meeting at 2.23pm.

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS    

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

PRECEDENCE OF BUSINESS

In accordance with Standing Order 10.4 the Chair accorded precedence of business to item 7 b) Communities of Interest Update.

This item is recorded in the order in which it is listed on the order paper.

5.

Recommendation to Te Kaunihera o Te Awa Kairangi |Council - 24 May 2022 - Local Community Projects Fund (22/862)

 

Speaking under public comment, Mr David Gillespie representing the Northern Community Funding Panel (the Panel) noted the concept of the Community Projects Fund was excellent but said there were ongoing challenges around the process.  He stated there were opportunities for Panel members to have more cohesive engagement with officers to understand the timeline and process.  He highlighted that he had discussed the officer’s report with Panel members who were supportive of the extension to 31 March 2023.  He said the Panel members were also supportive of the provision to provide unspent funding to community groups.  He stated that Panel members would gratefully decline this offer at this time. He stated the Panel considered they had enough projects on hand to spend available funding.  He noted if other Panels chose to grant unspent funds to other community groups the Panel would support this. 

 

In response to questions from members, Mr Gillespie said if officers were not able to deliver planned projects, then he would support the allocation of funds.  He noted that allocations of funds were to the painted murals by local artists in the Taita Shopping Centre and the Stokes Valley entrance sign design and artwork by local artist Sue Lawson. He further noted he supported the funding of two smaller projects for a bench seat in the new hilltop walking track and the distribution of defibrillators in the community. He considered there may be opportunity for Council to use media to promote these projects.

  

The Director Neighbourhoods and Communities elaborated on the report.  She spoke to the Parks and Reserves Workplan attached as pages 10 to 11 of the minutes.  She highlighted that ongoing resource issues as a result of COVID was having a significant impact on the ability to deliver a number of projects, an impact on facilities as well as work plans.  She said over the past few months officers had prioritised projects with a focus on health and safety and strategic priorities.  She added that some projects had been deferred to 2023.  She advised the Panels were initiated to enable communities to identify and fund assets that fell outside of the Annual Plan process.  She noted this reflected how Council wanted to work with communities by providing them with more opportunities for participation and decision making.   She agreed that the way the Panels were set up could be enhanced and noted officers had met with the Panels’ Chairs to discuss potential solutions.  She highlighted officer resources needed to be considered when scoping and managing the delivery of projects.  She noted officers wanted to enable the differing approaches each Panel was pursuing. She said the proposed process was a pragmatic solution to the current situation to deliver funds to the community in this triennium for the purpose it was intended.  She said that for projects that could not be delivered, this funding would then be put to the most appropriate use in the community.  She said if Council agreed to the recommendations, officers would meet with Panel Chairs individually to work through which option to adopt and what projects they wanted to prioritise.

 

 

 

In response to questions from members the Director, Neighbourhoods and Communities advised for projects that were not expected to meet the March 2023 extension, the intent was to change the criteria for Panels to pass the funds onto community groups to deliver the funding in this triennium.  She said Panels could opt to tag this funding to a contestable round or to a future workstream.  She said that once the decision had been made by Council, officers would meet with the Panels’ Chairs in June 2022 to discuss how they would like to approach the process and set their priorities.  She noted that there would still be ongoing resourcing issues.  She said that Panel members would determine where any unspent funding on projects in their jurisdiction would be distributed. 

In response to a question from a member, the Director Neighbourhoods and Communities suggested that the Committee consider asking officers to continue to work with the current Community Funding Panels to confirm and deliver as many of the proposed projects as possible and to agree that any remaining 2019-2022 funds may be carried over to future Community Funding Panels

The Chair foreshadowed her intention to move an additional recommendation extending thanks to the Community Funding Panels for their work to date.

 

ReCOMMENDED:  (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Edwards)             Minute No. CCCCC 22202

 

“That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)    agrees to extend the term of the current Community Funding Panels until
31 March 2023, for the purpose of decision-making on the Local Community Projects Fund;

(2)    agrees to change the criteria for the Local Community Projects Fund to enable an alternate method of distribution in this triennium;

(3)     asks officers to continue to work with the current Community Funding Panels to confirm and deliver as many of the proposed projects as possible;

(4)      agrees that any remaining 2019-2022 funds may be carried over to the future Community Funding Panels; and

(5)         extends its thanks to the Community Funding Panels for their work to date.”

 

For the reason that this will enable more of The Fund to be allocated by Community Funding Panels for its intended purpose.

 

6.

Director's Report - Neighbourhoods and Communities (22/873)

Report No. CCCCC2022/2/74 by the Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

Cr Dyer left the meeting at 2.28pm and rejoined the meeting at 2.30pm.

The Director Neighbourhoods and Communities elaborated on the report.   She noted the continuing impacts on facilities as the result of COVID and how this might be managed into the future. She highlighted the progress being made within Council’s Neighbourhoods and Communities team on the new approach to enable communities to build capability around community development.  She said it was expected that 30 officers would be trained in this way of working by the end of the financial year who would be practitioners of community led development. 

In response to questions from members, the Director Neighbourhoods and Communities advised that the improvements to Naenae Library were maintenance improvements to address health and safety requirements.   She noted this site had been discussed as part of the Naenae Spatial Plan as a potential site for housing development.  She said officers would report back on the costs of the improvements to Naenae Library.  She said that a lot of running costs for pools were fixed costs and this had not changed over the COVID lockdown periods.  She advised revenue was down within pools as a result of no swimming lessons taking place. She said learn to swim and water safety programmes were growing in numbers as a result of the new Orange COVID traffic light setting.  She advised pools would revert to normal opening hours at the end of the school holidays.  She said she would ask officers to follow up marketing of the Libby library app to provide online access to library catalogues and services.

In response to a question from a member, the Head of Parks and Reserves advised officers were awaiting engineering advice to price the project to fix retaining devices in Taita Cemetery.   She said this work was expected to commence in January 2023.

 

Resolved: (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Hislop)                        Minute No. CCCCC 22203

 

“That the report be received and noted.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.          7.

a)

Information Items

City Safety Update (22/811)

Memorandum dated 31 March 2022 by the Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts

 

Cr Shaw left the meeting at 2.35pm and rejoined the meeting at 2.37pm.

The Head of Connected Communities elaborated on the report.  She noted in November 2021 officers provided a briefing to Councillors on city safety and undertook to provide six monthly updates.   She highlighted the mahi Council’s City Safety Team had been providing in recent months and the increase in vehicle licence plate thefts and the combined response from agencies to address this.

In response to questions from members, the Head of Connected Communities advised officers would follow up how community groups could assist with initiatives to prevent licence plate thefts.  She said officers would report back to members on the day and night audits relating to Naenae antisocial activity. She said officers were expecting to start formalising a contract for the Lower Hutt Neighbourhood Support Co-ordinator soon.

In response to questions from members, the Traffic Engineering Manager advised officers would involve the community major Waka Kotahi projects being developed in Lower Hutt.  He said stakeholder meetings and workshops through the development of those projects would be conducted as well as public consultation.   He noted work had commenced on illegal street racer issues in the Cornish Street area and officers would continue to work with Waka Kotahi to identify a long term solution.   He advised officers would be happy to accept feedback from members on the Wainuiomata street calming initiatives being developed.  He noted that the feedback would be considered as part of the overall design.

 

Resolved:   (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Shaw)             Minute No. CCCCC 22204 

 

“That the Committee notes the contents of the memorandum.”

 

b)

Communities of Interest Update (22/601)

Memorandum dated 25 March 2022 by the Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts

 

Ms J Sipeli, Executive Director and Mr M Sua, Covid Response Project Lead from Naku Enei Tamariki (NET) were in attendance for the item.

 

The Head of Connected Communities elaborated on the report.   She noted Council’s Communities of Interest portfolio sat within the Programmes and Innovation team.  She introduced the new Progammes and Innovation Manager,

 

 

Mr Samuel Chan.   She also noted the report included information on local intelligence and the appointments of community facilitators. 

Ms Sipeli provided an update on how NET was engaging with the community under the Community Emergency Resilience Fund.   She noted over the last eight months the short term goal had been to train 75 Pacific non-clinical community leaders in the Hutt Valley so they were pandemic response ready.  She said NET had completed one of three workshops which 25 Pacific leaders had attended. She stated that two of those members had now established community COVID action groups within their communities.  She highlighted the medium term goal was to be part of the food distribution hub.  She said the long term vision was to establish Pasifika community leaders or a response centre to respond to any future disaster occurring in the Hutt Valley.  She said the most significant issue for Pasifika families in relation to COVID was their hesitancy to come forward to ask for assistance.   She highlighted that the trusted faces, trusted places were the best type of engagement in these instances rather than using formal channels.  She noted ongoing challenges facing Pasifika families in relation to current price increases in food and power and the loss of jobs as the result of COVID lockdowns.

In response to questions from members, Ms Sipeli noted the food distribution hub was connected to the Kai Collective.  She said the current COVID vaccination rate for Pasifika children was approximately 60%.  She noted however they were still locating families who had not received their first COVID vaccination.  She said the major cause of lack of access to the internet for Pasifika households was the lack of access and affordability of devices.  She said NET had put in place discretionary funding to allow Pasifika families access to mobile devices for children and were working with school principals and their IT support staff to load data and donate these devices to learners.

Mr Michael Sua provided an update on the COVID Pasifika resilience workshops faciliated from the Pasifika Hub in Lower Hutt.   He noted these workshops had a Pacific focus and were in collaboration with the Wellington Region Emergency Management Office.  

In response to a question from a member, the Head of Connection Communities said she would follow up the statistics of Pasifika households without access to the internet. 

 

 

Resolved:   (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Dyer)              Minute No. CCCCC 22205

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the information.”

 

 

c)

Naenae projects - progress update (22/861)

Memorandum dated 14 April 2022 by the Project Manager (Naenae)

 

The Project Manager (Naenae) elaborated on the report.   He noted construction of the Naenae Pool and Fitness Centre was expected to commence in July 2022.   He highlighted the work being completed by the Naenae Advisory Group in relation to the development of the old Naenae Post Office into a new community facility.

Cr Mitchell elaborated on the community facility images.  He noted the building had heritage protection and that the Naenae Advisory Group had been working with a heritage architect.  He highlighted three co-working spaces which were interchangeable and could be shared.  He explained a kitchen, meeting rooms and bathroom areas would also be developed within the plan.

In response to questions from members, the Project Manager (Naenae) said the total capacity of the community facility would likely be 100+.  He provided a further Concept Design of the community facility attached as page 12 to the minutes.  He noted a fire evacuation scheme would be developed in line with the maximum capacity of the facility.  He said the concept drawings would be amended to reflect the true capacity size.  

Mayor Barry thanked officers and the community representatives for the work completed to date on this project.  He said the new facility and the journey to restore the old Post Office building would be highly valued by the local community.

 

Resolved:   (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Shaw)             Minute No. CCCCC 22206

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the memorandum.”

 

d)

Communities Committee Forward Programme 2022 (22/664)

Report No. CCCCC2022/2/69 by the Democracy Advisor

 

Resolved: (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Shaw)               Minute No. CCCCC 22207

 

“That the Communities Committee Forward Programme 2022 be received and noted.”

 

 

8.       QUESTIONS

          There were no questions.

9.

Closing formalities - Karakia Whakamutunga

Unuhia!

Unuhia!

Unuhia i te uru-tapu-nui

Kia wātea, kia māmā

Te ngākau, te tinana, te wairua i te ara takatū

Koia rā e Rongo whakairihia ake ki runga

Kia wātea, kia wātea!

Ae rā, kua wātea!

Hau, pai mārire.

Release us from the supreme sacredness of our tasks

To be clear and free
in heart, body and soul in our continuing journey

Oh Rongo, raise these words up high

so that we be cleansed and be free,

Yes indeed, we are free!

Good and peaceful

 

 

 

here being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 3.55pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

T Lewis

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 24th day of May 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Ratonga Rangatōpū me te Rautaki

Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom on

Thursday 28 April 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Cr S Edwards (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

(audio-visual link)

Cr G Barratt

Cr J Briggs

 

Cr K Brown (Deputy Chair)

Cr B Dyer

 

Cr D Hislop

Cr C Milne (from 2.19pm)

 

Cr A Mitchell

Cr N Shaw

 

Cr L Sutton (from 2.10pm)

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  Apologies were received from Cr Rasheed and Deputy Mayor Lewis and from Cr Sutton for lateness.

 

IN ATTENDANCE:        Ms J Miller, Chief Executive

(via audio-visual link)       Ms A Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

Mr J Griffiths, Director Strategy and Engagement

Ms H Oram, Director Environment and Sustainability

Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development  

Ms J Livschitz, Group Chief Financial Officer

Mr G Usoalii-Phillips, Treasury Officer

Ms K Pascall, Policy Planning Manager (part meeting)

Ms A Gordon, Senior Policy Advisor (part meeting)

Ms K Waldegrave, Acting Head of Strategy and Planning (part meeting)

Mr M Jennings, Kaitatari Tumuaki Māori (part meeting)

Mr N Geard, Principal Environmental Policy Analyst (part meeting)

Ms O Miller, Policy Advisor (part meeting)

Ms A Andrews, Business Analyst – Rates (part meeting)

Mr S Davis, Policy Planner (part meeting)

Mr C Page, Intermediate Policy Planner (part meeting)

Ms P Luke-Ngaheke a representative of Te Rūnanganui o te Āti Awa: In attendance for item 7 (part meeting).

Ms K Stannard, Head of Democracy Services

Ms J Randall, Democracy Advisor

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

1.

Opening formalities - Karakia Timatanga

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

The Chair welcomed Ms Peggy Luke-Ngaheke a representative of Te Rūnanganui o te Āti Awa to the meeting.

 

2.       APOLOGIES

Resolved: (Cr Edwards/Cr Mitchell)                                   Minute No. PFSC 22201

"That the apologies received from Cr Rasheed and Deputy Mayor Lewis be accepted and leave of absence be granted and the apology for lateness received from Cr Sutton be received.”

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.

 

Cr Sutton joined the meeting at 2.10pm.

 

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS   

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

Precedence of Business

In terms of Standing Order 10.4, the Chair accorded precedence to item 7 followed by items 5c and 6.

 

The items are recorded in the order in which they are listed on the agenda.

5.       Recommendations to Council | TE KAUNIHERA O TE AWA KAIRANGI - 24 MAY 2022

a)       

Water Supply Bylaw Review 2022 (22/556)

 

Mr Julian Fyfe and Ms Emily Greenberg, representatives of Wellington Water Ltd, were in attendance for the item.

The Senior Policy Advisor elaborated on the report. She advised changes made to the Water Supply Bylaw review (the bylaw) comprised of legislative updates, changes to technical language and formatting. She said the public engagement plan would commence in late May/early June 2022 once approved by Council at its meeting to be held on
24 May 2022. She added public feedback would be received via Council’s ‘Have Your say’ email address and outcomes would be shared on social media, in the Hutt News and on Council’s website.

In response to a question from a member, the Senior Policy Advisor explained that if the Three Waters Reform proposals did not go ahead, Council would need to review the bylaw in 2024 to incorporate new drinking standards that were expected to come into effect in July 2022.

 

 

RECOMMENDED:    (Cr Shaw/Cr Dyer)                    Minute No. PFSC 22202      

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)   notes the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002) requires Council to review its bylaws to ensure that they comply with the matters set out in sections 155 and 159 of the LGA 2002;

(2)   notes the Water Supply Bylaw 2010 has been reviewed in accordance with section 155 of the LGA 2002;

(3)   notes the outcome of the section 155 review of the Water Supply Bylaw is to propose amendments to the bylaw, as more particularly detailed in the Statement of Proposal (a draft of which is attached as Appendix 1 to the report) and that a Summary of the proposed Water Supply Bylaw is attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

(4)   agrees to consult on the Water Supply Bylaw (a draft of which is attached as Appendix 3 to the report) in accordance with the requirements of the LGA 2002;

(5)   notes if the Committee agrees to make the recommendation to Council in (4) above, the proposed Water Supply Bylaw (subject to any changes requested by the Committee) will be included on the agenda for Council’s consideration at its meeting on 24 May 2022, together with the Committee’s recommendations; and

(6)   agrees that the Chief Executive be delegated authority to make minor changes to the proposed Water Supply Bylaw if required prior to consultation.”

For the reasons that it is necessary to report to Council the background information associated with the s155 review of the Water Supply Bylaw 2010.

 

b)

Proposed Private District Plan Change 54: Boulcott's Farm Heritage Golf Club - Rezoning to General Residential Activity Area (22/658)

 

Cr Dyer, a member of the hearing panel that heard the plan change, provided additional context to the officer’s report. He said the majority of concerns from submitters focussed on traffic around the plan change site and mostly centred on the area where Kingston and High Streets intersected.  He highlighted that separate recommendations to the Traffic Subcommittee would attempt to address the traffic issues.

Cr Mitchell proposed an additional recommendation to the motion asking staff to consider the roading interventions as part of their ongoing road safety work, rather than reporting to the Traffic Subcommittee.

With the agreement of the mover and seconder of the motion, the additional recommendation was included as part (6) in the motion.

 

 

recommended: (Cr Edwards/Cr Shaw)              Minute No. PFSC 22203

“That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)   receives the report and recommendation of the hearing panel dated 30 March 2022 (attached as Appendix 1 to the report), acting under delegated authority pursuant to s34A of the Resource Management Act 1991, for the hearing of submissions and further submissions on Proposed Private District Plan Change 54 – Boulcott’s Farm Heritage Golf Club – Rezoning to General Residential Activity Area;

(2)   notes the process under the Resource Management Act 1991 for Proposed Private District Plan Change 54;

(3)   adopts the recommended decisions on Proposed Private District Plan Change 54, and reasons for those decisions, set out in the hearing panel’s report.

(4)   approves Proposed Private District Plan Change 54 as notified, as recommended in paragraph 5.1 of the hearing panel’s report;

(5)   resolves to publicly notify its decision on Proposed Private District Plan Change 54 within 10 working days of this decision, and to serve that decision on the applicant and submitters; and

(6)   instructs staff to investigate the roading interventions described in paragraph 4.18 of the hearing panel’s report, in accordance with recommendation 5.2 of that report, and asks staff to consider roading interventions as part of their work plan.”

For the reason that the hearing panel has considered the issues and all submissions on Proposed Private District Plan Change 54, based on the evidence provided to the hearing panel.

 

c)

New Zealand Local Government Funding Agency Green, Social and Sustainability Lending Programme (22/762)

 

Mr Mark Butcher, Chief Executive of New Zealand Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA) and Mr Nick Howell, Head of Sustainability of LGFA were in attendance for the item.  They presented slides on LGFA’s recent developments attached as pages 11-12 to the minutes.

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive of LGFA and the Head of Sustainability of LGFA advised decisions on Green, Social and Sustainable (GSS) Loans could be expected within 10 working days on the condition that councils provided all information required by the LGFA’s Sustainability Committee before it met. They advised loan criteria would not be based on any specific carbon reductions, but on points awarded for the individual components of a project. They added projects would require an overall rating from the New Zealand Green Building Council in order to qualify for a loan. They highlighted the GSS loan fund would not be limited and they encouraged councils to work on their eligibility to take advantage of the lower cost of borrowing.

 

 

 

recommended: (Cr Edwards/Cr Briggs)         Minute No. PFSC 22204

“That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)   notes and receives the update on the New Zealand Local Government Funding Agency’s (LGFA) Green, Social and Sustainability Lending Programme;

(2)   notes the cost of funds through the LGFA for Green, Social and Sustainability funding is set at five basis points lower (-0.05%) than conventional LGFA funding;

(3)   agrees that Council apply to LGFA for green financing of the Naenae pool rebuild project;

(4)   agrees in principal that Council progresses the financing of other applicable assets under the LGFA Green, Social and Sustainability Lending Programme; and

(5)   notes that the timing of LGFA lending under the Green, Social and Sustainability Programme will be dependent on cashflow projections of the relevant projects, together with broader Council Borrowing Strategy considerations.”

 

 

d)

Intensification Planning Instrument: Financial Contributions Assessment (22/982)

 

 

 

In response to a question from a member, the Intermediate Policy Planner explained development contributions covered larger scale work that had a cumulative effect on infrastructure, whereas financial contributions covered more reactive work where a development had a direct impact.

 

 

 

recommended: (Cr Edwards/Cr Dyer)               Minute No. PFSC 22205

“That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)   receives the information contained in the report;

(2)   approves Option 2 for financial contributions in the Intensification Planning Instrument, which provides for limited changes to expand existing financial contributions for off-site services and adjustment to applying reserves financial contributions; and

(3)   asks officers to explore the potential of using Option 3 for financial contributions, which provides for an increased scope to include option 2 and new provisions to mitigate effects on streetscape and/or environmental offsetting, as part of the wider District Plan Review following the introduction of the Intensification Planning Instrument.

 

6.

New Zealand Local Government Funding Agency - draft Statement of Intent 2022-2025 and half year performance results (22/593)

Report No. PFSC2022/2/70 by the Treasury Officer

 

The Group Chief Financial Officer elaborated on the report.

Mr Mark Butcher, Chief Executive of New Zealand Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA) and Mr Nick Howell, Head of Sustainability of LGFA were in attendance for the item.  They presented slides on LGFA’s recent developments attached as pages 9-11 to the minutes.

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive of LGFA explained LGFA lending allowed Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) to borrow from one source rather than receiving funds via various shareholders. He added the structure also worked well for differently structured CCOs where borrowing occurred at the CCO level. He advised a minimum debt of around $40M was required for CCOs because of higher legal costs. He said the LGFA would be working with government to potentially develop a lending model for mega-water entities under the proposed Three Waters reform.

The Group Chief Financial Officer explained that Council’s CCOs had a relatively low level of debt so there was no incentive to move its borrowing to LGFA at this stage. She advised that as CCOs debt increased this would be reviewed.

 

 

Resolved: (Cr Edwards/Cr Dyer)                                        Minute No. PFSC 22206

“That the Committee:

(1)   notes and receives the contents of the Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA) draft 2022-2023 Statement of Intent, covering the period up to 30 June 2025, attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

(2)   notes that officers do not have any suggested changes to the LGFA’s draft Statement of Intent; and

(3)   notes and receives the LGFA half year report to 30 December 2021, attached as Appendix 3 to the report.”

7.

Rates Remission on Māori Land Policy 2022 (22/752)

Report No. PFSC2022/2/72 by the Policy Advisor

 

Under Standing Order 30.5, Ms Peggy Luke-Ngaheke, a representative of Te Rūnanganui o te Āti Awa was in attendance for the item.

The Acting Head of Strategy and Planning elaborated on the report. She noted Kaitiaki of Māori Freehold Land and Mana Whenua partners had given positive feedback on the proposed Rates Remission on Māori Plan policy (the policy). She advised the Department of Internal Affairs had advised that a rating unit must not be treated as being ‘in use’ solely because the owner was a participant under the Climate Change Response Act in respect to an activity related to the rating unit.

In response to questions from members, the Business Analyst – Rates highlighted there could be opportunities for rates remissions after land was developed depending on the criteria and how the land was used. She advised officers had so far found only two instances of Māori land in Lower Hutt that was multi-owned but rated separately.

In response to a question from a member, the Acting Head of Strategy and Planning confirmed officers had found examples of Māori landowners who did not have opportunity to develop their land due to financial barriers.

Cr Milne joined the meeting at 2.19pm.

Ms Luke-Ngaheke expressed support for the recommendations. She said it represented a way for the Waiwhetū Marae to develop its land and keep the village around the marae intact.

 

Resolved: (UNANIMOUS) (Cr Edwards/Cr Brown)          Minute No. PFSC 22207

“That the Committee:

(1)   notes that under section 108 of the Local Government Act 2002 Council is required to have a policy on the remission and postponement of rates on Māori freehold land;

(2)   notes that The Local Government (Rating of Whenua Māori) Amendment Act 2021 imposes additional requirements on councils in relation to Māori freehold land;

(3)   notes officers recommendation to align the draft policy to Greater Wellington Regional Council, which extends rates remissions to include Māori land that is collectively owned;

(4)   agrees to consult on the proposed Rates Remission on Māori Land Policy (the policy) attached as Appendix 1 to the report, in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002; and

(5)   agrees that the Chief Executive be delegated authority to make minor changes to the proposed policy if required prior to consultation.”

For the reasons that the proposed policy reflects the legislative requirements under The Local Government (Rating of Whenua Māori) Amendment Act 2021, the views of our Mana Whenua partners, kaitiaki of Māori freehold land and aligns with Greater Wellington Regional Council’s proposed policy to ensure consistency across Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai.  The proposed policy reflects the intent of the legislation and uses the opportunity provided by the new legislation to support our Māori whanau by removing barriers that may stand in the way of them achieving their ambitions for their whenua.

8.       Information Item

Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee Forward Programme 2022 (22/863)

Report No. PFSC2022/2/71 by the Democracy Advisor

Speaking under public comment, Mr Frank Vickers expressed concern there was no draft Cat Bylaw (bylaw) in the Committee’s Forward Programme. He noted that, although Council had passed a resolution in July 2020 to develop a bylaw, there was little time to ratify the bylaw in this triennium.  He acknowledged Council’s resource constraints but considered that a few paragraphs could simply be added to the existing Animal Bylaw. He highlighted that Palmerston North City Council needed only 28 person hours to manage its bylaw in the 2019/20 year. He added the work of managing cats could be mostly taken care of by volunteer organisations.

 

In response to questions from members, Mr Vickers did not consider government was likely to enact national legislation to control cats if local authorities did not first act to control them.

 

In response to questions from members, the Director Strategy and Engagement said Council was currently experiencing resourcing issues and he expected this could continue into the coming year. He added it was looking at using the Local Government New Zealand remit process to encourage action on cats at a government level. He agreed to seek advice on whether a Council Committee in the new triennium could be required to progress the investigation of a bylaw or whether the recommendations made in July 2020 would lapse. He further agreed to seek advice on whether the resource costs that Council was trying to meet to develop the bylaw could be reported to the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Committee and whether the matter could be considered as part of the Annual Plan 2022/23.

Resolved: (Cr Edwards/Cr Barratt)                            Minute No. PFSC 22208

“That the Committee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the report.”

9.       QUESTIONS

There were no questions.

10.

Closing formalities - Karakia Whakamutunga

Unuhia!

Unuhia!

Unuhia i te uru-tapu-nui

Kia wātea, kia māmā

Te ngākau, te tinana, te wairua i te ara takatū

Koia rā e Rongo whakairihia ake ki runga

Kia wātea, kia wātea!

Ae rā, kua wātea!

Hau, pai mārire.

Release us from the supreme sacredness of our tasks

To be clear and free
in heart, body and soul in our continuing journey

Oh Rongo, raise these words up high

so that we be cleansed and be free,

Yes indeed, we are free!

Good and peaceful

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 3.25 pm.

 

S Edwards

CHAIR

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record   Dated this 24th day of May 2022

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Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Statement of Proposal to review the Hutt City Council Water Supply Bylaw 2022

 







Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Summary of Proposal to review the Hutt City Council Water Supply Bylaw 2022

 



Attachment 3

Appendix 3: Water Supply Bylaw Review 2022

 












Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Report of the Independent Hearing Panel

 






















































MEMORANDUM                                                  1                                                             24 May 2022

Hutt City Council

12 May 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1177)

 

 

 

 

Report no: HCC2022/2/37

 

Integrated Transport Strategy

 

 

 

 

1.    To seek Council’s approval of the Integrated Transport Strategy.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

(1)     notes that any future Hutt City Council plans developed to implement the Integrated Transport Strategy will not be inconsistent with the vision, objectives and outcomes of the Integrated Transport Strategy and other key strategies of Council, including (but not limited to) the Lower Hutt Climate Action Plan;

(2)     adopts the Integrated Transport Strategy attached as Appendix 1 to the report; and

(3)     authorises the Chief Executive to make any other minor amendments to the Integrated Transport Strategy.

 

2.    A report was presented to the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee on 3 May 2002 summarising the feedback after public consultation on the draft Integrated Transport Strategy (ITS).

 

3.    The Committee agreed to advise Council of its view of the ITS by way of amendments made at the meeting ahead of approval being sought at this meeting.

 

4.    The following feedback was received from the Committee:

·    Need to paint a picture of the magnitude of the change that is required.

·    Add to the vision statement: “and supports carbon zero emissions goal.” 

·    Changes to existing transport network should seek to ensure active travel modes are at least as attractive as travelling by private car.

·    Include a section explaining the context of the policy climate in which we operate, in particular governmental and regional policies, priorities and targets.

·    Climate change needs to be better highlighted throughout the document.

·    Need to reduce attractiveness of private car dependency.

·    Need to acknowledge the priorities of neighbouring local authorities to ensure we are not operating in isolation or against their efforts.

 

5.   Council officers have updated the ITS based on that feedback. The updated ITS is appended for Council’s approval.

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Integrated Transport Strategy

154

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 


Attachment 1

Integrated Transport Strategy

 

















































                                                                                       1                                                             24 May 2022

Hutt City Council

28 April 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1016)

 

 

 

 

Report no: HCC2022/2/90

 

Restrictions installed under Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is for Council to consider the parking restrictions installed under Part 6.9 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.

Recommendations

That it recommends that Council:

(1)   approves the installation of a No Stopping, At All Times restriction (5.25 metres) across the vehicle accesses (driveway) serving property number 451 Jackson Street, Petone, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 1 to this report;

(2)   approves the installation of a No Stopping, At All Times restrictions (6 metres) across the vehicle access (driveway) serving property number 3 Frederick Street, Wainuiomata, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 2 to this report;

(3)   rescinds any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they conflict with the traffic controls described in this resolution;

For the reason that the parking restrictions referred to reinforce current restrictions listed within the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004, and Part 13 (Parking Control) of the Traffic Control Devices Manual and the Land Transport (Traffic Control Devices) Rule 2004. 

 

Background

2.    The Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004 provides guidance with regards sections of road where parking is restricted. Part 6.9 of the Rule refers to the obstruction of vehicle entrances and exits as follows;
(1) A driver or person in charge of a vehicle must not stop, stand, or park the vehicle so as to obstruct entry to or exit from any driveway.

3.    A driveway, for the purpose of the Rule is defined as follows:

4.    The Land Transport (Traffic Control Devices) Rule 2004 describes the requirements for the design, construction, installation, operation and maintenance of traffic control devices. It sets out and details the responsibilities of Road Controlling Authority (Council). As in the provision of traffic control devices. Councils must follow the requirements as described in the TCD Rule. In particular, sub-clause 13.1 (1) states ‘a road controlling authority must comply with this rule when providing, installing, modifying or maintaining a traffic control device’.

5.    As indicated in section 3.2 of the Road User Rule, there are a number of locations and situations where the stopping, standing or parking of a vehicle is contrary to the Rule. Certain situations need not be specifically signed or marked unless the Council considers it appropriate to do so or has determined parking may occur and has signed or marked this exception.

a.   Driveways
Drivers must not stop, stand or park their vehicles so that they obstruct driveways. Obstruction is defined as a vehicle being parked within 1 m of the side of the driveway (Road User Rule, clause 6.9). The TCD Rule does not require Councils to mark or sign such locations and, in general, it is recommended they are not marked. However, the Council may consider installing markings where there is high parking demand, Poor parking practices, or where sight visibility is an issue.

Discussion

6.    Obstructing vehicle entrances and exits (Part 6.9 Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004)

a.    in front of, or closer than 1 metre to, a vehicle entrance

7.    Council Officers routinely receive numerous safety and accessibility concerns from residents.

8.    Due to safety concerns, these two locations are being brought directly to Council for consideration, instead of the usual process of going via the Traffic Committee.

9.    Council Officers are looking to promote safer movement through improved manoeuvrability, visibility, and accessibility.

Options

10.  Council’s approval of these traffic resolutions will negate any confusion that may occur when enforcing offences committed.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

11.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

12.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.  

Consultation

13.  As the restrictions contained within this report are reinforcing requirements made under Part 6.9 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004, consultation was undertaken with the affected property owners only.

Legal Considerations

14.  These restrictions are made pursuant to the provisions of the Part 6.9 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.

Financial Considerations

15.  These changes can be funded from Council’s existing 2021/22 transport budgets

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Apendix - 1 - 451 Jackson Street

205

2

Apendix - 2 - 3 Frederick St

206

    

 

 

 

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Apendix - 1 - 451 Jackson Street

 


Attachment 2

Apendix - 2 - 3 Frederick St

 


                                                                                       1                                                             24 May 2022

Hutt City Council

09 May 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1126)

 

 

 

 

Report no: HCC2022/2/91

 

Council performance overview for third quarter ending 31 March 2022

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The report provides an overview of the Hutt City Council performance results for the period 1 July 2021 to 31 March 2022.

Recommendations

That Council notes and receives the report.

 

Background

2.    The performance results presented in this report are for Hutt City Council – the parent entity and not the consolidated group. These are unaudited results for the third quarter ended 31 March 2022. An external audit by Audit New Zealand will be completed at the end of the financial year.

3.    The performance overview results are provided to the Policy Finance and Strategy Committee on a quarterly basis.

Discussion

Key Achievements

4.    Key achievements and considerable progress towards deliverables throughout Quarter 3 include:

(a)   The development of the Draft Annual Plan 2022/2023 to advance the priorities and projects set out in the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031.

(b)   Future for Local Government Review Panel (FFLG) virtual meeting was held as part of a national roadshow with council and Mana Whenua presenting. Positive feedback from the Panel members was received.

(c)   The Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway was launched in March 2022, Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai, entitled ‘Our race against time | Ka whati te tai, ka pao te tōrea!’. The target is to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

(d)   Preparatory work was completed on our application to the Government’s Infrastructure Acceleration Fund (IAF) which progressed to the final negotiation stage, taking us a step closer to addressing major infrastructure challenges in the city centre. In April 2022 we were notified that Hutt City Council is one of thirty-five proposals to progress to the final stage of the IAF process.

(e)   The Play in the Hutt initiative received the Outstanding Project award at the 2020/21 Recreation Aotearoa Awards. This is a partnership with Sport New Zealand and the local community.

(f)    Fraser Park was named ‘Ground of the Year’ at the recent Wellington Cricket Celebration of Cricket. This is a testament to the work of our Parks and Reserves team and sports field contractors – Mexteds Sports Turf.

(g)   We received notified that our entry to the 2022 LGNZ Excellence Awards for Te Awa Kairangi Kai Collective had been short listed. The Kai Collective is a community-led initiative which includes council Common Unity, Kokiri marae, Lower Hutt Foodbank, Salvation Army Lower Hutt, Stokes Valley Foodbank and Te Aroha Kai.

(h)   Mana Whenua hui, held virtually over the past few weeks, were well-attended.

(i)    Te Ao Māori Capability Programme launched with impressive sign up by staff for the first intake and a waiting list is in place for the next intake.

(j)    33% electric fleet was achieved in total this quarter, exceeding the target of 25%, continuing council’s contribution to Carbon Zero Reduction.

(k)   Health, Safety and Wellbeing initiatives implemented to improve employee support, including the Organisational Capability Framework.

(l)    Telephony Upgrade and Legal Compliance Monitoring projects are now completed.

Challenges

5.    There is also the need to highlight the challenges council is addressing. Pressures include:

(a)    20% of our permanent workforce contracted COVID-19 and there were 38 exposure events across our sites. Our public-facing services, particularly libraries, pools and hubs had the highest rate of staff absence. Contractors reported high levels of staff absence due to COVID-19 and this impacted delivery of our capital programme and some services.

(b)    Supplier and construction shortages are negatively impacting major projects.

 

(c)    Continual shortages of planners, building officers and development engineers nationwide resulting in resourcing challenges to keep up with increasing demands as noted in the Regulatory Matters Report to the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee on 3 May 2022.

(d)    An upswing in demand due to changes in the development contributions policy effective 1 July 2021, accompanied by staffing challenges that were exacerbated by COVID-19, has led to statutory deadlines in consenting not being met. 42% (total average) of non-notified resource consents were issued on time and 59% (total average) of building consents were issued on time across Quarter 3. Please see individual monthly results for the quarter in Appendix 2 to this report. An Improvement Board has been established to improve the performance against statutory timeframes and the associated business processes and practices.

(e)    The initially reported delays with Land Information Memorandums have now caught up and requests are now being processed within statutory timeframes.

(f)     Attached as Appendix 1 to this report is further detailed information on achievements, challenges, and an overview of performance for Quarter 3.

Finance Background – Annual Plans versus Revised Budget

6.    The Long Term Plan 2021-2031 was approved on 30 June 2021. The budgets included in the plan for 2021/22 were based on the latest financial information and estimates available at the time of preparation of the plan.

7.    A review of the year-end financial results for 2020/21 identified budget matters which had flow-on impacts for 2021/22. For example, the estimated timing of project expenditure budgeted in 2021/22 changed for a range of reasons and the value of expenditure actually incurred in 2020/21 differed to the previous forecast. Budget managers requested updates to the 2021/22 budget to include carryovers to reflect the timing differences and improve phasing of project budgets.

8.    A revised budget for 2021/22 was created to reflect the budget updates required to improve the accuracy of budgets and the associated reporting of variances. Similar to 2020/21, the focus of performance monitoring is on financial results compared to the revised budget, as this is the most meaningful from a performance perspective.

9.    Table 1 that follows, provides a summary view of the budget changes made to date, and includes decisions by the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee in September 2021 (refer PFS2021/4/197, report entitled ‘Budget Update 2021/22’) and by the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee on 16 December 2021 (refer LTPAP2021/5/290, report entitled ‘Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023 – Financial Aspects’) and 28 February 2022 (refer LTPAP2022/1/33, report entitled ‘Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023’), with the latest identified carryovers being presented to the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee on 18 May 2022.

 

Table 1: Changes captured by the revised budget

$Million

Net surplus 2021/22

Capital investment  2021/22

Annual Plan 2021/22

0.5

103.5

Surplus

Operating and capital project budgets and subsidies carried forward from 2020/21

(2.2)

5.6

Rephasing of budgets from 2021/22 to future financial years as approved at the LTP/AP Subcommittee meeting on 16 December 2021

3.3

(7.1)

Reclassify capital budget to operating to reflect the use of Software as a Service in Information Systems programme delivery

(0.3)

(0.3)

Revised Budget 2021/22 as at 31 Dec 2021

1.3

101.7

Surplus

Go Digital - Reclassify capital budget to operating to reflect the use of Software as a Service in Information Systems programme delivery

(3.3)

(3.3)

Increase Traffic budget to address storm damage and repair as approved in the LTP/AP Subcommittee meeting on 28 Feb 2022

(0.4)

0

Carry forward of budgets from 2021/22 to future financial years to 2022/23 as approved at the LTP/AP Subcommittee meeting on 28 Feb 2022

0.9

(4.9)

Further carry forward of budgets from 2021/22 to future financial years to 2022/23 pending approval at the LTP/AP Subcommittee meeting on 18 May 2022

1.3

(13.8)

Revised Budget 2021/22 as at 31 March 2022

(0.2)

Deficit

79.7

Financial Performance Results

10.  This section provides an overview of the financial performance results for the nine-month period ended 31 March 2022.

11.  Attached as Appendix 4 to the report is further detailed information. The financial performance results provide an indication on how Council performed against the revised budget, and the associated financial risks.

12.  The year-to-date (YTD) net operating financial result is $8.7M (45.1%) favourable to budget. The full year (FY) forecast is $2.3M (10.6%) unfavourable to budget mainly due to a loss of revenue due to the impacts of COVID-19 on services.

 


 

Table 2: Operating results

$Millions

YTD Actual

YTD Revised Budget

Variance

FY Forecast

FY Revised Budget

Variance

FY Annual Plan

Operating revenue

50.3

47.0

3.3

64.4

61.6

2.8

61.4

7.0%

4.5%

Operating expenditure

153.0

157.2

4.2

218.8

212.7

(6.1)

212.5

2.7%

-2.9%

Net operating deficit before rates income

(102.7)

(110.2)

7.5

(154.4)

(151.1)

(3.3)

(151.1)

6.8%

-2.2%

Rates income

130.7

129.5

1.2

130.5

129.5

1.0

129.5

0.9%

0.8%

Net operating surplus/ (deficit)

28.0

19.3

8.7

(23.9)

-21.6

(2.3)

(21.6)

45.1%

 -10.6%

Capital contributions

11.8

12.3

(0.5)

22.3

20.4

1.9

22.1

Net surplus/(deficit) before adjustments

39.8

31.6

8.2

(1.6)

(1.2)

(0.4)

0.5

Other non-operating adjustments

15.5

0.9

14.6

15.6

1.0

14.6

0

Net surplus/ (deficit)

55.3

32.5

22.8

14.0

(0.2)

14.2

0.5

 

13.  Operating revenue: The operating revenue for the year is forecast to be $2.8M favourable (4.5%) to the budget of $61.6M. This is largely due to higher landfill revenue of $0.8M, an increased allocation to operating subsidies from the Three Waters Stimulus Funding $3.4M and recoverable contractor fees in Regulatory Services $0.4M. This is offset by a loss of revenue due to closures and restrictions because of COVID-19 impacting parking infringement, pools and other community spaces $2M.

14.  Operating expenditure: The operating expenditure for the year is forecast to be $6.1M (2.9%) unfavourable to the budget of $212.7M. This is largely due to work related to the Three Waters Stimulus Funding $3.3M, increased interest expense $1M, higher resourcing costs in Regulatory Services $1M (partly recoverable) and increased operating and maintenance costs in Solid Waste of $0.8M.

15.  The year-do-date operating expenditure is currently $4.2M favourable to budget. This is largely due to COVID-19 restrictions, resulting in delays to programmed work and site closures, reducing operating spend. The year-end forecast is based on the expectation that much of the delayed work will be completed by the end of the financial year as programmes progress, with the budget for the remainder carried over to the 2022/23 and later financial years.

16.  Rates income: The rates income for the year of $130.5M is forecast to be $1M higher than budgeted mainly due to additional growth in the rating base, database maintenance updates and other minor variances.

17.  Capital contributions: These are forecast to be $1.9M greater than budgeted mainly due to forecast increases in financial contributions for Parks Reserves $3M as a result of increased development, offset by a reallocation of Three Waters Stimulus Funding to cover increased operating costs as a result of delays to capital projects $1.1M.

18.  Non-operating adjustments: Gains on the fair value of derivatives was $15.5M on 31 March 2021.  These are accounting (non-cash) adjustments related to fair value of the treasury derivatives portfolio and reflects the financial markets at the time.

Capital Investment

Table 3: Capital expenditure results

$Millions

YTD Actual

YTD Revised Budget

Variance

FY Forecast

FY Revised Budget

Variance

FY Annual Plan

Replacements

16.3

22.0

5.7

33.3

34.0

0.7

52.1

Improvements

20.8

25.6

4.8

43.0

43.3

0.3

48.1

Growth

0.7

0.8

0.1

1.2

2.4

1.2

3.3

Total

37.8

48.4

10.6

77.5

79.7

2.2

103.5

 

19.  Capital expenditure delivery to-date is $37.8M or 49% of the full programme forecast for the year of $77.5M. The capital delivery is forecast to be $2.2M underspent to revised budget, with $25.8M of 2021/22 capital budget carried over or rephased to the 2022/23 and future financial years. The majority of this is made up of capital projects in The Three Waters $11.2M, Open Parks and Spaces $9M and Transport $4M, with carryovers and project rephasing mainly as a result of delays due to availability and capacity constraints of contractors as well as internal resourcing constraints.

Treasury Compliance

20.  Council has been fully compliant with Financial Strategy borrowing limits.

Table 4:  Financial Strategy limits

Measures

Policy

Actual
31 Mar 2022

Compliant

Net external debt/total revenue

Maximum 250%

104%

Yes

Net interest on external debt/total revenue

Maximum 10%

2%

Yes

Net interest to annual rates income

Maximum 20%

2.9%

Yes

Liquidity ratio

Minimum 110%

122%

Yes

 

21.  Cost of funds of 2.8% over the period was achieved, which is 0.3% higher than budgeted, primarily due to market-driven changes.

22.  Interest costs are higher to date than budget by $0.9M, mainly due to slightly higher debt levels than budgeted and increased cost of funds due to market changes.

23.  Interest earned on cash holdings is slightly ahead of budget by $0.15M, primarily due to higher cash holdings and pre-funding activities for debt maturing in 2022.

24.  Attached as Appendix 5 to the report are details around Treasury Compliance.

Options

25.  Not applicable

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

26.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

27.  There are no climate change impacts or considerations arising from this report.

Consultation

28.  There are no consultation requirements arising from this report.

Legal Considerations

29.  There are legal implications to consider relating to ongoing failure to comply with statutory deadlines in consenting. Whilst 90% (total average) of Code of Compliance certificates were issued within statutory timeframes, only 59% (total average) of building consents and 42% (total average) of non- notified resource consents were issued in time across Quarter 3.

Financial Considerations

30.  See Appendix 3. There are no considerations in addition to those noted in the report.


 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Quarterly Performance 1 January 2022 to 31 March 2022

215

2

Appendix 2 - Non-financial KPI results for the nine month period to 31 March 2022

238

3

Appendix 3 - Financial performance results for the nine month period to 31 March 2022

245

4

Appendix 4 - Project performance overview for the period to 31 March 2022

254

5

Appendix 5 - Treasury Report for the period ended 31 March 2022

260

    

 

 

 

 

Author: Jenny Livschitz

Group Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

Author: Michelle Palmer

Head of Enterprise Portfolio Management Office

 

 

 

Author: Kelly Alkema

Chief People Officer

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jarred Griffiths

Director Strategy and Engagement

 

 

 

Approved By: Jo Miller

Chief Executive

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Quarterly Performance 1 January 2022 to 31 March 2022

 
























Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Non-financial KPI results for the nine month period to 31 March 2022

 








Attachment 3

Appendix 3 - Financial performance results for the nine month period to 31 March 2022

 










Attachment 4

Appendix 4 - Project performance overview for the period to 31 March 2022

 







Attachment 5

Appendix 5 - Treasury Report for the period ended 31 March 2022

 




 

Council minutes dated 23 March 2022

 



































 

Council minutes dated 4 April 2022

 



 

Hearings Subcommittee minutes dated 7 March 2022

 



























































1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Ratonga o Te Awa Kairangi|

Hutt Valley Services Committee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via audio visual link on

 Friday 11 March 2022 commencing at 9.30am

 

 

PRESENT: (via audio visual)

Cr J Briggs (Chair)

Cr H Newell, UHCC (Deputy Chair)

 

Cr B Dyer

Cr C Carson, UHCC

 

Cr S Rasheed

Mayor W Guppy, UHCC

 

Cr N Shaw

Cr P Lambert, UHCC

 

APOLOGIES:                   There were no apologies.

 

IN ATTENDANCE:          (via audio visual)
                                           Cr L Sutton, HCC (Alternate)
                                           Cr H Swales, UHCC (Alternate)
                                           Deputy Mayor T Lewis, HCC

                                        Cr S Edwards, HCC

                                        Cr A Mitchell, HCC

                                        Cr A McLeod, UHCC

                                        Cr T Ultra, UHCC

                                           Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director, Economy and Development, HCC

Mr B Hodgins, Strategic Advisor, , HCC

Mr J Scherzer, Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC

Mr G Swainson, Director Asset Management and Operations, UHCC

Ms K Thompson, Director, Finance, Risk and Digital Solutions, UHCC

Mr D Kerite, Head of Regulatory Services, HCC

Ms T Gibson, Alcohol Team Lead, HCC (part meeting)

Mr R Schouten, Waste Minimisation Officer, UHCC

Mr P Mans, Animal Services Manager, HCC

Mr S Sykes, Compliance Services Manager, UHCC

Ms K Glanville, Senior Democracy Advisor, HCC (part meeting)

Mr A Buchanan, Senior Governance Advisor, UHCC

Ms Toi Lealofi, Democracy Advisor, HCC

Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker, HCC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES - Karakia Timatanga     

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

2.       APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

There was no public comment.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

          There were no conflict of interest declarations.

5.       Minutes

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Lambert)                                       Minute No. HVSC 22101

 

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Hutt Valley Services Committee held on Friday, 26 November 2021, be confirmed as a true and correct record, subject to an amendment to item 11, Dog Control Update from Hutt City Council, the second paragraph should end ….. after the 2022 local body elections.”

  

 

6.

Wastewater Joint Venture Update:  3 November - 18 February 2022 (22/403)

Report No. HVSC2022/1/48 by the Wastewater Contracts Manager, Wellington Water Limited

 

The Strategic Advisor, HCC elaborated on the report.  He advised the non-compliance at the Seaview Wastewater Treatment Plant was still active.  He said Veolia was operating a spray system to try to remove the algae and assist in the ultraviolet lamp operation.  He noted the main outfall trunk pipe was leaking which had required the overflow to be discharged as repairs were undertaken. 

Mr Colin Crampton, Chief Executive of Wellington Water Limited (WWL) elaborated on the Veolia review.  He advised that Veolia had been selected as the successful contractor due to its extensive international practice and experience. He noted a number of issues had arisen in relation to compliance with the Resource Management Act (RMA) 1991 and a number of operational faults.  He advised the 17 August 2021 sludge blanket overflow incident that occurred at the Porirua Wastewater Treatment Plant had resulted in toxic material being discharged directly into the ocean.  He said WWL had then initiated an independent review of the contract. He advised the review was completed in late December 2021 which highlighted three main issues.  He said Veolia had not addressed all the conditions of the contract.  He noted WWL had not put in place all necessary contract management functions and that the relationship between the two parties had become strained. He advised that the WWL Board had now endorsed five recommendations to improve the current system.

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive of WWL advised the review was a whole-of-system review, including the operating model, the performance of both parties and the contract itself.  He advised that WWL staff had noted issues with Veolia’s performance after approximately one year and that the 17 August 2021 incident had escalated the situation.  He said it was proposed to provide monthly reports to both Hutt City and Upper Hutt City Councils to show progress with the delivery of the Implementation Plan (the plan).  He advised the Australasian Chief Executive of Veolia had now been engaged for direct input into operations and would provide regular reports to all WWL Board meetings.  He noted that the contract contained fines for non-compliance and that Veolia continued to not meet requirements or pay the fines. He noted WWL had instructed their staff to develop the plan incorporating the five recommendations.  He added the plan was near completion, with expected implementation from 1 April 2022. He advised an improved process to prevent any further blanket sludge overflows from occurring was in place, including installation of an alarm in the clarifiers.  He added it remained unclear what action Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) would take in relation to the August 2021 incident.  He advised that WWL and Veolia had recently appointed Programme Managers to oversee the operation of the contract and the plan.  He anticipated the plan would take six to nine months to address all of the recommendations.  He advised GWRC had requested that a GWRC officer be appointed to work with WWL and Veolia.

In response to questions from members, the Chief Advisor Service Delivery, WWL advised that Veolia was the world’s largest company in this field and employed international experts.  He advised options for moving forward had included cancelling the contract and using in-house resources. He highlighted that this could be costly as the economic climate had altered since the contract was awarded. He said it was also unknown if another company would have the capacity and expertise required. He agreed to report back on  any feedback received from Veolia’s other operational contracts in New Zealand. He added that monthly meetings were underway with officers from GWRC and that it was anticipated clarity concerning next steps would be achieved within the next few weeks. 

In response to a question from a member, the Strategic Advisor, HCC advised the emissions sources and relevant mitigation works were a separate work programme to the plan.

The Chair thanked WWL officers for the work to date and for instigating the review and responding to the recommendations. 

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Carson)                                            Minute No. HVSC 22102

“That the Committee notes the information in the report.”

 

7.

Update on Silverstream Landfill (22/23)

Report No. HVSC2022/1/40 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC

 

The Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC elaborated on the report.

In response to questions from members, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC noted there had been no meeting with the Residents Group in the timeframe of the report as they only met with them in six monthly intervals.  He said there had been two or three odour complaints received from the public.  He noted that the spike in the waste received at the landfill had been caused by commercial waste.  He also noted that kerbside recycling only contributed a small portion (6,000 tonnes) to the total amount of material received by the landfill (150,000 tonnes). He said that the change to weight-based charges for the landfill would be progressively introduced from 1 April 2022.  He advised items noted in orange in Appendix 2 to the report indicated that investigations and mitigations were occurring.  He noted this did not mean consent conditions had been breached.  He undertook to clarify reporting on this in the future.  He advised the Refuse Transfer Station and Resource Recovery Project was now in Phase 2 and it was expected to be completed by the end of March 2022.  He said that a new Transfer Station and Recovery Park could not be accommodated at the landfill due to capacity issues.  He said HCC officers had been impressed with a 2021 site visit to a purpose-built centre in Hamilton.  He advised he was unaware of discussions concerning a location for a second transfer station for Upper Hutt.  He advised that once the procurement process had progressed, he would update the Committee. He advised that regular testing and monitoring confirmed that the wastewater sludge deposited at the landfill had resulted in no impact on the alkalinity of the ground water.  He added that the landfill was fully lined and any material which entered the leachate system was collected through a pipe network and was transferred to the wastewater system. 

 

Cr Newell expressed disappointment that as the previous Chair of the Committee, she had not been invited to attend the site visit to the Hamilton Centre and that there was no report to the Committee on this visit.  The Chair explained that the visit had been organised by HCC officers as an opportunity to research options for HCC only.

 

Cr Carson expressed disappointment that more active dialogue had not occurred between officers of Hutt City and Upper Hutt City Councils regarding the issue.  He noted the Committee was a joint Hutt Valley entity.  He believed it was an important issue for both councils and their residents. 

 

MOVED:  (Cr Carson/Cr Lambert) 

 

“That the Committee supports future involvement of Upper Hutt City Council in the Transfer Station and Resource Recovery Park Request for Proposal process.”

 

The motion was declared LOST on the voices.

 

The Chair repeated a comment Mayor Guppy had made at an earlier Committee meeting, that if an entity participated in a process, it had to be prepared to contribute to the costs.  He cautioned members about committing UHCC to a financial cost they had no knowledge of.  Mayor Guppy added that a final decision could not be made until all financial implications had been presented to UHCC. 

 

The Chair requested the Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC ensured dialogue on the issue continued between officers from both councils.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Shaw)                                             Minute No. HVSC 22103

 

“That the Committee receives the report.”

8.

Akatarawa Cemetery Update (22/37)

Report No. HVSC2022/1/41 by the Parks and Reserves Manager, UHCC

 

The Director Asset Management and Operations, UHCC elaborated on the report.  He highlighted the $90,000 excavator had been purchased as there were no other available contractors. He advised that the operating costs of the cemetery were primarily funded through cost recovery measures and top-ups from UHCC with no input from HCC.  He noted that plans for the future development of the cemetery were underway with a steering group to be established consisting of officers from both councils.  He said the steering group would draft a brief and engage a design team to progress the project to tender stage.  He noted that HCC would contribute to the cos, with the primary contract for the work being held by UHCC. 

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Shaw)                                           Minute No. HVSC 22104

“That the Committee receives and notes the report.”

9.    Dog Control Update – HCC (22/174)

 

The Animal Services Manager, HCC elaborated on the report.

In response to questions from members, the Animal Services Manager, HCC advised officers were currently assessing the selection of electric utility and four-wheel drive vehicles.  He agreed to report back regarding the reasons for the increase in dog euthanasia numbers in October 2021.  He confirmed the boarding kennels were run as a commercial enterprise.  He advised the education programme that officers provided to schools was also offered to adults.

 

The Chair requested officers liaise with the Communications Team in developing a digital programme to support the education programme.  He extended an invitation to members to visit the Les Dalton Dog Park in Wainuiomata.  

 

Resolved(Cr Briggs/Cr Lambert)                                            Minute No. HVSC 22105

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the information.”

 

10.

Dog Control Update - UHCC (22/39)

Report No. HVSC2022/1/42 by the Compliance Services Manager, UHCC

 

The Compliance Services Manager, UHCC elaborated on the report.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Mayor Guppy)                                  Minute No. HVSC 22106

 

“That the report be received and noted.”

11.

Health Office Activities Update (22/289)

Report No. HVSC2022/1/43 by the Environmental Health Manager, HCC

 

The Head of Regulatory Services elaborated on the report.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Carson)                                         Minute No. HVSC 22107

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the information.”

12.

Hutt Valley Services Committee Forward Programme 2022 (22/551)

Report No. HVSC2022/1/50 by the Democracy Advisor

 

The Chair advised that the future of the Committee needed to be discussed prior to the local body elections in October 2022.  He requested members send their comments to himself and Cr Newell.  They would collate the feedback and present a report to the Committee to consider at the last meeting of the triennium.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Mayor Guppy)                                  Minute No. HVSC 22108

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.”

13.  REGIONAL JOINT SERVICES OPPORTUNITIES

       Cr Carson requested officers to investigate the possibility of joint participation in the development of a transfer station and resource recovery park in the Hutt Valley.  The Chair requested officers to report back on the matter with the possibility of a briefing if required. 

 

 14.    CLOSING FORMALITIES - Karakia WHAKAMUTUNGA

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 11.04am.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cr J Briggs

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 6th day of May 2022

 


1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

Komiti Ngā Wai Hangarua |Wellington Water Committee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom on

 Friday 18 March 2022 commencing at 10.00am

 

 

PRESENT:

Mayor C Barry (Chair) (HCC)

(via audio visual)

Mayor W Guppy (Deputy Chair) (UHCC)

 

Mayor A Baker (PCC)

 

Mayor A Beijen (SWDC)

 

Ms L Rauhina-August (Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika)

 

Cr S Rush (WCC)

 

Cr J van Lier (GWRC)

 

APOLOGIES:                  No  apologies.

 

NON-ATTENDANCE:   Ms M Pomare, Te Rūnunga o Toa Rangatira

 

IN ATTENDANCE:        

(via audio visual)              Deputy Mayor H Swales  (UHCC Alternate)

                                            Deputy Mayor G Emms (SWDC Alternate)

                                            Deputy Mayor T Lewis (HCC Alternate)

                                            Cr I Pannett (WCC Alternate) (part meeting)

Cr R Leggett (PCC Alternate) (part meeting)

Ms W Walker, Chief Executive, PCC

                                          Mr C Crampton, Chief Executive, WWL (part meeting)

Ms L Carroll, Chair WWL Board (part meeting)

Mr M Underhill, Director, WWL Board  (part meeting)

Mr D List, Project Director, Regional Water Reform, PCC (part meeting)

Mr M Ford, Group Manager Business Services/Chief Financial Officer, WWL (part meeting)

Ms T Haskell, Group Manager, Network Development and Delivery, WWL (part meeting)

Mr K Locke, Group Manager Customer Operations, WWL (part meeting)

Mr C Barker, Director, Regulatory Services, WWL (part meeting)

Mr M Hall, Manager Commercial, Business Improvement and Procurement, WWL  (part meeting)

Mr E Stitt, Chief Advisor Service Delivery, WWL (part meeting)

Mr F Clarke, Principal Advisor, Strategy, WWL(part meeting)

Ms S Watkins, Manager Business Planning and Performance Reporting, WWL

Mr L Davies, Governance Coordinator, WWL (part meeting)

Mr B Hodgins, Strategic Advisor, HCC (part meeting)

Ms K Stannard, Head of Democratic Services, HCC (part meeting)

Mrs A Doornebosch, Democracy Advisor, HCC  (part meeting)

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES - Karakia Timatanga     

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

2.       APOLOGIES

There were no apologies. 

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

There was no public comment.

 

4.        CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

 

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

 

5.

Chair's Statement

A written transcript of the Chair’s Statement is attached as pages 12 and 13 to the minutes.

6.       Minutes

Resolved: (Mayor Barry/Mayor Baker)                                  Minute No. WWC 22101

 

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Komiti Ngā Wai Hangarua | Wellington Water Committee held on Monday, 29 November 2021, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

 

7.

Water Reforms - Regional Update

Mr Dougal List, Project Director, Porirua City Council (PCC) presented slides on the Three Waters reforms attached as pages 14 and 15 to the minutes.  He noted useful feedback had been received from all councils. 

 

In response to questions from members, the Project Director, PCC said some iwi felt well informed and had good representation in the working group process.   He acknowledged that some iwi and hapū were feeling left out of the process and there was a mixed level of understanding regarding the reforms.  He advised the feedback had been passed on to the Department of Internal Affairs and a focus around iwi engagement moving forward would be addressed.

 

The Chief Executive, PCC advised a hui would be held later in March 2022 for iwi representatives on the Committee to be briefed and discuss future iwi engagement on water reforms.

 

           

  

8.

Wellington Water Limited - Company Update (22/307)

Report No. WWC2022/1/4 by Wellington Water Limited

 

The Board Chair, Wellington Water Limited (WWL) elaborated on the report.  She said the Board had concerns regarding the transition phase of the water reforms especially in relation to staff resourcing.   She noted the recent changes in isolation rules for COVID had reduced frontline staff absences from 30% to 12% and added WWL was managing urgent servicing.  She said the Board would shortly review its governance frameworks including the establishment of a People and Culture Subcommittee and an Annual Board Work Programme.  She noted the fatality at Omāroro Water Reservoir in March 2022 and advised Worksafe was now undertaking an investigation.  She noted that HEB Construction as the Person Conducting a Business (PCBU) would undertake an investigation and the draft report was expected by the end of March 2022.  She highlighted WWL was also responsible for ensuring its responsibilities were fulfilled.    She acknowledged WWL staff for providing support to the whānau and attending the tangi.  She expressed her deepest condolences to the family. 

In response to a question from a member, the Board Chair advised WWL staff would reach out to iwi representatives on the Committee if any incidents occurred at sites in the future.

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive, WWL said he would provide advice to members on the contamination vulnerabilities identified in the Asset Condition Assessments at the Omāroro Reservoir and what risks surrounded this. He said WWL staff would issue on behalf of the Committee, an enhanced version of the Wastewater Treatment Plant compliance and diagrams by the end of March 2022.  

In response to questions from members, the Principal Advisor, WWL said WWL staff had been advancing work on the business case for universal smart water meters.  He advised discussions were ongoing with the National Transition Unit and Greater Wellington Regional Council to ensure any further plans would have a life beyond the water reforms transition in 2024.   The Chief Executive, WWL advised these discussions would include how to address sustainable water supply risk and the balance between the provision of water meters and new water sources. 

Mayor Barry left the meeting at 10.49am.  Mayor Guppy chaired the meeting.

Mayor Barry rejoined the meeting at 10.52am and resumed the chair.

 

 

Resolved:  (Mayor Barry/Mayor Guppy)                              Minute No. WWC 22102

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the report.”

 

9.

Wellington Water Limited Half Yearly Report as at 31 December 2021 (22/308)

Report No. WWC2022/1/3 by Wellington Water Limited

 

The Board Chair of Wellington Water Limited elaborated on the report. 

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Mayor Baker)                               Minute No. WWC 22103

 

“That the Committee receives Wellington Water Limited’s Half-Year Report to 31 December 2021 attached as Appendix 1 to the report.”

 

10.

Wellington Water Limited 2021/22 Capital Works Programme (22/309)

Report No. WWC2022/1/52 by Wellington Water Limited

 

The Group Manager, Network Development and Delivery, Wellington Water Limited (WWL) elaborated on the report.  She noted the biggest risk realised in the month since writing the report was COVID.  She said this would impact the capital programme for March 2022.  She noted WWL staff would reassess the delivery programme for the rest of the year and what impact these delays would have on years two and three.  She advised a draft Long Term Plan (LTP) programme had been distributed to WWL panels for review and staff were working through the design and plan phases.  She said this would ensure the LTP endured the water reforms process.  She said once complete WWL staff would meet with client councils to plan work programmes for each council.

 

 

Resolved: (Mayor Barry/Mayor Guppy)                             Minute No. WWC 22104

 

“That the Committee notes the report.”

 

11.

Wellington Water Limited - Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Contract Review (22/310)

Report No. WWC2022/1/5 by Wellington Water Limited

 

The Chief Executive, Wellington Water Limited (WWL) elaborated on the report.

 

Mayor Baker noted the review of the Porirua Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) had gone well and thanked WWL staff for the work completed to date.

 

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive, WWL noted the implementation plan was scheduled for delivery.  He said this would be submitted to the Steering Group and then the Board of WWL.  He said it was then expected to be circulated to Councils and Committee members in April 2022.   He noted WWL had appointed a new Contract Manager and new Programme Manager for overseeing this implementation.  He said the reason WWL chose Veolia as an international supplier was to encourage new ideas but noted this was lacking in the review’s findings.  He advised part of the implementation plan was to secure a programme to show how to bring those ideas and international expertise to the table.  He noted WWL had provided updates to various councils, and the response to this had been positive. He said the independent reviewers would assess the implementation after six months.  He highlighted New Zealand’s restricted labour market limited opportunity to secure other suppliers in New Zealand but there were credible international suppliers.  He advised that the review concluded that WWL should proceed with the contract as it stood.  He noted the CEO of Veolia Australasia now attended every Board meeting and there was a good line of communication between New Zealand and the rest of Australasia.  He said he would report back to Ms Rauhina-August on who provided the wording for the Future State as noted on page 15 of the Independent Review Report. He said officers would provide an update on costs to oversee the implementation of the review findings at the next Committee meeting.

Ms Rauhina-August left the meeting at 11.08am and rejoined the meeting at 11.10am.

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr van Lier)                                    Minute No. WWC 22105

 

“That the Committee:

(1)   receives the Wastewater Treatment Plant Review, ‘the Review’ attached as Appendix 1 to the report;

  

(2)   notes the implementation plan which addresses all recommendations contained within the Review will be completed on 23 March 2022; 

 

(3)   notes the Wellington Water Committee will receive a summary of the implementation plan once it is endorsed by the Steering Group.”

 

12.

Wellington Water Limited - Drinking Water Regulation Update (22/448)

Report No. WWC2022/1/6 by Wellington Water Limited

 

The Director, Regulatory Services, Wellington Water Limited (WWL) elaborated on the report.   He highlighted the responsibility of WWL to engage with councils in drafting a Source Water Risk Management Plan, which was a new requirement from Taumata Arowai. He advised during this process, WWL had taken on board feedback from Mana Whenua and would seek further feedback from iwi and councils.  He highlighted Taumata Arowai’s expectation that WWL would provide drinking water safety plans by November 2022.  He noted by the beginning of 2023 WWL would have reporting templates complete and would be able to share these with the WWL Board and Committee.

 

In response to questions from members, the Director, Regulatory Services, WWL said the Source Water Risk Management Plans would be developed by July 2022.  He noted a water safety plan had been finalised for Wellington and WWL staff were currently drafting a plan for South Wairarapa.   He said he would distribute the Mana Whenua Whaitua Implementation Plan to members.

 

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Mayor Baker)                             Minute No. WWC 22106

 

“That the Committee:

(1)   receives the Regulation Update; and

(2)   notes the enclosed briefing pack.”

 

13.

Wellington Water Limited - Six Monthly Value for Money Report (22/311)

Report No. WWC2022/1/7 by Wellington Water Limited

 

The Chief Executive, Wellington Water Limited (WWL) elaborated on the report.  

 

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive, WWL advised staff would provide future updates on the metrics inside the contractor and consultant panels and how WWL constructed value for money across the panels.  He said WWL staff would also provide an update on the Value for Money process for extending consultant and contractor panel agreements at the next Committee meeting.  

 

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Mayor Guppy)                              Minute No. WWC 22107

 

“That the Committee receives the Six-Monthly Value for Money report attached as Appendix 1 to the report.”

 

14.

Wellington Water Limited - Draft Statement of Intent 2022-25 (22/312)

Report No. WWC2022/1/8 by Wellington Water Limited

 

The Board Chair, Wellington Water Limited (WWL) elaborated on the report.   She said over the remaining two years of operation the focus would be on delivery for WWL owners.  She highlighted WWL would also focus on staff retention including requests for assistance from the National Transition Unit.  She noted WWL wanted a clear intent to focus on the delivery of the Waste Water Treatment Plant, network services and steadily build the CAPEX programme.  She highlighted the need to form strong working relationships with partners and the NTU to ensure the company provided a seamless transition for customers across to the new Entity C structure in two years’ time.

 

The Chair asked for a clear outline of the reporting process for the Statement of Intent and how councils could provide feedback on this process.

 

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr van Lier)                                Minute No. WWC 22108

 

“That the Committee:

(1)   receives Wellington Water Limited’s draft Statement of Intent 2022-25 attached as Appendix 1 to the report; 

 

(2)   provides combined shareholder feedback on Wellington Water Limited’s draft Statement of Intent by Monday, 2 May 2022; 

 

(3)   endorses the outlined approach to finalise Wellington Water Limited’s Statement of Intent 2022-25 to allow for alignment with council annual plan decision-making; and 

 

(4)   agrees to provide Wellington Water Limited with a one-month extension in accordance with Schedule 8, Part 1, Clause 4 of the Local Government Act 2002 to deliver the final Statement of Intent 2022-25 to the Committee by 31 July 2022.”

 

15.     FLUORIDATION OF DRINKING WATER

The Director, Regulatory Services, Wellington Water Limited (WWL) presented slides attached as pages 16 and 17 to the minutes.  He noted WWL had four fluoridation plants located at Waterloo, Wainuiomata, Gear Island and Te Mārua.  He said the Waterloo plant was dosing and had good reliability.  He highlighted the Waterloo plant produced more water than it was capable of fluoridating, so some of that water was diverted to the Gear Island plant to be fluoridated.  He said the Wainuiomata plant was dosing with fluoride and the equipment was operable and reliable.  He said this plant’s reliability could be enhanced so WWL would consider a control system to optimise its operation.  He advised the Gear Island plant was not dosing and the plant was not reliable.  He said the fluoridation room had some structural issues and WWL had requested engineers to assess this.  He noted in the short term WWL would ensure the fluoridation room was safe and commence repairs to the fluoridation system or consider an external containerised solution. He said over the medium term an option could be to close the Gear Island plant and extend the Waterloo plant capacity. 

He noted it was possible to add extra fluoridation capacity into the Waterloo plant, but this would mean water supplied to Petone and Korokoro would also be fluoridated where historically they had been provided with unfluoridated water.  He noted the Te Mārua plant provided all the water supply for Petone and most of Wellington city.  He said there were some concerns with the reliablity of this plant and the baffle curtain which controlled the flow of water and blended the fluoridated water. He said divers were going to assess the baffle curtain and prepare the fluoride plant to dose again.  He noted this plant was historically unreliable. He advised WWL had ordered a new baffle curtain as a long term replacement.  He said if the curtain was repairable WWL officers were confident the fluoridation plant would be operating again within a month.

In response to questions from members, the Director, Regulatory Services, WWL advised that at no point had there been any concern or risk to the health or the quality of the drinking water supplied. He said that when the plants had malfunctioned this had always been identified and remedied before reaching the consumer.  He confirmed the water supply to Porirua was sourced at the Te Mārua Treatment Plant. He said Regional Public Health had released advice to consumers and this was available on its website.

The Chief Executive, WWL noted WWL had been in contact with the Ministry of Health who had asked WWL to keep Taumata Arowai informed regarding the fluoride issue. He advised Greater Wellington Regional Council had agreed to receive funding requests for short term operational costs and medium to long term CAPEX costs.  He noted the Chief Advisor Service Delivery, WWL would be the Project Lead and WWL would create a programme of work which would be monitored. He agreed to provide a status document and a high level plan to members going forward. 

In response to questions from members, the Chief Executive, WWL advised he would circulate the implementation plan to members once it was available.  He noted WWL had been in contact with the District Health Boards and Regional Public Health.   He said WWL staff would provide a regulatory check of all requirements for the supply of drinking water.  He noted this would also be consolidated into the inquiry.  

The Chair acknowledged the support being provided by Greater Wellington Regional Council funding to resolve these issues.

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr van Lier)                                        Minute No. WWC 22109

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the update on Fluoridation of Drinking Water.”

 


 

 

16.     Information Item

Wellington Water Committee Forward Programme 2022 (22/474)

Memorandum dated 24 February 2022 by the Democracy Advisor

The Chair noted the programme would be updated for the next meeting, including an update on the independent inquiry into fluoride in drinking water supplies.

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Mayor Baker)                    Minute No. WWC 22110

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.”

 

 

17.     EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

Resolved:  (Mayor Barry/Cr van Lier)                                       Minute No. WWC 22111

“That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely:

18.   Appointment of Directors to Wellington Water Limited (22/285)

        The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

 

(A)

(B)

(C)

 

 

 

General subject of the matter to be considered.

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter.

Ground under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution.

 

 

 

Appointment of Directors to Wellington Water Limited.

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons. (s7(2)(a)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as specified in Column (B) above.”

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the public portion of the meeting closed at 12.08pm.  The non public portion of the meeting closed at 1.05pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mayor C Barry

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 27th day of May 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chair’s Statement

 

Wellington Water Committee 18 March 2022

 

Kia ora everyone, before we begin I would like to give a brief statement. 

 

Overview of fluoride situation 

 

I would like to provide a brief overview of where we are at with the Gear Island and Te Marua fluoride facilities. 

 

Firstly, I want to make it very clear that our drinking water is safe and poses no public health risk according to health experts. 

 

However, we as a committee are very disappointed to hear that fluoridation at these facilities was stopped, and that the closing of these facilities were not reported accurately to the board or the committee. 

 

The Water Committee fully supports the Board’s decision to review what has happened by appointing an independent investigation on the matter. I’m pleased to say that Doug Martin will take up the investigation, which will likely take 8 weeks to complete. 

 

Ultimately, we need to find accountability so that we can resolve this issue, and ensure transparency is maintained at Wellington Water. 

 

Infrastructure skills centre


Moving on, I’m really pleased to see Wellington Water drive their infrastructure skills centre – a six week course for youth which provides them the foundational skills, capabilities and knowledge to establish a meaningful career in the water industry.

 

We know in this region that a budget line alone doesn’t deliver results, and we need the workforce to back it up. 


Unfortunately, having contracted COVID-19 this week, I was unable to go out and visit the team. However, I’m looking forward to visiting them soon, and meeting the young people who will help us front up to the challenges we face within our three water networks.

 

Barber grove wastewater sod turning

 

I want to congratulate the team on the sod turning for the Barber Grove to Seaview wastewater treatment plant pipe duplication project. 

 

This is a project that has been years in the making, and is critical to the Hutt Valley’s wastewater infrastructure. 

 

When completed, the duplicated pipe will service 90% of the Hutt Valley’s wastewater (150,000 residents) and reduce the risk of wastewater entering Te Awa Kairangi and the Waiwhetu stream in an earthquake. 

 

 

General shout out to WW workers 

 

I also want to give a massive shoutout to everyone at Wellington Water who have been working hard to keep up with demand while teams have been impacted by COVID-19. 

 

I know this has resulted in some jobs taking a bit longer to complete with less workers on the ground, so thank you to our communities across the region for their understanding and patience. 

 

Acknowledgement of passing employing 

 

Finally I want to acknowledge the tragic event that happened at Omāroro Reservoir earlier this month. Sadly a worker on site passed away after an accident on site. 

 

On behalf of the committee, I want to share my sincere condolences to the family and all those who worked with him.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1

 

TE KAUNIHERA O TE AWA KAIRANGI | HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Iti Mahere ā-Ngahurutanga / Mahere ā-Tau

Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom

 on

 Monday 4 April 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Mayor C Barry (Chair)

Deputy Mayor T Lewis (Deputy Chair)

(via audio-visual link)

Cr J Briggs

Cr K Brown

 

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

 

Cr D Hislop

Cr C Milne

 

Cr A Mitchell

Cr S Rasheed

 

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

APOLOGIES:                  Cr Barratt

 

IN ATTENDANCE:        Ms J Miller, Chief Executive

(via audio-visual link)      Ms A Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

Mr J Griffiths, Director Strategy and Engagement

Ms H Oram, Director Environment and Sustainability

Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development

Mr B Cato, Chief Legal Officer (part meeting)

Mr D Koenders, Acting Group Chief Financial Officer

Mr H Singh, Advisor Strategic Planning and Business

Mr J Kingsbury, Head of Transport

Ms K Waldegrave, Acting Head of Strategy and Planning

Ms A Dowdle, Senior Communications Advisor

Ms K Stannard, Head of Democratic Services

Ms T Lealofi, Democracy Advisor

Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES - Karakia Timatanga     

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

 

 

2.       APOLOGIES

 Resolved(Mayor Barry/Cr Briggs)                                   Minute No. LTPAP 22201

“That the apology received from Cr G Barratt be accepted and leave of absence be granted.”

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS   

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

5.       Recommendations to te kaunihera o te awa kairangi | Council - 4 April 2022

Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023 (22/567)

Speaking under public comment, Mr Matt Young spoke on the Beltway southern section.  He expressed confusion over the status of the section, citing documents which stated the section was either fully funded or had no funding, however was supported.  He explained the section would provide an important link for Wainuiomata and Waiwhetu residents to the rest of the valley and also for those employed in the Seaview and Gracefield suburbs.  He asked the following questions:  when did officers envision phasing/completion of the southern section?; how much was the southern section projected to cost?; are there interim options that could be explored similar to Wellington City?

Mayor Barry urged Mr Young to formerly provide feedback through the Annual Plan engagement process.  He asked officers to respond to Mr Young’s questions and to include members in the response.

The Acting Group Chief Financial Officer elaborated on the report.  He confirmed that the Annual Plan direction was in line with Council’s previous resolutions.  He advised there were no significant changes proposed and that regular updates had been provided to Council over the past four months.

The Director Strategy and Engagement advised that the adopted ‘light touch’ digital engagement process had been prepared which aligned with the Long Term Plan approach.  He noted the documentation had been designed using an ‘information design’ approach.  He added this digital format would be supplemented with a short, printed document which would be delivered to all letterboxes (independent of the rates’ notices) and would be available in libraries and other community facilities.  He further added the printed document would contain information explaining how to access the digital survey.  He advised officers had also specifically engaged with the business sector which included meetings with Hutt Valley Chamber of Commerce and other business groups.

In response to questions from members, the Acting Group Chief Financial Officer explained that the Long Term Plan was a three year document with years two and three being supplemented with an Annual Plan.  He agreed that it was coincidental  that inflation this year was the same figure as the proposed rates increase.  He reiterated the Annual Plan and engagement documentation had been developed based on Council’s resolutions providing direction since November 2021.  He confirmed that the revaluation figure for Queensgate was not finalised.  He highlighted that once the figure was finalised, it would be included in the Annual Plan calculation with any changes required being reflected in the Central Commercial Business rates only. 

In response to questions from a member, the Acting Group Chief Financial Officer advised the savings made in the budgets related to savings made in the 2021/2022 financial year.  He stated that savings were on-going throughout the life of the Long Term Plan.

In response to a question from a member, the Chief Executive explained that the organisation was managing the savings in the operations areas and that regular reporting would occur if situations changed.

In response to a question from a member, the Director Economy and Development advised the southern section of the Beltway Project would be included in the wider cycling programme.

In response to a question from a member, the Acting Group Chief Financial Officer clarified when the terms ‘user charges ‘and ‘targeted rates’ were to be used.

Members discussed the proposed engagement content and questions for public engagement.

Members agreed that proposed question two in the engagement document be removed and proposed question three be altered to read  ‘is there anything you would like to share about the priorities or projects or expenditure we are planning to progress in the coming year?’

In response to questions from members, the Director Strategy and Engagement advised that no significant departures from the Long Term Plan were being planned and that the proposed questions being asked reflected the scope of influence.  He noted the questions represented a “check-in point” for the relevance of the Long Term Plan.

The Chief Executive advised that if a departure from the Long Term Plan was planned then a completely different set of procedures would then be required.  She highlighted the change could result in Council not setting the rates before the legal date. 

MOVED:  (Mayor Barry/Cr Briggs)

“That the Subcommittee recommends that Council:

(1)     receives the information;

(2)     notes the high level plan as outlined in Table 1 contained with the report and that the light engagement is planned for the period 12 April to 3 May 2022;

(3)     notes that officers found cost savings or re-prioritised within the base budget to balance rising costs and to retain the rates revenue increases as projected in the Long Term Plan 2021-2031;

(4)     approves the Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023, as attached in Appendix 1 to the report;

(5)     approves the engagement content attached in Appendix 2 and engagement questions including amendments made at the meeting attached in Appendix 3 to the report for public engagement between 12 April and 3 May 2022; and

(6)     agrees that the Chief Executive be delegated authority to make minor editorial changes to the Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023 documents ahead of these being published for public engagement.

In response to a question from a member, the Chief Executive confirmed the current engagement document reflected previous Council resolutions.

In response to a question from a member, the Director Strategy and Engagement confirmed additional wording within the document may be added to clarify exactly how projects were being funded.  He highlighted for example, the $23M of government funding received for the Naenae Pool project.

AMENDMENT MOVED: (Cr Rasheed/Cr Milne) 

“That in light of the severe Covid-19 related stress on local businesses, that the change in rates differential be frozen for 12 months.”

In response to a question from a member, the Chief Executive advised that the actions required from the proposed amendment would be a significant document revision.  She added freezing the rates differential for a year would have consequences on the rates amount, thereby significantly affecting the budget and Annual Plan.  She added that this would then require an amendment to the Long Term Plan and a more formal consultation process.

The meeting adjourned at 2.55pm and reconvened at 3.15pm.

In response to a question from a member, the Chief Executive advised that legal advice had been received confirming that the passing of the amendment could result in the undoing of a number of previous Council resolutions.  She highlighted that this would represent a significant issue and a departure from the Long Term Plan.  She confirmed that once the engagement period was completed, analysis of the feedback received may result in additional actions being required depending on the feedback.

In response to a question from a member, the Chief Legal Officer advised that the amendment would be a highly risky course of action for Council.  He advised that the Local Government Act allowed for a light touch engagement process where no significant changes to the Long Term Plan were proposed.  He stated that form of engagement could not signal a significant departure from the Long Term Plan.

In response to a question from a member, the Director Strategy and Engagement confirmed a rates differential freeze was put in place in the 2017/2018 financial year through a full consultation process. 

Mayor Barry asked the mover of the amendment whether she wished to withdraw her amendment in light of the information provided by the Chief Executive and Chief Legal Officer.  Cr Rasheed advised that she did not wish to withdraw her amendment.

Mayor Barry expressed concern that the amendment did not comply with the responsibilities of being good governors or of good governance.

Cr Dyer expressed concern with the amendment as it would involve a complete revision of the engagement document.

Cr Brown expressed concern that the amendment may be against the law.  She noted that while businesses had received some financial assistance from the government during the Covid-19 situation, residents had not.  She stated there were residents facing hardship as a result of the Covid-19 situation. 

Cr Milne expressed support for the amendment.  He stated circumstances had changed since the Long Term Plan was adopted by Council.  He believed it needed to be reflected in Council actions to support the local business community.

Cr Rasheed, as mover of the amendment, stated it would result in a fairer ratings system.  She added the business sector greatly contributed to the community and that Council needed to show its support for businesses. 

Cr Mitchell expressed concern with the amendment.  He stated decisions had already been made by Council leading up to the formation of the engagement document.  He also stated he would support targeted relief for struggling businesses, as he was aware of some businesses that had thrived during the Covid-19 situation.  He requested the latest economic data be provided, as the 31 December 2021 data showed the GDP for the city had grown at its fastest rate for a number of years.

Crs Briggs and Edwards expressed support for the comments made by Crs Dyer, Brown and Mitchell.  Cr Edwards added that the rates differential split reflected approximately where Council’s costs laid.  He was mindful of the upcoming revaluations which may impact on the rates intake in the future.

Cr Hislop expressed concern with the amendment.  She added that if the residential rates were increased, this would have an unintended consequence on the disposable income of many residents who would then not be able to spend money with the businesses who were struggling.

In response to a question from a member, the Chief Executive advised that the implications of changing the rates differential as a result of feedback received in the engagement process would be considered by Council at its meeting to be held on
18 May 2022.

The amendment was declared LOST on a show of hands with two in favour and 10 against.

With the agreement of the seconder, Mayor Barry advised of an amendment to his original motion to reflect that Council direct officers to provide further advice on a package of targeted initiatives to provide support to the hospitality business sector and other business sectors significantly impacted by Covid-19 and report back to Council on 18 May 2022.

Mayor Barry stated that in the current times of uncertainty, it was important that Council provided certainty.  He believed that central government was best placed to provide overall support for the business community and that local government could provide targeted support measures.

Cr Briggs expressed enthusiasm for the forthcoming digital engagement process.

Cr Milne expressed concern with the amendment to the original motion as there was no definition as to what a ‘hospitality business’ was.  He believed it would be an impossible task for officers to identify which businesses were in most need of targeted assistance. 

Cr Mitchell suggested targeted relief could be provided based on completion of an application form.  He expressed support for the proposed additional motion. 

In his right of reply, Mayor Barry believed officers could identify businesses most in need of assistance.  He noted that no new funds were being allocated, with any assistance being provided from within existing budgets. 

Cr Dyer requested the motion be taken in parts.  He declared a conflict of interest in relation to part (7) below and took no part in voting.

The motion was taken in parts.  Parts (1)-(6) were declared CARRIED by Division.  Part (7) was declared CARRIED by Division.

Recommended: (By Division) (Mayor Barry/Cr Briggs) Minute No. LTPAP 22202

That the Subcommittee recommends that Council:

(1)     receives the information;

(2)     notes the high level plan as outlined in Table 1 contained with the report and that the light engagement is planned for the period 12 April to 3 May 2022;

(3)     notes that officers found cost savings or re-prioritised within the base budget to balance rising costs and to retain the rates revenue increases as projected in the Long Term Plan 2021-2031;

(4)     approves the Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023, as attached in Appendix 1 to the report;

(5)     approves the engagement content attached in Appendix 2 and engagement questions including amendments made at the meeting attached in Appendix 3 to the report for public engagement between 12 April and 3 May 2022;

(6)     agrees that the Chief Executive be delegated authority to make minor editorial changes to the Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023 documents ahead of these being published for public engagement.”

For

 

Mayor Barry

Deputy Mayor Lewis

Cr Briggs

Cr Brown

Cr Dyer

Cr Edwards

Cr Hislop

Cr Mitchell

Cr Shaw

Against

 

Cr Milne

Cr Rasheed

Cr Sutton

Total: 9

Total: 3

ReCOMMENDED: (By Division)(Mayor Barry/Cr Briggs)    Minute No. LTPAP 22203

“That the Subcommittee recommends that Council directs officers to provide further advice on a package of targeted initiatives to support hospitality businesses and other sectors significantly affected by COVID 19 and report back to the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee meeting on
18 May 2022.”

For

 

Mayor Barry

Deputy Mayor Lewis

Cr Briggs

Cr Brown

Cr Edwards

Cr Hislop

Cr Mitchell

Cr Rasheed

Cr Shaw

Cr Sutton

 

Against

 

Cr Milne

Total: 10

Total: 1

 

Cr Dyer abstained from voting on part (7) above.

 

6.       QUESTIONS

There were no questions.

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 3.54pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C Barry

MAYOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record
dated this 24th day of May 2022


1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

KOMITI HANGANGA | Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

 

Minutes of a meeting held in the Via Zoom on

 Tuesday 3 May 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Cr D Hislop (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

 

Cr G Barratt

Cr K Brown

 

Cr B Dyer

Cr A Mitchell (Deputy Chair)

 

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

APOLOGIES:                  There were no apologies.

 

IN ATTENDANCE:        Cr J Briggs

Cr S Edwards

Ms J Miller, Chief Executive

Ms A Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

Ms H Oram, Director Environment and Sustainability

Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development 

Mr D Kerite, Head of Regulatory Services

Mr J Kingsbury, Head of Transport

Mr T Grieve, Senior Communications Advisor

Mr M Radu, Senior Traffic Engineer

Ms C Taylor, Principal Advisor Research and Evaluation

Mr R Soni, Traffic Engineer

Mr B Hu, Traffic Engineering Manager

                                          Ms K Stannard, Head of Democratic Services

                                          Ms K Glanville, Senior Democracy Advisor

                                          Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

The Chair announced that Crs Briggs and Edwards were attending the meeting as non-appointed members of the committee.  She advised that the members could not vote on any matter at the meeting.  She granted permission for Crs Briggs and Edwards to take part in the meeting’s discussions. 

 

The Chair advised that she had received questions prior to the meeting submitted by
Cr Milne in relation to item 7 on the agenda.  She said that the questions had been responded to in writing by an officer.  She observed that Cr Milne, as a non-appointed member of the committee, was not in attendance at the meeting therefore he may potentially be satisfied with the officer’s answers to his questions.

 

1.       APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS    

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

 

Minor item not on the agenda

 

Resolved(Cr Shaw/Cr Hislop)                                             Minute No. IARCC 22201

“That, in terms of Standing Order 10.13, the Committee:

(1)   notes that the Director of Economy and Development has a verbal announcement on the Infrastructure Acceleration Fund;

(2)   notes the meeting may not make a resolution, decision or recommendation about the item except to refer it to a subsequent meeting for further discussion; and

(3)   agrees that the verbal announcement be considered as a minor item not on the agenda.”

 

The Director Economy and Development advised that Council’s application to the contestable Infrastructure Acceleration Fund (IAF) had been accepted to progress to the next stage of negotiations with Kāinga Ora.  He explained the application was based on detailed work that Wellington Water Limited had undertaken to assess the future infrastructural requirements on the valley floor for urban development.  He noted the Riverlink project could lead to 1,200-1,750 new homes being constructed.  He said there was the potential to unlock additional development capacity to approximately 6,000 new homes on the valley floor if the infrastructure was improved. He added that progress to this next stage did not guarantee the application would receive funding from the IAF.  He stated Council’s application was one of 35 to progress this far, seeking funding from the $100M fund.

In response to questions from members, the Director Economy and Development advised there were originally 200 applications to the IAF, equating to over $5B worth of works.  He noted that the work Council had completed regarding Riverlink, Plan Change 43 and Development Contributions were all positive indicators to Kāinga Ora that Council was serious in planning for future urban development within the city.  He further noted that a timeline moving forward had yet to be finalised and that the upcoming discussions with Kāinga Ora would provide further details.  He said that Kāinga Ora had signalled the Hutt Valley was an area of focus for them, and that in order for their plans to proceed, overall improvements to all the infrastructural networks were required.  He clarified the application was based on a part funding model and there would be an expectation that Development Contributions would balance any shortfall of cost associated with infrastructure. 

Cr Hislop thanked the team for the work that had occurred in getting the application this far.  She said improving infrastructure now would benefit the city in the future. 

 

 

4.         Integrated Transport Strategy (22/1000)

A report titled ‘Additional Draft Integrated Transport Strategy Report (22/1022)’ was attached to the supplementary agenda.

Speaking under public comment, Mr Matt Young and Mr Quentin Duthie representing Hutt Carbon Zero Network spoke to the submission.  Mr Young believed the Integrated Transport Strategy (the strategy) was a step in the right direction.  He noted that the stragety could be further improved. He requested the strategy quantify the changes required in order to achieve the targets, including measures to decrease dependence on private transport modes.  He asked that a full analysis of the walking networks within the city be undertaken.

Mr Duthie asked that the vision statement include a reference to supporting net emission goals and that climate change needed to be a clear driver in how transport was planned.  He also requested that changes made to the existing transport network should seek to ensure active travel modes were at least as attractive as travelling by private car.  He questioned how the strategy would lead to broader considerations of planning for the future of the city.

Speaking under public comment, Ms Jo Clendon representing Hutt Cycle Network spoke to the submission.  She commended Council on the development of the strategy and stated it was difficult to gain a clear understanding of the magnitude of change that was required.  She said the strategy required more clarity and signposts.  She requested that “safety” and the “perception of safety” both be analysed in order to gain a complete understanding of each issue.  She believed that in order to achieve a modal shift, the focus needed to be on the built enviornment and not just on transport systems.

In response to questions from members, Ms Clendon stated there were no local authorities encompassing both safety and the perception of safety at present.  She supported measures which resulted in active transport modes being at least as attractive as private vehicle usage.  She added measures needed to be put in place which made it less attractive to drive cars.  She suggested Council investigate charging for parking on streets.

 

 

Speaking under public comment, Ms Ellen Blake representing Living Streets Aotearoa spoke to the submission.  She supported the strategy and suggested more emphasis be placed on walking networks.  She noted that only 4% of people walked to work in the city.  However 50% of residents worked in the city.  She believed the stated balance between cars and other modes of transport was not useful as investment into private vehicle infrastructure far outweighed that in other modes of transport.  She suggested efforts should support the transport modes the city wanted to see more of.  She supported the inclusion of the “perception of safety” concept.

In response to questions from members, Ms Blake explained that worldwide, the order of focus was walking, cycling and public transport.  She said it was important to encourage people to access the public transport hubs.

The Head of Transport elaborated on the report.  He noted the strategy was designed to be a living document.  He said that once central government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (the plan) was released the strategy would be altered to reflect the plan.  He reiterated that the strategy was an overarching document that did not contain targets or numbers.  He said the next step would be to develop the seven focus areas in collaboration with Greater Wellington Regional Council and Waka Kotahi.  He advised that measureable outcomes would be developed at that time.

Cr Hislop acknowledged and thanked the Head of Transport and his team for the work undertaken on the strategy. 

In response to questions from members, the Head of Transport agreed to investigate and report back on the issue of the number of properties in the city which could park their cars off road but chose to park on the street.  He added that parking overall was an issue which would be investigated over the next three years.  He confirmed that both safety and the perception of safety were important issues.  He confirmed that to his knowledge, there were no local authorities in New Zealand who had dealt with both issues.  He noted Council would deal with both issues in the future.  He acknowledged shared pathways were a contentious issue and that an effective education programme could help eliminate some of the negative perceptions about shared pathways being unsafe.

In response to further questions from members, the Head of Transport confirmed the strategy would link with the new District Plan in the coming years.  He further confirmed that once the strategy had been approved by Council, work would commence on developing the plans required including liaising with partners and assessing the Cross Valley Link.

 

 

Members provided feedback on the strategy:

·      need to paint a picture of the magnitude of the the change that is required.

·      add to the vision statement: “and supports carbon zero emissions goal.” 

·      changes to the existing transport network should seek to ensure active travel modes are at least as attractive as travelling by private car.

·      include a section explaining the context of the policy climate in which Council operates, in particular government and regional policies, priorities and targets.

·      climate change needed to be better highlighted throughout the document.

·      need to reduce attractiveness of private car dependency.

·      need to acknowledge the priorities of neighbouring local authorities to ensure Council was not operating in isolation or against their efforts.

Cr Shaw stated that the strategy was an important piece of work for the city and that with climate change, there would be some tough decisions needed to be made in the future.

Mayor Barry acknowledged all the positive feedback received from submitters and members.  He highlighted that a positive submission had been recevied from Waka Kotahi.

Cr Hislop acknowledged the work that submitters had put into their submissions.

 

Resolved(Cr Hislop/Cr Mitchell)                         Minute No. IARCC 22202

“That the Committee:

(1)     receives and notes the information;

(2)     thanks the submitters for their feedback on the draft Integrated Transport Strategy attached to the supplementary agenda;

(3)     notes the submissions received on the draft Integrated Transport Strategy;

(4)     agrees to advise Council of its view of the Integrated Transport Strategy by way of amendments made at the meeting ahead of approval being sought from Council on 24 May 2022.”

For the reason set out in the report and attachments.

 

 

 

5.

Response to Petition - Save the Atkinson tree in York Bay, Eastbourne from removal (22/927)

Report No. IARCC2022/2/74 by the Head of Transport

 

Speaking under public comment, Ms Fiona Christeller commended Council on the shared pathway and urged for the tree to be saved for heritage, placemaking and shading values.  She stated that she favoured Option B.  She offered to lead a fundraising effort to raise monies to pay for a replacement tree if the Atkinson tree could not be saved.  She requested further consultation occur at the completion of the officer’s investigation. 

In response to questions from members, Ms Christeller advised the carpark opposite the tree was used 50% of the time, by residents and visitors.  She said that generally driveways were not blocked in this area by parked vehicles.  She understood the tree was not part of the consented documentation for the shared pathway and was being dealt with as a separate issue.  She maintained the tree should be saved and that alternative options be considered.  

The Head of Transport elaborated on the report.  He thanked Ms Christeller for her offer to lead any fundraising efforts.  He said that officers would report back to the community with a preferred design in due course.  He noted it was undesirable to split the shared pathway in two and that encroachments into the marine environment were not posible.

In response to questions from members, the Head of Transport advised the project team were adhering to all resource consent conditions.  He confirmed the Eastbourne Community Board had been regularly updated on all aspects of the shared pathway project. 

 

Resolved:  (Cr Hislop/Cr Barratt)                                        Minute No. IARCC 22203

“That the report be noted and received.”

 

6.

Proposed Private Street Names: Subdivision of 128 and 132A Molesworth Street, Taita (22/908)

Report No. IARCC2022/2/75 by the Traffic Engineer

 

In response to questions from members, the Traffic Engineering Manager confirmed consultation had occurred in accordance with the previous Naming Policy.

Cr Brown left the meeting at 3.34pm and rejoined at 3.36pm.

Cr Dyer expressed support for the recommended name.  He noted there were other names on the Naming List which had been set aside for use by Urban Plus Limited.

Cr Mitchell expressed support for the recommended name.

 

Resolved:  (Cr Hislop/Cr Shaw)                                          Minute No. IARCC 22204

“That the Committee:

(1)       approves a new street name for the new private road shown in Appendix 1 of the report, as ‘Te Ara o Takapū’; and

 

(2)      approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.”

For the reasons so that these sections of the development may proceed to completion as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require formalised street addresses for the necessary connections to be provided.

 

7.

Regulatory Matters Report (22/865)

Report No. IARCC2022/2/76 by the Head of Regulatory Services

 

Speaking under public comment, Mr Max Shierlaw expressed concern with the statement that 40 days for processing of building consents was an acceptable timeframe.  He requested Council adhere to the legal requirement of 20 working days and that the discounted fees be applied to all building consent and LIM applications.  He questioned where the additional staff resource funds had been spent. 

In response to questions from members, Mr Shierlaw hoped that the 20 working day timeframe would be adhered to and that additional officers would be employed.  He understood that if Council adopted his proposal, any shortfall in costs would be borne by the ratepayers.

A written comment under public comment from Mr Grant Birkinshaw was read out by the Director Economy and Development in Te Reo Maori. 

In response to a question from a member, the Director Economy and Development confirmed Mr Birkenshaw’s written comment stated he was of Ngati Toa descent.

The Director Environment and Sustainability elaborated on the report.  She explained the timeframe figures provided in the report were constantly changing.

Cr Brown and Cr Sutton left the meeting at 3.38pm.

The Director Environment and Sustainability advised the hui recently held with developers would become a regular quarterly event.

Cr Sutton rejoined the meeting at 3.40pm.

The Director Environment and Sustainability advised three of the four vacancies in Council’s Resource Consent team had been filled with the last one due to be finalised by the end of the week.  She said that consultants were still being used when required.  She further advised that the required information had been supplied to International Accreditation New Zealand on time with a further audit scheduled for August 2022.  She noted the Food Verification Division had completed a successful audit.

Cr Brown rejoined the meeting at 3.43pm.

In response to questions from members, the Director Environment and Sustainability confirmed the relaxing of the national borders may assist in the recruitment process over time.  She agreed to report back to members regarding the 28 Raukawa Street development.  She explained that even though the Avalon Studios may be the largest such complex in Australasia, if an application was received to alter it in any way, Council’s Regulatory team had to process it as the building was not protected.  She added the tower block was remaining.

In response to a question from a member regarding Project Information Memoranda (PIM), the Director Environment and Sustainability explained that with the advent of Kāinga Ora becoming a processing unit, it required access to all the PIM information.  He said this had created a new work programme for Council’s Regulatory team.

In response to further questions from members, the Director Environment and Sustainability advised officers were constantly learning from previous applications and would apply those learnings to new applications.  She confirmed the suggested 40 working day timeframe for building consent processing had been discussed with other local authorities in the region.  She advised she was unaware of any proposed legislative changes to processing times.  She said the general comments from the developer hui centred around processing times and increasing communications.  She added officers were seeking technical and legal advice about some of the suggestions.  She noted that a slowing down of building applications had yet to occur to reflect the slowing housing market. 

In response to questions from members regarding the recruitment of Design Engineer specialists, the Director Economy and Development advised there was a national shortage of these skilled personnel. 

Crs Dyer and Hislop thanked officers for the updates and acknowledged the difficulties the nationwide worker shortages presented.

 

Resolved:    (Cr Hislop/Mayor Barry)                                  Minute No. IARCC 22205

“That the Committee:

(1)      receives and notes the information;

(2)      notes that the Committee will continue to be updated on all matters identified in the Regulatory Matters report; and

(3)      asks the Chief Executive to keep the Chair of the Committee up to date on all regulatory matters between meetings of the Committee.”

8.       Information Items

a)

Street Names Approved by Community Boards (22/857)

Memorandum dated 5 April 2022 by the Traffic Engineer

 

Resolved:  (Cr Hislop/Cr Barratt)                              Minute No. IARCC 22206

“That the Committee receives and notes the contents of the memorandum.”

 

b)

Infrastructure and Regulatory Forward Programme 2022 (22/858)

Report No. IARCC2022/2/77 by the Democracy Advisor

 

Resolved:  (Cr Hislop/Cr Dyer)                                    Minute No. IARCC 22207

“That the Committee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as appendix 1 to the memorandum.”

9.       QUESTIONS

There were no questions.

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 4.07 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D Hislop

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 24th day of May 2022

 


1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Kaupapa Taiao

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom on Thursday 5 May 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Cr J Briggs (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

 

Cr K Brown

Cr S Edwards

 

Cr A Mitchell

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  Cr Rasheed, Cr Shaw, Deputy Mayor Lewis

 

IN ATTENDANCE:        Ms A Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities (part meeting)

Ms H Oram, Director Environment and Sustainability

Mr J Scherzer, Head of Climate and Solid Waste
Mr D Uppal, Solid Waste Manager
Mr A Saker, Senior Advisor Waste Minimisation

Mr B Hu, Traffic Engineering Manager

Ms K Stannard, Head of Democracy Services

Ms J Randall, Democracy Advisor

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

1.

Opening formalities - Karakia Timatanga

Whakataka te hau ki te uru                    Cease the winds from the west
Whakataka te hau ki te tonga                Cease the winds from the south
Kia mākinakina ki uta                             Let the breeze blow over the land
Kia mātaratara ki tai                               Let the breeze blow over the ocean
E hī ake ana te atakura                          Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air
He tio, he huka, he hau hū                    A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day
Tīhei mauri ora.

2.       APOLOGIES

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Mitchell)                                       Minute No. CCASC 22201

“That the apologies received from Cr Rasheed, Cr Shaw and Deputy Mayor Lewis be accepted and leave of absence be granted.”

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

There was no public comment.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS   

There were no conflict of interest declarations. 

5.

Update on Council's solid waste and waste minimisation work (22/837)

Report No. CCASC2022/2/77 by the Solid Waste Manager

 

The Solid Waste Manager elaborated on the report. He advised a communications and engagement campaign (engagement campaign) to reduce contamination in Council’s kerbside recycling service would commence in late August 2022 or early September 2022. He added an agency had been selected and scoping and research work would commence over the next three months to understand residents’ recycling habits.

In response to questions from members, the Solid Waste Manager said the engagement campaign would target contamination across the city. He added the work of recycling ambassadors would be more targeted. He said recycling ambassadors would commence work from mid-May 2022 for a three month period. He highlighted the ambassadors would report back on data contamination, problem suburbs and streets and identify the type of materials causing contamination. He confirmed Lower Hutt recycling had not reached the contamination threshold of 20% that would exclude it from being recycled.  He acknowledged it was getting close to the threshold.  He envisaged the work of the recycling ambassadors would help modify behaviour but said if behaviour did not improve some bins might not be collected. He added recycling inspectors would allow for up to 10% contamination. He considered most contamination was a result of confusion rather than deliberate dumping since rules around recycling differed between local authorities. He confirmed kerbside recycling levels had not increased considerably since the introduction of the new bins.

In response to a question from a member, the Director of Environment and Sustainability explained the delay in relaying information to members on the timeline for the engagement campaign was caused by the need to source an external agency. She confirmed additional detail would be available for the Committee’s meeting on
14 July 2022.

In response to questions from members, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste explained de-carbonisation had a 10% weighting in the procurement process but tenders were measured on a range of criteria. He added successful contractors would be required to implement measures to de-carbonise to assist Council’s goal of achieving a 50% reduction in emissions by 2030.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Mayor Barry)                                     Minute No. CCASC 22202

“That the Committee notes the update on various solid waste management and minimisation matters.”

 

6.

Update on Council's climate change work (22/838)

Report No. CCASC2022/2/78 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

The Head of Climate and Solid Waste elaborated on the report. He advised that the installation of three charging stations at Koraunui was almost complete.

Mayor Barry asked officers for a further update on charging stations for the next meeting of the Committee.  He also asked that the update included the status of each charging station and a map showing locations.

In response to a question from a member, the Traffic Engineering Manager advised there would be no continuation of the LED street lighting programme this financial year. He added a programme was being developed alongside Waka Kotahi to continue LED installations in the next financial year.

Cr Mitchell suggested that Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) be required to report annually on its carbon emissions in the same way that Council’s contractors were required to report on its emissions to Council.

Mayor Barry and the Chair agreed emissions reporting from CCOs would be beneficial and would provide a more complete picture of Council’s overall emissions, including whether reductions were on track.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Edwards)                                      Minute No. CCASC 22203

“That the Committee notes the update on various climate change work streams.”

 

7.

Submission to Ministry for the Environment (22/941)

Report No. CCASC2022/2/79 by the Senior Advisor Waste Minimisation

 

The Senior Advisor Waste Minimisation elaborated on the report. He advised additional information regarding a ‘Recycling Mate’ app had been added to the submission since the Committee’s agenda had been distributed. He highlighted an app would provide up-front information on recycling for consumers, particularly with the proposed introduction of a Container Return Scheme (CRS). 

In response to questions from a member, the Senior Advisor Waste Minimisation explained the Manatū Mō Te Taiao | Ministry for the Environment discussion document had not presented an analysis on the financial implications of fewer beverage containers in kerbside recycling due to the CRS scheme.  He highlighted WasteMinz had submitted that milk containers should not be excluded from the CRS scheme and noted that Council’s submission had not included this level of detail.

In response to a question from a member, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste advised a preferred consultant for a food waste collection service would be confirmed shortly. He said more information would be reported to the relevant Committee early in 2023 to enable informed decisions to be made before Council’s next Long Term Plan. He added a food waste collection service could commence by July 2024 subject to the time needed for a business plan, community consultation and procurement.

Cr Mitchell suggested the following amendments to the submission:

·      including Liquid Paper Board in the Container Return Scheme could cause confusion since it was not accepted in kerbside recycling. It should be accepted by both schemes or by neither.

·      separating business food waste would have a financial impact on local authorities and financial support should be provided particularly for smaller local authorities. Ask for co-investment and investment in local research to investigate the best solution for local authorities and their residents.

·      acknowledge there might be other more local app providers such as Wastewise or a national solution.

Cr Mitchell expressed support for the government proposals and the submission including the amendments. He noted that standardising recycling across the country would make messaging easier and more effective.

The Chair asked officers to include the feedback from Cr Mitchell in the final version of the submission.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Mitchell)                                       Minute No. CCASC 22204

That the Committee:

(1)   agrees to the updated submission on the Manatū Mō Te Taiao |Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document: ‘Te panoni i te hangarua |Transforming recycling,’ attached as pages 6-8 of the minutes;

(2)   agrees that, due to the submission deadline of 8 May 2022, the submission be sent by the Mayor or the Chair of the Climate Change and Sustainability Committee; and

(3)   agrees to include the feedback provided at the meeting in the submission.”

For the reasons outlined in this report.

8.       Information Item

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee Forward Programme 2022 (22/943)

Report No. CCASC2022/2/80 by the Democracy Advisor

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Brown)                                Minute No. CCASC 22205

“That the Committee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the report.”

 

9.       QUESTIONS

There were no questions.

10.

Closing formalities - Karakia Whakamutunga

Unuhia!

Unuhia!

Unuhia i te uru-tapu-nui

Kia wātea, kia māmā

Te ngākau, te tinana, te wairua i te ara takatū

Koia rā e Rongo whakairihia ake ki runga

Kia wātea, kia wātea!

Ae rā, kua wātea!

Hau, pai mārire.

Release us from the supreme sacredness of our tasks

To be clear and free
in heart, body and soul in our continuing journey

Oh Rongo, raise these words up high

so that we be cleansed and be free,

Yes indeed, we are free!

Good and peaceful

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 2.43 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J Briggs

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 24th day of May 2022

 


 

Transforming recycling consultation
Ministry for the Environment
PO Box 10362
Wellington 6143

Attention: Submissions Analysis Team

Submission on Ministry for the Environment’s Te panoni i te hangarua Transforming recycling consultation document

I am writing to you on behalf of Hutt City Council’s Climate Change and Sustainability Committee.

On 13 March 2022 the Ministry for the Environment released its Te panoni i te hangarua Transforming recycling consultation document, which sets out three proposals to transform recycling in Aotearoa New Zealand. These proposals are:

-          Container Return Scheme (CRS)

-          Improvements to household kerbside recycling

-          Separation of business food waste

Our committee supports the general intent of these proposals but suggests that some areas may need further consideration. We also encourage the government to ensure that councils have sufficient input into all stages of the planning and implementation phases of any final policies that arise from this consultation.  

This submission outlines our committee’s support and feedback on these proposals.

Container Return Scheme (CRS)

We agree with the proposed definitions of a beverage and an eligible beverage container but suggest that any eligibility criteria for beverage containers is mindful of the term ‘single use’ as this may provide an opportunity for beverage producers that use ‘sipper bottles’ (for example Pump water bottles) to opt out of any CRS.

We agree that a proposed refund amount of 20 cents is likely to achieve the stated CRS policy objectives. However, in the absence of any data or research, there is a risk that this amount will not have the desired effect of changing people’s littering habits. On that note, it would be prudent to include a formal commitment in the CRS charter to review the refund amount every two or three years to ensure the refund amount remains congruent with the said policy objectives – especially in the face of changing economic pressures. Furthermore, we think that local government needs to be integral to such a review process so that insights into the CRS’s efficacy can be adequately considered. A possible avenue for this could be the Waste MINZ Territorial Authority Forum.

We support the proposed broad scope of beverage container material types to be included, especially the inclusion of Liquid Paper Board, and agree that alternative beverage container types should be considered on a case-by-case basis.

We are comfortable with a not-for-profit industry led scheme. However, we believe that any authority must (a) be required to undergo independent auditing and (b) have government oversight - with input from local government. As pointed out in the discussion document, local government is responsible for the disposal of end-of-life containers, therefore it would be reasonable for such organisations to have input into the governance of any CRS.

Improvements to household kerbside recycling

We support the implementation of standardised kerbside recycling across New Zealand on the basis that a standardised approach will help to reduce confusion for all New Zealanders - and thereby lead to improved national recycling rates.

In July 2021, the Hutt City Council rolled out a rates-funded rubbish and recycling kerbside collection for residents of Lower Hutt. This includes a weekly rubbish collection, fortnightly recycling collection (for glass, cans, plastics #1, #2, #5, paper/cardboard) and an optional garden waste collection every four weeks. Glass is collected separately at the kerbside on alternating weeks with recycling. Therefore, Lower Hutt is already in alignment with the proposed standardisation.

Aside from standardising materials and separate collection of glass, we suggest that thought be given to multi-unit dwellings in terms of how materials are collected. Such housing types are quickly becoming a significant component of the urban environment in Lower Hutt and around New Zealand. Any future regulations in this area will need to be sufficiently flexible to allow local government to successfully manage collections from these types of development. 

We note that any kerbside recycling scheme is dependent on the viability of end markets for recycled product both in New Zealand and overseas. However, the discussion document did not articulate what options were available should our current end markets become compromised or non-existent. We believe that robust contingency plans need to be developed by government to manage fluctuations and possible cessations of end markets for recycled product. There is a risk that a national recycling scheme could be adversely impacted, and its credibility could be undermined if local government were forced to landfill diverted material due to oversupply issues.

We do not believe that a government minister should decide on what new materials are to be included in a kerbside recycling scheme. This power could make the process unnecessarily political. As mentioned above, local government is currently responsible for the disposal of end-of-life products, so once again it would be reasonable to include local government in any decision-making on the inclusion of any new materials. With this in mind we suggest the government seriously considers how it will approach the capability of infrastructure for materials that are proposed to be excluded from kerbside collections, and simultaneously investigate ways to reduce these material streams through product stewardship schemes.

We believe that if New Zealand was to receive a CRS and a standardised kerbside recycling service, that serious thought be given to funding the introduction of an ‘app’ or similar tool to help consumers quickly and easily identify where their nearest CRS depot is and what items/materials can be recycled and/or what recycling bin should be used (at their homes or in public places). Hutt City Council officers have established contact with the Australian Federal Government funded Recycling Mate app. This app has taken over three years to develop, contains a library of over 5,000 commonly available products and is underpinned by advanced AI functionality. Recycling Mate have indicated they are keen to introduce the app to Lower Hutt and by extension, New Zealand, and Council officers are currently working with them to establish what costs would be involved. We encourage MfE/government to contact Council officers for more information about this app if there is interest in pursuing Recycle Mate for all of New Zealand.

 

Separation of business food waste

We support the general intent of businesses separating food waste. However, we cannot make further submissions at this time as both the Hutt and Porirua City Councils are at the nascent stages of assessing the viability of their approach to managing residential and commercial food waste. We are happy for the Ministry for the Environment to contact Hutt City Council officers for more information regarding our approach in the future.

Our Committee supports the direction that the government is heading with these proposals. We look forward to working in partnership with central government and its agencies with any future actions.

 

 


1

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Ratonga o Te Awa Kairangi|

Hutt Valley Services Committee

 

Minutes of a meeting held in the

Upper Hutt City Council Chambers, 838-842 Fergusson Drive, Upper Hutt on

 Friday 6 May 2022 commencing at 9.00am

 

 

 

PRESENT:

Cr J Briggs (Chair), HCC

Cr H Newell, UHCC (Deputy Chair)

 

Cr B Dyer, HCC

Cr C Carson, UHCC

 

Mayor W Guppy, UHCC (until 9.34am)

Cr P Lambert, UHCC (via audio visual link)

 

Cr H Swales, UHCC (from 9.34am) [1]

 

 

APOLOGIES:                   Cr S Rasheed, Cr N Shaw and Cr L Sutton. Mayor Guppy for early departure

 

IN ATTENDANCE:         Cr H Swales, UHCC (Alternate)
Ms H Oram, Director, Environment and Sustainability, HCC

Mr B Hodgins, Strategic Advisor, HCC

Mr J Scherzer, Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC

Mr G Swainson, Director Asset Management and Operations, UHCC

Mr P Mans, Animal Services Manager, HCC

Mr S Sykes, Compliance Services Manager, UHCC

Ms L Kynaston, Governance Advisor, UHCC

Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker, HCC

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES - Karakia Timatanga     

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.       APOLOGIES

RESOLVED:  (Cr J Briggs/Mayor Guppy)                           Minute No. HVSC 22201

“That the apologies received from Cr Rasheed, Cr Shaw and Cr Sutton be accepted and leaves of absence be granted and the apology received from Mayor Guppy for early departure be accepted.”

 

3.

PUBLIC COMMENT

There was no public comment.

 

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

 There were no conflict of interest declarations.

 

 

5.       Minutes

Resolved:   (Cr Briggs/Cr Carson)                                         Minute No. HVSC 22202

 

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Hutt Valley Services Committee held on
Friday, 11 March 2022, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

 

 

6.

Wastewater Joint Venture Update - 18 February 2022 –

14 April 2022 (22/961)

Report No. HVSC2022/2/1 by Wellington Water Limited

 

Mr S Hutchison, Chief Advisor Wastewater from Wellington Water Limited (WWL) was in attendance for the item.

 

The Chief Advisor, Wastewater, WWL elaborated on the report. 

In response to questions from members, the Chief Advisor, Wastewater, WWL advised he would provide an update to members on the Barber Grove project.  He said a full update report would also be provided to the next Committee meeting.  He advised that Seaview Wastewater Treatment Plant’s odour monitoring included measurement using an Odour Control System and feedback from staff and neighbours.  He advised that the non-compliance at the Seaview plant related to compliance that was measured over a 90 day period.  He added that on average the plant was performing well.  He said he would provide members with a copy of the response of the “please explain” letter from Greater Wellington Regional Council.  He highlighted this was an operational matter and would be for information purposes only.  He advised staff were still collecting samples for Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) for COVID testing.  He noted the Dashboard detail of the review measures showed the work programme for the next three months.  He added the majority of the work required should be completed by the next Committee meeting.  He said it was anticipated that the global consent would be granted for a period of 35 years with six yearly reviews. 

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Dyer)                                            Minute No. HVSC 22203

“That the Committee notes the information in the report.”

7.

Update on Silverstream Landfill (22/886)

Report No. HVSC2022/2/82 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste, Hutt City Council

 

The Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC elaborated on the report.

In response to questions from members, the Head of Climate and Solid Waste, HCC, advised that from 1 July 2022 all vehicles entering the Silverstream landfill would be weighed and charged (pending approval of the HCC’s Annual Plan 2022-2023). He said that currently only private SUV vehicles, utility vehicles and vehicles towing a trailer were weighed. He acknowledged that this had caused some confusion for users of the landfill. He highlighted the possible implications if Wellington City Council (WCC) decided not to utilise the Southern Landfill. He advised that officers were liaising with WCC in case this waste was distributed to either the Silverstream or Porirua landfills.

The Director Environment and Sustainability, HCC agreed to ask HCC’s Communications Team to liaise with UHCC to provide key messaging regarding weight-based fee charges at Silverstream landfill.

 

 

The Chair expressed concern that WCC officers had not kept the management teams of the region’s landfills informed on options for Wellington city waste.

 

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Newell)                                         Minute No. HVSC 22204

 

“That the Committee receives the report.”

 

8.

Akatarawa Cemetery Update (22/833)

Report No. HVSC2022/2/83 by the Parks and Reserves Manager, Upper Hutt City Council

 

The Director Asset Management and Operations, UHCC elaborated on the report.

In response to a question from a member, the Director Asset Management and Operations, UHCC advised that in the past all contracts had been let as separate tenders.  He noted these had been combined into one tender in the belief that economies of scale could be achieved.  He added that these projected economies of scale had not eventuated and now tenders were being readvertised as separate entities.

Cr Lambert congratulated the contractors on the tidy state of the cemetery. 

The Chair thanked officers from both councils for their collaborative work in assessing how to reduce carbon emissions in the contracts for the cemetery.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Dyer)                                               Minute No. HVSC 22205

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the report.”

 

9.

Dog Control Update (22/874)

Report No. HVSC2022/2/84 by the Animal Services Manager, Hutt City Council

 

The Animal Services Manager, HCC elaborated on the report.  He explained that the use of electric powered utilities had been investigated and these would replace existing diesel vehicles as they came up for renewal.

In response to a question from a member, the Director Environment and Sustainability, HCC advised she was unaware of any officer collaboration in relation to UHCC’s proposed Dog Policy review.  She agreed to report back to members on the matter. 

 

Resolved:   (Cr Briggs/Cr Carson)                                              Minute No. HVSC 22206

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the information.”

      

 

10.

Dog Control Update (22/834)

Report No. HVSC2022/2/85 by the Compliance Services Manager, Upper Hutt City Council

 

The Compliance Services Manager, UHCC elaborated on the report.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Mayor Guppy)                                      Minute No. HVSC 22207

 

“That the report be received and noted.”

 

11.

Health Activities Update (22/905)

Report No. HVSC2022/2/86 by the Compliance Services Manager, Upper Hutt City Council

 

The Compliance Services Manager, UHCC elaborated on the report.

In response to a question from a member, the Compliance Services Manager, UHCC confirmed UHCC was proposing to introduce an Appearance Industries Bylaw.  He noted a 12 month transition was proposed which meant there would be no reporting to the Committee on the matter for in this triennium.

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Cr Carson)                                             Minute No. HVSC 22208

 

“That the report be received and noted.”

 

12.

Hutt Valley Services Committee Forward Programme 2022 (22/835)

Report No. HVSC2022/2/87 by the Democracy Advisor

 

Resolved: (Cr Briggs/Mayor Guppy)                                      Minute No. HVSC 22209

 

“That the Committee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.”

 

13.

REGIONAL JOINT SERVICES OPPORTUNITIES

 

The Chair noted a briefing for Councillors regarding the Silverstream landfill would occur in the next eight weeks.  He said a site visit to the landfill for members would not be possible in this triennium.

 

Mayor Guppy left the meeting at 9.43am.

 

Cr Dyer asked if HCC and UHCC could collaborate on its District Plan reviews after the Intensification Planning Instrument had been initiated in August 2022. 

 

The Director Environment and Sustainability, HCC and the Director Asset Management and Operations, UHCC agreed to meet to discuss the matter.

 

The Chair noted a report regarding the future of the Committee would be considered by the Committee at its next meeting.

 

14.    CLOSING FORMALITIES - Karakia WHAKAMUTUNGA

 

Unuhia!

Unuhia!

Unuhia i te uru-tapu-nui

Kia wātea, kia māmā

Te ngākau, te tinana, te wairua i te ara takatū

Koia rā e Rongo whakairihia ake ki runga

Kia wātea, kia wātea!

Ae rā, kua wātea!

Hau, pai mārire.

Release us from the supreme sacredness of our tasks

To be clear and free
in heart, body and soul in our continuing journey

Oh Rongo, raise these words up high

so that we be cleansed and be free,

Yes indeed, we are free!

Good and peaceful

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 9.45am.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cr J Briggs

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 26th day of August 2022


                                                                                       1                                                             24 May 2022

Hutt City Council

26 April 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/1008)

 

 

 

 

Report no: HCC2022/2/18

 

Sealing Authority

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approves the affixing of the Common Seal to all relevant documents in connection with the items set out in Schedule 1 contained in the report.

 

SCHEDULE 1 - GENERAL SEALING AUTHORITY

 

Subdivision related documents – including Easements to Council

Standard easements and related requirements granting rights to Council as part of the subdivision process:

Easements in Gross

a)   37A Nelson Street, Petone

Nelson St Enterprises Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-262

 

b)   130 Richmond Street, Petone (Stage 2)

Bew Properties 2021 Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-266

 

c)   307 Marine Drive, York Bay, Eastbourne

Richard Thomas Gaines and Cheryl Aylene Cargill and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-268

 


 

d)   83 Seddon Street, Lower Hutt

AJK & Co Investments Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-269

 

e)   2 Milne Crescent, Lower Hutt

Peter Anthony Rive Walker and Cheryl Jan Walker and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-270

 

f)    1041A High Street, Lower Hutt

Avalon Projects Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-271

 

g)   11-19 Cuba Street & 10-20 Tory Street, Petone

Petone Shore Limited & CT Petone Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-274

 

h)   141-147 Holborn Drive, Stokes Valley

John Walsh and John Walsh as Executor and Hutt City Council

LA21-1499586145-150

 

i)    269 Waterloo Road, Lower Hutt

Jackson Holdings (2005) Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-280

 

j)    28 Fitzherbert Road, Wainuiomata

Fitzherbert Road Developments (28) Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-279

 

k)   39 Percy Cameron Street, Lower Hutt

A Investment Company Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-281

 

l)    182 – 183 Cambridge Terrace, Lower Hutt

William Corporation Trading 6 Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-282

 

m)  105 Woburn Road, Lower Hutt

H and K Property Limited and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-283

 


 

Land Covenant under s116(1)(a) or (b) Land Transfer Act 2017

a)   38 Central Terrace, Alicetown, Lower Hutt

Ilse Seilis and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-264

 

Land Covenant under s116(1)(a) or (b) Land Transfer Act 2017 and Easement

a)   18 North Street, Petone

Pradeepkumar Parbhubhai Patel, Sapna Roopal Gandhi and Manju Gandhi and Hutt City Council

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-265

 

Agreement for Sale and Purchase of Real Estate

a)   Land adjacent to 2 Miromiro Road, Normandale, Lower Hutt

Alistair John Hardy and Frances Mary Smith

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-273

 

Discharge of Charging Orders

a)   19, 21 & 25 Norfolk Street, Wainuiomata

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-276

 

Memorandum of Agreement

a)   63 Marsden Street, Lower Hutt

Wellington Regional Council and Hutt City Council and Christina Maria Williams and Nicholas Mark Williams

57WNMYAPPKJ5-1407309756-277



[1] Cr Swales had voting rights from 9.34am.