HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

KOMITI ITI ARA WAKA |

Traffic Subcommittee

 

 

12 April 2022

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held via Zoom

(the meeting will be live streamed on Council’s Facebook page) on:

 

Thursday 21 April 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

Members of the public wishing to speak to items on the agenda are asked to contact

democracticservicesteam@huttcity.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

Membership

 

 

Cr B Dyer (Chair)

Cr G Barratt

Cr J Briggs (Deputy Chair)

Cr K Brown

Cr A Mitchell

Cr N Shaw

 

Cr D Hislop (Alternate)

Deputy Mayor Lewis (Alternate)

Cr S Rasheed (Alternate)

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

TRAFFIC SUBCOMMITTEE
Membership:	6
Alternates:	3
Quorum:	Half of the members
Meeting Cycle:	The Traffic Subcommittee will meet on an eight weekly basis or as required.
	Chair and Deputy Chair positions to rotate 18 months into each triennium, i.e. as at 30 April in the year prior to the next local authority election.
Reports to:	Council

 

PURPOSE:

The Traffic Subcommittee has primary responsibility for considering and making recommendations to Council on traffic matters and considering any traffic matters referred to it by Council.

For the avoidance of doubt, “traffic” includes parking, and excludes temporary road closures under clause 11(e) of the Tenth Schedule of the LGA 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965.

TERMS OF REFERENCE:

The Traffic Subcommittee has authority to:

§   Do all things necessary to hear, consider and make recommendations to Council on any traffic related matter.

§   Regulate its own processes and proceedings to achieve its purpose and objective.

§   Provide options for the consideration of Council.

The Chair will have authority to refer any traffic matter to:

§   A Community Board; or

§   The Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee; or

§   Council.

DELEGATED AUTHORITY:

The Traffic Subcommittee will have delegated authority to carry out activities within its terms of reference.


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

Komiti Iti Ara Waka |Traffic Subcommittee

 

Meeting to be held via Zoom

on

 Thursday 21 April 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES – KARAKIA TIMATANGA

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

 

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

2.       APOLOGIES

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

5.       Recommendation to Council - 24 May 2022

Proposed Electric Vehicle Parking Restrictions at five locations (22/761)

          Report No. TSC2022/2/70 by the Advisor Energy and Carbon                              5

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed”

 

 

6.       Information Items

a)      Bus Stop Review Procedures (22/830)

Memorandum dated 4 April 2022 by the Traffic Engineering Manager      20

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the memorandum be endorsed”

 

b)      Traffic Subcommittee Forward Programme 2022 (22/760)

Report No. TSC2022/2/72 by the Democracy Advisor                                29

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the memorandum be endorsed”

7.       QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

8.       CLOSING FORMALITIES – KARAKIA WHAKAMUTUNGA

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toi Lealofi

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR


 


                                                                                       6                                                           21 April 2022

Traffic Subcommittee

11 April 2022

 

 

File: (22/761)

 

 

Report no: TSC2022/2/70

 

Proposed Electric Vehicle Parking Restrictions at five locations

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s approval to put in place Electric Vehicle (EV) Parking Restrictions at various locations across the city, to enable the roll-out of EV charging stations.

Recommendation

That the Traffic Subcommittee recommends that Council:

(1)   notes that Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations are proposed to be installed at the following locations:

(a    Fairway Drive (Avalon Playground);

(b    Randwick Crescent (Moera Library);

(c    Bowers Street (Koraunui Stokes Valley Community Hub);

(d    the Walter Nash carpark adjacent to Taine/Tocker walkway (Walter Nash Stadium); and

(e    Queen Street (Wainuiomata Community Hub);

(2)   approves P120 EV Parking Restrictions, applicable at ‘all times’ for the sites as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(3)   approves the installation of road signs under the provisions of section 2.2 and 2.3 of the Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017, and section 6.4 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004 and Traffic Control Device Manual, part 13, para 3.3.1(At All Times) and para 4.4.1 (Time Limits i.e. P120) Parking signs and markings – general and Parking Management;

(4)   approves the straightening of three car parks on Bowers Street (Stokes Valley Community Hub), as perpendicular carparks are preferred for EV charging, in order to allow vehicles to either nose in or reverse in so that cables can reach the vehicle’s charging inlet; and

(5)   rescinds any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they conflict with the traffic controls described in this resolution.

For the reasons the the proposed restrictions would facilitate the effective operation of the proposed EV charging stations, improve parking turnover and availability of the EV parks, benefitting both local businesses and their customers. The proposed changes have garnered support from the community and would support Council’s Parking Policy (2017). 

Background

2.    Electric vehicles (EVs) play a significant role in decarbonising New Zealand’s transport system. The benefits associated with the shift to EVs is clear, and a useful overview is available in a 2021 White Paper by the International Council on Clean Transportation: “A Global Comparison of the Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Combustion Engine and Electric Passenger Cars.”

3.    The uptake of EVs is accelerating in New Zealand, as shown in New Zealand’s EV fleet statistics, available from the Ministry of Transport:

4.    The 2019 “Supporting EVs in the Wellington Region” advisory report indicated that by mid-2024 there could be between 15,000 and 28,000 EVs in the Wellington region, up from about 3,000, and that this would require a significant increase in the number of public charging stations available to EV drivers.

5.    There are two types of charging: DC charging is considered ‘fast’ as it can deliver about 100 km of range within 45min of charging (for a 25kWh charging station; more for faster 50kWh and 100kWh charging stations), AC charging is considered ‘slow’ as it can typically deliver 20-40 km of range per hour of charging.

 

 

6.    As part of the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan, Hutt City Council approved a project to roll out 20 Direct Current (DC) charging stations, to create a comprehensive charging network to facilitate “neighbourhood” travel by residents and other drivers from through-out the region. The project complements existing privately-operated charging locations, and the emergence of very fast ‘hyperchargers’ along highways to facilitate long-distance travel.

7.    Our project is also complementary to a project led by Wellington City Council to roll out at least 30x 25kW DC charging stations in its area. Taken together, the two projects will significantly lift the number of DC charging stations in the Wellington region, in line with the recommendations by the “Supporting EVs in the Wellington Region” report.

8.    We selected mainly medium-speed 25kW DC public charging stations as our preferred technology and approach, as they are useful to motorists (add about 100km of range within 45min of charging), allow many users to charge their vehicles each day, and make our ability to recover costs more likely in light of lower upfront investment costs compared to hyperchargers.

9.    In July 2021 the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) agreed to fund 50% of the project, via the Low Emissions Vehicle Contestable Fund.

10.  In late 2021, Meridian Energy was selected to lead the roll out of the charging stations, and to operate them once in place. As part of our agreement, Meridian Energy has agreed, where possible, to co-locate AC charging stations at our preferred sites, but these would be owned and operated by Meridian Energy.

11.  The proposed locations (see Appendix 1) require traffic resolutions in order for the restrictions to be enforceable. Consultation on the proposed sites was undertaken for a 10 day period at the end of March 2022, see https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/ev-chargers.


 

12.  At some sites Meridian Energy proposes to co-locate AC charging stations, depending on feasibility and electrical capacity, and two sites would feature a 75kWh charging unit. These can charge either one vehicle at up to 75kWh, or two cars can charge simultaneously by sharing the available power.

 

Charging outlets

 

Site

25kWh DC

75kWh DC

AC

EV Charging bays

Avalon

3

2

4

9

Moera

2

-

-

2

Stokes Valley

3

-

-

3

Walter Nash

3

-

2

5

Wainuiomata

3

1

4

9

 

13.  Note that charging stations at Seaview Marina, which are part of our project, had already been completed in December 2021 (2x DC). This is to inform the Traffic Subcommittee that this site does not require any traffic resolutions as it is located outside of the road reserve (and within the Seaview Marina premises, albeit accessible to the general public).

Proposed sites

Avalon Park, Avalon

14.  The site at Avalon Park has been proposed as it is very close to the motorway and located alongside a main road, and it can service users of the park and those passing through. On weekends there are coffee and takeaway carts at the park, and they may be further encouraged by the addition of charging infrastructure.

15.  Nine EV charging bays (5 DC and 4 AC) are proposed for this site, see Appendix 1 (figure 2). Two charging bays would be serviced by a 75kWh DC unit.

16.  It is proposed to put in a place a two-hour time limit across both DC and AC parks, to ensure multiple users can utilise the charging stations each day.

17.  Consultation showed that 87% of respondents supported the proposed location at Avalon Park, with 13% opposed. However, there was feedback requesting that Council consider moving the charging locations to the side of the carpark facing Fairway Drive, to reduce the risk of charging bays being ICE’d (ie blocked by conventional ‘internal combustion engine’ vehicles utilising the car parks as they are more conveniently located at the entrance to the playground area). As a result, the location has been adjusted, and Appendix 1 shows the revised site.

18.  In addition, Council had proposed 8 charging bays during the consultation. However, as a result of adding a DC charging unit at this location, to future proof the site, it is proposed to increase the total number of charging bays to 9 (5 DC and 4 AC). Consultation showed support by some for maximising the number of charging bays.

Morea Library/Hall, Moera

19.  The site at the Moera Library has been proposed as it is very close to the community library and hall, and some shops and cafes, and can service users of these sites. It is also located alongside a main road.

20.  Two charging bays are proposed for this site (both DC), see Appendix 1 (figure 3). (Note that it has now been confirmed that electrical capacity restricts this site to two charging stations only.)

21.  It is proposed to put in a place a two-hour time limit for the two carparks, to ensure multiple users can utilise the charging stations each day.

22.  Consultation showed that 86% of respondents supported the proposed location at Moera Library/Hall, with 14% opposed.

Koraunui Stokes Valley Community Hub, Stokes Valley

23.  The site at the Koraunui Stokes Valley Community Hub has been proposed as it is very close to the town centre. Nearby amenities include the community hub, the swimming pool, and a supermarket.

24.  Note that consultation was limited at this site to a question on the preferred number of stations, as three DC units are already being installed during April 2022. The decision to roll out three DC units was made previously in the context of replacing an existing damaged charging station, and in order to future-proof the site. However, in order to make the additional two EV charging bays enforceable, a formal traffic resolution is required.

25.  For the scenario that sufficient capacity might be available to allow for a fourth charging station at this site (eg an AC unit), we included a question to find out the community’s view on whether a fourth unit would be supported. Our consultation showed that 61% of respondents supported this. However, further analysis has since revealed that electrical capacity cannot cater for a fourth unit, therefore, this will not be possible at this point in time.

26.  Therefore, three EV charging bays (3 DC) are to be implemented for this site, see Appendix 1 (figure 4) as attached to the report.

27.  Note that some EVs have a charging inlet at the front of the vehicle and others at the rear, and perpendicular carparks are preferred in order to allow vehicles to either nose in or reverse in so that cables can reach the vehicle’s charging inlet. Therefore, straightening of three car parks on Bowers Street is required, and this change would result in the loss of one car park.

28.  It is proposed to put in a place a two-hour time limit for those carparks, to ensure multiple users can utilise the charging stations each day.


 

Walter Nash Stadium, Taita

29.  The site at the Walter Nash Stadium has been proposed as it is adjacent to the community hub, and is located close to a main road, the train station and the town centre.

30.  Five EV charging bays (3 DC parks and 2 AC) are proposed for this site, see Appendix 1 (figure 5). The five charging stations are proposed to be placed next to the Taine/Tocker walkway, so that they are as close as possible to the existing dedicated transformer.

31.  It is proposed to put in a place a two-hour time limit for both DC and AC carparks, to ensure multiple users can utilise the charging stations each day.

32.  Consultation showed that 86% of respondents supported the proposed location at the Walter Nash Centre, with 14% opposed.

33.  Council had proposed 6 charging bays during the consultation (2 DC and 4 AC). However, as a result of substituting an AC unit with a DC charging unit at this location, to future proof the site, it is proposed to decrease the total number of charging bays to 5 (3 DC and 2 AC), as electrical capacity does not allow for an additional AC charging unit. 

34.  Note that the proposed carparks are currently displayed as staff-only. Therefore, this change would result in some loss of carparking to HCC staff. Overall, there is no loss in car parking.

Wainuiomata Community Hub, Wainuiomata

35.  The site at the Wainuiomata Community Hub has been proposed as it is centrally located in Wainuiomata and alongside a main road.

36.  Nine EV charging bays (5 DC parks and 4 AC) are proposed for this site, see Appendix 1 (figure 6). Two charging bays would be serviced by a 75kWh DC unit.

37.  It is proposed to put in a place a two-hour time limit for both DC and AC carparks, to ensure multiple users can utilise the charging stations each day.

38.  Consultation showed that 88% of respondents supported the proposed location in Wainuiomata, with 12% opposed. In Wainuiomata, we provided two site options, and asked the community for feedback. About 65% of respondents preferred option A (located adjacent to the community hall).


 

39.  However, officers recommend Option B as the preferred location (as shown in Appendix 1), for the following reasons:

a.    It is slightly more open, and has better natural surveillance, improving perceived safety of the site.

b.    It is further away from the shops, and this reduces the risk of charging bays being ICE’d (ie blocked by conventional vehicles utilising the car parks) as they could be viewed as less convenient to users.

40.  Council had proposed 8 charging bays during the consultation. However, as a result of adding a DC charging unit at this location, to future proof the site, it is proposed to increase the total number of charging bays to 9 (5 DC and 4 AC). Consultation showed support by some for maximising the number of charging bays.

Options

41.  The options are to:

a.    leave the areas as they are and accept the current level of service for parking/charging of electric vehicles; or

b.    put in place P120 Electric Vehicle Parking restrictions at the proposed sites, and to have the restrictions apply at all times or

c.     put in place some lesser or greater parking time restrictions.

42.  Option a) is not preferred as it would not enable Council to expand EV charging opportunities at its facilities, in order to facilitate increased EV uptake.

43.  Officers recommend option b) as it enables us to expand EV charging opportunities and ensures multiple users can utilise the charging stations each day. In addition, it is likely that most users would spend no more than two hours at each of the sites, when visiting cafes, libraries, hubs, halls or sports facilities. Having in place parking restrictions will give motorists more confidence to be able to access the charging stations, as it reduces the likelihood of having car parks blocked.

44.  In line with option c), it could be possible to have different time limits for AC and DC carparks. However, for simplicity and consistency, a common time limit is proposed.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

45.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

46.  Electric vehicles (EVs) play a significant role in decarbonising New Zealand’s transport system and helping Lower Hutt reduce its emissions.

47.  The benefits associated with the shift to EVs is clear, and a useful overview is available in a 2021 White Paper by the International Council on Clean Transportation: “A Global Comparison of the Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Combustion Engine and Electric Passenger Cars.”

Consultation

48.  Consultation on the proposed sites was undertaken for a 10 day period (21 March to 31 March 2022), see https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/ev-chargers.

49.  There were 142 respondents, and there was strong support for having charging stations at those locations. A summary of consultation findings is available in Appendix 2.

Legal Considerations

50.  The parking restrictions are proposed to be made pursuant to the provisions of section 2.2 and 2.3 of the Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017, and section 6.4 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004:

6.4 Parking contrary to notice, traffic sign, or marking

(1) A driver or person in charge of a vehicle must not stop, stand, or park the vehicle on any part of a road contrary to the terms of a notice, traffic sign, or marking that—

(1B) Without limiting subclause (1), a driver or person in charge of a vehicle must not stop, stand, or park the vehicle in any parking area reserved for the charging of electric vehicles unless the vehicle is an electric vehicle.

51.  The installation of road signs and markings would be carried out as set out in the Traffic Control Device Manual, part 13, para 3.3.1(At All Times) and para 4.4.1 (Time Limits ie P120) Parking signs and markings – general and Parking Management.

52.  Note that parking compliance checking by Council’s parking services can be carried out proactively or if there is evidence of abuse.

Financial Considerations

53.  The proposed parking restrictions will not result in any new costs to Council. The project to roll out charging stations in Lower Hutt is an existing project as per Council’s Long Term Plan 2021-31, with budgets in place.

54.  Note that costs to operate the charging stations will be recovered through user fees.


 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Proposed sites

14

2

Appendix 2 - Summary of consultation findings

17

 

 

Author: Jonathan Linders

Advisor Energy and Carbon

 

p

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

Reviewed: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Proposed sites

 




Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Summary of consultation findings

 




1

 

Our Reference          22/830

TO:                      Chair and Members

Traffic Subcommittee

FROM:                Bob Hu, Traffic Engineering Manager

DATE:                04 April 2022

SUBJECT:           Bus Stop Review Procedures

 

Recommendation

That the Traffic Subcommittee receives and notes this memorandum.

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide information to members regarding to the Bus Stop Review Procedures that Hutt City Council (HCC) Officers and Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) Officers developed to work collaborate in reviewing and implementing Bus Stop improvements in the Hutt City area.

Background

2.    The HCC and GWRC Officers are currently working on bus stop reviews along Route 150 and Route 160. There has been negative feedback from ratepayers following public consultation on some of the proposed bus stop sites.  Officers are working on incorporating all comments into the design modification (where it is appropriate).

3.    For the purpose of formalising the bus stop review procedures and making it transparent to the community, this memorandum discusses the agreed bus stop review procedures between HCC and GWRC moving forward.

4.    GWRC’s Te Mahere Waka Whenua Tūmatanui o te Rohe o Pōneke (Wellington Regional Public Transport Plan 2021 - 2031) has outlined three Strategic Focus Areas:

a.  Mode Shift;

b.  Decarbonise Public Transport Vehicle Fleet; and

c.  Improve Customer Experience.

5.    As part of improving the customer experience, GWRC has committed to prioritising the safety and maintenance of the public transport network. The associated key measure is a 40% reduction in serious injuries on the public transport network by 2030, which can be achieved by prioritising safety through continuous improvement to both infrastructure and operations.


 

6.    In 2018 GWRC implemented the largest range of changes to Wellington City bus services for many years. The changes were the culmination of years of engagement with residents, and community representatives and technical work to review the bus network, as well as the development and implementation of new contractual arrangements with operators in line with the Government’s Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM).

7.    The implementation of changes started on 30 April 2018 in Wairarapa, followed by the Hutt Valley on 17 June and then Kāpiti Coast, Porirua and Wellington on 15 July. While the changes caused some disruption and customer reaction, in Wellington City other less predictable issues like driver shortages led to ongoing operational issues such as reliability. The major change to bus routes and timetables occurred within Wellington City, with minor changes to timetables in other areas.

8.    A high quality, reliable, accessible and modern public transport network relies on the provision of fit for purpose, well designed and maintained infrastructure and facilities. This includes roads, bus stops and shelters, transport interchanges and hubs, rail tracks and associated infrastructure, train stations, ferry terminals and wharves, Park and Ride facilities, cycle paths and footpaths, and door-to-door transport services for those with limited access to public transport.

 

9.    Infrastructure and facilities need to provide good access, safety and personal security at all stages of the journey, particularly for people with impairments. Public transport elements also require clear and consistent branding with services and levels and information to meet customer needs for an integrated, easy-to-use customer focused system. As different agencies have ownership or control of various elements of the system, communication and cooperation between all parties is required to achieve this.

Design Principles

10.  A large proportion of current bus stop infrastructure in Hutt City has not kept pace with a changing and improving bus fleet. While new buses are designed to be fully accessible for customers, they are only accessible where the bus can pull up parallel to the kerb, allowing customers step-free access to the bus.

11.  This is particularly critical for customers with wheelchairs or other mobility aids, along with prams and wheeled luggage, where having to step out onto the roadway and then up into the bus is a significant barrier to access as well as safety concerns.

12.  The following diagrams illustrate some of issues our current bus stop infrastructures in the Hutt City.

Double Decker Buses will not sit at a dangours angle

No Exit Tapper allows bus to depart safely

No Entry Tapper allows bus to get into the bus stop

 

13.  As part of the GWRC’s Bus Stop Review programme, GWRC Officers are working collaboratively with HCC Officers through improvements to all bus stops within the Hutt City Area either through a /an:

a.  Systematic fashion, bus route improvement programme over a number of years; or

b.  Ad Hoc fashion, issues log bus stops that require immediate change outside of the bus route improvement program.

14.  The following diagram shows the current plan Systematic programme for the Hutt City bus stops.

15.  In order to ensure consistency across the wider network, alterations to existing stops are designed to comply with Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency’s “Guidelines for Public Transport Infrastructure and Facilities”, March 2014.

16.  The guidelines have been adopted by a number of Road Control Authorities in New Zealand (including GWRC and Auckland Transport) for bus stop infrastructure optimisation and implementation.

17.  The diagram below illustrates the bus stop area design length guidelines used for bus stops in the Hutt City Area and agreed with GWRC. It should be noted that the proposed minimum 9m entry taper is shorter the Waka Kotahi’s guideline which requires 15m, and the entry and exit tapers can include the width of an intersection or an accessway. The purpose of the adaption was to optimise safety and parking loss considering local context.

18.  It is noted that deviating from these measurements is likely to significantly increase safety and accessibility risks, and the same time, it is also understood that there are situations where the guidelines cannot be achieved without significant cost implications. Therefore, final bus stop area length can be altered on a case by case basis as provided there is supporting evidence to do so.

Implementation Procedures

19.  Bus Stop Identification

a.  GWRC Officers work with HCC Officers to identify the priority of the systematic bus route improvement programme.

b.  The programme will be continuously monitoring and reprioritised if/when required.

c.  Complaints and request log from both the HCC and GWRC will be reviewed and included in the ad-hoc bus stops improvement programme.

d.  Priority will be reviewed and agreed on a monthly basis for bus stops that require immediate change outside of the bus route improvement programme.

 

20.  Bus Stop Review and Initial Design

a.  GWRC Officers undertake an initial bus stop review and design for the bus stops in both the systematic and ad-hoc improvement programmes through the above identification process;

b.  The bus stop review and design will target addressing accessibility and safety problems for each bus stop (if any), and the design principles discussed in the previous section will be followed.

21.  Design Review and Approval

a.  HCC Officers will undertake a review of the bus stop improvement designs in both the systematic and ad-hoc improvement programmes proposed by the GWRC Officers;

b.  Design changes considering both the engineering philosophies and local / community knowledge will be discussed and agreed; and

c.  GWRC Officers will revise the design based on the above agreement and / or consider alternative options for HCC Officers’ approval.

22.  Public Consultation

a.  GWRC Officers undertake consultation with all affected residents within proximity of the bus stops requiring changes following HCC’s approval;

b.  The consultation will mostly be letter drop method due to the limited area a bus stop could affect. An initial period of two weeks will be given to affected residents for comments and feedback;

c.  If no response occurs, a second consultation letter will be dropped to the residents with an additional two weeks’ period and phone call following up; and

d.  All feedback received from the GRWC consultation will be recorded and shared with HCC Officers.

23.  Consultation Feedback Review

a.  GWRC Officers will review all consultation feedback received; and

b.  For all negative feedback, GWRC Officers will consider (where it is appropriate) the following three options:

i. Investigate justification where a feedback is not relevant;

ii.            Revise design to address the residents’ concerns; or

iii.           Develop alternative options for further consideration.


 

24.  Design Modification and Alternative Option Consideration

a.  HCC Officers will review the proposed changes following GWRC’s consultation feedback review;

b.  Design modifications and alternative options will be discussed and agreed; and

c.  GWRC Officers will revise the design based on the above agreement and / or consider alternative options for HCC Officers’ approval.

25.  Close Consultation Loop

a.  GWRC officers will close the consultation loop with HCC’s approval by

i.     Notifing the residents where a no change is applied with justifications;

ii.    Notifing the residents where a design revision is applied with explanations; or

iii.   Re-consul with the residents where an alternative option is developed and proposed.

b.  Record of feedback, review, design modification and consultation loop closure will be provided to HCC Officers.

26.  Council Ratification

a.  HCC Officers will notify and seek consideration, if any changes fall in a community board area, during the local community board meetings;

b.  HCC Officer will seek Traffic Subcommittees’ approval (if appropriate) for rescinding any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls described in the proposed resolutions;

c.  Any design and / or design changes made within four weeks prior to each Council meeting will not be included and reported in that meeting for seeking consideration or approval.

27.  Construction

a.  GWRC Officers will work with HCC Officers collaboratively to construct the proposed bus stop improvements once the resolutions are ratified by HCC;

b.  The construction of bus shelters and bus stop infrastructure and facilities will be funded and managed by GWRC; and

c.  The construction of any road layout changes, markings and signage will be funded and managed by HCC.

28.  Appendix 1 process flow diagram illustrates the proposed procedures and decision-making gate.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

29.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

30.  Transport infrastructure and facilities that provide good access, safety, and personal security at all stages of the journey, particularly for people with impairments will help to remove barriers to the use of public transport.  The more barriers removed by Council will make the choice to use public transport easier and will support moves to reduce car dependency and therefore the corresponding carbon emissions.

31.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.

Legal Considerations

32.  The proposed changes in restrictions are made pursuant to the provisions of the Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017

Financial Considerations

33.  Any proposed traffic related changes can be funded from Council’s transport budgets.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1Bus Stop Review Process Flow Diagram

28

 

 

Author: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport


Attachment 1

Bus Stop Review Process Flow Diagram

 


                                                                                       1                                                           21 April 2022

Traffic Subcommittee

01 April 2022

 

File: (22/760)

 

 

 

Report no: TSC2022/2/72

 

Traffic Subcommittee Forward Programme 2022

 

 

Recommendation

That the Subcommittee receives and notes the Forward Programme for 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.

Purpose of Memorandum

1.  To provide the Traffic Subcommittee (the subcommittee) with a forward programme of work planned for the subcommittee for 2022.

Background

2.  The Terms of Reference for the subcommittee requires the subcommittee to consider and make recommendations to Council on traffic matters and considering any traffic matters referred to it by Council.

3.  The forward programme for 2022 provides a planning tool for both members and officers to co-ordinate programmes of work for the year.  The forward programme is attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.

Forward Programme

 

4.    The forward programme is a working document and is subject to change on a regular basis.

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Traffic Subcommittee Forward Programme 2022

30

 

 

Author: Toi Lealofi

Democracy Advisor

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services  


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Traffic Subcommittee Forward Programme 2022