HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

POARI HAPORI O PITO-ONE |

Petone Community Board

 

 

4 April 2022

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held via Zoom

on:

 

 

 

 

 

Monday 11 April 2022 commencing at 6.30pm

 

Members of the public wishing to speak to an item on the agenda are asked to contact democraticservicesteam@huttcity.govt.nz

 

 

 

Membership

 

Pam Hanna (Chair)

Mike Fisher (Deputy Chair)

Mike Henderson

Matt Roberts

Alex Voutratzis

Karen Yung

Deputy Mayor Tui Lewis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

COMMUNITY BOARDS FUNCTIONS AND DELEGATIONS

This document records the delegation of Council functions, responsibilities, duties, and powers to Community Boards.

The Community Boards have been established under section 49 of the Local Government Act 2002 to represent, and act as an advocate for, the interests of their community.

The delegations are expressed in general terms. The delegations shall be exercised with proper regard for the Council’s strategic direction, policies, plans, Standing Orders and its interpretation of its statutory obligations. The delegations are to be read together with the following propositions.

These delegations are based on the following principles:

·                Issues relevant to a specific community should be decided as closely as possible to that community. Where an issue has city-wide implications, ie any effects of the decision cross a ward or community boundary or have consequences for the city as a whole, the matter will be decided by Council after seeking a recommendation from the relevant Community Board or (any ambiguity around the interpretation of “city-wide” will be determined by the Mayor and Chief Executive in consultation with the relevant Chair);

·                Efficient decision-making should be paramount;

·                Conflicts of interest should be avoided and risks minimised;

·                To ensure processes are free from bias and pre-determination Community Boards should not adjudicate on issues on which they have advocated or wish to advocate to Council;

·                Community Boards should proactively and constructively engage with residents on local matters that affect the community they represent and raise with Council issues raised with them by their community and advocate on behalf of their community.

These delegations:

(a)         do not delegate any function, duty or power which a statute (for example section 53(3) and clause 32(1) of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002) prohibits from being delegated;

(b)         are subject to and do not affect any delegation which the Council has already made or subsequently makes to any other committee, Council officer or other member of staff;

(c)         are subject to any other statutory requirements that may apply to a particular delegation;

(d)         are subject to any notice issued by the Council, from time to time, to a Community Board that a particular issue must be referred to Council for decision;

(e)         reflect that decisions with significant financial implications should be made by Council (or a committee with delegated authority);

(f)           promote centralisation of those functions where the appropriate expertise must be ensured; and

(g)         reflect that all statutory and legal requirements must be met.


                                                                       1                                                                       

DELEGATIONS

Decide:

·              Naming new roads and alterations to street names (in the Community Board’s area) within the provisions of Council’s Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027.

·              Official naming of parks, reserves and sports grounds within the provisions of Council’s Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027. Note 1

·              Removal and/or planting of street trees within the provisions of Council’s Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan. Note 2

·              The granting of leases and licences in terms of Council policy to voluntary organisations for Council owned properties in their local area, for example, halls, but not including the granting of leases and licences to community houses and centres.

·              The granting of rights-of-way and other easements over local purpose reserves and granting of leases or licences on local purpose reserves.

·              The granting of leases and licences for new activities in terms of Council policy to community and commercial organisations over recreation reserves subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and land managed as reserve subject to the provisions of the Local Government 2002, in their local area. (Note: renewal of existing leases and licences will be reported once a year to Council’s City Development Committee).

·              The allocation of funding from the Community Engagement Fund in accordance with Council’s adopted guidelines.

·              Expenditure of funds allocated by the Council to the Board from the Miscellaneous Budget to cover expenditure associated with the activities of the Board. The Chair to approve expenditure, in consultation with the Board, and forward appropriate documentation to the Committee Advisor for authorisation. Boards must not exceed their annual expenditure from the Miscellaneous Budget.

·              The allocation of funding for the training and development of Community Board or members, including formal training courses, attendance at seminars or attendance at relevant conferences.

CONSIDER AND MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS TO COUNCIL ON:

·              Particular issues notified from time to time by Council to the Community Board.

·              Roading issues considered by the Mayor and Chief Executive to be strategic due to their significance on a city-wide basis, including links to the State Highway, or where their effects cross ward or community boundaries.

 


 

1  This excludes sites that are considered high profile, significant on a city-wide basis due to their size and location, or where the  site crosses ward or community boundaries.

 

·              The Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan is available from Council’s Parks and Gardens Division.

·              Parks, reserves and sports ground naming for sites that have a high profile, city-wide importance due to their size and location and/or cross ward or community boundaries.

·              Representatives to any Council committee, subcommittee, subordinate decision-making body, working group, or ad hoc group on which a Community Board representative is required by Council.

·              The setting, amending or revoking of speed limits in accordance with the Hutt City Council Bylaw 2005 Speed Limits, including the hearing of any submissions.

GENERAL FUNCTIONS

Provide their local community’s input on:

·              Council’s Long Term Plan and/or Annual Plan.

·              Council’s policies, programmes (including the District Roading Programme) and bylaws.

·              Changes or variations to the District Plan.

·              Resource management issues which it believes are relevant to its local community, through advocacy.

·              The disposal or acquisition of significant assets.

·              Road safety including road safety education within its area.

·              Any other issues a Board believes is relevant to its local area.

·              Review Local Community Plans as required.

Reports may be prepared by the Board and presented to Council Committees, along with an officer’s recommendation, for consideration.

Any submissions lodged by a Board or Committee require formal endorsement by way of resolution.

Co-ordinate with Council staff:

·              Local community consultation on city-wide issues on which the Council has called for consultation.

Maintain:

·              An overview of roadworks, water supply, sewerage, stormwater drainage, waste management and traffic management for its local area.

·              An overview of parks, recreational facilities and community activities within its local area.

Develop:

·              Community Response Plans in close consultation with the Wellington Region Emergency Management Office, emergency organisations, the community, residents’ associations, other community groups, and local businesses. The Community Response Plans will be reviewed on an annual basis.

Grant:

·              Local community awards.

Promote:

·              Recreational facilities and opportunities in its area with a view to ensure maximum usage.Arts and crafts in its area.

Appoint:

·              A liaison member or, where appropriate, representatives to ad hoc bodies, which are involved in community activities within the Board’s area, on which a community representative is sought.

Endorse:

·         Amendments to the Eastbourne Community Trust Deed (Eastbourne Community Board only).


 

appendix 1 – community engagement fund

criteria

 

The fund is for local activities and events that directly benefit the local community. 

 

To be eligible for funding the organisation must be a charitable trust or an incorporated society and the activity must take place within the Hutt. 

 

Each of the city’s seven wards receive funding according to the number of residents within its boundaries. For each resident there is an allocation of 40 cents. 

The ward allocations are listed below:

Ward

Amount

Eastbourne

$2,366

Petone

$6,250

Wainuiomata

$8,607

Central

$9,320

Eastern

$8,461

Northern

$7,644

Western

$6,201

Applications must support the Local Community Plan, if there is one, and also core Council business as identified in the Long Term Plan.

Decisions

Each Community Board decides the funding applications within its area. Boards are free to distribute their funding in a single large allocation or spread it over a number of smaller ones.

What can be funded

·         purchase of office equipment

·         food and catering costs

·         community festivals

·         youth group events and projects run by the elderly or citizens associations

·         art projects that are not part of the core curriculum

·         advertising, promotion costs

What won’t be funded

Activities that:

·         promote an organisation’s religious, ethical, commercial or political views

·         involve buying land or buildings or carrying out maintenance on buildings 

·         duplicate services that are already covered by Council or by government agencies eg, health or education providers

·         have already begun or have already finished

·         involve the redistribution of funds to others at the applicant’s discretion

·         involve fundraising or legal costs

·         involve capital investments or trust funds

·         go towards prize money

·         are operational costs eg, salaries, wages, rent, power

Funding rules

Successful applicants must:

·         use funds only for the approved purpose and in accordance with any terms and conditions set by Council

·         use funds by June 30 of the following year

·         let Council’s funding officer know immediately if any difficulty or potential difficulty arises that may compromise the service or project

·         lay a complaint with Police if any funds are stolen or misappropriated, and then notify Council

·         allow Council to audit the use of the funds should it wish to do so

·         recognise Council’s  support in all publicity material, annual reports and similar publications

·         complete an Accountability Report no later than six weeks after completing the project. This should outline how the funds were used and how the community benefited

·         make a presentation to the funding group showing how the event met its objectives.

Council’s Community Funding Advisor is available to support and assist community groups when making applications through the Council’s online grants system.

 

 


 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Poari Hapori o Pito-one | Petone Community Board

 

Meeting to be held via Zoom

on

 Monday 11 April 2022 commencing at 6.30pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES

2.       He Mihi (22/646)

Aio ki te Aorangi

Aroha ki te Aorangi

Koa ki te Aorangi

Pono ki te Aorangi

Peace to the universe

Love to the universe

Joy to the universe

Truth to the universe

 

Nā Rangimarie Rose Pere

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

4.       Presentation

Presentation by the Jackson Street Programme (22/647)

Verbal presentation by a representative of the Jackson Street Programme

5.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

6.       Minutes

Meeting minutes Petone Community Board, 14 February 2022                              9

7.       Proposed New Private Street Name: 124 Richmond Street, Petone (22/621)

Report No. PCB2022/2/60 by the Traffic Engineer                                               19

8.       Democracy Advisor's Report (22/645)

Report No. PCB2022/2/59 by the Democracy Advisor                                         32

9.       Chair's Report (22/784)

Report No. PCB2022/2/65 by the Chair                                                                52

  10.     INFORMATION ITEM

          Petone Transport Projects Updates (22/676)[KG1] 

Memorandum dated 23 March 2022 by the Traffic Engineering Manager            54

11.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

Toi Lealofi

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR


 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Poari Hapori o Pito-one | Petone Community Board 

 

Minutes of a meeting held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road
Lower Hutt on

 Monday 14 February 2022 commencing at 6.30pm

 

 

 PRESENT:                       Ms P Hanna (Chair)                     Mr M Fisher (Deputy Chair)

                                          Mr M Henderson                         Mr M Roberts

Mr A Voutratzis                            Ms K Yung                

Deputy Mayor T Lewis               

 

APOLOGIES:                  There were no apologies.

 

IN ATTENDANCE:
(via audio-visual)              Mayor C Barry (part meeting)

Ms A Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

Mr B Hu, Traffic Engineering Manager

Mr J Kingsbury, Head of Transport

Mr R Soni, Traffic Engineer

Ms J Randall, Democracy Advisor

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

1.       APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

2.

He Mihi

Aio ki te Aorangi

Aroha ki te Aorangi

Koa ki te Aorangi

Pono ki te Aorangi

Peace to the universe

Love to the universe

Joy to the universe

Truth to the universe

 

Nā Rangimarie Rose Pere

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Under Standing Order 15.1, Mr Wayne Mackenzie raised a matter under public comment which fell within the terms of reference of the Petone Community Board.

 

Speaking under public comment, Mr Wayne Mackenzie advised the speed reducing humps and cushions installed by Council in Cornish Street, Petone had not been effective. He said the anti-social driving behaviour continued even though there was reducing humps and cushions.

The Head of Transport advised Council had been working with Waka Kotahi to introduce bollards or gates at night. He noted consultation on the measures would be necessary.  He highlighted that the introduction of bollards or gates would be done in partnership with the New Zealand Police.

 

Mayor Barry assured Mr Mackenzie that Council would be investigating all possible options to reduce anti-social driving in Cornish Street, Petone and in the Seaview area.

 

4.

MayoRAL ADDRESS

Mayor Barry provided a verbal address attached as page 7-8 to the minutes.

5.       Presentations

a)

Presentation by Local Councillor from Greater Wellington Regional Council

Cr van Lier was not in attendance at the meeting.

 

b)

Presentation by the Jackson Street Programme

Ms Hellen Swales, Co-ordinator of the Jackson Street Programme (JSP), provided the following update on JSP activities:

·           Virtual Christmas events went ahead as planned and had been well received. JSP intended building on this platform for future events.

 

·           JSP was encouraging residents to support local businesses and create a circular economy.

 

·           JSP was encouraging businesses to use on-line platforms so they could provide virtual shopping options.

 

·           Work with the Hutt Valley Chamber of Commerce was continuing to support local businesses with staff and financial resources.

In response to questions from members, Ms Swales confirmed some Jackson Street businesses were struggling and may close. She added JSP was hoping to hold an open-air event in May 2022 to encourage shoppers into Jackson Street.

6.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS  

There were no conflicts of interest.

 

 

7.       Minutes

Resolved: (Mr Fisher/Ms Yung)                                           Minute No. PCB 22101

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Petone Community Board held on Monday, 1 November 2021, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

8.       Reports referred for Board input before being considered by Subcommittee of Council

 

a)

Traffic Resolution - Proposed Changes to Route 150 (Kelson - Lower Hutt - Maungaraki - Petone) Bus Stop Configuration (22/151)

Report No. PCB2022/1/17 by the Transport Asset and Planning Lead

 

 

 

The Traffic Engineer elaborated on the report.

In response to questions from members, the Traffic Engineer agreed to ensure all bus stops listed in the officer’s report were within the Board’s area. He confirmed all factors regarding accessibility and safety had been taken into account when considering the proposed changes.

 

 

 

Resolved: (Ms Hanna/Mr Voutratzis)                        Minute No. PCB 22102

“That the Board recommends that the Traffic Subcommittee:

 

(1)   notes and receives the report;

(2)   endorses the proposed changes to bus stops on Route 150 within the Board’s catchment area attached as below:

a.    Hutt Road, Petone (Stop 9050)

i.     Bus Stop - At All Times (16 metres) as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

ii.    No Stopping - At All Times (9 metres) ‘exit taper’ as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

b.    Hutt Road, Petone (Stop 8046)

i.     Bus Stop - At All Times (15 metres) as shown in Appendix 2 attached to the report;

ii.    No Stopping - At All Times (20 metre) ‘entry taper’ as shown in Appendix 2 attached to the report;

iii.   No Stopping - At All Times (14 metre) ‘exit taper’ as shown in Appendix 2 attached to the report;

c.     Hutt Road, Petone (Stop 8047)

i.     Bus Stop - At All Times (15 metres) as shown in Appendix 3 attached to the report;

ii.    No Stopping - At All Times (17 metre) ‘exit taper’ as shown in Appendix 3 attached to the report;     

(3)   supports the rescinding of any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they conflict with the traffic controls described in the above resolutions; and

(4)   notes that these changes will only take effect once approval is gained from Council, and the appropriate signage and/or road-markings have been installed.”

For the reasons that the proposed bus stop layout changes will ensure that the bus box is of sufficient length to accommodate buses; no stopping restrictions will prevent other vehicles from blocking full access to the bus stop; and passengers will be able to board and alight safely and easily.

 

 

b)

Traffic Resolutions - Confirmation of Restrictions Installed under Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004 (22/94)

Report No. PCB2022/1/3 by the Transport Asset and Planning Lead

 

 

 

Resolved: (Ms Hanna/Deputy Mayor Lewis)            Minute No. PCB 22103

“That the Board:

(1)   receives the report;

(2)   notes that the following parking restrictions have been installed within the Petone Community Board catchment area as follows:

(a)     the installation of a No Stopping – At All Times restriction (8 metres) across the vehicle access (driveway) serving the property located at 134 Hutt Road, Petone, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 1 to the report;

(b)     the installation of a No Stopping – At All Times restriction (9 metres) across the vehicle accesses (driveways) serving property numbers 16 and 18 Tirangi Road, Moera, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

(c)      the installation of a No Stopping – At All Times restriction (37 metres) on the inside of a bend outside property numbers 163 to 165 Riverside Drive, Waiwhetu, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 3 to the report;

(d)     the installation of No Stopping – At All Times restrictions (11 metres and 9 metres) across the vehicle accesses (driveways) serving property numbers
7 to 9 and 13 Richmond Street, Petone, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 4 to the report;

(e)      the installation of a No Stopping – At All Times restriction (5 metres) across the vehicle access (driveway) serving property number 13 King Street, Petone, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 5 to the report;

(f)      the installation of multiple No Stopping – At All Times restrictions (90 metres) across the vehicle accesses (driveways) serving NZOSL Hutt City Terminal at 55 Port Road, Seaview, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 6 to the report; and

(g)     the installation of a No Stopping – At All Times restriction (5 metres) across the vehicle access (driveway) servicing property number 39 Pirie Crescent, Moera, as shown on the plan attached as Appendix 7 to the report;

 

(3)   notes that Council will rescind any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they conflict with the traffic controls described in this resolution; at its meeting in February 2022; and

(4)   notes that these restrictions have already been installed and are currently being enforced through the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.”

For the reason that the parking restrictions appear in the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004, and these resolutions formally reinforce the restriction(s) as recommended in Part 13 – Parking Control – Traffic Control Devices Manual.

 

9.

Democracy Advisor's Report (21/2264)

Report No. PCB2022/1/14 by the Democracy Advisor

 

The Chair elaborated on several aspects of the report. She tabled an update from Council’s Head of Parks and Reserves on the efficacy of Big Belly Bins that were installed along the Petone foreshore in October 2020 (attached as pages 8-9 to the minutes).

In response to questions from members, the Director Neighbourhoods and Communities agreed to provide members with an update on housing intensification planning after the Council meeting on 23 March 2022.

 

Resolved: (Ms Hanna/Mr Fisher)                                        Minute No. PCB 22104

“That the Board receives and notes the report.”

10.

Chair's Report (22/231)

Report No. PCB2022/1/19 by the Chair, Petone Community Board

 

The Chair elaborated on the report.

In response to a question from a member, the Director Neighbourhoods and Communities advised that Heritage New Zealand had requested a conservation report for Petone Wharf. She noted this would also inform the resource consent process. She added the resource consent application was expected to be lodged in March or April 2022 with the application publicly notified in May or June 2022. She agreed the Head of Parks and Reserves would attend the Board’s meeting on 11 April 2022 to provide an update on progress.

Deputy Mayor Lewis thanked the Chair for her continued input to the Board’s work while she was on leave.

 

Resolved: (Ms Hanna/Deputy Mayor Lewis)                     Minute No. PCB 22105

“That the report be noted and received.”

 


 

11.     Information Item

 

Update: COVID-19, Petone Library remedial work and Moera Library proposed extension. (22/215)

 

The Director Neighbourhoods and Communities advised the concept plans for the Moera library completed approximately 18 months ago would be refreshed to ensure they were still fit for purpose. She advised that since there was significant community engagement on the plans at that time, there would be a limited
check-in as part of the refresh in February or March 2022.  She highlighted that Council’s engagement team would spend time at the Moera library and with key stakeholders. She requested that members assist by identifying any key stakeholders that should be involved in the process.

The Director Neighbourhoods and Communities advised a series of consultation workshops on plans for the refurbishment of the Petone library would be held in March/April 2022. She agreed to circulate draft plans to members before consultation took place.

In response to questions from members, the Director Neighbourhoods and Communities agreed to ensure the timeline for installing an EV charging station at the Moera library would not disrupt the Moera library upgrade.  She said the placement of the entrance was chosen for safety, weather and prevailing winds.  She confirmed the Petone library refurbishment would also include a conversation about the surrounding area.

12.     QUESTIONS

There were no questions.

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 7.17 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

P Hanna

CHAIR

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 11th day of April 2022

 


 

Mayoral Address

 

Kia ora tatou,  

 

Firstly, welcome back, I hope you have all had a refreshing summer break and are feeling energised as we get back into work for 2022!  This year we will be heavily focusing on delivering our Long Term Plan. As you know, over the next ten years Council will invest $1.5 billion in projects that aim to build strong foundations for the future of our city.  In particular, we are addressing issues within our Three Waters network and transport infrastructure, both of which continue to affect the communities you represent.  If we want to build a city where everyone can thrive, we need to get the basics right – and that starts with ensuring our water is safe to drink, our systems handling storm events, and our infrastructure having the capacity to support the growth we’re experiencing.  And it also means building and improving a transport system that makes it easier for everyone to get around our city. Whether it be on public transport, on bikes, walking, or in private vehicles, we are determined to address the causes of congestion so all modes can move around Lower Hutt efficiently.  

 

Petone  

 

2022 has a range of other exciting investments being made in Petone to support the community.  Work begins this year on strengthening and upgrading the iconic Petone Wharf, with $7 million set aside for this key project.  We are also spending $206,000 to further develop the Petone 2040 vision, so that a pathway can be set out to capitalise on the potential this community holds.  And $1.5 million will be spent to continue upgrading Petone Library, so that our communities can continue to use the range of valuable resources it has to offer.  

 

 COVID-19 

2022 is shaping up to be another busy year, and it’s fair to say COVID-19 is going to continue to play a part.  

 

I urge you all to encourage members of your community to get boosted, or vaccinated if they haven’t started that journey yet, and continue to scan into places they visit.  

 

With omicron being the dominant variant in New Zealand now, cases are sure to rise. We need to do everything we can to prevent the spread, but in the event that it does, we need to be equipped to track and deal with outbreaks.  

 

And encourage your communities to be prepared for self-isolation. Every family, big or small, needs to have a plan for how they can be supported in the case that a member has to self-isolate.  

 

 

Conclusion  

 

While 2022 will include a number of challenges, I’m confident that this year will also be full of amazing opportunities.  

 

The work we’re doing together in Lower Hutt – getting the basics right to build the foundations needed for our future – will bring our communities closer together, and I’m excited to see what we will collectively achieve this year.  


 

Kia ora Pam

 

Here is an update about the Big Belly bins.  This information is sourced from the Parks and Reserves team and Grant at Downer NZ Ltd.

 

By replacing 21 traditional bins requiring frequent emptying with 6 Big Belly Bins the annual cost of rubbish bin collection at Petone Foreshore has reduced approximately $21,000 incl gst.  In addition to the lower operational the cost, the Big Belly Bins hold more rubbish and loose litter has reduced on the Foreshore.  The Parks and Reserves Team’s view is that Big Belly Bins are a better option than traditional bins on the Petone Foreshore at this time.  Our view may change as prices alter.

 

From a long term perspective, when we take into account the cost of supply, install and emptying over the useful life of the Petone Foreshore bins, swapping to Big Belly bins represents a saving of approximately $74,000 incl gst.

 

Six Big Belly rubbish bins were installed as a trial on the Petone Foreshore in Oct 2020.  The six Big Belly Bins replaced a suite of 21 bins (15 traditional bins removed from the Foreshore).  The bins are rented from a commercial supplier.  These solar powered bins compact litter automatically and can hold significantly higher quantities of rubbish than traditional bins.  They also communicate data about remaining capacity via a website and mobile app.  The bin supplier is responsible for replacing the bins at the end of their useful life. 

 

Council’s operational maintenance contractor for reserves, Downer NZ Ltd and their sub-contractor Intergroup, are required to monitor these bins using the app and empty them I time to prevent them becoming over-full.  The timing and frequency of bin emptying varies in response to use. 

 

The total cost of supply, install and emptying 21 traditional bins is approximately $440,000 for 15 years or $29,333 per year.

 

The total cost of hiring and emptying 6 Big Belly bins is approximately $365,250 for 15 years or $24,350 per year.

 

These figures include gst.

 

For this exercise, I have assumed that the useful life of rubbish bins on the Foreshore is approximately 15 years.  I have not included the cost of removing the 21 traditional bins.

 

Because the bins contain a compactor, the volume of rubbish is reduced and a much greater amount of compacted rubbish can be contained in the bin before emptying is required.  This this extends the time taken to fill the bin and reduces the frequency of collection.

 

Emptying traditional bins on the Petone Foreshore and meeting the requirements of the contract specification has been very challenging for the contractor on fine days.  Even with some bins being emptied 3 times daily, it was difficult for the contractor to meet contract specifications.  Since the six Big Belly bins were installed, servicing once per day meeting is sufficient even during summer.  Non-compliance with the contract (as it relates to litter bin emptying) is greatly reduced.

Statement from contractor:

 

next to no complaints since being introduced, we have noticed a decrease in the amount of loose litter along foreshore also, the closed lids don’t have the issue of wind blow and seagulls taken rubbish out of the bins.” 

 

So far the Parks and Reserves Business Unit and the contractor have been impressed with the Big Belly bin trial on the Petone Foreshore.  Advantages of the new bins include:

 

Please call me if you have any questions about the Big Belly Bins.

 

Ngā mihi

 



Kelly Crandle
Head of Parks and Reserves 

 

 


                                                                                       1                                                           11 April 2022

Petone Community Board

17 March 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/621)

 

 

 

 

Report no: PCB2022/2/60

 

Proposed New Private Street Name:
124 Richmond Street, Petone

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The report seeks approval for appropriate street names for two private roads at 124 Richmond Street, Petone.

Recommendations

That the Board:

(1)   notes and receives the report;

(2)   notes that the new private road (Road 1) will continue the use of the name ‘John Street’.

(3)   approves a new street name for new private road (Road 2) shown in Appendix 1 of the report, as suggested below:

a)   “Wharawhara” suggested road type “Way”;

b)   “Hohipene” suggested road type “Way”;

c)   an alternate name from the names provided by the developer; or

d)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

e)   an appropriate name tabled during the meeting;

(4)   approves a new street name for new private road (Road 3) shown in Appendix 1 of the report, as suggested below:

a)   “Takiri” suggested road type “Court”;

b)   an alternate name from the names provided by the developer; or

c)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

d)   an appropriate name tabled during the meeting;

 

(5)   approves an appropriate LINZ approved back up name if one of the options 3(a), 3(b) or 4(a) is selected; and

(6)   approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

 

For the reasons that the development may proceed to completion as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require formalised street addresses for the necessary connections to be provided.

 

Background

2.    The development of this site creates 95 residential lots gaining access off Richmond and Bouverie Street, and three new private roads, two of which require new street names.

3.    Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that Road 1 which is directly off the intersection of existing John Street and Richmond Street (as shown on aerial below), can continue to use John Street as its name.

4.    Remaining Road 2 and Road 3 require new names.

5.    The responsibility for naming new roads within Petone lies with Petone Community Board.

Discussion

6.    This is to inform the Board that at the Council meeting held on 23 March 2022, Council had adopted the Kaupapa Here Tapanga, the New Street naming Policy.

7.    This process was carried out under the old policy where no public consultation was needed for private roads, given that the process commenced last year. Officers have however carried out a two-week consultation with the Board and relevant Mana Whenua (Taranaki Whānui) on suitable names.

8.    Below names were suggested through the community network consultation.

a)   Ripeka Wharawhara Love

Rīpeka Wharawhara Love was through descent and marriage kin to Te Āti Awa chiefs whose mana continued to extend over the Wellington region after the arrival of Pākehā settlers in 1840. As an heir to that mana, she was part of an ongoing tradition of leadership, exercising with her husband the rights and duties of Wellington's leading Māori families. (Source: Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand). She lived at Taumata, the house on Korokoro and was awarded an OBE for her work in the 1918 Pandemic. More information on the name can be found on

https://teara.govt.nz/en/biographies/3l14/love-ripeka-wharawhara.

It is to be noted that a private street named ‘Ripeka Way’ exists in Moera named after the daughter of one of the earliest settlers in Petone, Joseph Robinson.

b)   Te Amo Hohipene

The mother of Wi Hape Paku Love (Mother-in-law to Ripeka Wharawhara).

c)   Takiri Eruini or Takiri Love

Takiri Akuhata Love was born in Paraparaumu 1900, her parents were Ruhia Epiha and Akuhata Eruini of Te Atiawa Ki Whakarongotai descent. Although associated with the Takiri House on Coastlands, Takiri Eruini’s family are all Petone based, and she passed away in Petone in 1983. In a difficult time for Māori landowners balancing their commitment to preserving their lands for future generations and meeting the pressure to release land for sale, or having blocks taken under the Public Works Act, Takiri steadfastly stood for Te Atiawa.

 

9.   The three names above are currently being checked with LINZ for suitability with LINZ. LINZ’s comments on the names will be presented to the committee at the meeting.

10.  The developer has submitted the following names and background information for consideration for Road 2 and 3. [KG2] 

d)   Player

Submitted as the first preference for Road 2, Player is taken from John Players & Sons who in amalgamation of 13 British tobacco & cigarette companies (including WH + HO Wills) created Imperial Tobacco Company in 1901. Imperial Tobacco purchased the factory in the 1990s. As Imperial was unavailable due to it already being used in Wellington, Player is offered in recognition of the strong link that Imperial has to the site and Petone.

e)   Tobacco

The name ‘Tobacco’ has been selected as it is the raw material used in the factory that sat on the site since 1919. The site is well known for having a cigarette factory onsite for about a decade and presents strong links to the site. The developer has submitted this name as the backup name for Road

2.

f)   Wills

Submitted for Road 3, Wills has been taken from WD & HO Wills who are a British tobacco and cigarette company who moved its New Zealand manufacturing to the Petone factory in 1919.

 

11.  All three developer proposed names above have been checked with LINZ for duplicates and acceptability and are suitable for use at this location.

Options

12. The suggested names from the community network for the two roads being discussed are;

a.   Ripeka Wharawhara Love;

b.   Te Amo Hohipene; and

c.   Takiri Eruini or Takiri Love.

 

13.  The suggested names from the developer for the two roads being discussed are;

d.   Player;

e.   Tobacco; and

f.    Wills

14.  Road types suggested are;

e)   Way,

f)    Court, or

g)   an appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

15.  The names in no. 12 above are currently being checked with LINZ for suitability. LINZ comments on the names will be presented to the committee at the meeting.

16.  If options in no. 12 are selected, a backup name from the names approved by LINZ (Names submitted by the developer or from the Reserved List) is required for each road if LINZ approval for the recommended names have not been received before the meeting.

17. The community board also has the option of selecting a different combination of names from the options in no.12.

18.  If an alternate name is tabled during the meeting, it can be considered for use but will be subject to meeting the requirements of AS/NZS 4819:2011 and gaining LINZ approval. An appropriate backup name must also be recommended in case the alternate name is deemed not suitable.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

19. The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.  

Consultation

20.  As is normal with the naming of private ways, consultation has been limited to the relevant Board, the developer and their community network.

21.  Based on the site’s proximity to 134 Richmond Street, which backs on to this section and is a Taranaki Whānui RFR property, suggestions have been invited by officers from Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika (Port Nicholson Block Settlement) Trust Naming Committee. No suggestions were received.

22.  When researching names for the streets, the developer’s representative has also approached Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika (Port Nicholson Block Settlement) Trust Naming Committee and have had no response.

23. As a result of community network consultation, three names were submitted by Pam Hanna of Petone Community Board.

Legal Considerations

24.  The Community Board has the delegated responsibility to name the private road.

25.  The new street name is required as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require individual street addresses for the necessary connections to be provided.

Financial Considerations

26.  There are no financial considerations. The developer is responsible for the necessary street name signs. This will be undertaken by Council’s contractor with the cost paid by the developer.


 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - 124 Richmond Street - Street Naming

25

2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Names

27

3

Appendix 3 - Extract from Permitted Roads

30

 

 

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport




Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - 124 Richmond Street - Street Naming

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Names

 




Attachment 3

Appendix 3 - Extract from Permitted Roads

 



                                                                                       1                                                           11 April 2022

Petone Community Board

24 March 2022

 

 

File: (22/645)

 

 

 

Report no: PCB2022/2/59

 

Democracy Advisor's Report

 

 

 

1.    The primary purpose of the report is to update the Board on items of interest.

 

Recommendations

That the Board:

(1)   receives the report;

(2)   notes the amendment to the Community Boards - Functions and Delegations as approved by Council on 23 March 2022 attached as Appendix 1 to the report; and

(3)   notes the Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027 attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

 

Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027

 

2.     Council at its meeting held on 23 March 2022 adopted the Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027 attached as Appendix 2 to the report.  At the same meeting, Council agreed to amend the community boards’ delegations as highlighted in red wording (attached as Appendix 1 to the report) to reflect that the naming of new roads and alterations to street names will be in accordance with the Kaupapa Here Tapanga - Naming Policy 2022-2027. 

 

Consultation and community engagement

 

Integrated Transport Strategy

 

3.     The draft Integrated Transport Strategy (the strategy) sets out Council’s vision and roadmap for the future of Lower Hutt’s transport network.  The strategy will support future-focused decision making for integrated transport that improves everyone’s experience and options. Focus areas include optimising the transport and land-use system to minimise demand, supporting travel behaviour change, making it easier to use public transport and improving transport infrastructure. Consultation begins 30 March 2022 and ends 12 April 2022. You can find out more information and take the survey: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/integrated-transport-strategy

District Plan, housing intensification consultation

 

4.    Public consultation will commence in late March 2022 on parts of Lower Hutt’s District Plan affected by new legislation requiring councils to allow higher and denser housing construction. This legislation forces a change to Council’s work on the District Plan review that was already underway. Public consultation on the changes will open on 28 March 2022 and run until the end of April 2022. Council’s District Plan Review Subcommittee will consider any further changes following consultation, and a proposed change to affected parts of the District Plan will then be released for public consultation in August 2022. You can find out more information and have your say here: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/dp-intensification

 

Three Waters Consultation

 

5.    Government is proposing reforms to how three waters services are delivered across New Zealand. Although this is a government process and Council has limited influence over the outcome, officers will be preparing to engage residents on their thoughts about water and the proposed reforms. Officers are hosting an online survey from 24 March to 7 April 2022, alongside information about what the proposals mean for Lower Hutt. The results of this survey will be used to inform Council’s submission to the Environment Select Committee once the reform legislation is introduced to Parliament later this year. You can find out more information and have your say here: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/three-waters-reform

 

Electric Vehicle Parking

 

6.    Lower Hutt has a goal of halving emissions by 2030 and reducing emissions to net zero by no later than 2050. Over half of our emissions come from transport, so in continuing our goal towards a lower carbon city we are installing additional EV charging stations across Lower Hutt. We have five proposed locations that we want your feedback on. You can find out more information and have your say here: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/ev-chargers

 


 

Lower Hutt Community Climate Change Response

 

7.    The Lower Hutt Community, through a co-design process led by a group of community representatives, has the Lower Hutt Climate Pathway Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai, ‘Our Race against time Ka whati te tai, ka pao te torea!’. You can find out more information on here: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/communityclimatechange

 

Updates from the last Board meeting

 

Housing Intensification in areas subject to natural hazards in Petone

 

8.    Council’s Director, Environment and Sustainability provided a response on whether housing intensification would be permitted in areas subject to natural hazards in Petone:

 

Whilst Council is required by government to provide for intensification in most of the residential areas of Lower Hutt (including residential areas in Petone), Council will have the ability to restrict building heights and density to the extent necessary to address the qualifying matters specified in the Resource Management Act.  The management of significant risks from natural hazards is one of these qualifying matters.

 

Council officers are looking at what areas are particularly prone to natural hazards, including earthquakes and tsunami. 

 

Council will have the ability to restrict building heights and density in the identified areas to the extent necessary to manage the natural hazard risk.

 

In an extreme circumstance, this may mean that new dwellings in an area are prevented (an example of this would areas on top of the Wellington Fault, where the District Plan currently prevents new dwellings).

 

However, in areas where the hazard risk is less severe (such as an area where there is occasional ponding) development may still be enabled.

 

2021/2022 Miscellaneous Administration and Training Budgets

 

9.    The Board is allocated $8,000 GST exclusive per annum, comprised of

 

       Miscellaneous Administration                            $5,000

       Training                                                               $3,000

 

10.  The Board has no expenditure to 21 March 2022.

 

11.  The Young Elected Members’ Hui that was postponed in October 2021 due to COVID-19 restrictions will no longer take place in 2022.

 


 

 

Miscellaneous Administration

Training

 

$5,000.00

$3,000.00

Expenditure

             

$0.00

$0.00

Balance remaining

$5,000.00

$3,000.00

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 Updated Community Boards - Functions and Delegations

36

2

Appendix 2 - Kaupapa Here Tapanga Naming Policy

40

 

 

Author: Toi Lealofi

Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 Updated Community Boards - Functions and Delegations

 





Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Kaupapa Here Tapanga Naming Policy

 













                                                                                       1                                                           11 April 2022

Petone Community Board

29 March 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/784)

 

 

 

 

Report no: PCB2022/2/65

 

Chair's Report

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Chair’s report be received and notes.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Chair's report

53

 

 

 

Author: Pam Hanna

Chair, Petone Community Board

 

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Chair's report

 



MEMORANDUM                                                  1                                                           11 April 2022

Our Reference          22/676

TO:                      Chair and Members

Petone Community Board

FROM:                Bob Hu

DATE:                23 March 2022

SUBJECT:           Petone Transport Projects Updates

 

Recommendation

That the Board receives and notes this memorandum.

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    To provide members information regarding to the planned transport projects in Petone area.

Background

2.    The previous Esplanade Optimisation Study were developed with valuable inputs from the members in mid-2021.

3.    The study investigated transport related problems and opportunities on the corridor along the Esplanade between the Hutt Road roundabout and Waione Street roundabout as well as its connections.

4.    The study recommended a program of interventions including school/workplace travel plans, intersection treatment, bus service improvements, and walking and cycling connections.

5.    Following the study, Council is now progressing further with a number interventions’ planning and designs, and these are briefly discussed below.

6.    Jackson Street Walking and Cycling connections, the project is aiming to provide improved walking and cycling connections between Jackson Street and The Esplanade, and it will be delivered under the Low Cost Low Risk program with confirmed funding. It is currently under the optioneering and design phase, and the first design workshop is planned for next week. The construction is planned for 2023.

7.    The Esplanade Walking and Cycling connections, the project is aiming to provide improved walking and cycling connections between Te Ara Tupua (Ngauranga to Petone Cycleway) and Tupua Horo Nuku (Eastern Bays Shared Path), and it will be delivered under the Cross Valley Link stage 1 program. It is currently under Single Stage Business Case for funding application and design, and the first design workshop is planned in late April 2022.

8.    School Travel Plans, the Transport Safety Coordinator (replacement for Aileen Campbell) has been appointed, and the travel plan programs will be delivered as part of the Business as Usual for the new person.

9.    Station Accessibility, the project is aiming to provide improved accessibility for three train stations including Petone Station, Ava Station and Woburn Station. This work will be delivered under the Cross Valley Link stage 1 program. Council officers are working closely with Greater Wellington Regional Council’s public transport and mode shift team developing options and designs. The interventions are planned to be implemented within the current 3 years.

10.  Jackson Street bus stop improvements, the work is led by Great Wellington Regional Council with Hutt City Council’s inputs. Council officers will ensure the improved bus stops will align and add value to other transport projects in the vicinity. The interventions are planned to be implemented early 2023.

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

Author: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


 [KG1]should this be an information item?

 [KG2]has the developer been advised of the names provided by mana whenua?