HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

KOMITI HANGANGA | Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

 

 

22 February 2022

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Tuesday 1 March 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

This meeting is held under the Red Traffic setting.

Members of the public wishing to speak to items on the agenda are asked to contact

democraticservicesteam@huttcity.govt.nz

 

Membership

 

 

Cr D Hislop (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr G Barratt

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr A Mitchell (Deputy Chair)

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

INFRASTRUCTURE & REGULATORY COMMITTEE
Membership:		8
Meeting Cycle:		Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:		Half of the members
Membership RMA Hearings:	An independent Commissioner plus a minimum of either 3 or 4 elected members (including the Chair) and alternates who have current certification under the Making Good Decisions Training, Assessment and Certification Programme for RMA Decision-Makers. 
Reports to:		Council

OVERVIEW:

This is an operationally focused committee, overseeing Council’s above and below ground core infrastructure needs, and core regulatory functions. 

The Committee is aligned with the Economy & Development, and Environment & Sustainability, Directorates.

Its areas of focus are:

§  Three waters infrastructure

§  Roading/transport

§  Infrastructure strategy

§  Integrated transport strategy

§  Wharves

§  Environmental consents

§  Regulatory functions including enforcement

PURPOSE:

To deliver quality infrastructure to support healthy and sustainable living, providing efficient and safe transport options, and promoting the city’s prosperity.

To consider matters relating to the regulatory and quasi-judicial responsibilities of the Council under Council’s bylaws and relevant legislation including the following:

§  Building Act 2004

§  Dog Control Act 1996

§  Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987

§  Local Government Act 1974

§  Local Government Act 2002

§  Public Works Act 1981

§  Reserves Act 1977

§  Resource Management Act 1991

§  Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012

DELEGATIONS FOR THE COMMITTEES AREAS OF FOCUS:

§   All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities including the activities outlined below.

§   Develop required strategies and policies. Recommend draft and final versions to Council for adoption where they have a city-wide or strategic focus.

§   Implement, monitor and review strategies and policies.

§   Oversee the implementation of major projects provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§   Oversee budgetary decisions provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§   Oversee the development and implementation of plans and functions that promote economic wellbeing.

§   Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s Economy & Development Directorate.

§   Undertake the administration of all statutory functions, powers and duties other than those specifically delegated to any other committee or subcommittee, or retained by Council.

§   Conduct any consultation processes required on infrastructure issues before the Committee.

§   Approval and forwarding of submissions.

§   Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

§   The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee. When exercised, the report/minutes of the meeting require a resolution noting that the committee has performed the responsibilities of another committee and the reason/s.

§   If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Communities Committee and/or Climate Change & Sustainability Committee, then the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committees. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

Additional Infrastructure Delegations:

§  Determine roading issues considered by the Mayor and Chief Executive to be strategic due to their significance on a city-wide basis, including links to the State Highway, or where their effects cross ward or community boundaries.

 

§  Hear objections to specified traffic matters where the community board wishes to take an advocacy role.

§  Make decisions under Clause 11(e) of the Tenth Schedule of the Local Government Act 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965 in respect of temporary road closures, including making decisions on any ancillary matters including, without limitation, approval of temporary “No Stopping” restrictions under Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017. 

§  Undertake hearings on road stopping under the Local Government Act 1974.

§  Make recommendations to Council whether to proceed with a road stopping and the disposal of stopped road, including (where the proposal includes or involves a related acquisition, disposal or land exchange) a recommendation to Council on the acquisition, disposal or exchange.

§  Consider and recommend to Council any request to the Crown that a road is stopped under section 116 of the Public Works Act 1981, and the disposal of the stopped road.

§  Make any resolution required under section 319A of the Local Government Act 1974 regarding the naming of new roads and alterations to street names (other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas).

Additional Regulatory Delegations:

§  Develop any regulations required to achieve Council’s objectives.

§  Approve Council’s list of hearings commissioners under the Resource Management Act 1991, including councillors sitting as hearings commissioners and independent commissioners.

§  Conduct statutory hearings on regulatory matters and make decisions on those hearings2, excluding those conducted under the Resource Management Act 1991, which are delegated to the Hearings Subcommittee and District Plan Hearings Subcommittee.

§  Authorise the submission of appeals to the Environment Court on behalf of Council.

§  Make decisions on applications required under the Development Contributions Policy for remissions, postponements, reconsiderations and objections.  

§  Recommend to Council the list of members approved to be members of the District Licensing Committee under section 192 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

Delegations to make Appointments:

§  The Chair of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, is authorised to appoint a subcommittee of suitably qualified persons to conduct hearings on behalf of the Committee.

§  The Chair of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, is authorised to appoint a Hearings Subcommittee of suitably qualified persons to conduct resource consent and related hearings on behalf of the Committee.

§  The Chair of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee is authorised to appoint three people from the list prepared under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 to specific meetings (Chair and two members).

NOTE:

The Ministry for the Environment advocates that Councils offer specialist RMA training in areas of law which are difficult to grasp or where mistakes are commonly made. This is to complement the Good Decision Making RMA training that they run (which is an overview and basic summary of decision making, rather than an in-depth training in specific areas of the RMA). Therefore in order to facilitate this, the RMA training run for councillors that wish to be hearings commissioners is mandatory.

Reasons for the importance of the training:

1.   Hearings commissioners are kept abreast of developments in the legislation.

2. Legal and technical errors that have been made previously are avoided (many of which have resulted in Environment Court action which is costly, time consuming and often creates unrealistic expectations for the community).

3. The reputation of Council as good and fair decision makers or judges (rather than legislators) is upheld.

1            When acting in this capacity the committee has a quasi-judicial role.

 

 


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Hanganga | Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Tuesday 1 March 2022 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have     

4.       Recommendations to Council - Te Kaunihera o Te Awa Kairangi -
23 March 2022

a)    47a Collingwood Street Road Stopping and Disposal (21/1731)

Report No. IARCC2021/5/273 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner           10

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

b)    Draft Integrated Transport Strategy (22/354)

Report No. IARCC2022/1/35 by the Head of Transport                             14

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 


 

5.       PETITION – SAVE THE ATKINSON TREE IN YORK BAY, EASTBOURNE FROM REMOVAL (21/425)

          To be seperately ciruclated.

6.       Proposed Public Street Names: Subdivision of 64 Waipounamu Drive, Kelson (21/1641)

Report No. IARCC2021/5/274 by the Traffic Engineer                                         52

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report to be discussed.”

7.       Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Muritai Road, Eastbourne - ANZAC DAY SERVICE 2022 (22/273)

Report No. IARCC2022/1/36 by the Traffic Engineer                                          65

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

8.       Proposed Temporary Road Closures: Laings Road, Knights Road and Queens Drive, Hutt Central - ANZAC DAY DAWN SERVICE AND WREATH LAYING 2022 (22/274)

Report No. IARCC2022/1/37 by the Traffic Engineer                                          73

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

9.       Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Reynolds Bach Drive, Silverstream - Hutt Valley Motorsport Club Hill Climb 2022 (22/276)

Report No. IARCC2022/1/38 by the Traffic Engineer                                          81

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

10.     Three Waters Update (22/314)

Report No. IARCC2022/1/39 by the Strategic Advisor                                        89

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

11.     Regulatory Matters (22/212)

Report No. IARCC2022/1/40 by the Head of Regulatory Services                       93

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

12.     Information Item

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee Work Programme 2022 (22/305)

Report No. IARCC2022/1/32 by the Senior Democracy Advisor                       116

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

13.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

14.     EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

CHAIR'S RECOMMENDATION:

 

“That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely:

          15.          Approval of the Riverlink Project Partner Agreement Variation (22/404)

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:


 

(A)

(B)

(C)

 

 

 

General subject of the matter to be considered.

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter.

Ground under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approval of the Riverlink Project Partner Agreement Variation.

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations) (s7(2)(i)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as specified in Column (B) above.”

 

 

Toi Lealofi

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR

 


 


                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

20 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1731)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/5/273

 

47a Collingwood Street Road Stopping and Disposal

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To agree to initiate the road stopping and disposal process for 47a Collingwood Street, Waterloo. 

Recommendation

That the Committee recommends to Council that the service lane 47a Collingwood Street, Waterloo SEC 41 BLK XXIV Hutt Valley Settlement SO 24065 be stopped under s116 of the Public Works Act 1981 and sold to an adjoining property owner.

For the reason to dispose of land that is surplus to Council requirements.

 

Background

2.    At its meeting on 24 March 2009, Council resolved to dispose of 47a Collingwood Street and enter into further discussions with the owner of 55 Collingwood Street and the Order of St John who owned 45 and 47 Collingwood Street at that time.

3.    The parcel was never disposed of due to a failure to agree to a purchase price with the neighbours and complications around the parcel’s status as a service lane.

4.    Since then, parcels 45 and 47 Collingwood Street have been sold and the new owner requested that the road stopping and disposal be readdressed.

 

 

Discussion

5.    The location of 47a Collingwood Street can be seen on the map in appendix 1 as attached to the report.  The subject land is essentially land locked between private properties and it has no independent legal access. The land has a legal road status, which will have to be road stopped or status changed to enable a sale and purchase to proceed. The land has little public value in terms of open space or recreation values. The land has been valued at $280,000.  

6.    The road stopping process can be undertaken under s116 Public Works Act 1981 (PWA) or the Local Government Act 1974 (LGA).  The main difference between the two is that the LGA requires public consultation. 

7.    It is proposed that the PWA be used for the road stopping process and that consultation be undertaken with the property owners directly adjoining the subject land.  These discussions will include an opportunity for those owners to consider purchasing the property following the road stop process.

8.   In 2008 the adjoining properties were invited to make a submission on the proposal to classify 47a Collingwood Street as surplus to Council requirements. St John’s were the only party to make a submission requesting that the land be gifted or leased to them.  No action was taken at the time and St John’s has since sold the land privately.

9.    Urban Plus Limited (UPL), on behalf of Council, has held preliminary sale and purchase discussions with owners of 47 and 45 Collingwood Street.  These owners are proposing to undertake a housing subdivision across 45 and 47 Collingwood Street, and it makes sense that the land locked 47a also be included as a part of this development. 

10. An independent legal title review was conducted on the parcel in 2009.  This noted that it is unlikely that an offer back would be required, and that the site could only be sold to an adjoining owner.  Officers will obtain further confirmation as a part of the process.

11. Road and traffic has been consulted and there is no concern regarding the sale of a traffic engineering point of view.

Options

12.  To enable the proposal to enter into a sale and purchase process, agree to the road stopping under the Public Works Act 1981 or agree to a road stopping under the Local Government Act 1974.

13.  Not approve the road stopping and sale process and retain the land. This is not supported by officers.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

14.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

15.  The land has no ecological or amenity reserve value that could contribute to mitigating the effects of climate change.

Consultation

16.  Consultation is not required by legislation however, adjoining landowners would be given information of the intent of Council to road stop and dispose of the parcel.

Legal Considerations

17.  Land stopped under s116 of the Public Works Act 1981 may be dealt with in the same manner and in all respects as if the road had been stopped pursuant to the Local Government Act 1974.

Financial Considerations

18.  Legal, valuation, and consultant fees will be offset by the land sale.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: 47a Collingwood Street Location

13

 

 

Author: Tyler Kimbrell

Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kelly Crandle

Head of Parks and Reserves

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: 47a Collingwood Street Location

 


                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

13 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/354)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2022/1/35

 

Draft Integrated Transport Strategy

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee’s approval of the draft Integrated Transport Strategy and recommend that it be referred to Council for approval to commence public consultation.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)   notes and receives the draft Integrated Transport Strategy; and

(2)   approves the draft Integrated Transport Strategy, attached as Appendix 1 to the report, to commence public consultation.

 

Background

2.    Officers started working on the Integrated Transport Strategy in September 2020.

3.    Elected Members have been briefed on the development of the strategy on several occasions, most recently on 28 October 2021.

4.    The draft Integrated Transport Strategy has been informed by community and through a series of stakeholder engagements.

Discussion

5.    The draft Integrated Transport Strategy includes the following vision:

Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt has a sustainable transport network that connects communities and enables all of our people to thrive

 

6.    The draft strategy provides feedback from the community and stakeholders which has shaped the 7 focus areas:

·    Build housing close to employment and activity centres to reduce travel distances and reliance on cars

·    Encourage people to rethink how & when they travel

·    Support the uptake of cleaner transport options

·    Make it easier for all people to use public transport

·    Create people-focused, liveable streets around key transport hubs and local centres

·    Develop a connected and safe transport network that makes it more attractive for people to cycle, walk or use the bus

·    Improve connectivity to the regional transport network to support the movement of goods and services

7.    Mana Whenua have been engaged to provide guidance and feedback on the draft Integrated Transport Strategy (this is ongoing). Mana Whenua have been provided an option to weave their contributions throughout the document and or have their own specific section. Mana Whenua contributions to the draft Integrated Transport Strategy will be included prior to the draft strategy going to Council on 23 March 2022.

8.    It should be noted that members have been provided with a text-only version as the graphics are still being developed. This will be finalised ahead of the paper going to Council in March.

9.    Following public consultation, the strategy will be updated to reflect public feedback, then come back for endorsement from the Committee and Council.

Options

10.  Officers are seeking the approval of the Committee on the draft strategy ahead of it being released for wider public consultation.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

11.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide. The development of the draft Integrated Transport Strategy has involved the relevant officer within council and members of the public (who have interests in climate change matters) for their input as a part of the consultation and stakeholder engagement process.

Consultation

12.  The draft strategy has been developed based on consultation with Council Officers, Elected Members, key stakeholders, mana whenua and the community.

Legal Considerations

13.  There are no legal considerations in respect of this paper.

Financial Considerations

14.  There are no financial considerations in respect of this paper.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Draft Integrated Transport Strategy

17

 

Author: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Draft Integrated Transport Strategy

 




































                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

01 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (21/1641)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/5/274

 

Proposed Public Street Names: Subdivision of 64 Waipounamu Drive, Kelson

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek approval for appropriate street names for two public roads and one private road of the subdivision at 64 Waipounamu Drive, Kelson.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   approves a new street name for new public road (Road 2) shown in Appendix 1 of the report, as suggested below:

(a)      “Kairaumati” recommended road type “Crescent”;

(b)      an alternate name as provided by the developer;

(c)      an alternate name from the list provided through public consultation;

(d)      an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

(e)      an appropriate name tabled during the meeting;

(2)   approves a new street name for new public road (Road 3) shown in Appendix 1 of the report, as suggested below:

(a)       “Takapō” recommended road type “Grove”;

(b)      an alternate name as provided by the developer;

(c)      an alternate name from the list provided through public consultation;

(d)      an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

(e)      an appropriate name tabled during the meeting;

 

(3)   approves a new street name for new private road (Road 4) shown in Appendix 1 of the report, as suggested below:

(a)       “Mohua” recommended road type “Way”;

(b)      an alternate name as provided by the developer;

(c)      an alternate name from the list provided through public consultation;

(d)      an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

(e)      an appropriate name tabled during the meeting;

(4)   If necessary, approves an appropriate LINZ approved back up name if options (a),(b), or (e) of (1), (2), or (3) is selected; and

(5)   approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

These recommendations are made so these sections of the development may proceed to completion as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require formalised street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

 

Background

2.    The subdivision of 64 Waipounamu Drive, Kelson creates seven new roads within the development, four of them being part of Stages 1 and 2 of the development.

3.    As per the plan supplied in Appendix 1 attached to the report, Road 1 will be a continuation of Waipounamu Drive and Road 5 (part of Stage 3) will continue as Christchurch Crescent.

4.    This report seeks to confirm names for two public roads and one private road (Roads 2, 3, and 4 on the plan) formed as part of Stages 1 and 2 of the development. 

5.    The responsibility for naming new roads within Lower Hutt (outside of the Community Board catchment areas) lies with the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee.


 

Discussion

6.    The developer has submitted the following names for consideration, in keeping with the current street naming policy where the theme of roads in Kelson make reference to the South Island. Council’s Kaitatari Tumuaki Māori has provided the corresponding Māori names of these suggestions as below.Takapō,

a.       Takapō,

b.       Tasman Bay – Te Tai o Aorere,

c.       Sumner - Matuku Takotako, and

d.      Matheson - Kairaumati.

7.    Below names were suggested by Council’s Kaitatari Tumuaki Māori in the internal consultation process

a.       Mohua (Golden bay)         

b.       Mārahau   

c.       Rākaunui   

d.      Motuareronui

8.    The lots are being sold with dwellings already built, with the prospective buyers being able to choose a different style of house. The house stylings are named after South Island place names and the developer thought that these would also make great names for the surrounding streets. Each one of the names listed are one of these choices, where the paint and roof colours have been selected from to try representing that region.

9.    The English variation of the names submitted by the developer have been checked with Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) for suitability and are acceptable for use.

10.  The Māori variations of the names in 6. and all names in 7. are currently being checked with LINZ for suitability however officers anticipate all names to be suitable given there are no duplications in the applicable vicinity. LINZ comments on the names will be presented to the committee at the meeting.


 

11.  From public consultations the following suggestions were received from the Pareraho Forest Trust as below.

Mokomoko:         general Māori name for skinks. To make way for the Waipounamu development, 60-odd skinks were collected and relocated to Manor Park. Mokomoko is also an estuary in Southland, fitting with the Kelson streets theme of South Island locations.”

Parauriki (Kākā Point): a beach in the South Island near the settlement of Kaitangata in South Otago/Southland. Kākā have recently been sighted and heard in Pareraho Forest, although are not resident yet. A goal of local conservation work is to make the forest a safe and food-rich place for kākā to live as they spread beyond Wellington

Moko kākāriki:  the Wellington green gecko (or Barking gecko) found in Pareraho Forest. Secretive and inconspicuous nestled in forest canopy, they live amongst us but are seldom seen.

Kaikōmako:        a special native tree, whose fruit is a favourite food of the korimako (bellbird). Korimako are making a come back in Pareraho Forest  thanks to council and community pest control efforts, and are often seen around Kelson, but more less common than its showy cousin the tūī. Kaikōmako is an important tree for Māori as it was used for hika ahi (to make fire) often with mahoe one of the most common trees in Pareraho, and features in the pūrakau about Māui deceiving his ancester Mahuika to give people the ability to create fire.

12.  The above submissions from Pareraho Forest Trust have been checked with LINZ and are suitable for use.

13.  A general consideration in Council’s Naming Policy is that where there is a theme in the area, the theme is to be followed, for example Māori names in Korokoro, the names of trees in Maungaraki and the use of South Island names in Kelson.


 

Options

14.  The recommended names for all three roads under discussion are;

a)   Takap­ō;

b)   Te Tai o Aorere;

c)   Matuku Takotako;

d)   Kairaumati;

e)   Mohua;          

f)    Mārahau;       

g)   Rākaunui;      

h)   Motuareronui;

i)    Mokomoko;

j)    Parauriki;

k)   Moko kakariki; and

l)    Kaikōmako.

 

15.  Road Types recommended are;

a)   Grove;

b)   Way;

c)   Crescent; or

d)   an appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

 

16.  Options a) to h) in 14. are being checked with LINZ at the time of finalising the report and the outcome will be tabled at the meeting.

17.  Options i) to l) in 14. have been checked with LINZ are acceptable to use.

18.  A backup name from the names approved by LINZ (Names submitted by Pareraho Forest Trust) is required for each road if LINZ approval for the recommended names have not been received before the meeting.

19.  If an alternate name is tabled during the meeting, it can be considered for use, but will be subject to meeting the requirements of AS/NZS 4819:2011 and gaining LINZ approval. An appropriate backup name must also be recommended in case the alternate name is deemed not suitable.

 

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

 

20.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

21.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.

Consultation

 

22.  Public consultation was carried out via the following channels:

•   Advertisement in Hutt News.

 

23.  As a result of the public consultation, four submissions were received from Quentin Duthie, Convenor of the Pareraho Forest Trust.

24.  Council’s Kaitatari Tumuaki Māori have checked the Māori names for spellings and suitability.

25.  Mana whenua consultation for public roads have not been undertaken.

Legal Considerations

26.  The Committee has the delegated authority to name the public road.

27.  The new street name is required as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require individual street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

Financial Considerations

28.  There are no financial considerations. The developer is responsible for the necessary street name signs. This will be undertaken by Council’s contractor with the cost paid by the developer.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - 64 Waipounamu Drive - St Naming Plan

59

2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Name List 2021

60

3

Appendix 3 - Permitted Road Types

63

 


 

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

Reviewed By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - 64 Waipounamu Drive - St Naming Plan

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Name List 2021

 




Attachment 3

Appendix 3 - Permitted Road Types

 



                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

04 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/273)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2022/1/36

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Muritai Road, Eastbourne - ANZAC DAY SERVICE 2022

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek approval of the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee, as per the authorised process, for the temporary closure of roads in Hutt City for the Eastbourne Memorial Returned Services Association - Anzac Day Service 2022.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   notes and receives the report;

(2)   notes that the recommendations should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(3)   agrees to temporary close the following road, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report attached as appendix 1 to the report;

Anzac Day Service – 2022: Monday 25 April 2022 between the hours of 9:00am to 11:00am attached as appendix 2 to the report;

Muritai Road, Eastbourne (the section of road between the intersections of Rimu and Makaro Streets);

(4)   agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following roads:

·    Anzac Day Service – 2022: Monday 25 April 2022 between the hours of 9:00am to 11:00am attached as appendix 2 to the report; and

·    Muritai Road, Eastbourne (the section of road between the intersections of Rimu and Makaro Streets).

For the reasons that the proposed road closure and parking restrictions are required to accommodate the annual Eastbourne Memorial Returned Services Association - Anzac Day Service 2022, and closures for previous year’s events have not solicited any complaints from the public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    Council has received a request from the Eastbourne Memorial RSA (Inc.) for approval to hold its annual ANZAC Day Service, an event involving a temporary road closure and temporary ‘No Stopping’ restrictions as detailed in the recommendations above. Details of the event and expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

4.    At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) (LGA) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures, including the required communications and consultations prior to any approval of a closure.

6.    For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be inconsiderately parked, it is necessary for Council to also pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event allows for the legal removal of vehicles at the direction of the event organizer and administered by Council’s Parking Enforcement Officers.

7.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

8.    This is an annual event and the proposed closures have been approved in the past.

9.    Council’s Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Eastbourne Memorial RSA – ANZAC Day Service 2022: The proposed closure, if implemented in accordance with an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

10.  Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closure during this event will be a safety concern and therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

11.  Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

12.  Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the event will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed.

13.  The Event Organiser is responsible to follow the Covid - Public & Private gatherings (Traffic Lights Settings) guidelines.
https://covid19.govt.nz/traffic-lights/

Options

14.  The Committee can:

a.    approve the proposed temporary road closure and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions; or

b.    amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the next Council meeting, so as to give officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on the impact to traffic and the network.

15.   Officers recommend Option a, as the effects of the event can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

17.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate.  

Consultation

18.  The public was notified that Council was to consider the proposed temporary road closure through a Public Notice advertisement in The Hutt News on Tuesday 25 January 2022. No correspondence had been received at the time this report was finalized.  However, any subsequent correspondence will be presented at the Committee meeting.

19.  Public notice of any decision to close roads will be advertised in The Hutt News.

Legal Considerations

20.  Approval is required from Council, or the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee, to allow for the temporary closure of roads and temporary ‘No Stopping’ restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads for events within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

21.  For community events, the cost of public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. This is a community event.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report

69

2

Appendix 2: Road Closure Aerial

72

 

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report

 




Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Road Closure Aerial

 

 


                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

04 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/274)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2022/1/37

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closures: Laings Road, Knights Road and Queens Drive, Hutt Central - ANZAC DAY DAWN SERVICE AND WREATH LAYING 2022

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek approval of the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee, as per the authorised process, for the temporary closure of roads in Hutt City for the Civic - Anzac Day Dawn Service and Wreath Laying 2022.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   notes and receives the information;

(2)   notes that the recommendations should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(3)   agrees to temporary close the following roads, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report attached as appendix 1 to the report:

Anzac Day Dawn Service and Wreath Laying – 2022: Monday 25 April 2022 between the hours of 5:00am to 11:00am attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

(a)   Laings Road, Hutt Central (the section of road between the intersections of Myrtle Street and Queens Drive); and

(b)   Knights Road, Hutt Central (the section of road between the intersections of Stevens Grove and Laings Road); and

(c)   Queens Drive, Hutt Central (the section of road between the High Street roundabout and Laings Road); and

(4)   agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following roads:

Anzac Day Dawn Service and Wreath Laying – 2022: Monday 25 April 2022 between the hours of 5:00am to 11:00am attached as Appendix 2 to the report);

(a)     Laings Road, Hutt Central (the section of road between the intersections of Myrtle Street and Queens Drive);

(b)     Knights Road, Hutt Central (the section of road between the intersections of Stevens Grove and Laings Road); and

(c)     Queens Drive, Hutt Central (the section of road between the High Street roundabout and Laings Road).

For the reasons that the proposed road closures and parking restrictions are required to accommodate the Civic - Anzac Day Dawn Service and Wreath Laying 2022, and closures for previous year’s events have not solicited any complaints from the public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    Council has received a request from the Mayor’s Office for approval to hold the Civic ANZAC Day Dawn Service and Wreath Laying, an event involving both temporary road closures, and temporary ‘No Stopping’ restrictions as detailed in the recommendations above. Details of the event and expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

4.    At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) (LGA) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures, including the required communications and consultations prior to any approval of a closure.

6.    For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be inconsiderately parked, it is necessary for Council to also pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event allows for the legal removal of vehicles at the direction of the event organiser and administered by Council’s Parking Enforcement Officers.


 

7.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

8.    This is an annual event and the proposed closures have been approved in the past.

9.    Council Officer, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Civic ANZAC Day Dawn Service and Wreath Laying 2022: The proposed closures, if implemented in accordance with an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

10.  Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closures during these events will be a safety concern and therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

11.  Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

12.  Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the event will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed.

13.  The Event Organiser is responsible to follow the Covid - Public & Private gatherings (Traffic Lights Settings) guidelines - https://covid19.govt.nz/traffic-lights/

Options

14.  The Committee can:

a.    approve the proposed temporary road closure and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions; or

b.    amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the next Council, so as to give officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on the impact to traffic and the network.

15.  Officers recommend Option a, as the effects of the event can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

17.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate.     

Consultation

18.  The public was notified that Council was to consider the proposed temporary road closure through a Public Notice advertisement in The Hutt News on Tuesday 25 January 2022. No correspondence had been received at the time this draft report was finalized.  However, any subsequent correspondence will be presented at the Committee meeting.

19.  Public notice of any decision to close roads will be advertised in The Hutt News.

Legal Considerations

20.  Approval is required from Council, or the Committee, to allow for the temporary closure of roads and temporary ‘No Stopping’ restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads for events within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

21.  For community events, the cost of public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. This is a community event.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

77

2

Appendix 2 - Road Closure Aerial

80

 

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

 




Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Road Closure Aerial

 


                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

04 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/276)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2022/1/38

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Reynolds Bach Drive, Silverstream - Hutt Valley Motorsport Club Hill Climb 2022

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek approval of the Committee, as per the authorised process, for the temporary closure of roads in Hutt City for the Hutt Valley Motorsport Clubs – Reynolds Bach Drive Hill Climb 2022.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   notes and receives the report.

(2)   notes that the recommendations should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(3)   agrees to temporary close the following road, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report attached as Appendix 1 to the report:

Hutt Valley Motorsport Club Hill Climb – 2022: Friday 15 April 2022 (Good Friday) between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report);

Reynolds Bach Drive, Stokes Valley (the section of road between the ‘gates’ to the end of Reynolds Bach Drive); and

(4)   agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following roads:


Hutt Valley Motorsport Club Hill Climb – 2022: Friday 15 April 2022 (Good Friday) between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report); and

Reynolds Bach Drive, Stokes Valley (the section of road between the ‘gates’ to the end of Reynolds Bach Drive).

For the reasons that the proposed road closure and parking restrictions are required to accommodate the annual Hill Climb event held by the Hutt Valley Motor Sport Club, and that closures for previous year’s events have not solicited any complaints from the public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    Council has received a request from the Hutt Valley Motorsport Club for approval to hold its annual Hill Climb event, an event involving a temporary road closure, and temporary ‘No Stopping’ restrictions as detailed in the recommendations above. Details of the event and expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

4.    At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) (LGA) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures, including the required communications and consultations prior to any approval of a closure.

6.    For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be inconsiderately parked, it is necessary for Council to also pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event allows for the legal removal of vehicles at the direction of the event organiser and administered by Council’s Parking Enforcement Officers.

7.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

8.    This is an annual event and the proposed closures have been approved in the past.

9.    Council’s Traffic Engineer has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:


 

Hutt Valley Motorsport Club – Hill Climb 2022: The proposed closure, if implemented in accordance with an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions is not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the wider network given the landfill is not operational on Good Friday.

10.  Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closure during this event will be a safety concern and therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

11.  Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

12.  Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the event will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed

Options

13.  The Committee can.

a.    approve the proposed temporary road closure and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions; or

b.    amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the next Council meeting, so as to give officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on the impact to traffic and the network.

14.  Officers recommend Option a, as the effects of the event can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

15.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

16.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate.     

Consultation

17.  The public was notified that Council was to consider the proposed temporary road closure through a Public Notice advertisement in The Hutt News on Tuesday 25 January 2022. No correspondence had been received at the time this report was finalised.  However, any subsequent correspondence will be presented at the Committee meeting.

18.  Public notice of any decision to close roads will be advertised in The Hutt News.

19.  The organiser has approached and gained the support of the local businesses for this event (including the Landfill and Silverstream Retreat).

 

Legal Considerations

20.   Approval is required from Council, or the Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads and temporary ‘No Stopping At All Times’ restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

21.  For community events, the cost of public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. This is a commercial event.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report

85

2

Appendix 2: Road Closure Aerial

88

 

Author: Ravi Soni

Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report

 




Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Road Closure Aerial

 

 


                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

10 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/314)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2022/1/39

 

Three Waters Update

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report provides an update on Three Waters activities including the capital works programme and specific operating work programmes of interest.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives the report and notes its contents.

 

Background

2.    Wellington Water Limited (WWL) provides Council with regular updates on capital and operating projects and programmes currently funded.  These are summarised in the following paragraphs.

2021/22 Capex Programme

3.    The total programmed budget for 2021/22 for the three waters is $39.4M including carry-overs.  At the Council briefing on 18 August 2021, WWL indicated that it would be aiming to deliver the capital works programme across the region on a stepped-up basis over the next three years, noting that investment in three waters infrastructure by Councils across the region had increased significantly.  WWL has planned to increase resources on a graduated basis and review delivery processes to help meet this challenge.

4.    The actual year to date result (to 31 January 2022), is 20% below budget with a total actual spend of $9.4M against a budget of $11.7M. The brief COVID lockdown period experienced in August had an impact on the programme with all physical works ceasing during that period.


 

5.    At the end of January 2022, WWL has forecast an underspend for the year of $11.2M, with a total forecast spend of $28.2M. This is now at the lowest end of the predicted spend range of $28M-$34M, following a review of risks and mitigations to the programme.  This is a decrease of $1.5M from the December forecast, reflecting a decrease in confidence based on risks and the current progress of the work programme.

6.    Approximately 80% of the underspend is in the drinking water renewals programme with a forecast year-end spend of $4.1M against a budget of $13M ($8.9M variance). The renewals will occur in Wainuiomata and Naenae with contracts awarded but construction due to start later than originally planned.

7.    The biggest ongoing risk to the capital works programme through to the end of this financial year is COVID.  The COVID Protection Framework that is now in place enables WWL to manage projects on a risk basis.  Even with this in place we are likely to see project sites having to close temporarily where contract staff have been exposed to the virus.

8.    While the capital works programme budget for this year is backloaded (with most works programmed to occur in the last five months of the financial year), WWL is working on years two and three of the programme to ensure works are more evenly spread across those years to achieve the full three-year programme. Key to achieving this are the catchment renewal programmes for Epuni, Avalon and Wainuiomata.

Critical Assets Assessments

9.    The pumpstations are 95% complete with the balance being a few selected switchboards that need to be assessed. 

 

10.  Assessments of all the reservoirs are complete including the 1 buried reservoir.

 

11.  Inspection and assessment of the pipes are progressing steadily with about 80% of the pipes that were scheduled for inspection having been completed (note this schedule is about ½ the number of kms of pipes that have been desktop assessed and is focused on the high-risk pipes) and data collection in various stages of completion. 

 

12.  Challenges with the pressure pipes means alternative technologies are now being worked through.   The result is pressure pipes will be underrepresented in the physical based assessments so there will be more reliance on desktop assessments.

 

13.  Site works for scheduled pipe inspections are programmed for completion in March/April with data interpretation and finalised condition assessment remaining this financial year.

 

14.  The revised assessments based on physical pipe inspections are generally confirming the desktop-based inspection completed last year, with no major issues being identified.

 

15.   In terms of the results so far:

 

a.   About 40% of the HCC pumpstations are assessed to have some assets in a poor or very poor condition (unchanged).

 

b.   While it varies by water about 15% of the Very High Critical Asset (VHCA) pipes are assessed to be in a poor or very poor condition – at this point this is largely based on desktop condition assessments.

 

c.   About 15% of the HCC reservoirs are assessed to be in a poor structural condition (status unchanged) – in addition individual aspects of many reservoirs need attention to address contamination and health and safety risks. Some good news here is roof sealing works on 11 HCC reservoirs have been completed to address some of these contamination risk issues.

 

16.  The results of the condition assessments will be fed into future work programmes.

Knowing Your Pipes

17.  In the Black Creek area 71 private property inspections have been undertaken. Of these WWL has identified 44 faults of varying severity. These are being assessed and some are likely to require repair work to be carried out. WWL is looking at the possibility of packaging together these faults for a single renewal/repair contract. This will require cooperation/agreement from landowners.

18.  WWL has also identified 29 faults within the public network, some of these are an extension of the issues identified within private property.  These issues are being assessed and will likely be included in the proposed single renewal/repair contract.

19.  To date one repair letter has been issued and the fault has subsequently been repaired. A further five letters requiring repair are ready to be issued, with others addressing the balance of the 44 faults to follow. 

20.  WWL has detected high readings in the Fitzherbert Road catchment area and is re-sampling to consider including this area in the project.

21.  WWL has also detected high readings in the upper Waiwhetu catchment and the Taita/Avalon area and is working to develop new plans for these two areas. The investigation areas are being narrowed down by smoke testing the networks.

Bulk Water Consumption

22.  Hutt City’s bulk water consumption, as at 2 February 2022, was up by around 2.2% over the same period for the previous year, increasing from 12,780 megalitres to 13,062 megalitres. The following graph shows consumption tracking over the past 12 months against the previous year. The graph shows that the increase in use has largely occurred in the December/January period.  Despite the increase in use, as a percentage of regional use, Hutt City is tracking slightly below where it was 12 months ago (26.0% versus 26.2%).  This can be seen in the second bar graph. Budget wise this translates into a projected $80k favourable variance. 

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

23.  This report focuses on the current WWL capital work programme for which council has previously made decisions as part of consideration of the Long Term Plan on Climate Change considerations.   These programmes focus on ensuring the efficiency of our critical resources, which aids in community resilience and reduces waste of resources. 

Financial Considerations

24.  The Capex budget is likely to be underspent at year end in line with WWL advice.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

Author: Bruce Hodgins

Strategic Advisor

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability


                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

02 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/212)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2022/1/40

 

Regulatory Matters

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update of regulatory matters arising from the work of the Environment and Sustainability Group.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the information.

 

Background

2.  The report covers the regulatory activities associated with the teams in the Environment and Sustainability Group. In particular, the Regulatory Services and Resource Consents teams.

 

3.  Relevant consents data is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

 

4.  The Regulatory Services team process applications under the Food Act, the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act and the Building Act (building consents, liquor and food licenses and District Licensing reports), trade waste applications, bylaws, animal services, and parking services.

 

5.  The Resource Consents team processes consent applications under the Resource Management Act.

 

6.  Environmental Health services are provided for Upper Hutt as well as Lower Hutt.

 

7.  Animal Services are provided for Wellington as well as Lower Hutt.

 




 

Resource Consents Team

8.    We have had a record year for resource consents in 2021 with 650 applications received. This is compared to 475 (2020), 450 (2019).  The previous highest number of applications was during remissions year where we received 530 by 31 December 2018. In 2021 356 resource consents were issued compared to 326 in 2020.

9.    In November we issued 32 consents and received 26 consents.  In December we issued 41 resource consents and received 43 resource consents. In January we issued 20 and received 26.

10.  As identified above there are currently record numbers of applications which Council has received which has caused delays in processing. We also have staff shortages in the planning area and engineering area compounding these issues. We are currently carrying four vacancies for resource consent planners.  Despite using planning contractors to process resource consent applications alongside our own staff, we are unable to keep up with processing the number of applications within statutory timeframes.  Anna Martin started on 8th February as our Resource Consents and Compliance Manager and are actively recruiting for the other vacancies.

11.  Resource consents over statutory timeframes: of the resource consent applications for the three month period November- January issued above the statutory 20 working days totalled 55, representing around 48% of issued resource consents.  We are managing customer expectations through our acknowledgements, the website and other correspondence.

12.  Riverlink: The independent consultant planner assessing the applications for designations and resource consent on behalf of HCC issued a report on 22 November 2021.  The report recommended to the Environment Court that the resource consent and designations be approved subject to amended conditions of consent.  Currently mediation is underway between the applicant and those submitters who have chosen to become a party to Environment Court proceedings.  A court date has been scheduled for the 4th until the 8th of April 2022.

13.  Silverstream Pipeline Bridge: The Silverstream Pipeline Replacement project proposes to replace an existing section of the ‘Te Mārua to Karori’ pipeline (known as the Kaitoke Main) at Silverstream which, under normal conditions, supplies 100% of Porirua City’s and 40% of Wellington City’s potable water supply. The resource consent for this project was publicly notified.  Submissions closed on 2 December 2021.


 

Notable resource consents lodged:

•          17 Britannia Street, Petone (50 units)

•          20-22 Raukawa Street, Stokes Valley (40 units)

•          33-34 Raukawa Street (33 units)

•          15-17 Awamutu Grove (14 units)

•          44 Dover Road (20 units)

•          33-35 Bush Street (15 units)

•          147-149 Reynolds Street (14 units)

•          1 Rainey Grove/ 1100 High Street (15 Units)

•          22 Pearce Crescent (15 units)

•          92 Cambridge Terrace, Waterloo (16 units)

•          20 Fitzherbert Street, Wainuiomata (10 units)

•          19-25 Seaview Road, Seaview (1st stage of business park – stage 1 is for 40 units)

Upcoming resource consent hearings:

•          70 Maungaraki Road – 13 lot subdivision and dwellings

Recently granted resource consents:

•          4 Ferry Road, Days Bay (10 dwellings)

•          6 Johnston Grove, Taita (22 units)

•          41 Main Road, Wainuiomata (11 units)

•          246 Wise Street, Wainuiomata (41 dwellings)

•          14 Fitzherbert Road, Wainuiomata (9 dwellings)

•          205 Jackson Street, Petone (additions to heritage building)

•          22 Fitzherbert Road, Wainuiomata (18 units)

•          124 Richmond Street, Petone (subdivision of the Imperial Tobacco Development)


 

RMA compliance updates

Wainuiomata Cleanfill

14.  All the latest compliance related information is now available online here http://www.huttcity.govt.nz/Services/Rubbish-and-recycling/cleanfill/

15.  No complaints relating to the cleanfill have been received for November, December or January 2022.

16.  Notification has been received that the cleanfill is closing on the 28th of February. They will not be accepting any more hard fill and only topsoil will be accepted to complete the contouring and landscaping in winter.

Building Consents

 

17.  There were 431 building consent applications received in the second quarter of the financial year.  The total value of work in the applications received was $208M, reflecting an increase of 82% for the same period last year.

18.  The table below shows the comparison between the number of building consents received and the total value of work over the last three years for the same period.

Year

No. of Consents Received

Total Value of Work

October, November December 2021

431

$208,717,237.98

October, November December 2020

423

$114,079,223.52

 

October, November December 2019

457

$139,090,675.63

 

 

19.  There continues to be high demand for building consents for multi-unit  residential developments across the City and this is expected to continue as RMA changes will allow for more intensified development without the need for a resource consent. These changes will come into effect in August 2022.

20.  The competitive job market and demand for skilled building offers continues to be a challenge, we are currently recruiting for six vacancies in the building team. We are managing the high workload with assistance from external consultants, whose availability is also being stretched and as a result our statutory timeframes have suffered. We are continually liaising with stakeholders and communicating messages about timeframes on our website. 

 

 

21.  The digital consenting project will see efficiencies gained in the processing and inspections space is progressing towards confirming requirements with the preferred vendor. The project plan is running to schedule, and we are expecting to have a new computer system to be up and running by July 2022.

 

22.  The building team had its IANZ routine reassessment in February, which was done online due to covid restrictions. The assessment looked at our documented policy and procedures and performance of the building consent authority against the procedures and regulations. IANZ raised some areas of non-compliance and given the standard three months period to address them. 

 

23.  There are proposed changes to the Building Act for Modular Component Manufacturers (prefabricated construction) as current building consenting processes are best suited to traditional construction methods and can present barriers, duplication and delays for more innovated products and methods. Some of the benefits will be, shorter and more efficient consenting for certified manufacturers, with fewer inspections needed and confidence for Building Consent Authorities that certified manufacturers construction is compliant with the Building Code. Building owners may benefit from more building choices and reduced time, costs, and assurance of quality construction in a controlled environment.

 

Notable Building Consents Received

 

·    155 Waterloo Road - seismic strengthening of old fire station and conversion to apartments

 

·    69 Gracefield Road - Callaghan Innovation, GIQ Library Building - seismic strengthening of building, internal fit out, $14.5M

 

·    Avalon Tower – Stage 1 - seismic upgrade of Avalon Tower, $2.5M

 

·    4-8 Ferry Road - 10 New townhouses arranged in three blocks, $2.0M

 

·    41 Main Rd Wainuiomata - multi-unit dwelling with attached garages, $776K

 

·    43 Main Rd Wainuiomata - multi-unit dwelling with one attached garage, $750K

 

·    24 Fitzherbert Rd Wainuiomata - Stage 4, multi-residential dwelling - 5 Townhouses, $1.4M

 

·    12 Rainey Gr, Taita - 6 blocks of multi-residential dwellings - 35 Townhouses (20 x 1 bedroom, 15 x 2 bedroom), $5.9M

 


 

Building Quality Assurance Team

Inspections of residential pools

24.  We are finalising the first round of pool inspections under the Building Act 2004 and undertaking planning to the start the second round of inspections. We are currently undertaking a stocktake of pools in Lower Hutt with assistance from our GIS team. We are liaising with large multiple property owners such as Kainga Ora to resolve any pool issues at their properties.

Earthquake Prone Building work

25.  We are about to start issuing the next group of letters advising building owners where their buildings meet the MBIE profile categories that their buildings are potentially earthquake prone.

26.  The owners of these properties will have 12 months to provide information to Council for consideration regarding this matter before Council officers will make decisions on the earthquake prone status of their building.

Environmental Health Team

Alcohol Licensing

27.       The immediate modification order, (which extends the timeframes within which agencies must report on all applications), expires on the 29th February 2022. There has been no indication that this will be extended further at this stage. The order has so far not impacted on the ability of the DLC to grant and issue licences, as reports have continued to be received from the agencies.

28.       A hearing has been set down at the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority to hear an appeal against a Lower Hutt DLC decision, which declined a manager’s certificate application. The application was declined by the DLC due to opposition from police.

Food 

29. The Quality Management System (QMS) for food verification is due to be audited in February 2022, it is likely that the audit will be conducted online due to covid restrictions.

30. There are currently 88 verifications that are overdue in Lower Hutt, up from 60 as last reported. This is primarily due to the period during the covid lockdown, when verifications were unable to be carried out.


 

31. The food verification system incentivises good operators by reducing their verification frequency, which also reduces their financial expenses. The number of operators at each step are as follows.

 

Verification Frequency

Number of Operators

Step 1 (3 Months)

16

Step 2 (6 Months)

25

Step 3 (9 Months)

142

Step 4 (12 Months)

376

Step 5 (18 Months)

405

Step 6 (2 Years)

158

Step 7 (3 Years)

40

Step 8 (no further verifications)

19

Litter

32. Illegal dumping has decreased slightly recently. However, with the holiday period there has been a large spike in illegal dumping and issues with recycling being left on the berm due to residents not having the space in their bins. Dumping in general still consists mostly of larger items that won’t fit into bins. Unfortunately, there is little evidence of the offender being found, and therefore infringement fines are unable to be issued.

33. Hebden Crescent has experienced an increased amount of dumping recently. Often this area gets dumping of large loads such as aggregate, soil and green waste. The Coast Road glass bin site still experiences periodic dumping and generally has glass bottles sitting next to the bin. Over the holiday period the bin space/emptying frequency does not appear to have been sufficient to cope with the extra volume. The Hutt Riverbank has experienced regular dumping, often these are not reported by public but found by monitoring of the sites.

34. Due to the great weather and increased visitation at Petone beach, groups have seen an increase in general litter. The regular community groups have been doing their clean-ups consistently and Council’s Environmental Investigations Officer has been involved with some larger annual clean-ups with Kiwi Rail and other community groups. Te Papa staff did a clean-up recently for the first time at Petone beach and are keen to organise a regular annual event.


 

Trade Waste

35. The Inflow Project (stormwater entering sewer) in Maungaraki, mentioned in the previous report is close to commencing. A Traffic Management Plan has been approved and work is expected to start soon.
Parking Services

36.  During November, December 2021 and January 2022, the Parking Team issued a total of 6,506 infringements, at an average of 2,168 a month and $101 per ticket.

 

37.  The warmer weather has seen an increase of vehicle congestion and illegal parking at our beaches, particularly Days Bay. To manage the safety risks we have increased patrols and enforcement in these areas and are taking the opportunity to educate motorists of the hazards of illegal parking. We have engaged with our communications team to post key messages through our social media channels.  Given the comments on social media, we know these have attracted some community interest. 

 

Animal Services

38.  We currently have 10,617 registered dogs in Lower Hutt and staff are working steadily to follow up on the remaining 596 unregistered dogs. Penalties for any dog not registered is a $300 infringement fine and/or seizure of the dog.

39.  There has been a big uptake from dog owners on the offer of a payment plan over four weeks. Providing this alternative has allowed those facing financial difficulties a means to have their dogs registered that they didn’t have previously.  

40.  We have successfully recruited two new animal control officers who replaced positions that were vacated by staff departures. They are currently undergoing training of Senior Animal control officers. We also successfully recruited a new Administration Team Leader.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

41.  Work is happening to ensure the next round of dog registration letters and invoices are sent to owners via email rather than on paper through the mail, which has traditionally been the case.

42.  As part of our business plan, we have committed to review any vehicles that come up for renewal in the Regulatory Services department, preference for electric vehicles is always considered as a priority.

Consultation

43.  Not applicable.

Legal Considerations

44.  Not applicable.

Financial Considerations

45.  Any costs associated with delivering the activities covered in this report are met by available budget.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

2022-01 - Jan YTD - 2021-2022 - Graphs for Regulatory Services

102

 

Author: Derek Kerite

Head of Regulatory Services

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

2022-01 - Jan YTD - 2021-2022 - Graphs for Regulatory Services

 















                                                                                       1                                                         01 March 2022

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

09 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/305)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2022/1/32

 

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee Work Programme 2022

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the report be noted and received.

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee Work Programme 2022

117

 

Author: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services


Attachment 1

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee Work Programme 2022