HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

KOMITI KAUPAPA TAIAO
Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

 

 

24 February 2022

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held via ZOOM

on:

 

 

 

Thursday 3 March 2022 commencing at 2.00pm

 

This meeting is held under the Red Traffic Light setting.

Members of the public wishing to speak to items on the agenda are asked to contact democraticservicesteam@huttcity.govt.nz.

 

 

Membership

 

 

Cr J Briggs (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr K Brown

Cr S Edwards

Deputy Mayor T Lewis

Cr A Mitchell

Cr S Rasheed (Deputy Chair)

Cr N Shaw

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY

 

CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE
Membership:	8
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Reports to:	Council

HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

 

 

OVERVIEW:

This Committee has responsibility for oversight of Council’s environment and climate change response.

The Committee is aligned with the Environment & Sustainability Directorate.

Its areas of focus are:

§   Oversight of Council’s plan to reach Carbon Zero, including raising awareness of climate-related issues

§   Developing and implementing climate and environmental policies and plans including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters

§   Waste and recycling

 

PURPOSE:

To develop, implement, monitor and review strategies, policies, plans and functions associated with environmental and climate change activities.

 

DELEGATIONS FOR THE COMMITTEES AREAS OF FOCUS:

        All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities including the activities outlined below.

       Develop required strategies and policies. Recommend draft and final versions to Council for adoption where they have a city-wide or strategic focus.

       Implement, monitor and review strategies and policies.

       Oversee the implementation of major projects provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

       Oversee budgetary decisions provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

       Oversee the development and implementation of plans and functions that promote environmental wellbeing, including Council’s plan to reach Carbon Zero.

       Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s Environment & Sustainability Directorate.

       Address matters related to ecological protection, the protection of biodiversity, and biosecurity.

       Address matters related to climate change, including raising awareness of climate-related issues, advocating for climate change issues and actions, and championing initiatives that reduce carbon emissions.

       Recommend to Council the acquisition or disposal of assets, unless the acquisition or disposal is provided for specifically in the LTP.

       Conduct any consultation processes required on issues before the Committee.

       Approval and forwarding of submissions.

       Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

       The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee. When exercised, the report/minutes of the meeting require a resolution noting that the committee has performed the responsibilities of another committee and the reason/s.

       If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Climate Change & Sustainability Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Communities Committee and/or Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, then the Climate Change & Sustainability Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committees. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

 

    


                 4                                                                     03 March 2022

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee | Komiti Kaupapa Taiao

 

Meeting to be held via ZOOM on

 Thursday 3 March 2022 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

          Opening formalities - Karakia Timatanga (22/423)

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

 

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

1.       APOLOGIES

No apologies have been received.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have     

4.       Recommendation to Council - TE KAUNIHERA O TE AWA KAIRANGI - 23 MARCH 2022

Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway (22/431)

Report No. CCASC2022/1/50 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste                7

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed”

 

5.       Climate change related reporting (21/1868)

Report No. CCASC2022/1/43 by the Manager Financial Strategy & Planning  108

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed”

6.       Update on Council's solid waste and waste minimisation work (22/25)

Report No. CCASC2022/1/45 by the Solid Waste Manager                               115

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

7.       Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara: Update on implementation (22/26)

Report No. CCASC2022/1/46 by the Senior Advisor Climate and Sustainability 119

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

8.       Update on Council's climate change work (22/24)

Report No. CCASC2022/1/44 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste            134

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

9.       Information Items

a)      Update on pest and animal control work programme (22/406)

Report No. CCASC2022/1/47 by the Head of Parks and Reserves           138

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

b)      Climate Change and Sustainability Committee Work Programme 2022 (22/360)

Report No. CCASC2022/1/34 by the Democracy Advisor                        143

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

 

10.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

          Closing formalities - Karakia Whakamutunga (22/424)

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

 

 

 

Judy Randall

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR

 


                                                                                       8                                                         03 March 2022

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

23 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/431)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2022/1/50

 

Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To present the finalised Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)   endorses and supports the finalised Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway entitled ‘Ka whati te tai, ka pao te tōrea! Our race against time’ attached as Appendix 1 to this report;

(2)   acknowledges the Lead Group members for their significant contribution and leadership in the design of the engagement process and the development of the pathway document; and

(3)   notes the transition of the existing Lead Group into the Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway Steering Group to oversee the implementation of the Pathway.

For the reasons outlined in this report.

 

Background

2.    In 2018, Council set an organisational net zero carbon by 2050 target and agreed that officers would also undertake work to develop a Lower Hutt Climate and Resilience Plan and identify relevant objectives and prioritised community-focused actions to assist in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in line with the (then) proposed New Zealand net zero by 2050 target (refer PRC2018/5/314 from 26 November 2018).

3.    In late 2019, Council commenced work to undertake a co-design process, facilitated by Creative HQ, to engage with the community and to develop a city-wide pathway to realise carbon emission reductions in line with the net zero target.

Pathway finalised

4.    The Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway (the Pathway) entitled ‘Ka whati te tai, ka pao te tōrea! Our race against time’, the development of which was led by the Lead Group and facilitated by Creative HQ, has now been finalised and is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

5.    Information on the Pathway’s development, including information on the various community meetings, and design logs of a number of workshops, is available at https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/communityclimatechange.

6.    The Pathway’s audience is community and business leaders, influencers and residents who are involved or want to get involved in climate action to make a positive change for our city.

7.    Throughout the Pathway, please note that the word ‘we’ means the Lower Hutt community as a whole, including businesses, organisations, the wider community, and also Hutt City Council. Therefore, the Pathway is not a Council document per se, but its ownership lies with the Lower Hutt community.

8.    Officers request that the Committee recommends that Council supports and endorses the Pathway and thanks the Lead Group for their work in the design of the engagement process and the development of the Pathway document.

Next steps

9.    With regard to ongoing governance, reporting and oversight of the Pathway, officers are working to establish a secretariat to support this. Its purpose will be to maintain relationships, report on the progress of actions, and support the governance arrangements that are to be set up to champion the Pathway and initiatives under its umbrella. This is to occur in addition to Council’s internal reporting on the progress of climate change initiatives to the Climate Change and Sustainability Committee.

10.  The Lead Group considers that it will be important that any governance arrangement provides some continuity in membership, albeit recognising that the role of the group changes from one of design and engagement, to implementation and championing the Pathway. Based on this, officers propose to establish a Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway Steering Group, to invite interested Lead Group members to become members of this, and to supplement the membership where appropriate (such as with a representative from the business community). The steering group would be expected to meet quarterly and be serviced by the proposed Council secretariat.

11.  In addition to seeking Council’s endorsement for the Pathway, officers are also pursuing endorsement from our mana whenua partners and key stakeholders, such as the Chamber of Commerce.

12.  With regard to the formal public release of the Pathway, this is currently scheduled for the end of March 2022. However, note that officers are no longer pursuing a physical launch event, due to the challenges associated with Omicron.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

13.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

14.  The Pathway aims to facilitate city-wide action on climate change.

Consultation

15.  The development of the Pathway is the result of a co-design process with direct involvement from mana whenua, a wide range of stakeholders and the wider community. The process was facilitated by Creative HQ, and the Lead Group had a key role to play in designing the engagement process and developing the Pathway.

16.  Once endorsed by Council, the Pathway will be made available publicly at https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/communityclimatechange

Legal Considerations

17.  There are no legal considerations at this time.

Financial Considerations

18.  Costs associated with the governance arrangements and provision of a secretariat to support the implementation of the Pathway, will be covered within existing budgets.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1:Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway

10

    

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1:Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway

 



































































































                                                                                       1                                                         03 March 2022

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

04 November 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1868)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2022/1/43

 

Climate change related reporting

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To inform the committee in relation to climate change related disclosures.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)        receives the report; and

(2)       notes that officers will undertake work with the intention of including climate change related disclosures in or alongside the Annual Report for future annual reports beginning in the 2022/23 financial year.

For the reasons outlined in the report.

 

Background

2.    For 2021/22 the Chief Executive’s performance framework includes the performance measure of “Performance framework measures climate change impacts including investigating future improvements to sustainability reporting.”

3.    This report outlines information on the emerging international best practice for climate change related disclosures in organisational reporting and how implementation of this reporting is currently being implemented in the New Zealand context.

4.    Most large New Zealand entities provide limited or no information on what climate change might mean to them or are reporting in inconsistent ways.

5.    This information deficit is driving what the Productivity Commission termed in their Low Emissions Economy report “an ongoing and systemic overvaluation of emissions-intensive activities.”

6.    The goal of mandatory climate-related disclosures is to:

a.   ensure that the effects of climate change are routinely considered in business, investment, lending and insurance underwriting decisions;

b.   help climate reporting entities better demonstrate responsibility and foresight in their consideration of climate issues; and

c.   lead to more efficient allocation of capital, and help smooth the transition to a more sustainable, low emissions economy.

7.    Mandatory reporting of climate-related disclosures would help New Zealand meet its international obligations and achieve its target of net zero carbon by 2050. It would also help to address climate change risks outlined in the National Climate Change Risk Assessment by making our financial system more resilient.

Proposed reporting requirements

8.    Climate related disclosures have their origin in a 2017 report from the international Task Force for Climate Change related Financial Disclosures (TCFD).

9.    The Task Force proposed disclosure in four thematic areas:

a.   Governance - The organisation’s governance around climate-related risks and opportunities

b.   Strategy - The actual and potential impacts of climate-related risks and opportunities on the organisation’s business, strategy and financial planning

c.   Risk management (including opportunities) - The processes used by the organisation to identify, assess and manage climate-related risks

d.   Metrics and targets - The metrics and targets used to assess and manage relevant climate-related risks and opportunities.

Climate Risks

10.  TCFD divided climate-related risks into two major categories:

a.   risks related to the transition to a lower-carbon economy

i.     Policy and legal risks

ii.    Technology risk

iii.   Market risk

iv.   Reputation risk.

b.   risks related to the physical impacts of climate change

i.     Acute risk

ii.    Chronic risk.

11.  TCFD also identified four opportunity areas

a.   Resource efficiency

b.   Energy source

c.   Products and services

d.   Markets

e.   Resilience

12.  Collating our understanding of these risks and opportunities can lead to a greater understanding of the financial impact climate change may have on Council.

13.  The snip below is from TCFD’s final report. This lays out how consideration of climate change related risks and opportunities is intended to flow into financial decision making.

 Reporting Categories

14.  The TCFD structured its recommendations around four thematic areas that represent core elements of how organisations operate—governance, strategy, risk management and metrics and targets. The four overarching recommendations are supported by key climate-related financial disclosures.

15.  TCFD recommendations and supporting disclosures are as follows:

Legislation

16.  Government has recently enacted the Financial Sector (Climate-related Disclosures and Other Matters) Amendment Bill that requires a range of entities to report on climate related disclosures.

17.  Around 200 entities would be required to make disclosures from years commencing in 2023. This includes banks, fund managers and all equity and debt issuers listed on the NZX. Territorial authorities are not included in the entities required to report under this legislation at this time.

18.  The legislation refers to reporting standards to be issued by the External Reporting Board (XRB), a crown entity responsible for developing accounting and other reporting standards.

19.  The XRB are developing standards that are expected to align with the direction set by the TCFD using the four thematic areas.

20.  The XRB is in the process of issuing exposure drafts in relation to the thematic areas. The primary focus of standards proposed is currently focused on users of the information being investors, lenders and insurance underwriters.

21.  Several organisations have begun to report climate related disclosures already, following the recommendations of the TCFD. These include Auckland Council[1] and the New Zealand Superfund[2].

Current reporting requirements on Council 

22.  Council currently has obligations to report to the Climate Change Commission and Ministry for the Environment, when requested, to inform their National Adaption Plan. This requirement arises through section 5ZW of the Climate Change Response Act 2002. Categories of reporting required under the Act are aligned with the categories in the TCFD recommendations.

23.  Council’s Annual Report will also be expected to include reporting on environmental matters.  Caring for and protecting the environment is a priority area under Council’s adopted Long Term Plan 2021-2031 and environmental wellbeing is an outcome area of Council’s performance framework.  Therefore, Council will be required to report against these elements of the Long Term Plan in its Annual Report through both performance measures in place and through the report’s narrative.

Next steps

24.  Reporting against the TCFD thematic areas has the potential to add value to Council’s current reporting and align with emerging best practice.  In addition, it will provide a transparent means of meeting current reporting requirements to the Climate Change Commission and the Ministry for the Environment.

25.  Officers recommend that Council agrees to begin work with the intention to report climate related disclosures in, or alongside, the future Group Annual Reports. It is expected that initial work would be able to begin in the second half of 2022 and information gathered in 2023, with the intention of including in the Group Annual Report for the 2022/23 year.

26.  The option to include information alongside the Annual Report instead of directly in the Annual Report would have the benefit of not over-inflating the size of the Annual Report and providing a report that stands alone on climate matters that can be used by Council to engage with the community.  The most appropriate approach will be considered further by officers as the content is prepared.

27.  Reporting would be prepared with the intention of moving towards complying with any standards issued by the XRB or following TCFD recommendations in the absence of finalised XRB reporting standards. 

28.  The TCFD laid out seven principles for the preparation of the disclosure. These are detailed below. Officers would endeavour to adhere to these principles in the preparation of the content.

29.  Preparation of the content will require input from business units across Council and will likely require external advice in relation to areas such as scenario analysis.  It is expected that aspects of the reporting requirements may not be available for the initial report. Any gaps or areas for improvement will be addressed in future years.

30.  As part of the preparation for this work officers will assess the resources required to incorporate this information into reporting in the long term. This will include considering internal resourcing impacts and any requirements for external specialist advice.

31.  Review structures for preparation will be required to be developed. This would be expected to be in line with those used for the Annual Report and include review by senior officers as well as Council’s Audit and Risk Subcommittee.

32.  Officers will report back to the Committee in late 2022 after the initial planning work has been completed.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

33.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

34.  This report addresses improvements that can be made to Council reporting in relation to climate related matters. Implementing this reporting will improve the transparency in relation to how climate related matters will impact Council and how Council is addressing this.

Consultation

35.  No consultation is required.

Legal Considerations

36.  There are no legal considerations other than those contained within the legislation section of this report.

Financial Considerations

37.  Costs of preparation of the initial reporting of climate related disclosures is expected to be met through existing baseline budget.

38.  As part of the preparation for this work officers will assess the resources required to incorporate this information into reporting in the long term. This will include considering internal resourcing impacts and any requirements for external specialist advice.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Daniel Koenders

Manager Financial Strategy & Planning

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jenny Livschitz

Group Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                       1                                                         03 March 2022

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

21 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/25)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2022/1/45

 

Update on Council's solid waste and waste minimisation work

 

Purpose of report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update on various solid waste management and minimisation matters.

Recommendation

That the Committee notes the update on various solid waste management and minimisation matters.

 

Background

2.    Council undertakes a range of solid waste management and minimisation initiatives, and this report consolidates information on their status.

3.    However, detailed and regular information on the ongoing development, operation and performance of the Silverstream Landfill is covered in a separate report to the Hutt Valley Services Committee.

Procurement for landfill operations and resource recovery park

4.    Council has commenced a process to find an experienced and motivated partner to operate Silverstream Landfill and the development of a Resource Recovery Park, with landfill operations services commencing from early 2023.

5.    The Registration of Interest process has concluded, and we are preparing tender documents for the next stage of the process (Request for Proposals), to be sent out by mid-March.

Food waste investigation

6.    Officers have commenced work into the options for managing food waste in the future. Council is collaborating with Porirua City Council on this work, and we are in the process of identifying a suitable external consultant to assist in this work.

Changes at Silverstream transfer station

Transfer station & resource recovery

7.    Construction work is in progress for a new roundabout and improving health and safety at the transfer station by removing a large pit used for loading out waste.  Construction is to be completed by March 2022.

8.    The development of a resource recovery park (RRP) is part of the procurement process currently underway, and the procurement process allows enough flexibility for the RRP to be situated anywhere in Lower Hutt based on the needs of the community.

Weighing of light vehicles and trailers

9.    Officers have been progressing work to enable charging based on weight for users of the transfer station, in line with our current Long Term Plan, in order to replace the existing vehicle-type charges. The rationale of this change is to more accurately reflect disposal costs for vehicles with more than 300kg of waste. The change is scheduled to take effect from April 2022.

10.  Note that Council officers propose to remove all existing fixed vehicle-type charges as part of the upcoming draft annual plan process, and move to charge all vehicles based on weight, but this change is subject to confirmation and would not take effect until 1 July 2022. 

Kerbside Rubbish, Recycling and Green Waste bin service

11.  The kerbside service transition to the bin service is now complete and has entered business-as-usual phase. We have processed 3,183 bin changes, swaps and cancellations over and above the original selections and default deliveries since 1 July 2021. Requests for changes in the new year have reduced, and we are increasingly able to focus our staff resources on education and reducing contamination.

12.  New collection calendars for 2022 were posted to every household in Lower Hutt in late January. The calendars included reminders on bin placement, latches and advice on not overfilling bins in addition to dates of collection.

13.  The collection of old green waste crates was scheduled for the week of 21 February 2022. Communications channels including print, radio and social media promotions were used for seven days prior to collection to advise residents of the crate collection week and encourage them to place their old crate by the kerbside if they wish for it to be collected.

Kerbside bin service statistics

14.  The below figure shows the amount of material collected in the first six months of the kerbside service, for each service stream. As the service has bedded in, volumes have increased.

15.  With regard to recycling volumes (including glass and mixed recycling) and contamination rates, the below figure shows how the first six months of the new service compares to the last 12 months of the previous service. Recycling volumes have increased by about 25% for the July 2021 to December 2021 period, compared to the same period the year before.

16.  The contamination rates for the recycling service are measured by sampling at the processing plant.  For the first six months of the recycling service, the contamination was between 15% and 17%. This is currently above Council’s target, which is less than 10% contamination. (Note: Due to the effects of the COVID-19 lockdown, the August 2021 data was not robust enough and is an anomaly.)

17.  Penalties for contamination applied from November 2021, after a grace period of four months for the new service. Our contamination rate for November and December was about 16%. Costs are calculated retrospectively and we are currently in the process of confirming final costs for those two months. However, the cost could be in the order of $30,000 per month unless contamination can be reduced.

18.  In order to reduce contamination, education and behaviour change work is being planned as part of the service getting bedded-in. This includes a communications and engagement campaign in addition to the bin inspector employed as part of our contract with Waste Management NZ, who inspects bins and their content prior to them being emptied.

Climate change impact and considerations

19.  The work regarding improved resource recovery and food waste directly aligns with Council’s desire to reduce emissions at Silverstream Landfill, as it could reduce the amount of organic waste disposed.

20.  Procurement for a new landfill operations contract will have explicit requirements regarding sustainability and the reduction in carbon emissions.

Consultation

21.  Not applicable.

Legal considerations

22.  There are no legal considerations at this time.

Financial considerations

23.  The cost of contaminated recycling could be in the order of $30,000 per month (with associated negative future budget impacts) unless contamination can be reduced. It is likely that this has be to be multi-pronged approach, including a communication, social media, collateral, but also immediate feedback to households through bin inspections, and where required, the implementation of Council’s 3-strike approach. 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

 

Author: Diljinder Uppal

Solid Waste Manager

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                       1                                                         03 March 2022

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

21 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/26)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2022/1/46

 

Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara: Update on implementation

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To present information about the initial considerations around the implementation of the Whanganui-a-Tara “Whaitua Implementation Reports” for Hutt City Council (the Council) and to provide an update on the work done in this area.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the report.

 

Background

2.    The outcome of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee-led (the Committee) process was that two non-statutory reports were presented to Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) on 23 September 2021.

3.    The two complementary reports were:

a.    ‘Te Whanganui-a-Tara Whaitua Implementation Programme’ (Te Whanganui-a-Tara WIP) produced by the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee.

b.    ‘Te Mahere Wai o Te Kahui Taiao’ (Te Mahere Mai), the WIP implementation plan produced by the Mana Whenua members of the Committee.

4.    The two documents (WIPs) are available at the following links on the GWRC website:

 

Whaitua Implementation Programme:

https://www.gw.govt.nz/assets/Documents/2021/12/Te-Whaitua-te-Whanganui-a-Tara-Implementation-Programme_web.pdf

 

Te Mahere Wai:

https://www.gw.govt.nz/assets/Documents/2021/12/te_mahere_wai_20211028_v32_DIGI_FINAL.pdf

 

5.    The reports were received by the Climate Change and Sustainability Committee on 23 November 2021 [“Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara: Whaitua Implementation Reports” CCASC2021/5/269].

6.    The focus of the process has now moved to implementing the recommendations made in the two reports.

WIP implementation framing considerations – the significance of the recommendations

7.    The content of the two WIPs reflect the significantly increased importance given to water by the National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management [NPS-FM 2020] and especially the importance of Te Mana o Te Wai in the framework. The focus on this area reflects a fundamental change in how we value and manage freshwater. 

8.    GWRC have stated [Report 21.526 “Response to the receipt of Whaitua Te Whanganui-A-Tara Implementation Programme and Te Mahere Wai O Te Kahui Taiao”, 9 December 2021, page 45], that giving effect to Te Mana o Te Wai will “… require collective and integrated delivery across a number of partnerships” and that “realising Te Mana o Te Wai framework will challenge and put pressure on the Long Term and Annual Plan cycles, on our investment models and priorities.”

9.    The Committee was a non-statutory body. There is therefore no legislation underpinning the WIP reports directly and the recommendations made have no legal force of themselves and are not legally required to be implemented.

10.  However, many of the recommendations will inform the GWRC’s development of their Regional Policy Statement (RPS) and Natural Regional Plan (NRP) on how to enable and implement the Te Mana o Te Wai framework. The RPS and NRP are planning documents that Council must give due regard to in the review of our District Plan.

11.  The RPS will be publicly notified in August 2022 and may require District Plan amendments; this is being discussed with the team.

12.  Other changes that will also help give effect to Te Mana o Te Wai would need to be implemented via other ‘non-regulatory’ pathways by local authorities, including Council, that participated in the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a Tara process. 

WIP implementation framing considerations – partners and stakeholders

13.  Implementation of the recommendations in the two WIP documents will require actions by all the key actors mentioned in the reports: Mana Whenua partners; Hutt, Wellington and Upper Hutt City Councils; GWRC; the ‘Three Waters’ agency (currently Wellington Water Ltd (WWL)) and community groups.

14.  The two documents contain 115 recommendations (Te Whanganui-a-Tara WIP) and 101 recommendations (Te Mahere Wai), respectively. In the Te Whanganui-a-Tara WIP all the recommendations are assigned to one or more of the key stakeholders: GWRC, territorial authorities (TAs), Mana Whenua, the Three Waters agency and a small number involving generally unspecified community groups.

15.  The recommendations in Te Mahere Wai are primarily focused on achieving identified outcomes with assigned actions generally directed at GWRC but with a strong focus also on facilitating and enabling Mana Whenua to establish and develop their new partnership role in the freshwater management space.

16.  For the Te Whanganui-a-Tara WIP, while a number of recommendations are assigned to ‘TAs’ to lead, GWRC is the lead agency for 84 recommendations with TAs and the Three Waters Agency responsible for 16 and 15 of the remainder, respectively.

17.  While the exact shape and design of the implementation phase is still to be determined, there are a number of organisational considerations that will need to be resolved if the process is to be successful.

18.  Firstly, the resourcing of Mana Whenua to enable them to meaningfully participate at the mandated partnership level. This is a situation that will likely further aggravate, in the short-term at least, an existing resource shortfall that is the result of an increasing need/expectation for Mana Whenua partnership and participation in local government processes. While this is primarily an issue for GWRC, it is likely that this will impact TAs also, particularly when local sub-catchment areas have been specifically identified. Some of these, if not all, are of interest to Mana Whenua and their values.

19.  Secondly increased community involvement is another defining feature of the WIPs and is to be commended. The community-focused work will likely include providing information and resources, building capacity and developing relationships, all of which will be resource intensive both for the groups involved and for local authorities.

20.  Thirdly, the on-ground implementation of any recommendation involving water service delivery in the catchment currently is critically dependent on the availability of WWL’s services.

21.  This will likely take place against a backdrop of the national scale, contested Three Waters Reform process that is underway.

22.  Whatever the outcomes (and operational delivery of Three Waters services may be removed from TA control), the reform process will likely take a number of years to implement and bed in. These change driven pressures will exacerbate both the existing Three Waters related resource shortfall and the existing inflationary cost pressures arising from COVID-induced supply chain disruptions and broader economic conditions

23.  Fourthly, any implementation work at Council will likely require additional resource, the amount of which is not yet quantifiable. This will be required in two areas. The first of these is internal work on non-regulatory recommendations and on regulatory pathway recommendations that are included in the upcoming GWRC RPS and NRP. The second is external facing work relating to any actions agreed to by the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara stakeholders.

WIP implementation framing considerations – cost

24.  As was noted in an earlier report [refer CCASC2021/5/269] the costs associated with implementation of the recommendations (other than in a qualitative sense) were not considered in the work of either the Whaitua Committee or Te Kāhui Taiao and cost issues are therefore not discussed in their reports.

25.  However, the costs of fully implementing the two WIPs – which reflect the significantly increased importance given to water by the underpinning National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management [NPS-FM 2020] – will likely involve additional expenditure (and additional specialist technical resources) in the medium and long-term.

26.  One example where substantially increased costs are likely to occur is in the Three Waters area. A number of the recommendations propose extending the work programmes agreed with WWL and funded in the current Long-Term Plan. This cost will exceed the current expenditure agreed with WWL to upgrade the city’s water network ($1.3b over 30 years) but the quantum of additional expenditure is not yet known.

27.  Other than noting that the quantum of additional funding and resourcing required will be substantial in the medium and long-term, it is not possible, at this time, to provide an estimate of the likely total costs incurred to fully implement the WIPs. This is an area that requires further work by officers, both at Council and with other Whaitua stakeholder organisations.

WIP implementation framing considerations – timing

28.  A number of the recommendations in the two documents include a timeframe by which the reporting entity (the Whaitua Committee or Te Kāhui Taiao) would like to see the recommendations actioned, especially in the shorter-term. In a number of instances, the Te Mahere Wai WIP recommendations propose a tighter timeline than does the Te Whanganui-a-Tara WIP.

29.  In the case of Te Whanganui-a-Tara WIP, around 50% of the recommendations have a desired implementation date. Of these, 80% are assigned to the 2022 – 2026 period, with ten and nine recommendations assigned to the 2022 and 2023 calendar years, respectively.

30.  In the near-term (2022/23), there are only two actions associated with the reduction and phase out the use of copper-based brake pads in the vehicle fleet.

31.  These actions should be achievable at minimal cost albeit also with limited effectiveness. Council vehicles are typically turned over before brake pads require replacement and some suppliers of vehicles in Council’s fleet do not yet offer copper-free pads in their new vehicles.

32.  There are no actions proposed for implementation in 2023 solely assigned to TAs but two shared (with GWRC and Mana Whenua) recommendations [#44, 67] may be problematic to implement within the proposed timeframe.

33.  Recommendation #44 is to “ensure that all large green spaces (e.g., parks, school grounds, golf courses) are managed to reduce the infiltration of fertilizer into groundwater and waterways, with plans in place that include public reporting” and #67 is to “co-design operational guidelines for undertaking flood works on small urban streams, including those on private property.”

34.  Both these recommendations are relatively ambitious to achieve by the end of 2023 and require concerted action by Council officers and WWL and GWRC staff.

35.  The timelines proposed for implementation will be one of the factors that the implementation process will need to take into account, and possibly modify in some instances in the light of the available resources and funding.

WIP implementation – consideration of actions taken to date at HCC for proposed “TA led” recommendations

36.  A group of Council officers met in December 2021, to begin the process of assessing the potential impacts of the recommendations in the two WIPs on Council.

37.  As a first step, the status of work at Council relating to the recommendations that TAs are proposed to lead was examined.

38.  This work comprises two areas:

§ The 10 ‘TA only’ recommendations [# 26, 27, 30, 40, 53, 55, 63, 65, 66, 96]

§ The 6 ‘TA and Three Waters agency’ recommendations [# 20, 28, 29, 61, 62, 92]

39.  Consideration was given to the Council (and likely WWL) work areas involved, the actions, if any, underway at Council and the issues that will need to be addressed as part of the implementation process.  When the initial impact assessment work might be completed was also considered. [The output from the discussion is provided in Appendix 1 to the report.]

40.  The work to date has not considered the eight recommendations that involve TAs (ie Council) working with GWRC nor the 22 recommendations that relate to Council and GWRC working with others, variously Mana Whenua, Three Waters agency and community groups.

41.  Some learnings from the work to date are:

§ Unsurprisingly, given the breadth of the Committee’s work and the time available, a number of the recommendations will require discussion between stakeholder organisations to clarify key issues such as the scope before implementation work can start.

 

§ The functional interdependence of the stakeholder groups with respect to implementation – and the role of WWL – means that the ability of certain stakeholders groups (eg TAs) to unilaterally implement recommendations as proposed has been overestimated in a number of instances.

 

§ Some groups of recommendations are closely linked (eg #26 – 30) meaning that to effectively address the core problem all the component issues articulated in the relevant recommendations will need to be implemented.

WIP implementation – next steps

42.  For the two prior WIPs published to date, the implementation process has been carried out primarily by GWRC, processes that have not always been effective in delivering the outcomes desired by the Whaitua communities involved.

43.  Currently, this is the situation for Whaitua Te Wanganui-a-Tara also where GWRC has advised [GWRC Report 21.526] that the recommendations made in the WIPs will be part of their Whaitua Operational Implementation programme.

44.  Viewed holistically however, the operational landscape around the management of freshwater in the region is facing a number of challenges that mean that the upcoming Whaitua implementation process would benefit from a bespoke approach to ensure the best possible use of the limited resources available.

45.  The challenges include:

§  The breadth of the issues addressed in the two WIPs

§  The paradigm shift around the primacy of Te Mana o te Wai in the new NPS-FM framework

§  The uncertainty around the future delivery of Three Waters services and the functional resource constraints that already exist in this area

§  Other major challenges being faced by local authorities and our communities (including COVID and climate change).

46.  A bespoke approach may involve the Whaitua partners and key stakeholders working together rather than a GWRC-centric approach that was used for prior to the Whaitua. A bespoke approach should avoid either wastefully duplicating work or not working in a co-ordinated fashion on interdependent issues that require a regionally harmonised approach to succeed.

47.  Officers have approached GWRC to see whether other key Whaitua stakeholders (including TAs) see collective value in establishing some form of shared/co-ordinated implementation process and what this might look like. The initial, albeit informal response, has been favourable and the next step will be to see what support exists from other Whaitua partners and stakeholders.

48.  A Council officers’ group will also continue to assess the major impacts of the two sets of WIP recommendations on Council. The aim will be to provide a briefing to Council in mid-2022 once the necessary information is available.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

49.  No climate change impact assessment has been carried out, however climate change considerations were included in the scope of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee’s work.

Consultation

50.  No formal consultation has been undertaken on the reports, albeit community engagement by way of the Whaitua Committee has been at the heart of the process. As a consequence, all four councils in the whaitua are expected to lead community transformation in the way water is valued and treated, as set out in the recommendations in the two WIPs.

Legal Considerations

51.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial Considerations

52.  The financial and resourcing implications of the Whaitua Implementation Reports are not yet clear, and further analysis will be required although implementing the recommendations in full will have some degree of financial and resource risk associated with this path.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Whaitua considerations of impacts on Council of the TA led recommendations for implementation

127

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: David Burt

Senior Advisor Climate and Sustainability

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jenny Livschitz

Group Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Whaitua considerations of impacts on Council of the TA led recommendations for implementation

 








                                                                                       1                                                         03 March 2022

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

21 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/24)

 

 

Report no: CCASC2022/1/44

 

Update on Council's climate change work

 

Purpose of report

1.    Officers provide a regular update on key climate change work in order to implement Council’s organisational carbon target, facilitate a reduction in city-wide emissions, and address climate change impacts.

Recommendation

That the Committee notes the update on various climate change work streams.

 

Reducing Council’s organisational carbon emissions

Pools

2.    Heating plant changes at the Eastbourne and new Huia pool are now under way.

LED street lighting

3.    Between 31 October 2021 and 31 January 2022, there have been no changes to the number of LED streetlights in Lower Hutt. 55% of the city’s streets lights are currently LED.

Council’s vehicle fleet

4.    As at 31 January 2022, Council’s vehicle fleet includes 22 EVs, an increase by three vehicles compared to 31 October 2021. Council’s EV share is now at 32%. A further six EVs are scheduled to replace conventional vehicles within the next three months, which will increase Council’s EV share to about 42%.

5.    Work is also underway to supplement Council’s vehicle fleet offering with a car share option. Car sharing is a way by which people can book a provider’s cars by the minute or hour, with all costs such as fuel, insurance and parking included. Users become members of the providers, and can then find, book and unlock vehicles by smart phone.

6.    MEVO, a car share provider currently operating in Wellington, would like to offer free-floating car share vehicles in Lower Hutt. Council has agreed to become a launch customer with MEVO, with operations potentially commencing before the middle of 2022.

7.    The successful establishment of car sharing in Lower Hutt would provide a range of benefits for the city and the CBD area in particular:

a.   Would provide an additional travel option, and as a result, businesses and organisations could remove dedicated vehicles from their fleets, especially in cases where vehicles only have marginal use.

b.   RiverLink will lead to the removal of a significant number of car parks in the CBD; the establishment of a car share operation with 20 vehicles could remove about 200 vehicles from circulation. Each car share vehicle can take ten vehicles off the road, by organisations reducing their fleet sizes, or people forgoing the purchase of a replacement car]. Further growth in the scheme could remove more vehicles and compensate for the loss of car parks to a significant degree.

c.   MEVO is proposing all-electric car share vehicles, and the replacement of conventional vehicle trips would reduce carbon emissions.

Emissions from Silverstream Landfill

8.    The combustion of landfill gas by LMS Energy is tracking well, and the below graph shows the amount of methane combusted (in tCO2-e) through the power plant and supplementary flare for the 2021 calendar year. (Note that the graph shows the combined emissions from the open Stage 2 landfill and the closed Stage 1 landfill at Silverstream.)

9.    During the 2021 calendar year, the flare has enabled the combustion of a significant amount of methane, equivalent to 5,486 tCO2-e. The total methane combusted by the power plant and flare amounts to 102,096 tCO2-e for 2021. For comparison, total annual emissions associated with Council’s facilities amount to about 3,000 tCO2-e per year.

10.  The total liability under the Emissions Trading Scheme for 2021 has been assessed as 17,622 emission units (subject to confirmation). This compares to a liability of 37,262 emission units for 2020.

Emissions from the closed Wainuiomata Landfill

11.  Planning for the trial of a flare at the closed Wainuiomata Landfill is underway. The commencement of the trial is still dependent on the arrival of the flaring equipment (current estimate is at the end of May 2022).

12.  At this stage, we hope to have the results available on whether gas destruction is possible by approximately August 2022. 

Reducing city-wide carbon emissions and responding to climate change impacts

Development of a city-wide pathway

13.  The Te Ara Whakamua o Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai Lower Hutt Climate Action Pathway (the Pathway) entitled ‘Our race against time – Ka whati te tai, ka pao te tōrea!’, the development of which was led by the Lead Group and facilitated by Creative HQ, has now been finalised. Please refer to the separate report on this matter to this committee.

DC electric vehicle charging stations across Lower Hutt

14.  The installation of two DC charging stations at the Seaview Marina was completed in December 2021, and they are now available for use by the public.

15.  At the Koraunui Stokes Valley Community Hub, an existing AC charging unit failed in the middle of 2021, but it has not been possible to obtain an essential replacement part. In the context of the rollout of DC charging stations across the city, it was decided to replace the AC unit at that location with two DC units. Installation of the two DC units is scheduled to be completed in March 2022.

16.  Site assessments for the remaining six sites are being finalised, and this will inform community consultation and proposed traffic resolutions.

Climate change risk assessment

17.       Council is collaborating with all the other councils in the Wellington region to develop a regional risk assessment for key climate change impacts. This project will underpin the subsequent regional approach to climate change impacts undertaken by the Wellington Region Climate Change Forum and is carried out as part of the Wellington Regional Growth Framework work programme.

18.  Procurement for a suitable lead consultant is currently under way, with the actual work getting underway in the second quarter of 2022.

Climate Change impact and considerations

19.  This report responds directly to the need to reduce carbon emissions, by providing a regular update on Council’s key initiatives. 

20.  Practical initiatives noted in this report that will positively reduce Council’s carbon footprint include the continued electrification of its vehicle fleet, progress on our workstream to de-carbonise Council facilities, and maximising the combustion of methane at landfills.

21.  Council also undertakes work to reduce city-wide emissions for activities where it has little or no direct control, and the completion of the city-wide Pathway will play a key role in helping us achieve our objectives.

Consultation

22.  Not applicable.

Legal Considerations

23.  There are no legal considerations at this time.

Financial Considerations

24.  High emission destruction rates through the power plant and flare have enabled us to minimise Council’s liability under the Emissions Trading Scheme for the 2021 calendar year.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                       1                                                         03 March 2022

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

18 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/406)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2022/1/47

 

Update on pest and animal control work programme

 

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to update the Committee on the site-led and responsive pest animal control work programme.

 

Recommendation

The Committee notes and receives the report.

 

Background

2.    In September 2021 the Climate Change and Sustainability Committee received an update on Council’s biodiversity workstreams including site-led and responsive pest animal control.

3.    The Committee requested that a further update on site-led and responsive pest animal control be provided in early 2022. This work occurs in reserves throughout Lower Hutt and comprises a bait station network, rabbit control and deer control.

Deer Culling

4.    In 2020/21 Council undertook the second year of a deer control programme.  Councils prioritise biodiversity and the local deer population on reserves is not managed with recreational hunting in mind. The aim is to eradicate deer from Council reserves.  

5.    Council has engaged Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) biosecurity staff to manage this programme and ensure site safety. GWRC sub-contracts Trap and Trigger to undertake some of this work.

6.    The objective was to remove as many red deer as possible to:

·    Reduce public sightings and enhance public safety; and

·    Prevent damage to native forest, private property, Council reserves and gardens

7.    To create a downward trend in the resident deer population, the population needed to be reduced by 35%.  This figure of 35% is the rule of thumb for managing deer populations downwards where hind and stags are present in a population.  A stag will mate with several hinds and increase the population of their herd by three or more fawns annually.  Some fawns will not survive.

8.    The number of red deer in Council reserves is unknown.  Officers sought advice about methods to estimate the deer population from a consultant in February 2022.  One option might be to apply Environmental DNA (eDNA) technology by sampling water and ground samples.  The advice was not available at the time this report was written.

9.    The hunting work occurs in the optimum season and where reports of pests in reserves are high. In the 2020/2021 financial year there were a total of 57 red deer removed from reserves in Lower Hutt, which is almost twice as many as the previous year when there were around 25 removed.

10.  The locations and numbers of deer that were shot are:

·    Page Grove Reserve (Shooting range/race track) – 14 deer

·    Old Wainuiomata Landfill – 6 deer

·    Taita cemetery – 5 deer

·    Norrie Grove Reserve – 3 deer

·    Open Polytechnic – 1 deer

·    Wainuiomata Hill Road – 1 deer

·    East Stokes Valley – 14 deer, 1 goat, 1 pig

·    Haywards Scenic Reserve/Parkway – 6 deer

·    Taitā/West Stokes Valley – 5 deer

·    Hine Road – 2 deer

11.  The highest number of animals, 14, were removed from East Stokes Valley.  Most deer were shot near bush edges.  Where there were multiple animals, shooters chose hinds.

12.  In recent months community have raised concerns about increased deer activity in some parts of the city.

13.  From the limited research we have undertaken to date, it appears the deer population is increasing right across New Zealand. Deer are large animals and have no natural predators in New Zealand.  Deer need to forage large amounts of vegetation to sustain themselves and this reduces the quality of habitats.  Locally, deer also cause damage to gardens and restoration planting and they eat pasture.

Update

14.  GWRC pest animal control and Council Parks and Reserves officers are planning the third year of annual deer control for March to May 2022.

15.  For the third consecutive year Council officers will combine resources and agree on which areas to target based on survey data.  GWRC will organise the work and oversee a contractor. 

16.  A map provided by GWRC indicates that deer are being sighted at urban edges east of the Hutt River from Pinehaven to Muritai and in Wainuiomata between Arakura and Homedale. Council officers will discuss including Silverstream Landfill in the March/April 2022 cull, as this was an area of interest last year, but was not included as the landfill managers opted to manage this themselves.

17.  GWRC have installed a number of photo points to monitor the response of vegetation following control. 

18.  Given the increase in deer numbers, officers have investigated expanding the March to May culling and/or to carry out an additional cull later in the calendar year.  The cost of this would be met within existing budgets. GWRC advise however that prior to June 2022 the real issue is likely to be contractor availability as pest control work is heavily booked.  We will continue to investigate this, with the intention to undertake additional culling when contractors become available. 

19.  An additional cull in Spring each year would target animals that feed in grassy areas.  This would be a trial.  Theoretically animal numbers will reduce faster and there would be less immigration between herds and less breeding.

20.  As animal numbers drop, it will become harder to locate animals on reserve.  Per animal, it will become more expensive to control deer.  If the eDNA technology has application in our reserves, it may be possible to identify areas that contain small numbers of deer more precisely.

21.  We will also work with GWRC to encourage Lower Hutt residents to report deer sightings to identify any additional areas which should be treated as priority sites.

 

 

Proposed possum control (aerial 1080)

22.  Officers recently met with a culling firm called EcoFX Ltd who will be carrying out Bovine TB control with aerial 1080 in Wainuiomata and the Eastern Bays between April and September 2022.

23.  The work is being undertaken for OSPRI New Zealand (partners for TB control with primary industries and Government). At the moment the target is on reducing possums to reduce TB.

24.  The control work will cover approximately 20,000ha, and only a portion of this is inside the Lower Hutt TA boundary. Councils, the Department of Conservation, GWRC and private property owners are included in the proposed control area.  There is a high level of support for the work from landowners.  Large scale possum control work is common in New Zealand.  Aerial 1080 drops are an effective method of control where ground control is difficult.  The next step will be seeking landowner approval.

25.  Survey work and testing shows that TB is present in the local possum population.  Possum numbers in the Eastern Bays have reached 16% catch rate in some places. This density of possums is well above target levels, which are under 5%.

26.  Regular pest animal control is essential for the conservation of natural areas and biodiversity.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

27.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

28.  These activities support Council’s wider environmental goals.   

Legal Considerations

29.  The Biosecurity Act 19923 provides the legal framework for Councils to manage pest animals.  The act allows Regional Councils to develop regional pest management plans.  GWRC’s pest strategy identifies deer as a pest and encourages landowners to control wild deer.

Financial Considerations

30.  Deer control on Council reserve land is fully funded from the Parks and Reserves Business Unit operational budget. The Pest Animal arrangement with GWRC costs approximately $55,150 per annum and is reviewed annually.

31.  For deer culling specifically, the budgets are:

Year

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Budget

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

(expanded/additional cull would be a further $15,000

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Kelly Crandle

Head of Parks and Reserves

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 

 


                                                                                       1                                                         03 March 2022

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

14 February 2022

 

 

 

File: (22/360)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2022/1/34

 

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee Work Programme 2022

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the work programme be received and noted.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Work Programme 2022

144

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Judy Randall

Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Work Programme 2022

 

 



[1] For Auckland Council’s report refer https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-annual-reports/docsannualreportvolumes20202021/annual-report-2020-2021-volume-4.pdf

[2] For NZ Superfund report refer https://www.nzsuperfund.nz/assets/Uploads/NZSF-Climate-Change-Report-2021.pdf