HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

POARI HAPORI O WAINUIOMATA | Wainuiomata Community Board

 

 

27 October 2021

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata,

on:

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 3 November 2021 commencing at 6.30pm

 

The meeting will be held under Alert Level 2

 

 

 

 

Membership

 

Gabriel Tupou (Chair)

Dawn McKinley

Terry Stallworth

Gary Sue

Sisi Tuala-Le’afa

Jodie Winterburn

Cr Keri Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY


 

 

 

 

 


COMMUNITY BOARDS FUNCTIONS AND DELEGATIONS

This document records the delegation of Council functions, responsibilities, duties, and powers to Community Boards.

The Community Boards have been established under section 49 of the Local Government Act 2002 to represent, and act as an advocate for, the interests of their community.

The delegations are expressed in general terms. The delegations shall be exercised with proper regard for the Council’s strategic direction, policies, plans, Standing Orders and its interpretation of its statutory obligations. The delegations are to be read together with the following propositions.

These delegations are based on the following principles:

·                Issues relevant to a specific community should be decided as closely as possible to that community. Where an issue has city-wide implications, ie any effects of the decision cross a ward or community boundary or have consequences for the city as a whole, the matter will be decided by Council after seeking a recommendation from the relevant Community Board or (any ambiguity around the interpretation of “city-wide” will be determined by the Mayor and Chief Executive in consultation with the relevant Chair);

·                Efficient decision-making should be paramount;

·                Conflicts of interest should be avoided and risks minimised;

·                To ensure processes are free from bias and pre-determination Community Boards should not adjudicate on issues on which they have advocated or wish to advocate to Council;

·                Community Boards should proactively and constructively engage with residents on local matters that affect the community they represent and raise with Council issues raised with them by their community and advocate on behalf of their community.

These delegations:

(a)         do not delegate any function, duty or power which a statute (for example section 53(3) and clause 32(1) of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002) prohibits from being delegated;

(b)         are subject to and do not affect any delegation which the Council has already made or subsequently makes to any other committee, Council officer or other member of staff;

(c)         are subject to any other statutory requirements that may apply to a particular delegation;

(d)         are subject to any notice issued by the Council, from time to time, to a Community Board that a particular issue must be referred to Council for decision;

(e)         reflect that decisions with significant financial implications should be made by Council (or a committee with delegated authority);

(f)           promote centralisation of those functions where the appropriate expertise must be ensured; and

(g)         reflect that all statutory and legal requirements must be met.


DELEGATIONS

Decide:

·              Naming new roads and alterations to street names (in the Community Board’s area).

·              Official naming of parks, reserves and sports grounds within the provisions of Council’s Naming Policy. Note 1

·              Removal and/or planting of street trees within the provisions of Council’s Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan. Note 2

·              The granting of leases and licences in terms of Council policy to voluntary organisations for Council owned properties in their local area, for example, halls, but not including the granting of leases and licences to community houses and centres.

·              The granting of rights-of-way and other easements over local purpose reserves and granting of leases or licences on local purpose reserves.

·              The granting of leases and licences for new activities in terms of Council policy to community and commercial organisations over recreation reserves subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and land managed as reserve subject to the provisions of the Local Government 2002, in their local area. (Note: renewal of existing leases and licences will be reported once a year to Council’s City Development Committee).

·              The allocation of funding from the Community Engagement Fund in accordance with Council’s adopted guidelines.

·              Expenditure of funds allocated by the Council to the Board from the Miscellaneous Budget to cover expenditure associated with the activities of the Board. The Chair to approve expenditure, in consultation with the Board, and forward appropriate documentation to the Committee Advisor for authorisation. Boards must not exceed their annual expenditure from the Miscellaneous Budget.

·              The allocation of funding for the training and development of Community Board or members, including formal training courses, attendance at seminars or attendance at relevant conferences.

CONSIDER AND MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS TO COUNCIL ON:

·              Particular issues notified from time to time by Council to the Community Board.

·              Roading issues considered by the Mayor and Chief Executive to be strategic due to their significance on a city-wide basis, including links to the State Highway, or where their effects cross ward or community boundaries.

 

 

 


 

1  This excludes sites that are considered high profile, significant on a city-wide basis due to their size and location, or where the              site crosses ward or community boundaries.

2  The Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan is available from Council’s Parks and Gardens Division.


·              Parks, reserves and sports ground naming for sites that have a high profile, city-wide importance due to their size and location and/or cross ward or community boundaries.

·              Representatives to any Council committee, subcommittee, subordinate decision-making body, working group, or ad hoc group on which a Community Board representative is required by Council.

·              The setting, amending or revoking of speed limits in accordance with the Hutt City Council Bylaw 2005 Speed Limits, including the hearing of any submissions.

 

GENERAL FUNCTIONS

Provide their local community’s input on:

·              Council’s Long Term Plan and/or Annual Plan.

·              Council’s policies, programmes (including the District Roading Programme) and bylaws.

·              Changes or variations to the District Plan.

·              Resource management issues which it believes are relevant to its local community, through advocacy.

·              The disposal or acquisition of significant assets.

·              Road safety including road safety education within its area.

·              Any other issues a Board believes is relevant to its local area.

·              Review Local Community Plans as required.

Reports may be prepared by the Board and presented to Council Committees, along with an officer’s recommendation, for consideration.

Any submissions lodged by a Board or Committee require formal endorsement by way of resolution.

Co-ordinate with Council staff:

·              Local community consultation on city-wide issues on which the Council has called for consultation.

Maintain:

·              An overview of roadworks, water supply, sewerage, stormwater drainage, waste management and traffic management for its local area.

·              An overview of parks, recreational facilities and community activities within its local area.

Develop:

·              Community Response Plans in close consultation with the Wellington Region Emergency Management Office, emergency organisations, the community, residents’ associations, other community groups, and local businesses. The Community Response Plans will be reviewed on an annual basis.

Grant:

·              Local community awards.

Promote:

·              Recreational facilities and opportunities in its area with a view to ensure maximum usage.


·              Arts and crafts in its area.

Appoint:

·              A liaison member or, where appropriate, representatives to ad hoc bodies, which are involved in community activities within the Board’s area, on which a community representative is sought.

Endorse:

·         Amendments to the Eastbourne Community Trust Deed (Eastbourne Community Board only).


appendix 1 – community engagement fund

criteria

 

The fund is for local activities and events that directly benefit the local community. 

 

To be eligible for funding the organisation must be a charitable trust or an incorporated society and the activity must take place within the Hutt. 

 

Each of the city’s seven wards receive funding according to the number of residents within its boundaries. For each resident there is an allocation of 40 cents. 

The ward allocations are listed below:

Ward

Amount

Eastbourne

$2,366

Petone

$6,250

Wainuiomata

$8,607

Central

$9,320

Eastern

$8,461

Northern

$7,644

Western

$6,201

Applications must support the Local Community Plan, if there is one, and also core Council business as identified in the Long Term Plan.

Decisions

Each Community Board decides the funding applications within its area. Boards are free to distribute their funding in a single large allocation or spread it over a number of smaller ones.

What can be funded

·         purchase of office equipment

·         food and catering costs

·         community festivals

·         youth group events and projects run by the elderly or citizens associations

·         art projects that are not part of the core curriculum

·         advertising, promotion costs

What won’t be funded

Activities that:

·         promote an organisation’s religious, ethical, commercial or political views

·         involve buying land or buildings or carrying out maintenance on buildings 

·         duplicate services that are already covered by Council or by government agencies eg, health or education providers

·         have already begun or have already finished

·         involve the redistribution of funds to others at the applicant’s discretion

·         involve fundraising or legal costs

·         involve capital investments or trust funds

·         go towards prize money

·         are operational costs eg, salaries, wages, rent, power

Funding rules

Successful applicants must:

·         use funds only for the approved purpose and in accordance with any terms and conditions set by Council

·         use funds by June 30 of the following year

·         let Council’s funding officer know immediately if any difficulty or potential difficulty arises that may compromise the service or project

·         lay a complaint with Police if any funds are stolen or misappropriated, and then notify Council

·         allow Council to audit the use of the funds should it wish to do so

·         recognise Council’s  support in all publicity material, annual reports and similar publications

·         complete an Accountability Report no later than six weeks after completing the project. This should outline how the funds were used and how the community benefited

·         make a presentation to the funding group showing how the event met its objectives.

Council’s Community Funding Advisor is available to support and assist community groups when making applications through the Council’s online grants system.


 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Poari Hapori o Wainuiomata | Wainuiomata Community Board

 

Meeting to be held in the Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata

on

Wednesday 3 November 2021 commencing at 6.30pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       Mayor's Address (21/1587)

4.       Presentation by Local Councillor from Greater Wellington Regional Council (21/1588)

Verbal presentation by Local Councillor from Greater Wellington Regional Council.

5.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.  

6.       Minutes

Meeting minutes Wainuiomata Community Board, 1 September 2021                  9

7.       Report referred for Board input before being considered by Subcommittee of Council

Options regarding activities on the site of the closed Wainuiomata Landfill (21/1693)

Report No. WCB2021/5/244 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste                15

8.       Proposed New Private Street Name: Subdivision of 196B Wise Street, Wainuiomata (21/1631)

Report No. WCB2021/5/245 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations       25


 

9.       Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022 (21/1677)

Memorandum dated 14 October 2021 by the Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts                                                                                                                 35

10.     Democracy Advisor's Report (21/1585)

Report No. WCB2021/5/130 by the Democracy Advisor                                     37

11.     Chair's report (21/1586)

Report No. WCB2021/5/131 by the Chairperson                                                  41         

12.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

 

 

Toi Lealofi

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR

 


                                                                       9                                          1 September 2021

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

POARI HAPORI O WAINUIOMATA | Wainuiomata Community Board

 

Minutes of a meeting held via Zoom

 on

Wednesday 1 September 2021 commencing at 6.30pm

 

                 

PRESENT:

Mr G Tupou (Chair)

Ms D McKinley (Deputy Chair)

(via audio-visual)

Mr G Sue

Ms S Tuala-Le’afa

 

Mrs J Winterburn

Cr K Brown

 

APOLOGIES:                  Mr T Stallworth for lateness[1]

 

IN ATTENDANCE:

(via audio-visual)             Mayor Barry (part meeting)

Cr B Dyer (part meeting)

Cr J Briggs

                                          Cr A Mitchell

Ms H Oram, Director Environment and Sustainability

                                          Mr C Agate, Traffic Engineer– Network Operations (part meeting)

                                          Mr T Kimbrell, Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner (part meeting)

                                          Mr M Ackroyd, Service Desk Analyst

                                          Ms K Glanville, Senior Democracy Advisor

                                          Ms T Lealofi, Democracy Advisor

                                         

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mr Sue)                                                   Minute No. WCB 21401

“That the apology received from Mr Stallworth for lateness be accepted.”

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

There was no public comment.

 

3.

Mayor's Address

The Mayor read out his Mayoral Statement attached as page 6 of the minutes.

Cr Brown left the meeting at 6.39pm and re-joined at 6.41pm.

In response to a question from a member, Mayor Barry said the rubbish collection service would operate to its schedule at COVID-19 Alert Level 4. 

Cr Brown advised there was confusion about the rubbish and recycling collection in Wainuiomata due to different collection days in the area and the distribution of incorrect information. She advised the https://www.toogoodtowaste.co.nz/ website had the most up-to-date information.

The Director Environment and Sustainability noted any request to change bin sizes received after July 2021 would be reviewed after October 2021 due to the high volume of requests.

Mayor Barry confirmed the Wainuiomata Cleanfill would be closed prior to June 2022. He said Council would not consider another cleanfill site in Lower Hutt due to establishment of a cleanfill site in Silverstream, Upper Hutt.

4.

Presentation by Local Councillor from Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC)

Cr van Lier advised buses and trains were running on Saturday timetables during Alert Level 4 lockdown and this would continue when the region moved into Alert Level 3 lockdown. Travellers with monthly passes would be able to transfer their August passes to September and transfer September passes to October.  He said some Lower Hutt bus timetables would be changing to better align drivers with routes. This would help avoid bus cancellations and split shifts for drivers. He noted the Metlink fleet had received 10 new electric buses and was expecting 88 more in the successive 18 months.

Cr Van Lier advised there was ongoing restoration of the Wainuiomata river and its associated wetlands around Baring Head. He said this was a joint activity between GWRC, Friends of Baring Head and Conservation Volunteers New Zealand. He said they had planted up to 20,000 trees.  He noted the project required volunteers and the next intake was in September 2021.

5.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS  

          There were no conflict of interest declarations.

6.       Minutes

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Ms Tuala-Le'afa)                                   Minute No. WCB 21402

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Wainuiomata Community Board held on Wednesday, 30 June 2021, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

   

7.       Report referred for Board input before being considered by Subcommittee of Council

 

Traffic Resolutions - Proposed Changes to Route 160 Bus Stop Configuration (21/1281)

Report No. WCB2021/4/183 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

The Traffic Engineer elaborated on the report.

In response to a question from a member, the Traffic Engineer said Metlink responded to community feedback about any proposed changes to the bus network.

 

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mrs Winterburn)                           Minute No. WCB 21403

“That the Board endorses the recommendations contained in the report.”

For the reason that the proposed bus stop layout changes will ensure that the bus box is of sufficient length to accommodate buses; no stopping restrictions will prevent other vehicles from blocking full access to the bus stop and passengers will be able to board and alight safely and easily.

 

8.

Upper Fitzherbert Road Local Purpose Reserve (Road) Easement (21/1211)

Report No. WCB2021/4/184 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

The Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner elaborated on the report.

 

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mr Sue)                                                    Minute No. WCB 21404

“That the Board:

(1)   notes that additional consultation methods, including a letter drop and webpage were undertaken to satisfy its request made at its meeting held on 30 June 2021;

(2)   notes that the land was vested to Council in DP 78964 as Local Purpose Reserve (Road);

(3)   notes that all costs for the development of the road and maintenance of such will lie with the applicant; and

(4)   agrees to grant the stage two easement for Upper Fitzherbert Road Local Purpose Reserve (Road) under s48 of the Reserves Act 1977.”

For the reason to grant an easement over Lot 3 DP 78964 provides the applicant with the ability to subdivide the adjacent land and develop a road at no cost to Council.

 


 

Precedence of Business

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Mr Sue)                                                   Minute No. WCB 21405

“That, in terms of Standing Order 10.4, precedence be accorded to item 12: ECNZ Track Acquisition”.

The item is recorded in the order in which it is listed on the order paper.

 

9.

Democracy Advisor's Report (21/1205)

Report No. WCB2021/4/111 by the Democracy Advisor

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Cr Brown)                                               Minute No. WCB 21406

“That the Board receives and notes the report.”

10.

Chair's Report (21/1206)

Report No. WCB2021/4/112 by the Chairperson

 

The Chair elaborated on his report. He highlighted the comments made by members of the public regarding their concerns in Wainuiomata. He said he had liaised with Council officers to provide a response. He noted the queries had been actioned accordingly.

Ms McKinley advised there were still ongoing issues with the internet connection in the Wainuiomata rural area. She said further updates would be reported back to the Board.

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Ms Tuala-Le'afa)                                     Minute No. WCB 21407

“That the Chair’s report be received and noted.”

11.

2021 Young Elected members Hui (21/1238)

Memorandum dated 4 August 2021 by the Democracy Advisor

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Ms Tuala-Le'afa)                                     Minute No. WCB 21408

“That the Board:

(1)   notes the Young Elected Members Hui (the Hui) will be held in Northland from 27-30 October 2021;

(2)   notes the registration details for the Hui will not be finalised in time for this meeting to approve precise costs for Board members’ attendance;

(3)   notes the estimated cost of attending the Hui of approximately $1,300 per member;

(4)   notes the Training Policy for Community Boards adopted by Council at its meeting held on 26 March 2019 attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum;

(5)   approves the attendance of Mr Gabriel Tupou at the 2021 Hui; and

(6)   notes that any member attending a training course, conference, seminar or similar event will be required to provide a written report and evaluation to the Board.”


 

12.     Information Item

 

ECNZ Track Acquisition (21/1278)

Memorandum dated 12 August 2021 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

Ms Winterburn left the meeting at 7.56pm and rejoined at 7.59pm.

The Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner elaborated on the report.

 

Resolved: (Mr Tupou/Ms McKinley)                                Minute No. WCB 21409

“That the Board notes and receives the memorandum.”

13.     QUESTIONS   

          There were no questions.

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 8.20pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

G Tupou

CHAIR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 3rd day of November 2021


 

 

MAYORAL STATEMENT

 

Kia ora koutou,

 

Firstly, I hope you and your families are all keeping safe in your bubbles.

COVID-19

It’s positive that we are moving down to alert level three, it’s vital that we don’t get complacent. While it looks like we’re starting to flatten the curve, we have to remain vigilant under lockdown restrictions and ensure we’re all following official advice.

Even though cases are few in the Wellington region, the delta variant is highly transmissible, and all of us have to play our part and make sure community cases are contained.

 

And as local elected officials we need to lead and set a good example for those in our communities.

 

That means encouraging people to stay in their bubbles, following official advice, and to get vaccinated! I’ve just booked mine in, and it’s really easy, so please play your part and encourage others to do the same.

 

I want to take a moment to briefly recognise some local heroes from your community.

I want to recognise two really special locals, Nicole Thornton and Dame Winnie Laban, who were recently awarded a certificate of appreciation and Mayoral Citation respectively at the recent Mayoral awards.  Nicole’s services to community health in Te Awakairangi Lower Hutt have been nothing less than incredible as she initiated the I Can’t Wait campaign and advocated for those with Crohn's and colitis across Aotearoa New Zealand and Winnie from Wainuiomata’s services to central government, education and the Pacific community in Te Awakairangi Lower Hutt and across Aotearoa New Zealand, made her fully deserving of being recognised by her own community.

Progress in the city

 

Finally, I just want to touch on some of the progress we’ve made recently in Lower Hutt.

 

Wainuiomata community board

•          $8.5 million has been invested in the Wainuiomata streetscape to reinvigorate Queen St.

•          Beltway cycleway, which will ultimately link up to our wider cycle networks, such as the Wainuiomata shared path

•          Council carbon reduction plan.

•          Funding for 20 new EV charging stations, including one in the Wainuiomata Hub

 


                                                                                       1                                                 03 November 2021

Wainuiomata Community Board

18 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1693)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2021/5/244

 

Options regarding activities on the site of the closed Wainuiomata Landfill

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Wainuiomata Community Board with information on options to be considered by Council to suspend any current or future planned activity on the site of the old Wainuiomata Landfill, in response to a Council resolution made on 10 August 2021.

Recommendations

That the Board:

(1)   notes the options regarding any activities that could take place on the site of Stage 3 of the old Wainuiomata landfill;

(2)   notes that officers are still investigating the feasibility and cost of establishing a gas collection and destruction system on the site;

(3)   notes that officers are carrying out further work to confirm the feasibility and cost of replanting the site;

(4)   notes that Council:

(a)   could continue to allow any current or potential activities on the site, as long as they don’t adversely impact on the ability to carry out further remediation of the site, or

(b)   could disallow any potential new activities that are not associated with remediation of the site, but continue to allow any current activities on the site as long as they don’t adversely impact on the ability to carry out further remediation of the site, or

(c)   could disallow any current and potential new activities that are not associated with remediation of the site;



(5)   notes that the potential establishment of a gas collection and destruction system, and/or replanting of the site were not included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2023, and additional revenue would be required to fund ongoing costs along with servicing of debt and depreciation if no alternative revenue is identified; and

(6)   provides any feedback to officers and the Council’s Climate Change and Sustainability Committee regarding the options presented in this report.

Background

2.    On 10 August 2021, Council passed a resolution, directing officers to:

a.   … report back to Council on options to suspend any current or future planned activity on the site of the old Wainuiomata Landfill, and consults with any affected parties; and

b.   … report back to Council on options to remediate the Wainuiomata Landfill site and minimise or offset its ongoing carbon impact.”

3.    These resolutions followed recommendations made by Council’s Climate Change and Sustainability Committee meeting on 22 July 2021. That Committee considered a report in relation to the investigation regarding a potential future cleanfill on Council-owned land.

4.    None of the sites owned by Council were considered suitable, but in relation to the site of the old Wainuiomata landfill at 255 Coast Road, the Committee passed two consequential recommendations (as noted above).

Site location and features

5.    The old Wainuiomata Landfill is located at 255 Coast Road, on the eastern side of Coast Road, approximately 1.5km south of Wainuiomata.

6.    The aerial view below shows the location of the various stages of the landfill, and some relevant features associated with the site.

7.    Landfill operations on the most recent Stage 3 commenced in 1979 following the closure of the two older landfill stages, and continued until the end of 2011. Approximately 6 ha was used for landfill activities in Stage 3, accommodating approximately 700,000 cubic metres of refuse.  (Stage 3 was also included in the scope of the recent assessment for potential cleanfill sites.)

8.    The Stage 3 site is located in a steep bush-clad valley orientated approximately in a north-south direction and is screened on all sides from public roads and developed areas. The area immediately above the landfill is currently covered in grass. The balance of the property is a mix of native bush, pine plantation and weeds (blackberry, gorse and pampas).


 

Current use of Stage 1 and 2

9.    The first stage of the old Wainuiomata Landfill is used for the storage of some building materials.

Stage 1 – old Wainuiomata landfill

 

10.  The second stage was used in the past by a pony club. It is now largely covered in blackberry, but there are some structures on the site used by a paint ball group.

Stage 2 – old Wainuiomata landfill

 

Current activities on Stage 3

11.  Stage 3 site is currently subject to quarterly site inspections, and maintenance activities, such as the mowing of grass and keeping drainage channels clear. If site inspections identify problems, such as leachate breakouts, Council has a contractor to remediate these as required.

 

 

Stage 3 – old Wainuiomata landfill

12.  In addition to maintenance activities, there are two current activities on the site:

Beehives

13.  Beehives by Ruapehu Sawmills Ltd are stored on site, via an informal arrangement, at the top of the closed landfill where they receive the most sun during winter. During the Manuka flowering season (October to March), the majority of the hives are moved offsite to around the North Island for Manuka honey collection.

Top-soil screening

14.  Wellington Pipelines Ltd has a resource consent (RM160130) that allows for stockpiling of up to 20,000m3 of natural materials for screening. The consent requires that the cap be protected by a thick rotomillings/gravel layer. The consent was granted in 2016, noting no significant effects.

15.  No formal lease agreement exists, but Wellington Pipelines Ltd is using the site for screening during summertime in a relatively small confined area.


 

Potential multi-shooting sports facility on Stage 3

16.  In 2014, the Wainuiomata Community Board gave approval in principle for the Hutt Valley Shooting Association (HVSA) to lease part of Stage 3 for a regional, multi-shooting sports facility.  This followed a publicly notified process, where there was broad support for the facility.  Twenty-five submissions were received, with some identifying concerns with noise. 

17.  The approval was subject to any necessary resource consent being obtained and any necessary Police certification to be obtained, to address any issues with noise or safety.

18.  HVSA estimates it has spent up to 200 hours and $30,000, primarily on noise consultants with a view to applying for a resource consent and/or addressing any potential adverse noise effects the facility might generate. 

19.  In 2020, officers met representatives of HVSA and advised that they would need to reapply to the Community Board if they still wished to proceed with the facility.  This was on the basis that too much time had passed and no consent had been obtained and no lease granted.

20.  HVSA advised that they did wish to proceed and would re-apply to the Community Board.  They have been working towards this.

Remediation options for the site

21.  In its decision on 10 August 2021, Council noted potential options of further remediation of the site by planting, and the destruction of gas.

Planting

22.  While the site is currently covered in grass, it could be beneficial to carry out further remediation of part or all of the site by planting a diverse mix of indigenous plant species.

23.  This could increase the sequestration of carbon (the amount of carbon captured would depend on the type of species that can be planted on the site), and further stabilise the site. Increased planting could help stabilise the landfill cap and reduce the risk of erosion associated with storm water run-off, and may also reduce the amount of water infiltration into the waste mass.

24.  Access tracks (4m wide with turning areas) would need to be retained for inspections and maintenance. A few key areas with known maintenance requirements (such as a section of the landfill front face prone to leachate breakouts) should also be kept clear of planting.

25.  Plant species on the landfill would need to be selected and maintained to ensure that no large trees became established that could impact the stability and integrity of the landfill cap.

 

26.  With regard to the benefit of reducing water infiltration into the waste mass, note that Council is currently working on options to improve the management of leachate originating in the landfill. The landfill has a gravity-fed leachate collection system, which flows to a pump station at the toe of the landfill where it is then pumped to trade waste for treatment. This system continued to be developed during the operational life of the landfill until closure in 2011.

27.  There have been ongoing issues with the leachate collection system since construction, specifically that leachate volumes can increase above the current capacity of the pipes and pumps used to pump the leachate to the nearest pump station at 130 Coast Road. While monthly water quality monitoring since 2005 has recorded no observable decrease in water quality in the Wainuiomata River, Council is looking at options to reduce the risk of overflows.

28.  Relevant options include an increase in holding tank capacity for the leachate, on-site leachate treatment, additional capping of the landfill, and/or planting of the site to minimise water infiltration into the waste mass. Therefore, there could be good alignment between planting of the site, and a reduction in the amount of leachate produced.

29.  Note that the potential planting of the site was not included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2023 and additional revenue would be required to fund ongoing costs along with servicing of debt and depreciation if no alternative revenue is identified.

Gas destruction

30.  Council, in its interim Carbon Reduction and Resilience Plan 2021-31, has committed to investigate the feasibility of destroying remaining methane emissions associated with the landfill site.

31.  Investigative work is under way, to inform a decision on the viability of a gas collection system and flare. If viable, it is likely that such system would involve the drilling of wells into the waste mass, the setup of gas collection pipes, and the installation and operation of a flare to destroy the gas.

32.  While this investigation won’t be complete until early to mid-2022, officers are preparing a budget request in the context of Council’s annual plan process for 2022/23 for the scenario that a flare and gas collection is considered feasible. Capital investment costs could be in the order of $500,000 to $800,000, with annual operating costs of about $90,000.

33.  Note that the potential addition of a gas collection and destruction system was not included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2023 and additional revenue would be required to fund ongoing costs along with servicing of debt and depreciation if no alternative revenue is identified.


 

Feedback from affected parties

34.  Before making a decision on the future of the site, Council asked officers to consult with affected parties.

35.  In late August 2021, officers sent a letter to all residents within 1km of the site, and the HVSA, inviting them to submit their views regarding their preferences for the site.

36.  In summary, the following feedback was received:

a.   There were seven written responses:  five from individual residents, one from a consortium of residents and one from the HVSA.

b.   Six of the responses representing residents were supportive of remediating the site.

c.   Many residents were supportive of further community involvement in any future planting scheme.

d.   HVSA were not supportive of suspending future activities, citing loss of an opportunity to establish a rifle range on the site, and associated impacts on the group members. Their response suggested a compromise scenario, incorporating both the rifle range in a small area, and planting / other operations across the rest of the site.

e.   Wellington Pipelines Ltd currently use the site, and they would like to continue doing so.

f.    One resident provided verbal feedback, and noted concerns about the space in front of the entrance to Stage 3, as it can be subject to anti-social behaviour.

Next steps

37.  The options for planting and gas collection may not necessarily be mutually exclusive, ie the operation of a flare and a gas collection system could work hand-in-hand with the planting of a mix of plant species provided access tracks are maintained and planting is excluded from areas where gas is extracted.

38.  Planting and any potential gas collection and destruction system may also work in conjunction with the existing activities on the site, given the relatively small footprint of those activities.

39.  However, it is unclear to what degree the establishment of a shooting facility at the site could work in conjunction with current activities or ideas to undertake further site remediation via planting and gas destruction. The set-up of at least two rifle ranges on the site (one up to 550m) and multiple hand gun bays, as outlined in the HVSA’s proposal from 2014, may conflict with them, and further work would be required to confirm feasibility.

40.  In principle, Council could decide to either

a.   continue to allow a mix of activities on the site, as long as they don’t adversely impact on the ability to carry out further remediation of the site, or

b.   disallow any potential new activities that are not associated with remediation of the site, but continue to allow any current activities on the site as long as they don’t adversely impact on the ability to carry out further remediation of the site, or

c.   limit any activities on the site to those that are associated with remediation of the site.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

41.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

42.  If viable, the establishment of a gas collection and destruction system could lead to significant carbon reductions, by destroying some of the methane emitted from the site. If a flare was in place by 2022, potentially around 18,000 tCO2-e could be destroyed by 2030.

43.  Planting of the site with a diverse mix of plant species could improve the potential to sequester more carbon. Officers are unable to estimate the carbon sequestration potential at this stage, but it may not be significant considering that we would need to ensure that no large trees become established that could impact the stability and integrity of the landfill cap.

Consultation

44.  In late August 2021, Council sent a letter to all residents within 1km of the site, and the HVSA, inviting them to submit their views regarding their preferences for the site. Wellington Pipelines Ltd was contacted via phone.

Legal Considerations

45.  A consent is in place for Wellington Pipelines Ltd to use the site for screening of soil, albeit no formal lease agreement is in place.

46.  There is currently no legal agreement, consent, or approval for HSVA to use the site.

Financial Considerations

47.  Council does not currently receive any revenue (or incur expenses) regarding the site’s use for beehive storage and soil screening.

48.  The development of a multi shooting sports facility, if permitted, would be funded by the Hutt Valley Shooting Association. The Association would be required to pay a lease rental, which would be determined on the total area of land leased under the reserves rental formula.

 

49.  The establishment of a gas collection and destruction system, and/or replanting of the site would require additional funds. Costs for planting are unknown at this stage. Capital costs for a gas collection and destruction system could be in the order of $500,000 to $800,000, with annual operating costs of about $90,000.

50.  The Long Term Plan 2021-2031 was adopted in June 2021.  This included a significant increase in capital budgets across the life of the plan. The plan also details how Council will not achieve a balanced budget until the 2028/29 financial year.  Funding for the potential establishment of a flare and gas collection system and/or planting is not included in the Long Term Plan. As such, an increase in costs for ongoing operations along with the servicing costs for debt and depreciation would require additional rates increases to fund these costs if no alternative revenue source can be found.

51.  In order to minimise relying on rates funding, for some costs, Council could consider selling (or borrowing against) its carbon credits that it receives for carbon sequestered on forest land registered under the Emissions Trading Scheme.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

Author: Janet Lawson

Reserves Asset Manager

 

 

Author: Bradley Cato

Chief Legal Officer

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jenny Livschitz

Group Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 


                                                                                       1                                                 03 November 2021

Wainuiomata Community Board

06 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1631)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2021/5/245

 

Proposed New Private Street Name: Subdivision of 196B Wise Street, Wainuiomata

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The report seeks approval for an appropriate street name for the new private road of the subdivision at 196B Wise Street, Wainuiomata.

 

Recommendations

That the Board:

 

(1) notes and receives the report; and

(2) approves a name for the proposed Private Road, shown on the plan attached      as Appendix 1 to the report as suggested below:

(a)   “Tauhou”, recommended road type “Lane”; or

(b)   “Waterford”, recommended road type “Way”; or

(c)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

(d)   an appropriate name tabled during the meeting; and

(e)   approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

For the reason that these recommendations have been made so that the development may proceed to completion as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require formalised street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

 


 

Background

2.    The subdivision of this site creates 10 residential lots gaining access off Trelawney Road, Wainuiomata.

3.    The responsibility for naming new roads within Lower Hutt lies with either the relevant Community Board or with the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee for areas of the city not represented by a Community Board.

4.    In this case the naming for the proposed road lies with the Wainuiomata Community Board.

Discussion

5.    The developer has submitted the following names for consideration when naming the private road:

a)   Tauhou Lane
Tauhou is the Māori name for the silvereye or wax eye native bird which can be found in the bush areas around Wainuiomata. Tauhou literally translates into “New Arrival”, which also nicely describes the recent new uprising of Wainuiomata as a great place to live.

b)   Waterford Way
This name has been taken from the Hutt City Council Reserved Street Name List: 2021, and reflects the history of Wainuiomata, the headland of the Wainuiomata river, and an area which grew out of a watery swamp during the 1855 Wairarapa earthquake.

6.    The above names meet the requirements of AS/NZS 4819:2011, and have been checked and verified by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) and are acceptable to be used.

7.    Several other suggestions were made namely Ruru, Makomako, and Korimako but were not accepted by LINZ due to existing street names within the 25km threshold.

Options

8.    Options for the naming of the Private Road are:

a)   “Tauhou”

b)   “Waterford”

c)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name List, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

d)   an alternate name tabled during the meeting.


 

9.    Road Types recommended for these private ways are:

a)   Lane; or

b)   Rise; or

c)   Way; or

d)   an appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3.

 

10.  If an alternate name is tabled during the meeting, it can be considered for use but will be subject to meeting the requirements of AS/NZS 4819:2011 and gaining LINZ approval. An appropriate backup name must also be recommended in case the alternate name is deemed not suitable.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

11.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

12.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.        

Consultation

13.  As is normal with the naming of private ways, consultation has been limited to the relevant committee, developer and their community network.

14.  Council’s Principal Māori Advisor has been consulted on the suitability of the names and is satisfied with the suggestions.

Legal Considerations

15.  The Community Board has the delegated responsibility to name the Private Road.

16.  The new street name is required as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require individual street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

Financial Considerations

17.  There are no financial considerations. The developer is responsible for the necessary street name signs. This will be undertaken by Council’s contractor with the cost paid by the developer.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Subdivision of 198B Wise Street, Wainuiomata

29

2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Name List

30

3

Appendix 3 - Extract of Permitted Road Types

33

    

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Bob Hu

Traffic Engineering Manager

 

 

 

Approved By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Subdivision of 198B Wise Street, Wainuiomata

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Name List

 




Attachment 3

Appendix 3 - Extract of Permitted Road Types

 



MEMORANDUM                                                  1                                                 03 November 2021

Our Reference          21/1677

TO:                      Chair and Members

Wainuiomata Community Board

FROM:                Debbie Hunter

DATE:                14 October 2021

SUBJECT:           Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022

Recommendations

That the Board:

(1) notes that the Community Engagement Fund closed on 14 October 2021 and one application had been received;

(2)  agrees that the application was considered according to the merits of the application criteria and priorities of the fund;

(3)  determines the funding to be granted through the Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022; and

(4)  requests the recipients of the Wainuiomata Community Engagement fund be    invited to attend a Community Board meeting in 2022 to introduce themselves to members and to give feedback on the use of the grants. 

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    For the Board to assess the eligible Community Engagement Fund application.

Background

Community Engagement Fund

2.    Council agreed through the 2016/2017 Annual Plan to annually contribute $48,850 annually for the Community Board/Community Committee (now the Community Funding Panel) Community Engagement Fund. 

3.    This is for local activities and events that directly benefit the communities concerned.

4.    The fund was advertised through the Hutt News, elected members, as well as through Council’s online grants system.

5.    This time round organisations were able to make applications through Council’s website.  

6.    One application was received under the Wainuiomata Community Board Community Engagement Fund 2021-2022. 


 

7.    Eligible application received as follows:

No

Organisation

Description

$Request

1

Nourish Trust

 

 

Towards the purchase of food for the Xmas hamper boxes for families in need from the local primary schools

$2,000

 

 

TOTAL REQUESTS

$2,000

 

8.    The Board has $8,607.00 to be allocated.  The funds must be fully allocated by end of June 2022.  Any unallocated funds can be used in Round 2 of the Community Engagement Fund. 

9.    Round 2 of the Community Engagement Fund is proposed to open on 18 April 2022 and close on 18 May 2022.  Decisions to be made at the Board’s meeting scheduled for June 2022. 

10.  Eligible Community Engagement Fund applications presented in this round request a total of $2,000.

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this Memorandum.    

 

Author: Debbie Hunter

Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts

 

 

 

Approved By: Melanie Laban

Head of Community Projects and Relationships

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


                                                                                       1                                                 03 November 2021

Wainuiomata Community Board

05 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1585)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2021/5/130

 

Democracy Advisor's Report

 

 

 

 

1.    The primary purpose of the report is to update the Board on items of interest.

 

Recommendation

That the Board receives and notes the report.

 

Consultation and community engagement

 

2.    District Plan Review

Council is still keen to receive your ideas, concerns and suggestions on the District Plan as it is reviewed. Currently it is seeking views on natural hazards and walkable neighbourhoods.  Go to: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/district-plan-review to have your say.

 

3.    Class 4 Gaming Venue and Board Venue Policy

Council is reviewing the use of Class 4 gaming machines across Te Awa Kairangi ki Tai/Lower Hutt as part of its wider vision to create a city of thriving communities. There are three options to consider: A sinking lid policy, the status quo or a per capita approach for machines and venues. Council wants feedback from as many interested parties as possible. To have your say go to https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/gambling-policy-review by 3 November 2021.

 

Young Elected Members Hui 221

 

4.    The 2021 Young Elected Members’ Hui that was due to be held in Northland from 27-30 October 2021 has been postponed due to COVID-19 restrictions. New dates for the hui will be advised once they have been confirmed.

 


 

Race to Zero – a city-wide carbon reduction initiative

 

5.    Council has voted in favour of signing up to the Race to Zero climate initiative, joining more than 730 cities around the world that have publicly committed to reducing carbon emissions. Hutt City Council is only the second council in New Zealand to join. The decision ensures continued work with the community on a city-wide roadmap with clear carbon reduction targets. It will require collective action – all Lower Hutt communities will need to do their part to reduce their carbon emissions. You can read more about this initiative in the Climate Change and Sustainability Committee agenda for 23 September 2021:  http://infocouncil.huttcity.govt.nz/Open/2021/09/CCASC_23092021_AGN_2951_AT.PDF

 

Central Ward By-election

6.    Following Council’s Central Ward by-election, Glenda Barratt is the city’s new Central Ward councillor. This is Glenda’s third time as an elected member.  She has collectively served 12 years as a Hutt City Councillor in previous years.

 

Wainuiomata Cleanfill

 

7.    The Wainuiomata Cleanfill was temporarily closed from 2 October 2021. This is due to a significant amount of wet material arriving in recent weeks which cannot be impacted. See http://www.huttcity.govt.nz/Services/Rubbish-and-recycling/cleanfill/

for more information.

 

2021/22 Administration and Training Budget

8.    The Board is allocated $8,000.00 GST exclusive per annum, comprising of:

 

Miscellaneous Administration                $5,000.00

Training                                                   $3,000.00

 

Please note that approximately $1,300 is expected to be spent from the training budget in February 2022 if the Young Elected Members’ conference that was postponed in October 2021 goes ahead as planned.

 

6.    The Board’s expenditure as at 30 September 2021 is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.


 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Wainuiomata Community Board expenditure to September 2021

40

 

 

Author: Toi Lealofi

Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Wainuiomata Community Board expenditure to September 2021

 


                                                                                       1                                                 03 November 2021

Wainuiomata Community Board

05 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1586)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2021/5/131

 

Chair's report

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Chair’s report be received and noted.

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Chair's Report

42

 

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Chair's Report

 

 



[1] Mr Terry Stallworth was not in attendance at the meeting.