HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

 

 KOMITI HAPORI │Communities Committee

 

 

10 November 2021

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Wednesday 17 November 2021 commencing at 2.00pm

The meeting will be held under Alert Level 2.

 

 

Membership

 

 

Deputy Mayor T Lewis (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr G Barratt

Cr J Briggs

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

Cr D Hislop

Cr C Milne

Cr A Mitchell

Cr S Rasheed

Cr N Shaw (Deputy Chair)

Cr L Sutton

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

COMMUNITIES COMMITTEE
Membership:	13
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Reports to:	Council

OVERVIEW:

This Committee assists Council to ensure healthy, vibrant and resilient communities through development and management of relevant plans, strategies and functions.

The Committee is aligned with the Neighbourhoods & Communities Directorate.

Its areas of focus are:

§   Urban design and spatial planning

§   Major Neighbourhoods & Communities projects (e.g. Naenae Pool)

§   Arts and culture

§   Parks and reserves

§   Sport and recreation

§   Community funding

§   Community development

§   Community facilities and services

§   Community safety

§   Emergency management

PURPOSE:

To develop, implement, monitor and review strategies, policies, plans and functions associated with community, social and cultural activities. This includes making the city a desirable, safe and attractive place, providing facilities and recreational opportunities that support quality living and healthy lifestyles, and supporting the cultural wellbeing of residents.

DELEGATIONS FOR THE COMMITTEES AREAS OF FOCUS:

§  All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities including the activities outlined below.

§  Develop required strategies and policies. Recommend draft and final versions to Council for adoption where they have a city-wide or strategic focus.

§  Implement, monitor and review strategies and policies.

§  Oversee the implementation of major projects provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§  Oversee budgetary decisions provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§  Oversee the development and implementation of plans and functions associated with community, social and cultural activities.

§  Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s Neighbourhoods & Communities Directorate.

§  Advocate in conjunction with relevant community organisations on matters related to the health and social/cultural wellbeing of communities.

§  Recommend to Council the acquisition or disposal of assets, unless the acquisition or disposal is provided for specifically in the LTP.

§  Approve and oversee monitoring around Community Funding Strategy grants.

§  Matters arising from the activities of Community Houses, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas.

§  Conduct any consultation processes required on issues before the Committee.

§  Approval and forwarding of submissions.

§  Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

§  The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee. When exercised, the report/minutes of the meeting require a resolution noting that the committee has performed the responsibilities of another committee and the reason/s.

§  If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Communities Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee and/or Climate Change & Sustainability Committee, then the Communities Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committees. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

Additional Parks and Reserves Delegations:

§  Adopt, and agree amendments to, open space or reserve management plans.

§  Make any decisions under open space or reserve management plans that are not otherwise delegated.

§  Grant leases, licences, rights of way and easements in terms of Council policy for Council owned properties that are either open space under the District Plan or reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. This delegation, except the granting of leases and licences to Council owned community houses/centres in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, is sub-delegated to the community boards in those areas.

§  Official naming of parks, reserves and sports grounds within the provisions of Council’s Naming Policy, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas, except where the sites have a high profile, city-wide importance due to their size and location and/or cross ward or community boundaries.

§  Removal and/or planting of street trees within the provisions of Council’s Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas.

 

    


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Hapori| Communities Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on Wednesday 17 November 2021 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES - KARAKIA TĪMATANGA (21/1571)

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

 

2.       APOLOGIES

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have     

5.       Recommendations to Te Kaunihera o Te Awa Kairangi |Council - 16 December 2021

a)      Electricity Corporation of New Zealand Ltd (ECNZ) Track- 166 Upper Fitzherbert (21/1664)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/252 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner         7

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

 

 

b)      1 Tipperary Grove, Wainuiomata Consultation for Revocation (21/1747)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/253 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner         31

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

 

6.       Williams Park Management Plan (21/1686)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/254 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner 42

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the matter be discussed.”

 

7.       City Safety Approach for 2021-2031 (21/1804)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/256 by the Head of Community Projects and Relationships      238

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

8.       Possible Alternative uses of Petone Wharf (21/1802)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/251 by the Reserves Asset Manager                        249

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

9.       Community Funding 2021-2022 (21/1638)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/255 by the Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts                                                                                                                              254

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

 

 

 

 

10.     Director's Report: Neighbourhoods and Communities Group (21/1792)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/24 by the Head of Community Projects and Relationships        264

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

11.     Information Items

a)      Naenae Projects Update (21/1779)

Memorandum dated 27 October 2021 by the Project Manager (Naenae)  277

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the memorandum be endorsed.”

 

b)      Communities Committee Work Programme (21/1573)

Report No. CCCCC2021/5/138 by the Democracy Advisor                     280

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

12.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

13.     CLOSING FORMALITIES - KARAKIA WHAKAMUTUNGA (21/1572)

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

 

 

Annie Doornebosch

Democracy Advisor

Democratic Services


 

Communities Committee

13 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1664)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/252

 

Electricity Corporation of New Zealand Ltd (ECNZ) Track- 166 Upper Fitzherbert

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To legalise public access to the Electricity Corporation New Zealand Ltd (ECNZ) track at the north end of 166 Upper Fitzherbert Road, Wainuiomata through the acquisition of land and to initiate public consultation for an easement over reserve land.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)   notes that this proposal is consistent with Council Policy including the Reserves Acquisition and Disposal Policy and Private Use of Council Reserve Land Policy;

 

(2)   agrees to purchase the 3ha of land that includes the track at the north end of 166 Upper Fitzherbert for $78,000;

(3)   agrees to release public notice for the proposed easement over 171 Upper Fitzherbert Road in favour of the owners of 166 and 169 Upper Fitzherbert Road consistent with the requirements of s119 and s120 of the Reserves Act 1977; and

(4)   notes that a follow-up report to the Committee will be submitted in the next meeting cycle presenting any submissions received regarding the proposed easement over 171 Upper Fitzherbert Road.

For the reason(s) to secure public access over the portion of ECNZ track at 166 Upper Fitzherbert Road.

 

 

Background

2.    The ECNZ track is approximately 15km of track connecting from the Wainuiomata Hill Road overpass to Stokes Valley. Please see appendix 1 attached to the report for an overview of the full ECNZ track length and 166, 169, and 171 Upper Fitzherbert Road.

3.    The track was originally established for maintenance of the ECNZ pylons and as a firebreak.  Approximately 30% of the track is located on private property.  This is a historical situation and officers have been working for many years to resolve this.

4.    The first stage of formalising access was concluded when Council, at its meeting on 5 October 2021 approved for officers to proceed to obtain an easement over properties 158 and 164 Upper Fitzherbert Road in favour of access rights related to the ECNZ track.  This resolution was supported by and resolved a long-term request by the property owners to conclude this matter.    

5.    This current proposal is viewed as a final stage to legalising access to the last section of track, which is located on private property at 166 Upper Fitzherbert Road. 

Discussion

6.    At the Communities Committee meeting 15 September 2021 council officers were asked to provide further options to resolving the track encroachments along the ECNZ track. This report seeks to provide those further options as it related to 166 Upper Fitzherbert Road.

7.    It was also mentioned at the Communities Committee meeting, through a submission made to a councillor, that acquisition of land along the ECNZ track was in the best interest for the protection of the natural vegetation and associated landscape values of the ridgeline, as well as protecting recreation opportunities in the area.  Approximately 400m of track is situated on private land at the north end of 166 Upper Fitzherbert Road.

8.    The owner of 166 Upper Fitzherbert has proposed to sell to Council 3ha of land that includes the portion of ECNZ track within their boundaries. An indicative map of the area (provided by the applicant) can be viewed in appendix 2 attached to the report.

9.    The proposed purchase price of $78,000 includes the cost to subdivide the parcel to be transferred to Council.

a.   This purchase price was proposed by the landowner.

b.   A registered valuer has not been contracted to assess the value of the 3ha including the track. However, based on the rates land value 3ha could be worth up to $94,000 (though it is likely to be lower than this due to the lack of buildable land).

c.   This figure includes $70,500 for the land and $7,500 for the surveying of the parcel.

10.  As part of the land sale negotiation the landowner has requested an easement in favour of them be considered on the council-owned 171 Upper Fitzherbert parcel to allow use of 169 Upper Fitzherbert Road. An indicative location (highlighted orange) of this can be seen on appendix 3 attached to the report.

a.   s48 of the Reserves Act 1977 requires all easement applications for land subject to the Act to go through a public consultation process consistent with s119 and s120 of the Act. This requires a notice to be placed in the local newspaper and a minimum one-month submission period.

b.   The applicant intends to use the easement to construct vehicle access from 169 Upper Fitzherbert to 166 Upper Fitzherbert allowing them to subdivide 166 Upper Fitzherbert, subject to consenting.

Options

11.  Agree to purchase the 3ha of land that includes a portion of the ECNZ track for the proposed $78,000.  This is the landowner’s preferred outcome.

12.  If purchasing the 3ha is unsatisfactory, officers could negotiate with the landowners to establish an easement in favour of HCC to legalise public access along the track.

a.   The landowners have previously requested that Council be responsible for the surveying of the track, legal fees associated with registering the easement, and waiving the reserve financial contributions of their future subdivision. This would likely cost Council $30,000 to $35,000.

13. Do not agree to release public notice for the proposed easement.

a.   The issue of access between 166 and 169 Upper Fitzherbert could be resolved in several ways including exchange of land, sale of land, or through an easement.

b.   Alternatively, no action could be taken.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

14.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

15.  This project will not have immediate climate change impacts. However, the protection of natural areas will have a positive effect on carbon sequestration and habitat protection over time.

Consultation

16.  Consultation for the purchase of the 3ha is not required by legislation or Council policy.

17.  Consultation for the easement over Council owned land identified as 171 Upper Fitzherbert Road in favour of the adjacent landowner, would be consistent with s48 of the Reserves Act 1977.

Policy Consideration

18.  Council is guided by the Reserves Acquisitions and Disposals Policy.  This provides the framework under which proposals of this nature are considered.  The current proposal is consistent with the Policy as the acquisition:

a.   ensures connections with, and formalises the multi-modal recreational pathways between the suburbs of Naenae, Wainuiomata and Stokes Valley; and

b.   promotes connected reserves and natural areas particularly, in the larger reserve land holdings.

19.  Council’s “Private Use of Hutt City Council Land”, among other things, guides the implementation of easements on Council-owned land regardless of its status under the Reserves Act 1977. This has been attached as appendix 4 to the report.

20.  Council must consider several things within with this policy including:

a.   Can the applicant use their own land or another private party’s land?

b.   Is Council’s intended use of the land significantly hindered as a result of the easement?

c.   Does Council need the land for any future development?

d.   And, what are the long-term benefits and disadvantages to the city and community?

21. It is officer’s opinion that the strip of land separating 166 and 169 Upper Fitzherbert Rd is unlikely to be used as access to any track or reserve in the future.  There is currently an established track access on Council land at 167 Upper Fitzherbert Road.

Legal Considerations

22.  Grants of rights of way and other easements on reserves are controlled by s48 of the Reserves Act 1977.

Financial Considerations

23.  The land purchase will be funded by Reserve Financial Contributions.

a.   Purchasing land is consistent with the intended use of reserve financial contributions;

b.   Reserve financial contributions are obtained through subdivision applications resulting in residential intensification and are meant to mitigate the negative effects of that intensification.

24.  Constructing a new track on Council property would likely cost between $150-300 per linear metre and could cost Council up to $120,000.

a.   Purchasing 3ha of land for $78,000 solely to bring 400m of track into public control values the track at approximately $195/metre.

25. While a valuer was not contracted to value the 3ha of land, based on the rates land value 3ha could be worth up to $94,000. Though it is likely to be lower than this due to the lack of buildable land.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

ECNZ Track- Full Length w/ 166, 169, & 171 Upper Fitzherbert Road

12

2

166 Upper Fitzherbert Indicative Boundary Map

13

3

166-171 Upper Fitzherbert Indicative Easement Location

14

4

Council Private Use of Public Land Policy

15

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Tyler Kimbrell

Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Aaron Marsh

Team Leader Parks

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jenny Livschitz

Group Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 




 

 


















Communities Committee

21 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1747)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/253

 

1 Tipperary Grove, Wainuiomata Consultation for Revocation

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report outlines a proposal to revoke the reserve status of an area of Tipperary Grove Reserve, Wainuiomata.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)        agrees to initiate the process to revoke the reserve status of land at 1 Tipperary Grove, Wainuiomata identified as Lot 118 DP 44658 Local Purpose Reserve (Community Building).

(2)        notes that officers would commence the formal consultation process as required by the Reserves Act 1977 with consultation to close by 10 February 2022; and

(3)        notes that a further report will be submitted following the consultation process likely in the second meeting cycle of 2022, to provide feedback on the consultation process and determine the next step for 1 Tipperary Grove, Wainuiomata.

For the reason to revoke the classification of Local Purpose Reserve (Community Building) of 1 Tipperary Grove which is no longer fit for purpose.

 

Background

2.    1 Tipperary Grove, Wainuiomata was identified in the 2008 land review as surplus however, no action was taken because of its status as Local Purpose Reserve (Community Building) under the Reserves Act 1977.

 

 

3.    A recent review of reserve land holdings was completed in 2020 and adopted as policy in 2021.  This latest review again identified the land as retaining limited functional and reserve land value.  Page 23 under “Opportunities” in the Wainuiomata Reserve Review states “Assessment of the reserve values of Tipperary Grove Reserve in order to come to a decision on its development and future as reserve land.”

4.    The land was previously used for a community hall before being sold to He Whare Tauri Trust in 2008. The community hall was abandoned circa 2011.  No other uses or users could be found and the building fell into disrepair, eventually being demolished in 2016.

5.    An aerial image of the site is attached as appendix 1 to the report.

Discussion

6.    The Wainuiomata Reserve Review identified 1 Tipperary Grove as a site needing to be assessed against the Reserve Strategic Direction’s land disposal criteria to determine whether the reserve should be retained. A quick assessment based on the assessment criteria is attached as appendix 2 to the report. In summary, this assessment concluded the land as having low to medium open space and visual characteristics, and mainly low level of significance in terms of natural site features.

7.    The maintenance requirements for the site have been continually rising due to anti-social behaviour occurring on the site such as dumping of rubbish and household items, and turf damage from cars driving on the reserve.

8.    The proposal to revoke the reserve status of Tipperary Grove does not impact on the accessibility of reserve space in the neighbourhood as Antrim Crescent Reserve is approximately 280m or a 4-minute walk from Tipperary Grove. A map of Antrim Crescent’s Playground’s proximity to 1 Tipperary Grove is attached as appendix 3 to this report.

9.    Antrim Crescent Reserve measures approximately 3,830m2, includes a playground and provides good open space for play.

10.  There is also opportunity to create access to nature reserve to the east of the 1 Tipperary Grove from an access leg between Tipperary Grove Reserve and Antrim Crescent Reserve. This can be viewed on the map attached as appendix 3 to this report.

11.  Urban Plus Limited (UPL) has expressed interest in the site to construct affordable housing. Prior to housing being developed the land would need to be revoked of its classification as reserve and a plan change would need to be undertaken. Currently, the site is zoned General Recreation under the District Plan.

Options

12.  Proceed with the revocation process with a view to declare the land surplus for sale.  The results of the revocation process, which includes public consultation will be reported back to this Committee .

13.  Not proceed with the revocation process and retain the land as a part of the reserve land holdings.  Given this land has been identified in the Wainuiomata Reserves Review project as contributing limited value to the network, officers consider revocation the favourable option.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

14.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

15.  The balance of the lot is grass and concrete, however, there is some native vegetation around a small stream that runs through the site, this area would be protected if the reserve classification is revoked. Retaining native vegetation promotes carbon sequestering and habitat preservation.

Consultation

16.  Pursuant to the requirements of s24(2)(c) of the Reserves Act 1977 Council will advertise its intention to revoke the reserve status.  The notification will also invite submissions on the proposal.  These will be collated and reported back to this Committee in the next phase of the process. 

17.  When the Wainuiomata Reserve Review was adopted it was made clear to the Wainuiomata Community Board at their meeting held on 14 April 2021 (report number WCB2021/2/54) that 1 Tipperary Grove’s value as reserve was likely to be assessed. Further communication with the Wainuiomata Community Board will be needed during the consultation period.

18.  The Reserve Strategic Direction Land Disposal Criteria (appendix 2) notes that culture and heritage criteria will need to be assessed as part of discussion with iwi and mana whenua.

Legal Considerations

19.  The revocation process is outlined in the Reserves Act 1977. 

Financial Considerations

20.  Costs involved with the revocation process are estimated at $2500 and will be absorbed internally. 

21.  Officers will need to obtain a valuation for the land should the process run through to its conclusion. 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

1 Tipperary Grove Aerial

35

2

1 Tipperary Grove- Reserve Strategic Directions Land Disposal Criteria

36

3

1 Tipperary Grove to Antrim Crescent Playground

41

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Tyler Kimbrell

Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Aaron Marsh

Team Leader Parks

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 








 


Communities Committee

15 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1686)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/254

 

Williams Park Management Plan

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To agree to the amendments of the Draft Williams Park Management Plan as detailed and adopt the amended plan.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   agrees to amend the Draft Williams Park Management Plan in line with the proposed changes attached as appendix 6 to this report;

(2)   agrees to adopt the Williams Park Management Plan as an official Hutt City Council reserve management plan following amendments;

(3)   agrees to classify Williams Park CT 49C/741 Pt Section 33 Harbour District as Recreation Reserve consistent with s17 of the Reserves Act 1977;

(4)   agrees that no concept plan be attached to the management plan at this stage;

(5)   notes that officers will continue to work with the community, the Eastbourne Community Board and the Eastern Shared Pathway team to provide the most optimal outcome for Williams Park; and

(6)   notes the current Long Term Plan includes $500k in 2021/22 which will fund removal of the caretakers house and other small improvements.

For the reason(s) to manage Williams Park under a single site reserve management plan to ensure that its amenities are administered according to community identified outcomes.

Background

2.    Reserve management plans are required for reserves that an administering body control, manage, or administer under the Reserves Act 1977.

3.    The management plan provides a framework to ensure the use, enjoyment, maintenance, protection, and preservation, as the case may require, and, to the extent that the administering body’s resources permit, the development, as appropriate, of the reserve for the purposes for which it is classified.

4.    Williams Park is currently managed under several different management plans including the Council facility reserve management plan, the sports park management plan, and the horticulture reserve management plan. Williams Park is a strategic reserve requiring its own specific plan

5.    As prescribed by legislation, two rounds of public consultation have been completed. The first round was undertaken from 14 December 2020 to 1 March 2021. The feedback from this round was included in the draft plan (attached as appendix 1 to the report) with the draft plan forming the basis for the second round of consultation. The second round of consultation was undertaken from 20 July 2021 to 24 September 2021 and included the Draft Williams Park Management Plan in appendix 1 attached to the report.

6.    The consultation report is included as appendix 2 attached to the report and summarises the first round of consultation and all feedback received during the second round of consultation.

Discussion

7.    The second round of consultation resulted in a series of submissions that either supported the Plan or proposed some amendments.  Many of the requests for changes were minor in nature and are summarised in appendix 6.

8.    Williams Park is currently not classified as a reserve pursuant to one of the classifications outlined in the Reserves Act. The Plan proposes formalising the reserve land status and commencing the process pursuant to s17 to s23 of the Reserves Act 1977. There were no submissions objecting to this action being taken.

9.    It was identified in the first round of submissions that the caretaker’s house be removed. The second round of consultation saw slightly more support for the caretaker’s house to be retained, however, on balance when reviewing the submissions across both consultation phases on this particular topic, there is more support for the removal of the house.

10.  Much of the support for retention was based on the possibility of the house being a heritage building. The district plan team was consulted as they are currently reviewing heritage buildings and it was determined that the house would likely not qualify for heritage status based on the renovations undertaken in the 1950s and 1980s. This is expanded upon in the Consultation Report attached as appendix 2 to this report.

11.  A house mover was consulted to determine whether the house could be preserved offsite. The advice received was that this cannot be done as the sub-floor and weatherboards are rotten.  This advice is consistent with previous preliminary advice we received regarding the condition of the house.  Unless significant capital investment was made to the house, the house mover recommended demolition.

12. Concept Development Plans (options A and B attached as appendices 3 and 4 to the report) were produced following the first phase of consultation to provide a visual representation of the ideas and feedback generated during the first round of consultation.

a.   Option B was preferable to Option A, however, several submissions expressed concern over the main entrance being moved to Kereru Road and therefore voted that neither option be adopted.

b.   An Option C, attached as appendix 5 to the report, was developed to address the concern of moving the main entrance however, following feedback from the Eastbourne Community Board, submissions, and the design uncertainty of the Eastern Shared Pathway it is recommended that no concept plan be attached to the management plan and that officers continue to work with the community and the Eastern Shared Pathway team to provide the most optimal outcome for Williams Park. 

13. Summary of Proposed Management Plan Changes

a.   There are some changes to the management plan proposed that include allowing more consideration for priority area 3 (grass tennis courts and beach volleyball area), additional pest management, and additional signage policy.

b.   A full list of proposed changes can be seen in appendix 6 attached to the report.

14. All submissions received in the second round of consultation can be viewed in appendix 7 attached to the report.

Options

15.  In adopting the management plan, request officers:

a.   to make the changes recommended in clause 11 of this report; or

b.   to make no change to the management plan.

16.  Note that no concept plan will be attached to the management plan but that development concepts will still be included in the main body of the plan.

17.  Classify Williams Park as Recreation Reserve Under s17 of the Reserves Act 1977 or, do not classify Williams Park as Recreation Reserve under s17 of the Reserves Act 1977.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

18.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

19.  Climate change and sea level rise is considered as a part of the Williams Park Management Plan.

Consultation

20. The first round of consultation was undertaken between December 2020 and March 2021 this informed the creation of the plan.

21. The second round of consultation was undertaken between July 2021 and September 2021

22. A consultation report for the second round of consultation can be viewed in appendix 2 attached to the report.

23. Iwi and Mana Whenua have been approached directly for comment with no feedback received.  As part of the ongoing work, officers will continue to seek advice and guidance from Iwi and Mana Whenua.

Legal Considerations

24.  The Management Plan satisfies the legislative requirement for Council to implement management plans for reserves.

Financial Considerations

25.  The current LTP includes $500k in 2021/22 which will fund removal of the caretaker’s house and other small improvements.  Funding of any further redevelopment would be subject to agreement of a plan and a future LTP process.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Draft Williams Park Management Plan

46

2

Williams Park Management Plan Consultation Report

125

3

Williams Park Development Plan Option A

155

4

Williams Park Development Plan Option B

156

5

Williams Park Development Plan Option C

157

6

Draft Williams Park Management Plan Changes

158

7

Draft Williams Park Management Plan Submissions

163

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Tyler Kimbrell

Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Aaron Marsh

Team Leader Parks

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 


































































































































































































Communities Committee

28 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1804)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/256

 

City Safety Approach for 2021-2031

 

Purpose of Report

1.       The purpose of this report to inform the Committee about the proposed City Safety approach for 2021-2031, and receive feedback so this work programme can be finalised. 

Recommendation

That the Committee:

(1)     notes and receives the information; and

(2)     provides feedback on the 2021-2031 City Safety Work Programme.

For the reason that officers have given careful consideration to the purpose of local government in Section 10 of the Local Government Act 2002.  Officers believe that this recommendation falls within the purpose of the Local Government Act. 

 

Background

2.       One of the six priorities of the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021/2031 is Tūhono Hapori - Connecting communities: investing to connect and empower neighbourhoods and communities so they can thrive and remain connected, healthy, inclusive, safe and resilient.

 

3.       This followed Council’s 2020 COVID Recovery Plan which said ‘Research shows that communities that are connected, trusting and cohesive survive and recover better than those that are less well-connected’ and recommended working in and with communities to create self-sustaining networks with a focus on connectedness, safety, and resilience.  It also recommended a focus on increasing the number of Neighbourhood Support networks across our communities.

 

 

4.       Council increased its investment in City Safety in the 2021-2031 LTP by $150k per annum for the first three years (to $750k pa) to support this work, with the intention of reviewing funding at that point.  This includes the Safe City Ambassadors contract ($241k), CCTV connectivity and maintenance ($80k) and supporting Community Patrols ($20k).  Additionally, $30k CAPEX is budgeted per annum to replace the existing equipment.

 

5.       Additionally, as part of the Transport team’s workplan, it invests in graffiti removal ($192k) and road safety which is funded via Waka Kotahi.

 

6.       With the organisational redesign now complete, the focus has shifted to aligning our workplans and resource to deliver on this priority, including two key shifts we are seeking to make in how we engage and work with communities – taking a holistic approach to neighbourhoods and more community-led development.

 

7.       This report focuses on how our approach to community and city safety contributes to achieving this outcome.

 

8.       Taituara provides a framework for measuring community wellbeing including indicators relating to safety and resilience, as follows:

 

Safety:

·        Perception of safety in the neighbourhood after dark; 

·        Number of victims of crime; and  

·        Rates of offending by individuals 15 - 24 years 

 

Social connection and cohesion:

·        People participating in clubs/societies/interest groups; and

·        Perception of loneliness

 

9.       Further work is needed to determine which indicators Council will use going forward.

 

Community/City Safety

10.     Community/City Safety is a concept that is concerned with achieving a positive state of well-being amongst people within social and physical environments.  Not only is it about reducing and preventing injury and crime, it is about building strong, cohesive, vibrant, participatory communities where people feel safe.  Ultimately, the perception of safety is as important as measuring injury and crime rates.

 

11.     Council has been involved in community safety since 2002.  The goal of the Public Place Work Plan (2002-2012), was to make Hutt City a safe place for everyone.  This was measured by the achievement of four key outcomes:

a)     Reduction in crime

b)     Increase in crime resolution

c)      Hutt City is perceived by its residents as a safe City

d)     Reduction in alcohol related harm.

 

12.     In 2013, the above Work Plan was replaced with the Community Safety Work Programme (2013-2016). The outcomes sought through the programme were:

a)     Less crime and injury; and 

b)     Increased perceptions of safety

 

13.     Since 2016, this work has been referred to as City Safety, and the current Work Programme has continued to support improved safety outcomes, through the wide range of initiatives, taking a partnership approach to crime prevention and community reassurance.

Discussion

14.     Officers have reviewed the current approach to City Safety and propose the following changes to align this mahi with the new strategic direction and make best use of available resources.  This will be delivered in line with current budgets in the LTP 2021/2024.

15.     Priorities (further detail below)

a)      Relationships with key stakeholders, to harness the collective impact of all those involved with safety issues (includes illegal driving, family harm) (continue);

b)      Neighbourhood Support (grow);

c)       Safe City Ambassadors (continue, potential change in approach);

d)      Community Patrols (continue);

e)       CCTV Suite and Volunteers  (continue);

f)       Supporting Council’s Homelessness Strategy (continue); 

g)      Graffiti Removal (continue);

h)      Road Safety (continue); and

i)       Provision of specialist advice to Council teams on a range of projects and safety issues including anti-social behavior and Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) (continue).

Relationships with key stakeholders

16.     In re-setting the way we engage and work with communities, Council is seeking to take a holistic view of neighbourhoods, shift to more community-led development and harness the collective impact of all those on the ground.  This will see safety and resilience included in the focus areas of neighbourhood co-ordinators and neighbourhood teams and in the programmes team.  This includes promoting Neighbourhood Support and Patrols in their areas and working with local Police on local issues.

 

 

 

 

17.     The Safety Lead will continue to work closely with other key stakeholders involved in city safety, in particular Police and social services, and connect relevant Council teams. Key issues include illegal driving, family harm and anti-social behaviour.  They will also provide specialist advice to Council teams on a range of projects and safety issues including Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED).

Neighbourhood Support

18.     In the past Neighbourhood Support (NS) has had a strong crime prevention focus.  In our discussion with Police, there is agreement that there would be greater value in focusing on building networks to increase community connectedness and therefore resilience, particularly given the current COVID situation.    

 

19.     This year a new trust has been established to oversee and co-ordinate Neighbourhood Support (NS) across the region – The Neighbourhood Support Wellington Regional Trust (NSWRT).  Because of our intention to take a regional approach where possible, and shift to more community-led development, we are intending to fund the Trust to deliver NS in our city. ($100kpa).

 

20.     Previously we have had .5FTE resource committed to delivering NS. NSWRT will appoint a full-time Lower Hutt Coordinator who will work closely with staff in our eight anchor facilities (Libraries/Hubs) and our Connected Communities team to support the NS kaupapa.  This work will grow Council’s database of community contacts which can also be activated, through agreement, by the Emergency Operations Centre (EOC).

Safe City Ambassadors

21.     This service is currently delivered via an external contractor and provides our city with a comprehensive ambassadorial service, where people feel safe, connected, and able to participate in city life at any time of the day or night.

 

22.     Four Safe City Ambassadors are deployed throughout the city over seven days and take a people centred approach with the following focus areas: Public Safety and Social Outreach/Connections.

 

23.     The people centred approach has seen the Safe City Ambassador service patrol in all suburban shopping areas, attend community events, provide outreach support for homeless/beggars, supporting members of the public, visiting and providing support at Council facilities, providing advice to retailers, promoting Neighbourhood Support, supporting Police and working closely with CCTV operators and Community Patrols.

 

24.     To align with the new approach, we are considering whether to bring this service in house and directly employ Safe City Ambassadors.  This would likely provide greater continuity in terms of personnel, leading to stronger Council and community relationships, and greater flexibility in terms of how they are deployed.  There would also be the opportunity to look at synergies with other roles and other Council services.  This would enhance the ability of Safe City Ambassadors to operate as part of ‘one Council team.’

 

25.     Our initial investigation suggests this would be cost neutral.  Further investigation is needed, including working with the People and Capability team to consider human resources aspects.  There would be an opportunity to make this shift when the current contract expires in June 2022. 

 

26.     Councils across the country have dedicated city safety teams patrolling the CBD and identified hot spots, including Wellington, Hamilton, Auckland and Whangarei.  The Safe City teams are employed by their respective Councils and work various hours depending on the safety landscape in their areas.

 

27.     Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 contractors are considered workers, which requires a PCBU to provide the same duty of care as they would to employees.  This would include ensuring there are systems, processes, training and resources to eliminate or minimise any risk related to the work undertaken by the role of Safe City Ambassadors.

 

28.     Where we are contracting the service out, to meet our due diligence and duty of care, we should ensure that we have a clear contract management plan with regular meetings, clear expectations, and visibility on any safety matters.

 

29.     Where we are providing the service in house, we will then need to support all activity, which includes logistical and administrative support.  However, overheads have already been considered as part of the initial costing analysis.

 

Community Patrols

30.     Patrollers are volunteers who work in partnership with Council, NZ Police and other agencies, providing highly visible patrolling in the community to prevent crime and reduce harm.

 

31.     We currently have four patrols operating across Wainuiomata, Petone, Naenae and Stokes Valley.

 

32.     We maintain the relationship with Community Patrol New Zealand as follows, accessing resources as required; provide radio equipment on the HCC network; attending monthly meetings (CPNZ, CCTV, Police and Council); sharing information provided by Police if relevant, and providing $5k annually per Patrol as a contribution towards their running costs.

CCTV Suite and Volunteers

33.     There are currently 43 (48) operational CCTV cameras installed across the city and we receive around one request a month for additional cameras. Whilst cameras are often seen as an immediate solution to anti-social activity, a number of factors need to be considered in determining whether they are the most appropriate response.

 

 

 

 

34.     A monitored CCTV system can help reduce crime, can help identify criminals and can make people feel safer.  However they also don’t stop crime, are easily abused, are expensive and have to be resourced to be fully effective.  The CCTV suite at Lower Hutt Police Station is not monitored 24/7, and although footage may assist Police to identify potential offenders, this does not always result in an arrest or conviction.

35.     It can often be more effective to have residents, businesses, neighbourhood support, community patrols, Safe City Ambassadors and Police provide natural/capable guardianship to deter crime and/or anti-social behaviour.

36.     Council receives approximately one request per month for new cameras to be installed across a range of areas from burial grounds and residential streets through to commercial businesses.  These requests are often driven by spikes in anti-social activity, requests from the public, or to supplement facility security.  While these requests are always well intentioned, they often fail to take into consideration the budgetary, resource and infrastructure requirements necessary to integrate into the Community Safety Camera System (CSCS).  It’s also important to note, the installation and relocation of cameras is subject to evidence based data from Police to ensure hot spots and areas of concern are monitored.

37.     Lower Hutt’s CCTV network involves Police, volunteer Community Patrols, Safe City Ambassadors and CCTV Volunteers.  Installation and location/relocation of the current network is determined by data provided by Police to ensure they are placed where most effective.  Recruitment, and training of volunteers is based out of the Lower Hutt Police Station.  There are currently 13 active volunteers who are rostered on at times where their presence is most valuable.  See Appendix 1 attached to the report – CCTV Cameras.

38.     In the past 18 months, six cameras have been stolen – five in Naenae and one in Petone. The cost for replacing a camera is between $3000 - $5000 (including labour).  Including wear and tear, around six cameras are replaced annually.

39.     While the current CCTV systems are providing a valuable service for Police and Council, it is an ageing system, and will require ongoing maintenance, repair and replacement of cameras and the upgrade of the software and server.  As part of this year’s work plan, officers will work with the IT team to review the current server and software being used, to make a recommendation for an upgrade when required.

Supporting Council’s Homelessness Strategy

40.     Safe City Ambassadors and Community Patrols provide outreach support to the homeless peoples and provide information to the City Safety Manager.

 

41.     The City Safety Manager attends the Hutt Valley Homelessness Hui and maintains relationships with support partners; Wellington City Mission, Oasis, Pomare Taita Community House, Tuatahi, Takiri Mai, Aro Mai, DCM, Women’s Refuge, ManKind Te Awa Kairangi, MSD, OT, Nga Anahera

 

42.     Emergency kits are available for distribution by Safe City Ambassadors and Community Patrols also distribute Emergency kits if required.

Graffiti Removal

43.     A graffiti removal contract is delivered externally by MMS Contractors.  The contract covers the removal of graffiti from Council property, however, removal of graffiti from other property varies.  For example:

 

·       Council’s Street Cleaning Contractor is responsible for removing graffiti on street bins;

·       Assets associated with Greater Wellington Regional Council and Kiwi Rail are their responsibility, with the exception of Bridge Piers sitting in the rail corridor which are classed as a Council asset; and

·       Private property is the responsibly of the owner, however private property and commercial properties ‘when road facing’ or offensive are cleared by Council’s contractor.

 

44.     In the past, graffiti removal data has not been shared regularly with Police to provide additional intel on what is happening across neighbourhoods.  In recent discussions with Police they have identified this as something that would be helpful to do more regularly.

Road Safety

45.     As part of the Waka Kotahi’s Low Cost Low Risk (LCLR) funding program, Council bid and successfully obtained approvals for a number of safety improvement projects.  These projects are classified under the “Road to Zero” and “Local Road Improvements” activity classes, and the funds are planned:

·        To provide safe school zones for six schools around Taita, Pomare, Wainuiomata and Naenae, by reducing speed limit and / or improving pedestrian crossing;

·        To implement area wide speed management interventions in a number of areas of Wainuiomata and Naenae, by installing speed humps/cushions;

·        To improve safety measures on a number of high risk intersections and pedestrian crossings, by redesigning intersection/pedestrian crossing controls; and

·        To enhance a more friendly footpath environment for mobility impaired users on priority routes, by refining the relevant kerbs and widths on their priority routes.

 

46.     Council works closely with Police to address illegal driving issues, which elected members were recently briefed on.  Current focus areas include:

 

·        Council has been working with Waka Kotahi on a plan to stop illegal street drivers from illegally exiting Cornish Street onto State Highway 2 and from doing burnouts in the turning bay. Council and Waka Kotahi are currently consulting with Cornish Street businesses to close the State Highway 2 exit onto Cornish Street. 

This, along with traffic calming measures such as speed cushions, should stop illegal street drivers from congregating at Cornish Street on Friday and Saturday nights as access will be more difficult and they won’t have anywhere to be able to do burnouts.  Consultation is scheduled to close on 1 November 2021.

·        Council has also been discussing illegal street driving in the Seaview area with representatives from Kokiri Marae and the NZ Police. A meeting with marae representatives, the Police and the Seaview Business Association is being organised for early November to look at possible solutions.

Options

47.     There are no options to consider.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

48.     The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

49.     In line with Council’s sustainability work, officers are considering all options to reduce the environmental impact of this work, and for this work to contribute to these outcomes.

 

50.     One of the best opportunities may be in using Neighbourhood Support networks as an additional way to educate and promote behaviour change in communities. 

Consultation

51.     Officers have met a number of times with the Hutt Valley Police Leadership team over the last 12 months, seeking their input and guidance on our approach.  They have endorsed our proposed approach detailed in this report.

Legal Considerations

52.     Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 contractors are considered workers, which requires a PCBU to provide the same duty of care as they would to employees.  This would include ensuring there are systems, processes, training and resources to eliminate or minimise any risk related to the work undertaken by the role of Safe City Ambassadors.

Financial Considerations

53.       This work programme will be delivered in line with current budgets in the Long Term Plan 2021/24.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Hutt Valley CCTV Surveillance Cameras

247

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Melanie Laban

Head of Community Projects and Relationships

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 




Communities Committee

28 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1802)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/251

 

Possible Alternative uses of Petone Wharf

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To update the Committee on feedback on possible uses for the refurbished Petone Wharf.

Recommendations

That the Committee receives and notes the information contained in the report.

For the reason(s) outlined in the report

 

Background

2.    As part of planning and preparation for the refurbishment of Petone Wharf, Council officers have been asked to consider future uses of the asset, and as such, have commenced gathering ideas from the community and potential users. Officers do not propose to go out for general consultation on this matter but rather engage with relevant agencies and representative groups.

Discussion

3.    The Petone Community Board has provided the attached list of initial ideas which have been compiled through community consultation undertaken by the Board in Petone. This was presented to the Petone Community Board in August 2021 and further suggestions were sought and discussed.

4.    The ideas outlined in Appendix 1 attached to the report were supported.  Additionally the Petone Community Board was supportive of the reinstatement of heritage features on the wharf, similar in character to that of the original wharf gates which were wrought iron. 

5.    Feedback was also sought for the draft criteria for assessing future uses.  The criteria as listed below were fully supported by the Petone Community Board. These are considered essential given the complexities of the wharf refurbishment project, the nature of the site, and the historical and cultural significance of the asset.

Criteria

·    Any alterations to the wharf must consider Iwi aspirations and Treaty obligations.

 

·    Any alterations to the wharf must be in keeping with, and not detract from, the heritage values of the wharf and be undertaken in conjunction with a heritage architect.

 

·    Any alterations to the wharf should not compromise the structural integrity of the wharf and/or add significant unrecoverable cost to the refurbishment of the wharf.

 

·    Any alterations to the wharf must maintain public access to all or most of the wharf.

Options

6.    There are no options for consideration.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

7.   The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

8.    The wharf is a largely timber structure and requires large hardwood timbers.  For Days Bay wharf, these were sourced from South America, however officers are also investigating supply from Australia.  Using timber from large mature trees does raise questions of sustainability.  HNZ are likely to require a significant amount of timber to be used on the refurbished wharf, particularly on external highly visible areas, however there may be options of using concrete or fibre composite materials for some parts.  All decisions on material options will be a compromise between heritage and sustainability values. 

Consultation

9.    The list of potential uses has been produced by the Petone Community Board following informal consultation with members of the public.

Legal Considerations

10.  There are no legal considerations

Financial Considerations

11.  There are no financial considerations

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Petone Community Board notes on possible uses of Petone Wharf

252

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Janet Lawson

Reserves Asset Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 




Communities Committee

11 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1638)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/255

 

Community Funding 2021-2022

 

Purpose of Report

1.       The purpose of this report is to make recommendations for allocation of the Mauri Ora Community Fund 2021/2022.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   notes that there is $633K available to be allocated under the Mauri Ora Fund 2021/2022;

(2)   agrees to the recommended allocations of $572,585 outlined in paragraph 12 of the report; and

(3)   agrees to the recommendation that the unallocated funds of $60,415 will be retained for allocation at a later date in line with COVID-19 recovery priorities once approved by the Mayor and Chairs’ group. 

 

 

Background

2.       One of the six priorities of the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021/2031 is Tūhono Hapori - Connecting communities: investing to connect and empower neighbourhoods and communities so they can thrive and remain connected, healthy, inclusive, safe and resilient. 

 

3.       This followed Council’s 2020 COVID Recovery Plan which said ‘Research shows that communities that are connected, trusting and cohesive survive and recover better than those that are less well-connected’ and recommended working in and with communities to create self-sustaining networks with a focus on connectedness, safety, and resilience.

 

4.       The Future Approach to Community Funding was adopted by Council in July 2021. 

The approach iterated the intentional shift from transactional contracting to relational partnering as articulated through these principles, approaches and priorities:

 

·        Meaningfully embracing and incorporating Te Ao Māori in our policies and fulfilling responsibilities under the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi;

·        Working together for impact (partnering, not just funding);

·        Learning together;

·        Engagement and relationship building;

·        Being a good funder;

·        Community-led; and

·        Equity

 

5.       Under the 2021/2022 financial year there is budgetary provision of $713K made through the Annual Plan.  Funding can be used towards operational costs for the organisation, to continue their programmes within the Hutt Valley.  A total of 46 applications were received requesting a total of $1.339M.  This is an increase on the number of applications received for the financial year 2020-2021 (31), however the total amount requested is similar.

6.       Of the $713K available for allocation, $80K is already committed to the third and final year of a multi-year funding agreement with Wesley Community Action.  This supports the Hutt Ageing Well Initiative/Network.  There is $633K available for allocation for 2021-2022.

7.       The Mouri Ora fund is promoted through Council’s website and was promoted through Council’s Online Grant’s system, which has a database of around 630 made up of community organisations and individuals who have previously applied for funding.  The fund was advertised through the Hutt News, social media and was also circulated to other funders to promote through their own networks.

Discussion

 

8.       Community priorities approved by this Council:

 

-        Community led: locally owned initiatives, goals and detailed outcomes; and

-        Equity: recognising different people with different levels of advantage require different approaches and resources to achieve equitable wellbeing outcomes.

 

9.       All applications were scored through a matrix system that was developed by the Council’s Community Funding Advisor and Senior Research and Evaluation Advisor.  Criteria included:

 

 

 

a)      Clearly making a difference - benefiting a diverse group, a priority group;

b)      Had community ownership – community led, local group with local volunteers, employee, service provided result of need identified community;

c)       Demonstrated collaborative approaches – working with others, included working with those who will benefit from the programme and activity as well as working with other organisations; 

d)      Show well managed organisations - financial reporting, organisation structure, charities commission up to date, evaluation; and

e)       COVID19 – basic needs of housing, food and safety were strong drivers in the assessment.

 

10.     The recommendations outlined in paragraph 12 of the report have been approved by Council’s Corporate Leadership Team.  More detail regarding the project/purpose of the funding is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

 

11.     Recommendations outlined in paragraph 12 are against a total allocation budget of $633k.  The total recommended is $572,585.

 

12.     Officer’s recommendations are as follows:

Kai

Takiri Mai te Whanau Ora Collective

$49,120

3 years

Pomare Taita Community Trust

$50,000


Kaibosh

$40,000

Blueprint Community Trust

(Petone Depot)

$9,750

 

Wellbeing

Moera Community House

$40,000

3 years

Team Naenae Trust

$10,000

Saint David's Anglican Parish of Naenae-Epuni (for Te Puna Manawa Drop-in Centre, Hillary Court, Naenae)

$20,000

 

Citizens Advice Bureau Lower Hutt

$36,000

Citizens Advice Bureau Petone

$31,380

English Language Partners

$6,526

 

Whanau

Toku Reo Charitable Trust Board

 

$21,888

Anglican Social Services (Hutt Valley) Trust Board (The Family Centre)

$20,000

 

Birthright Hutt Valley Trust

$23,069

 

Seniors

The Wellington City Mission (Anglican) Trust Board

$23,805

Age Concern Wellington

$28,657

3 years

Voice Arts Trust

 

$3,500

 

Safety

 

Porirua Living Without Violence Te Noho Kore Inc

$8,000

 

 

Youth

Ignite Sport Trust

$15,000

 

Trade School Industries Charitable Trust

$20,000

WORD Limited Charitable Trust

$10,000

Youth Inspire

$50,791

Naenae Charitable Youth Trust

$25,000

YMCA of Greater Wellington Inc

$15,000

 

Youth

Big Brothers Big Sisters Wellington

$7,500

Capital Zone Basketball Trust

$7,599

 

13.     The unallocated budget of $60,415 will be tagged towards COVID-19 recovery/resurgence.  Further recommendations will be forthcoming to the Mayor and Chairs for their approval. 

 

14.     Based on recommendations within this paper, the following groups will not receive funding from the Mauri Ora Fund and will be contacted by the Community Funding Advisor to be directed to other possible avenues of funding:

 

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

EKTA

The Naenae Old Boys Cricket Club Inc

Reach Out Counselling

Kids Need Dads Wellington Charitable Trust

Goodtime Foundation

Women of Worth Charitable Company Ltd

Graeme Dingle Foundation Wellington

Dementia Wellington Charitable Trust

Wharekai Pepe

The Girls Guide Association NZ Inc

Everybody is a Treasure Trust

Parkinsons

Epilepsy NZ

Kutumba

Puoru Kakano

Hope Centre

 

 

15.     Applications from Hutt Multicultural Council, Randwick Rugby League Club, Xin Huang, DJ Pomare and Te Rito Maioha were ineligible under this fund as they were either not a charitable trust/incorporated society or are already receiving funding from Council for the same project from another funding source. 

 

16.     All ineligible/declined groups will be contacted by the Community Funding Advisor and directed to other community funding within Council as well as external funding.

 

Consultation

17.     Relevant officers were consulted on during the assessments of the applications.

Risks

18.     There are no risks.

Financial Implications

19.     There are no financial implications.  There is an allocated budgeted available.

Legal Implications

 

20.     Funds must be used only for the purpose for which they were sought and/or approved.   

 

21.     Funds must be used within 12 months of the recipient being notified of their successful application.

 

22.     Recipients are required to inform Council immediately if any difficulties arise which may compromise the service or project.

 

23.     A complaint must be laid with the Police if any funds received under this scheme are stolen or misappropriated.  Council must be notified of all such complaints to the Police.

 

24.     The recipient must allow an audit on the use of Council’s funds should Council wish to undertake such an audit.

 

25.     The recipient must recognise the support of Council in appropriate publicity material, annual reports and similar publications.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

 

26.     In line with Council’s sustainability work, applicants to this fund were asked what practical steps their organisation or project had taken to address environmental concerns. 

The purpose of this was to then enable further conversation to occur with successful applicants around environmental impacts and how this can be related to the work they do in their context. 

27.     A relevant environmental impacts action plan will be established with successful applicants, as a condition to receiving this funding and will likely be used as criteria for future funding.

Communication and Engagement

28.     Funding decisions will be provided to the Community and Engagement team for them to share with the wider community.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Mouri Ora Fund Recommendations 2021-2022 - Communities Committee - 17 November 2021

260

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Debbie Hunter

Community Advisor Funding and Community Contracts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Melanie Laban

Head of Community Projects and Relationships

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jo Miller

Chief Executive

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 






Communities Committee

27 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1792)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/24

 

Director's Report: Neighbourhoods and Communities Group

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update from the Neighbourhoods and Communities Group.

 

Recommendations

That the report be received and noted.

 

Overview and highlights

2.    COVID 19 continues to have a significant impact on our community services and facilities. Visitor numbers are well down at many of our facilities and many report being extremely quiet for long periods of the day.

3.    Door counter statistics show that there has been around a 40% decrease in visitors across our 8 anchor facilities (hubs and libraries) from August 2021 compared to August 2020, and around a 50% decrease in visitors from September 2021 compared to September 2020. There has also been a negative impact on library circulation numbers with a decrease of around 50% in the total number of loans across all sites during August 2021, and 41% during September 2021 compared to the previous year. Even the number of virtual visits to the Hutt City Council Libraries online portal decreased by around 30% in both August and September 2021 compared to the previous year. Revenue across these facilities is down more than $500K to date (to be updated).

 

4.    Sites are also noticing that customers who do come in are much more ‘action-orientated’ and will use the space for completing their task(s), then leaving straight after. This may come down to the lack of programming and other amenities such as tea and coffee at some sites, or the increased level of anxiety of being in public spaces due to COVID. There is still demand for some key services including connect computers and printing to complete tasks such as writing CVs, job applications and filling in government documentation (work and income etc) across many of our sites showing the importance of having such a service available.

5.    Some of our key programmes have shifted online since lockdown (e.g. baby bounce, storytime, steady as you go) and while these were well attended in level 3, this has also seen a drop off since the beginning of level 2.

6.    Moera Library, Naenae and Taita Clubhouses did not initially re-open in level 2, due to increased physical distancing restrictions.  All three teams were redeployed to support front door contact tracing and greeting at other Hubs and Libraries, or to support the creation of online content.  Clubhouses have subsequently reopened in October, with low maximum occupancy. Moera Library has remained closed.

7.    Staff across our sites are identifying different ways which they can support their customers to continue to access services, even if they are not comfortable with entering our public spaces. This includes things like: leaving reservations/books at the front door if elderly customers call in before so they can pick up books without coming into the common spaces; or helping with questions around accessing e-books from home.

8.    In our pools, learn to swim classes were cancelled in Level 3 and many aquatic sports events have been cancelled through to the end of the year. School holidays, normally one of our busiest times, were very quiet at Huia and Stokes Valley pools. Due to its small size Stokes Valley Fitness Suite was closed for five weeks while we established a plan to safely reopen it.  

9.    Little Theatre bookings have been significantly affected by COVID uncertainty and restrictions on audience and performer numbers.

10.  Both Pukutākaro and Build & Play programmes in schools were paused during the recent covid lockdown and have since resumed.  

11.  Staff are reporting observing higher levels of anxiety and a noticeable decline in the wellbeing of customers across a number of our sites. As you are aware, there is an increased focus on staff wellbeing over this time.

Neighbourhoods

Taita:

12.  During the last couple of months the team at the Walter Nash Centre have continued to connect with local schools and preschools regularly (Taitā Central, St Michael’s, Taitā College and Best Start) through school/class visits and outreach, while also providing library loans on a regular basis for specific subject areas, and other material required for the school term.

13.  Our team in Taita have built up positive relationships with the patrons and recreation officer of ‘Aroha Care Centre for the elderly’ in Taitā which has helped streamline our services offered to this important group in the Taitā community.

Koraunui Stokes Valley:

14.  Our staff have been helping to keep the Stokes Valley community safe by helping community members with their vaccination bookings.

15.  Programming that could occur safely under L2 restrictions restarted, which saw programmes such as SAYGO, Ukulele class, Zumba, Taichi etc restart, providing the community a place to connect (safely), keep active and have fun.

16.  Te Awakairangi Health Network have started to run regular counselling clinics at the Hub.

Wainuiomata

17.  ATC & associates started their “Wahakaaē ki te Wero” programme running out of the Wainuiomata Community Hub; incorporating Marae & Tikanga, Cooking, Mau Rakau, Waiata, Haka & hauora, free gym membership, a trainer and nutritionist.

18.  Youth Inspires Youth Employability Programme in Wainuiomata has significantly reduced due to funding issues. However, Youth Inspire have committed to having a presence in Wainuiomata (out of the Wainuiomata Community hub) for at least 2 days a week to continue doing work with the local rangatahi.

19.  Remedial work has been started by Scott Duncan Construction on the Wainuiomata Memorial Hall with the estimated finish date being early December.

Epuni:

20.  The Epuni community activators course has been created and advertised to see if people in the community want to attend the learn how to better service and activate their community. This course is being run by Cissy from Inspiring Communities but is currently postponed due to Cissy being stuck in Northland due to COVID.

Naenae:

21.  In spite of COVID, there has been a noticeable increase in foot traffic and vibrancy in the town centre in recent months due to a number of things.

22.  One is the opening of Kōkiri Hauora Services.  Through a partnership with Council, they are providing rangatahi programmes, hauora services and kai which has created a lot of positive energy and friendly faces. We have also supported the Kokiri-run vaccination centre in Hillary Court over three weekends.

23.  Coco Pop-Up continues to be well-used by the community. Recently it enabled a very talented group of young pacific artists hold their first exhibition. With the support of providing a space, connecting to resources, and funding this beautiful exhibition Taeao Fou had their opening night in pre-lockdown with over 100 people attending. It was beautiful to see their artwork and their community coming out to support.  The group also provided workshops for people to come along and learn new skills or extend their knowledge.  Unfortunately, with going into lockdown we were unable to see out all workshops as we would have liked but we were fortunate to have the artwork stay in the space and open up blinds and allow people to look through the windows and see the artwork.

24.  The new Naenae Meats have opened their doors in Hillary Court right opposite Coco Pop-Up. A new barber’s shop is also due to open shortly next door.

25.  The Naenae Pool project team has been in Hillary Court for 4 consecutive Saturdays, engaging on the concept designs for the new pool. The community has reacted very positively to the news that Council has secured the old Post Office building for community space. They are also pleased to see demolition of the pool underway.

26.  On October 30, Team Naenae Trust held a public meeting in the Treadwell Street Hall to enable people to find out more about the Te Whare Whakaruruhau o Raumanuka service, a partnership between Ngāti Toa, Te Āti Awa and the Department of Corrections, working with Kainga Ora, to provide transitional housing and support for recently released prisoners.

27.  Council, along with other community leaders,  received a briefing on this initiative from Corrections and Iwi earlier this year and had the opportunity to understand the kaupapa. We asked a number of questions including how the programme will be managed, the criteria for tenants, whether other sites had been considered and how risks are being mitigated to ensure the safety of the community.  We encouraged them to engage with the local community proactively and as early as possible, and this meeting is part of that engagement.

Petone

28.  Concept plans and feedback for the refurbishment of the toilet facility at Petone Foreshore have been shared with the chair of the Petone Community Board.  The plan includes the introduction of a Changing Places facility alongside the refurbishment of the existing facility.  The Changing Places toilet is designed to cater for people with high needs disabilities.  Detailed design is underway and works are expected to commence in the first quarter of 2022.  A five to six month construction programme is anticipated.

Eastbourne

29.  Refurbishment options for the toilet and changing facility at Point Howard have been developed.  These will be shared with the Eastbourne Community Board as an item for information.  With the peak use summer season approaching, work will take place in April to June.  Preliminary concepts include the replacement of the existing facility with a modern design option.

 

30.  The Williams Park Reserve Management Plan is in its final stages of adoption.  The Plan is a legislative requirement and outlines the framework under which the reserve, Williams Park, Days Bay is to be managed, maintained, protected and enhanced.  The Plan has undergone a two-stage consultation process and includes a concept plan detailing the changes proposed for the Park. 

 Community Panels

31.  Projects approved and in progress:

Panel

Project

Status

Northern Panel

Toddlers Playground Equipment – Speldhurst Park

Two Water Fountains

Installation – November 2021

 
Installation – October 2021

 

32.  Projects to be discussed/approved in October/November meetings:

Panel

Proposed Projects

 Northern

 

 

Purchase of fruit trees, stakes and ties for primary schools within Stokes Valley and Taita (schools to be decided by the Panel);

Purchase of BBQ for Walter Nash Park;

Purchase and installation of a new swing set at Pomare Park;

Panel/officer exploration and funding towards the upgrade of Thomas Jones Park.

 Western

Funding towards the Maungaraki Community Bike Track situated on the Council Reserve field in Maungaraki adjacent to the Maungaraki Community Hall and Maungaraki Primary School. 

 

City Safety

 

Youth concerns:

33.  Anti-social behaviour by youth, predominantly youth from Wainuiomata, is a concern.  Over the last 3 weeks of September, there has been an increase in anti-social activity, especially in the Riddiford Gardens, Bunny Street bus stop and service lane area.  

34.  Newly recruited volunteers have been instrumental in the increase of incidents being identified and actioned (April to June 2021).  Police have praised the actions of CCTV volunteers reporting concerns early, resulting in reducing the harm to persons and/or property and apprehending offenders. 

Housing and homelessness network:

35.  The outreach approach provided by the Safe City Ambassadors continues to provide positive results.  This month, the team convinced three persons to agree to receive assistance from the relevant support agencies. Referrals have been made to Aro Mai, a Housing First provider.  Aro Mai have been very supportive, securing emergency housing and providing wrap around support. 

Begging

36.  The interaction and engagement by the Safe City Ambassadors and Kainga Ora Managers, has seen a reduction in aggressive begging in Moera.

Museums

37.  The Dowse has opened a number of new exhibitions including Stories We Tell Ourselves featuring recent additions to The Dowse collection and SOLO 21, a biennial exhibition that features 5 new installations by artists from the wider Wellington region. We hosted a small exhibition opening following COVID guidelines with restricted numbers and other measures. We have had to extend some exhibitions and reduce learning and public programmes which has had a significant impact on visitation, venue hire and retail. The Toi Hut family friendly space will reopen shortly with COVD guidelines in place. The Dowse programme has had significant media coverage in recent months with features in Kia ora Magazine, Art & America and The Dominion Post.   

38.  The Dowse website redevelopment project is currently underway as part of the larger Council website redevelopment. This is due to go live in the new year.

39.  Planning is underway on upcoming projects in the new year and some planned maintenance programmed for the coming months.

40.  Officers are currently in the process of writing a brief for the Boulcott Memorial Research project and will be seeking a contract researcher externally over the coming weeks.

Aquatics

Huia Pool:

41.  Huia Pool despite being closed at alert level 3 for public operation was utilised by Vertical Horizons to provide urgent training for the interislander crews under the essential services criteria.  Vertical Horizons will now use Huia Pool for all Interislander training during alert level 3 lockdowns, to ensure their training needs are meet and the interisland freight can keep moving.

 

42.  Huia Pool reopened for public operation at alert level 2 with programmed session times.  New restrictions have limited the number of customers we can have in the facility, therefore impacting on pool usage.  However, we have managed to provide space for most of our Aquatic User groups in their normal time frames, with only a few needing to adjust their schedules.

43.  School lessons were cancelled for term 3, however we have reintegrated them back into operations for term four and has so far been successful, with all bar Te Ara Whanui returning for their bookings.

44.  Unfortunately, we will be unable to host our annual late November National Water Polo Tournament, as New Zealand Water Polo has cancelled their remaining events due to COVID-19 restrictions.  A large number of teams were from Auckland, so their inability to attend was going to severely effect the delivery.

Stokes Valley Pool:

45.  Stokes Valley Pool reopened at for public operation at alert level 2 with programmed session times.  New restrictions have limited the number of customers we can have in the facility, therefore impacting on pool usage.  However, we have managed to provide space for most of our Aquatic User groups in their normal time frames, with only a few needing to adjust their schedules.

46.  School lessons were cancelled for term 3, however we have reintegrated them back into operations for term four and has so far been successful.  Some local schools have had to readjust bookings to work with session times and to elevate instances where bookings numbers may have been greater than the facility maximum would allow.

Fitness Suites

47.  While Stokes Valley Fitness Suite was closed for five weeks members were able to use Huia Pool Fitness Suite free of charge. It has now reopened using a strict bookings system, members are slowly starting to return. We have had some cancellations, due to uncertainty and some members wanting to return as the alert levels decrease.

48.  Huia Fitness Suite has remained strong during the alert level period. Number restrictions have meant at peak times there is a wait time to access the gym, but these times have been no longer than 20 minutes and the members have been mostly understanding.  Huia like Stokes Valley have had cancellations, due to COVID uncertainty.

Swim City Swim School

49.  Swim City ran an interim programme for 3 weeks after the return from lockdown.  Approximately half of the total Swim School attended the interim programme, under the new restrictions. 

50.  The School Holiday Learn to Swim Programme ran as per normal with almost full registrations, Swim City trialed for the first time holiday lessons in the afternoon, the uptake was successful and we will look to grow the afternoon holiday programme.

51.  Swim City are running a full programme for Term 4, approximately 90% of clients have returned and have attended their first week of lessons, operating under the AL2 restrictions.  

Parks and Recreation

Parks and Reserves

52.  Officers are working with external consultants on the Biodiversity Strategy.  The first phase will include establishing the structure including the consultation plan, collection and collation of information and an initial analysis and interpretation.  The results of this first phase, expected in June 2022, will be reported back to the Communities Committee.

53.  The Reserves Maintenance Contract is currently out for tender.  Five contractors were invited to tender with confirmation that three will be submitting a tender.  As a part of the process, officers made a presentation to the tenderers for the Reserves Maintenance Contract.  This is an up to 10-year contract for the maintenance of all the reserve land holdings (e.g. mowing, gardens), wharves, beaches and foreshore.  

54.  Council’s broader outcomes principles feature strongly in the documentation.  The outcomes are designed to ensure the contract is impactful in a positive way on the community.  Impacts can include, for example, employment opportunities for locals, and environmental and sustainability outcomes such as carbon reduction methods and systems.  Tenderers are required to present their tender to the evaluation team. The current contractor is Downer, who is also one of the current tenderers.  The contract is to be awarded in December.  The new contract will commence on 1 April 2022.

55.  Below is an update on specific capital projects.  As a general observation, there will be a delay in the delivery timelines for some of these projects due to supply line issues related to COVID impacts.  We will reassess our work programme ahead of mid-year budget reviews. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

56.  The following is an update on some of the Parks main projects identified in the 2021/2022 work programme:

21/22 Annual Plan

Completion

General Scope

Current Status

Wharves Refurbishment

Jun-22

Structural design work for removal of Pt Howard wharf.

Structural design for options at Petone Wharf

Consultation commenced with interested parties incl. yacht club (as a user of wharf), Centre Port (who owns the adjoining wharf) and contractors.

Early stages of engaging with engineers to pull together plans and consent information.  Expect consent to be notified due to heritage values with process to take up to one year to complete. 

Officers have had preliminary communications with Heritage NZ.  This will continue.  

Petone Wharf engineering survey and QRA completed with recommendation adopted by Council to remove part of the head and refurbish remaining at a cost of max $21M. Wharf will remain closed until work is completed estimate 2-3 years.

Toilets Upgrade

 Jun-22

Refurbishment or replacement of toilets at Petone Foreshore, Pt Howard, Parkway Reserve, McEwan Park

Preliminary design completed for Pt Howard and Petone Foreshore. Awaiting final costings. Works expected to commence in March to April due to need to ensure peak season use is maintained.

Manor Park Shared Path (cycle trail)

Jun - 22

New shared path to be constructed between Manor Park and Silverstream Bridge over land owned by GWRC and KiwiRail.

Construction commenced


 

 

21/22 Annual Plan

Completion

General Scope

Current Status

Te Aroha Matauranga facility - Te Whiti Park

Jan-22

Construction of multi-use facility adjoining HCC facility at Te Whiti Park

Construction well underway scheduled for completion in January 2022

 

Playgrounds

 Apr-Jun 22

Playground replacements at Judd Crescent, Naenae, and Pekanga Road, Normandale

Public consultation commenced for both projects

Hutt Valley Tennis – Mitchell Park

TBA

Contribution towards new covered tennis facility and upgrade of existing building. Requires sale of some Council land before project can commence.

Revocation of reserve status completed and approved by DOC. Sale and purchase of land underway as per Council resolution.  HVT is submitting resource consent application to commence development work.  Officers are being consulted regularly.

Williams Park Management Plan

Jun-22

To implement priorities identified in (to be adopted) management plan

Awaiting finalization of management plan – currently in final stage of public consultation


 

Healthy Families Hutt Valley

57.  As of 1 November 2021, Healthy Families Hutt Valley became part of the Connected Communities team, and we aim to further integrate this work into Council’s workplans.

58.  The team has been supporting the establishment and back boning of the Hutt Valley Emergency Kai Collective set up to respond to the August 2021 lockdown and the ongoing impact. This initiative compliments the work of the Hutt Valley Food Resilience Network which we continue to support.

59.  They have also been working the Strategy and Planning team on the 2022 review of Hutt City’s Smokefree Outdoor Public Places Policy. The review will cover the effectiveness of the policy to date, exploring designating areas outside of school gates as smokefree and vapefree and local government’s role in the Smokefree Aotearoa 2025 Action Plan.

60.  The Healthy Families Hutt Valley Strategic Leadership Group have finalised a shared alcohol position paper. The purpose of this paper is to create a shared understanding whilst aligning key messages across out partners working in the alcohol system.

61.  The Healthy Families Hutt Valley Strategic Leadership Group wrote a letter to MP Chlöe Swarbrick in support of the Members Bill – Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Harm Minimisation) Amendment Bill.

62.  HFHV is also partnering with Kōkiri Marae, Big Street Bikers and Waka Kotahi on a transport equity project that will provide a bike library of 50 e-bikes and cargo bikes through Kōkiri Marae for Wainuiomata whānau. Participants will be able to loan an e-bike for six months and have support from a local co-ordinator for the whole whānau to transition to active transport and biking for recreation. We’re currently co-designing the project with partners and have some of the funding confirmed

Recreational Programme and Events

63.  The past three months has seen a number of our programmes and events cancelled due to the current Covid climate. Like so many other events and programmes we have worked hard to change platforms and continue to work to ever changing goal posts.

64.  The Lower Hutt primary schools sports association (LHPSSA) that Council supports, has had all the major events cancelled due to number restrictions. This has prompted us to look at the way LHPSSA currently operates and if the status quo is fit for purpose in the Covid world moving forward. We are excited to use the extra time we have on developing the 2022 calendar of events and doing what we can to ensure we are able to run events next year without disruption.

65.  In the past our ‘Everybody Dance Now’ class (dance class for those impaired by physical and or intellectual disability) has not run outside of COVID level 1. Given the likelihood of there not being a ‘level 1’ in the near future, we reached out to those organisations that bring their clients to the class to get a gauge on how many would feel comfortable returning in the current level. With added safety measures in place there were a number that were comfortable to return and for those that couldn’t we took the class Live on a Facebook event page. This allowed us to have a greater reach than ever before. We had the Naenae college special needs unit take part online and also had great feedback from Living Plus saying 15 of their in-home clients danced together watching the live.  
https://www.facebook.com/events/422815856055958/?post_id=424028382601372&view=permalink

66.  We will be continuing with the live classes at Moera Hall for those that can attend and keep the Facebook online option for those that can’t. We are looking to share the online event further afield in future classes.

67.  Our Low Impact Fitness and community Yoga and Pilates classes have been running smoothly with a booking process in place to maintain class numbers and social distancing.

68.  There was demand for these to continue through the school holidays when they would usually take a break.  People really missed being able to keep their routine during lockdown, so it was nice to be able to arrange classes to continue in the holidays and keep people active.  Some classes are also live streamed in our Council Fitness facebook group with many happy at home attendees.

69.  Play continues to be a primary method of delivering physical activity.  Both Pukutākaro and Build & Play programmes in schools were paused during the recent covid lockdown. Play was promoted through Council and school social media. Both programmes have returned to schools for term 4.  Ongoing evaluation shows the positive changes these programmes are encouraging at schools and in the lives of our tamariki. Funding has been granted to continue these programmes through 2022 and our Summer Play Day Series December 2021 - February 2022.   Plans are being made to ensure these events can be delivered in a variety of Covid situations. 

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

70.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

71.  The Neighbourhoods and Communities team has contributed to the development of Council’s Carbon Reduction plan and will both lead and support initiatives.  There is expected to be an increased focus on sustainability in our community programming and projects.

 

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Melanie Laban

Head of Community Projects and Relationships

 

 

 

Author: Karl Chitham

Museums Director

 

 

 

Author: Marcus Sherwood

Head of Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

Author: Denise Clarkson

Promotion & Content Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 

 

 

 


Our Reference          21/1779

TO:                      Chair and Members

Communities Committee

FROM:                Andrew Quinn

DATE:                27 October 2021

SUBJECT:           Naenae Projects Update

 

 

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the information.

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    To provide an update to the Committee on the progress and management of the Whakatupu Ngaengae Project (pool and town centre development) since the last Committee meeting on 15 September 2021. 

Project Update

2.   Since the last report in September 2021, the project team has completed the concept design stage of the pool project and we are currently engaging with community over those design plans. It’s important that the community is able to contribute to the design so that their aspirations for the building are realised. The engagement will run from 16 October to 8 November 2021 and a feedback report summarising submissions will be available mid-December.

  

3.    Concurrent with the community engagement we will be opening the community hall for the recovery of salvage material and memorabilia from the pool building. This will take place over a number of weekends starting with Saturday 30 October (followed by 6 November and 13 November). Some of the material available includes timber and plastic seating from the pool and changing rooms, starter blocks, spare pool tiles and safety warning signs. 

 

4.    The demolition phase is in progress and mechanical dismantling of the leisure pool hall is nearly complete. The next task will be to dismantle the main pool building portal structure, roof and bleachers. There has been widespread interest in the recycling of materials, particularly the laminated timber arches. As noted in the last report, we are aiming to divert up to 80% of the demolition material away from the tip-site by recycling, re-using or re-purposing wherever possible.

 

 

 

 

     

5.    The project is reported to be on budget and the current forecast is $67.95M with a confidence level of 90%, that is there is only a 10% possibility of going over. The project team are committed to deliver the project within budget and have actively engaged with value management in order to stay within budget. The size of the pool building is still approximately 20% larger than original pool (and better configured and improved access to open space beyond).

 

Development of Naenae Town Centre

6.    Since the last report, the project team has made further progress with the acquisition of property for community facilities in Hillary Court. Vendors for 27 Hillary Court (the former Naenae Post Office) have now signed the sale and purchase agreement. Due diligence investigations are underway; confirmation of cost to refurbish, asbestos survey etc. and will be complete end of November. Settlement is due in December.   

 

7.    The project team continue to look for other properties to complement the Post Office and fulfil the community desire for large bookable space to hold community events. 

 

Financial Considerations

8.    The project team is working with finance team on the Annual Plan/budget for 2022/2023 and will present any major variances to the Major Projects Board for acceptance.

 

Risk Management

 

9.    To ensure that the project stays within budget, we have deployed specialist risk management expertise and completed a third quantitative risk analysis (QRA) that was used to create the original budget. This confirms the project budget of $68M is still realistic and achievable.   

 

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

10.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide

 

11.  The design team continue to work on reducing the environmental effects of the pool’s systems by introducing innovations that will reduce the carbon footprint of the building and deliver operational efficiencies.

 

12.  Work is also progressing to gain a Greenstar rating of 5 (NZ excellence) for the pool through the NZ Green Building Council, in conjunction and with the assistance of crown entity Callaghan Innovation.       

 

Legal Considerations

13.  There are no legal implications connected with this report. 

 

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this Memorandum.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Andrew Quinn

Project Manager (Naenae)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 

 

 


Communities Committee

01 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1573)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCCCC2021/5/138

 

Communities Committee Work Programme

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the work programme be noted and received.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Communities Committee Work Programme 2021-22

281

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Annie Doornebosch

Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services