HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

KOMITI KAUPAPA TAIAO
Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

 

 

18 November 2021

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Thursday 25 November 2021 commencing at 2.00pm

 

The meeting will be held under Alert Level 2

 

Membership

 

 

Cr J Briggs (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr K Brown

Cr S Edwards

Deputy Mayor T Lewis

Cr A Mitchell

Cr S Rasheed (Deputy Chair)

Cr N Shaw

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY


CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE
Membership:	8
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Reports to:	Council

HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

 

 

OVERVIEW:

This Committee has responsibility for oversight of Council’s environment and climate change response.

The Committee is aligned with the Environment & Sustainability Directorate.

Its areas of focus are:

§   Oversight of Council’s plan to reach Carbon Zero, including raising awareness of climate-related issues

§   Developing and implementing climate and environmental policies and plans including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters

§   Waste and recycling

 

PURPOSE:

To develop, implement, monitor and review strategies, policies, plans and functions associated with environmental and climate change activities.

 

DELEGATIONS FOR THE COMMITTEES AREAS OF FOCUS:

        All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities including the activities outlined below.

       Develop required strategies and policies. Recommend draft and final versions to Council for adoption where they have a city-wide or strategic focus.

       Implement, monitor and review strategies and policies.

       Oversee the implementation of major projects provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

       Oversee budgetary decisions provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

       Oversee the development and implementation of plans and functions that promote environmental wellbeing, including Council’s plan to reach Carbon Zero.

       Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s Environment & Sustainability Directorate.

       Address matters related to ecological protection, the protection of biodiversity, and biosecurity.

       Address matters related to climate change, including raising awareness of climate-related issues, advocating for climate change issues and actions, and championing initiatives that reduce carbon emissions.

       Recommend to Council the acquisition or disposal of assets, unless the acquisition or disposal is provided for specifically in the LTP.

       Conduct any consultation processes required on issues before the Committee.

       Approval and forwarding of submissions.

       Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

       The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee. When exercised, the report/minutes of the meeting require a resolution noting that the committee has performed the responsibilities of another committee and the reason/s.

       If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Climate Change & Sustainability Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Communities Committee and/or Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, then the Climate Change & Sustainability Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committees. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

 


                                                                       5                                         25 November 2021

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Kaupapa Taiao

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Thursday 25 November 2021 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

Opening formalities - Karakia Timatanga

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

 

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

1.       APOLOGIES

No apologies have been received.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.     

4.       Recommendation to Council | TE KAUNIHERA O TE AWA KAIRANGI - 16 December 2021

Options regarding activities on the site of the closed Wainuiomata Landfill (21/1807)

Report No. CCASC2021/5/268 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste              6

Chair’s Recommendation:

That “That the recommendations contained in the report be discussed.”

5.       Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara: Whaitua Implementation Reports (21/1867)

Report No. CCASC2021/5/269 by the Senior Advisor Climate and Sustainability 16

Chair’s Recommendation:

That “That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

6.       Submission to Ministry for Environment consultation (21/1875)

Report No. CCASC2021/5/270 by the Senior Advisor Climate and Sustainability 21

Chair’s Recommendation:

That “That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

7.       Update on Council's solid waste and waste minimisation work (21/1635)

Report No. CCASC2021/5/271 by the Solid Waste Manager                               26

Chair’s Recommendation:

That “That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

8.       Eastern Bays Shared Path - Project Update (21/1874)

Report No. CCASC2021/5/140 by the Head of Transport                                    32

Chair’s Recommendation:

That “That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

9.       Update on Council's climate change work (21/1634)

Report No. CCASC2021/5/272 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste            37

Chair’s Recommendation:

That “That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

10.     Climate Change and Sustainability Committee Work Programme 2021-2022 (21/1574)

Report No. CCASC2021/5/141 by the Democracy Advisor                                 43

Chair’s Recommendation:

That “That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

11.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.

Closing formalities - Karakia Whakamutunga

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio, he huka, he hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora.

Cease the winds from the west
Cease the winds from the south
Let the breeze blow over the land
Let the breeze blow over the ocean
Let the red-tipped dawn come with a sharpened air. 
A touch of frost, a promise of a glorious day.

     

 

 

 

Judy Randall

Democracy Advisor


                                                                                       7                                                 25 November 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

05 November 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1807)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/5/268

 

Options regarding activities on the site of the closed Wainuiomata Landfill

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with information on options to be considered by Council to suspend any current or future planned activity on the site of the old Wainuiomata Landfill (the Landfill), in response to a Council resolution made on 10 August 2021.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)     receives and notes the report;

(2)     notes that officers are still investigating the feasibility and cost of establishing a gas collection/destruction system on the site and replanting the site;

(3)     notes that the potential establishment of a gas collection and destruction system and/or replanting of the site, were not included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2023, and additional revenue would be required to fund ongoing costs along with servicing of debt and depreciation if no alternative revenue is identified;

(4)     agrees to EITHER:

(a)     continue to allow a mix of activities on the site;

(b)     continue to allow current activities but disallow new activities not associated with further remediation of the site; or

(c)     disallow any current or new activities not associated with further remediation of the site; and

(5)     agrees that, if either option a) or b) is chosen, for any activity to continue or go ahead it must not adversely impact on Council’s ability to carry out further remediation of the site.

 

Background

2.    On 10 August 2021, Council passed a resolution directing officers to:

a.       … report back to Council on options to suspend any current or future planned activity on the site of the old Wainuiomata Landfill, and consults with any affected parties; and

b.       … report back to Council on options to remediate the Wainuiomata Landfill site and minimise or offset its ongoing carbon impact.”

3.    These resolutions followed recommendations made by the Committee on 22 July 2021, when it considered a report in relation to the investigation of a potential future cleanfill on Council-owned land.

4.    None of the sites owned by Council were considered suitable, but in relation to the site of the old Landfill at 255 Coast Road, the Committee passed two consequential recommendations (as noted above).

Site location and features

5.    The old Landfill is located at 255 Coast Road, on the eastern side of Coast Road, approximately 1.5km south of Wainuiomata.

6.    The aerial view below shows the location of the various stages of the Landfill, and some relevant features associated with the site.

7.    Landfill operations on the most recent Stage 3 commenced in 1979 following the closure of the two older Landfill stages and continued until the end of 2012. Approximately 6 ha was used for Landfill activities in Stage 3, accommodating approximately 700,000 cubic metres of refuse.  (Stage 3 was also included in the scope of the recent assessment for potential cleanfill sites.)

8.    The Stage 3 site is located in a steep bush-clad valley orientated approximately in a north-south direction and is screened on all sides from public roads and developed areas. The area immediately above the Landfill is currently covered in grass. The balance of the property is a mix of native bush, pine plantation and weeds (blackberry, gorse and pampas).

Current use of Stage 1 and 2

9.    The first stage of the old Landfill is used for the storage of some building materials.

 

 

Stage 1 – old Wainuiomata Landfill

 

10.  The second stage is largely covered in blackberry, but there are some structures on the site used by a paint ball group.

Stage 2 – old Wainuiomata Landfill

 

Current activities on Stage 3

11.  Stage 3 site is currently subject to quarterly site inspections and maintenance activities, such as the mowing of grass and keeping drainage channels clear. If site inspections identify problems such as leachate breakouts, Council has a contractor to remediate these as required.

 


 

Stage 3 – old Wainuiomata Landfill

 

12.  In addition to maintenance activities, there are two current activities on the site:

Beehives

13.  Beehives by Ruapehu Sawmills Ltd are stored on site, via an informal arrangement, at the top of the closed landfill where they receive the most sun during winter. During the Manuka flowering season (October to March), the majority of the hives are moved to other sites around the North Island for Manuka honey collection.

Top-soil screening

14.  Wellington Pipelines Ltd has a resource consent (RM160130) that allows for stockpiling of up to 20,000m3 of natural materials for screening. The consent requires that the cap be protected by a thick rotomillings/gravel layer. The consent was granted in 2016, noting no significant effects.

15.  No formal lease agreement exists, but Wellington Pipelines Ltd is using the site for screening during summertime in a relatively small, confined area.

Potential multi-shooting sports facility on Stage 3

16.  In 2014 the Wainuiomata Community Board gave approval in principle for the Hutt Valley Shooting Association (HVSA) to lease part of Stage 3 for a regional, multi-shooting sports facility.  This followed a publicly notified process, where there was broad support for the facility.  25 submissions were received, with some identifying concerns with noise. 

17.  The approval was subject to any necessary resource consent being obtained and any necessary police certification to be obtained, to address any issues with noise or safety.

18.  HVSA estimates it has spent up to 200 hours and $30,000, primarily on noise consultants with a view to applying for a resource consent and/or addressing any potential adverse noise effects the facility might generate. 

19.  In 2020, officers met representatives of HVSA and advised that they would need to reapply to the Community Board if they still wished to proceed with leasing the facility.  This was on the basis that too much time had passed and no consent had been obtained and no lease granted.

20.  HVSA advised that they did wish to proceed and would re-apply to the Community Board.  They have been working towards this.

Remediation options for the site

21.  In its decision on 10 August 2021, Council noted potential options of further remediation of the site by planting, and the destruction of gas.

Planting

22.  While the site is currently covered in grass, it could be beneficial to carry out further remediation of part or all of the site by planting a diverse mix of indigenous plant species.

23.  This could increase the sequestration of carbon (the amount of carbon captured would depend on the type of species that can be planted on the site), and further stabilise the site. Increased planting could help stabilise the landfill cap and reduce the risk of erosion associated with storm water run-off, and may also reduce the amount of water infiltration into the waste mass.

24.  Access tracks (4m wide with turning areas) would need to be retained for inspections and maintenance. A few key areas with known maintenance requirements (such as a section of the landfill front face prone to leachate breakouts) should also be kept clear of planting.

25.  Plant species on the landfill would need to be selected and maintained to ensure that no large trees became established that could impact the stability and integrity of the landfill cap.

26.  With regard to the benefit of reducing water infiltration into the waste mass, note that Council is currently working on options to improve the management of leachate originating from the landfill. The landfill has a gravity-fed leachate collection system, which flows to a pump station at the toe of the landfill where it is then pumped to trade waste for treatment. This system continued to be developed during the operational life of the landfill until closure in 2012.

27.  There have been ongoing issues with the leachate collection system since construction, specifically that leachate volumes can increase above the current capacity of the pipes and pumps used to pump the leachate to the nearest pump station at 130 Coast Road. While monthly water quality monitoring since 2005 has recorded no observable decrease in water quality in the Wainuiomata River, Council is looking at options to reduce the risk of overflows.

28.  Relevant options include an increase in holding tank capacity for the leachate, an increase in the size of the pipe between the landfill and the nearest pumping station, on-site leachate treatment, additional capping of the landfill, and/or planting of the site to minimise water infiltration into the waste mass. Therefore, there could be good alignment between planting of the site, and a reduction in the amount of leachate produced.

29.  Note that the potential planting of the site was not included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2023 and additional revenue would be required to fund ongoing costs along with servicing of debt and depreciation if no alternative revenue is identified.

Gas destruction

30.  Council, in its interim Carbon Reduction and Resilience Plan 2021-31, has committed to investigate the feasibility of destroying remaining methane emissions associated with the Landfill site.

31.  Investigative work is under way to inform a decision on the viability of a gas collection system and flare. The trial will involve the drilling of five wells into the waste mass, the setup of temporary gas collection pipes and the installation and operation of a temporary flare to destroy the gas. If viable, more permanent infrastructure would need to be set up. Capital investment costs could be in the order of $500,000 to $800,000, with annual operating costs of about $90,000.

32.  Note that the potential addition of a gas collection and destruction system was not included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2023 and additional revenue would be required to fund ongoing costs along with servicing of debt and depreciation if no alternative revenue is identified.

Feedback from affected parties

33.  Before making a decision on the future of the site, Council asked officers to consult with affected parties.

34.  In late August 2021, officers sent a letter to all residents within 1km of the site, and the HVSA, inviting them to submit their views regarding their preferences for the site.

35.  In summary, the following feedback was received:

a.    There were seven written responses:  five from individual residents, one from a consortium of residents and one from the HVSA.

b.    Six of the responses representing residents were supportive of remediating the site.

c.     Many residents were supportive of further community involvement in any future planting scheme.

d.    HVSA were not supportive of suspending future activities, citing loss of an opportunity to establish a rifle range on the site, and associated impacts on the group members. Their response suggested a compromise scenario, incorporating both the rifle range in a small area, and planting / other operations across the rest of the site.

e.     Wellington Pipelines Ltd currently use the site, and they would like to continue doing so.

f.     One resident provided verbal feedback, and noted concerns about the space in front of the entrance to Stage 3, as it can be subject to anti-social behaviour.

Feedback from the Wainuiomata Community Board

36.  The Wainuiomata Community Board considered the information presented in this report on 3 November 2021 and recommended to the Committee option b), that is, to continue to allow any current activities on the site but disallow any new activities that are not associated with further remediation of the site.

Next steps

37.  The options for planting and gas collection may not necessarily be mutually exclusive, ie the operation of a flare and a gas collection system could work hand-in-hand with the planting of a mix of plant species provided access tracks are maintained and planting is excluded from areas where gas is extracted.

38.  Planting and any potential gas collection and destruction system may also work in conjunction with the existing activities on the site, given the relatively small footprint of those activities.

39.  However, it is unclear to what degree the establishment of a shooting facility at the site could work in conjunction with current activities or ideas to undertake further site remediation via planting and gas destruction. The set-up of at least two rifle ranges on the site (one up to 550m) and multiple hand gun bays, as outlined in the HVSA’s proposal from 2014, may conflict with them, and further work would be required to confirm feasibility.

40.  In principle, Council could decide to either

a.       continue to allow a mix of activities on the site, as long as they don’t adversely impact on the ability to carry out further remediation of the site, or

b.       continue to allow any current activities on the site as long as they don’t adversely impact on the ability to carry out further remediation of the site, and disallow any new activities that are not associated with further remediation of the site, or

c.       disallow any current or new activities on the site that are not associated with further remediation of the site.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

41.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

42.  If viable, the establishment of a gas collection and destruction system could lead to significant carbon reductions, by destroying some of the methane emitted from the site. If a flare was in place by 2022, potentially around 18,000 tCO2-e could be destroyed by 2030.

43.  Planting of the site with a diverse mix of plant species could improve the potential to sequester more carbon. Officers are unable to estimate the carbon sequestration potential at this stage, but it may not be significant considering that we would need to ensure that no large trees become established that could impact the stability and integrity of the landfill cap.

Consultation

44.  In late August 2021, Council sent a letter to all residents within 1km of the site, and the HVSA, inviting them to submit their views regarding their preferences for the site. Wellington Pipelines Ltd was contacted by phone.

45.  The Wainuiomata Community Board has been consulted.

46.  The trial involving the drilling of five wells into the waste mass and the installation and operation of a temporary flare to destroy the gas would likely get under way early in the 2022, in order to report back on the results in the second quarter in 2022. Officers will notify local residents and affected stakeholders prior to the installation getting under way.

Legal Considerations

47.  A consent is in place for Wellington Pipelines Ltd to use the site for screening of soil, albeit no formal lease agreement is in place.

48.  There is currently no legal agreement, consent or approval for HSVA to use the site.

Financial Considerations

49.  Council does not currently receive any revenue (or incur expenses) regarding the site’s use for beehive storage and soil screening.

50.  The development of a multi shooting sports facility, if permitted, would be funded by the Hutt Valley Shooting Association. The Association would be required to pay a lease rental, which would be determined on the total area of land leased under the reserves rental formula.

 

51.  The establishment of a gas collection and destruction system, and/or replanting of the site would require additional funds. Costs for planting are unknown at this stage. Capital costs for a gas collection and destruction system could be in the order of $500,000 to $800,000, with annual operating costs of about $90,000.

52.  Considering that potentially around 18,000 tCO2-e could be destroyed by 2030, and assuming total costs of between $1.3M and $1.6M for the same period of time, the mitigation cost is estimated at between $72/tCO2-e and $89/tCO2-e.

53.  The Long Term Plan 2021-2031 was adopted in June 2021.  This included a significant increase in capital budgets across the life of the plan. The plan also details how Council will not achieve a balanced budget until the 2028/29 financial year.  Funding for the potential establishment of a flare and gas collection system and/or planting is not included in the Long Term Plan. As such, an increase in costs for ongoing operations along with the servicing costs for debt and depreciation would require additional rates increases to fund these costs if no alternative revenue source can be found.

54.  However, in order to minimise relying on rates funding, at least for some costs, Council could consider selling (or borrowing against) its carbon credits that it receives for carbon sequestered on forest land registered under the Emissions Trading Scheme.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

Author: Janet Lawson

Reserves Asset Manager

 

Author: Bradley Cato

Chief Legal Officer

 

 

Reviewed By: Jenny Livschitz

Group Chief Financial Officer

 

Reviewed By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities


                                                                                       1                                                 25 November 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

04 November 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1867)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/5/269

 

Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara: Whaitua Implementation Reports

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report presents a brief update on the Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee process and presents the Whaitua Implementation Reports.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)        notes the ‘Whaitua Implementation Programme’ report, available at https://www.gw.govt.nz/assets/Whaitua-Te-Whanganui-a-Tara/Te-Whaitua-te-Whanganui-a-Tara-Implementation-Programmeweb.pdf and

(2)        notes the ‘Te Mahere Wai’ report, which is the implementation plan produced by the Mana Whenua Committee members (Te Kāhui Taiao),  available at https://www.gw.govt.nz/assets/Whaitua-Te-Whanganui-a-Tara/temaherewai20211028v32DIGIFINAL.pdf

 

 

Background

2.    The formal work of the Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee has now been completed, with the final non-statutory reports having been presented to Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) on 23 September 2021.

3.    The Committee produced two reports:

a.    ‘Whaitua Implementation Programme’ (WIP).

b.    ‘Te Mahere Wai’ (TMW), ie, the implementation plan produced by the Mana Whenua members of the Committee.

4.    The two documents are available at the following links on the GWRC website:

 

Whaitua Implementation Programme: https://www.gw.govt.nz/assets/Whaitua-Te-Whanganui-a-Tara/Te-Whaitua-te-Whanganui-a-Tara-Implementation-Programmeweb.pdf

 

Te Mahere Wai:
https://www.gw.govt.nz/assets/Whaitua-Te-Whanganui-a-Tara/temaherewai20211028v32DIGIFINAL.pdf

5.    The reports were received by Upper Hutt City Council on 20 October 2021, and Wellington City Council on 27 October 2021.

6.    A briefing on 28 October 2021 was provided to Council about the Whaitua process and its outputs, including an initial view of some of the Committee’s ‘Whaitua Implementation Programme’ (WIP) recommendations and related matters.

7.    The two reports were launched at an event on 9 November 2021 at Te Papa, in Wellington City.

Initial considerations of the Whaitua Committee’s recommendations

8.    While the perspective and structure of the two reports differ in a number of respects, they should be viewed as complementary. There is significant overlap between many of the recommendations in various areas and it is intended that a single implementation process will be run that will take both documents into account.

9.    The documents contain 115 recommendations (Whaitua Committee WIP) and 101 recommendations (Te Mahere Wai), respectively. All the Whaitua Committee’s recommendations are assigned to one or more of the key stakeholders: GWRC, ‘territorial authorities (TAs)’, Mana Whenua, the ‘Three Waters Agency’ (currently Wellington Water Ltd (WWL)) and a small number involving generally unspecified community groups.

10.  A breakdown of the number of recommendations in the WIP by agency is provided in Table 1 below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Focus of recommendation

Identified lead organisation/group

Number of recommendations/ actions

Percentage

TA’s only

TAs

10

9

TA’s and 3 Waters agency

TAs

6

5

TA’s and GWRC

GWRC

8

7

GWRC, TAs and other agencies (eg mana whenua, 3 Waters, community groups)

GWRC

22

19

Three Waters agency

Three Waters

15

13

GWRC only

GWRC

36

31

GWRC and other agencies but not including TAs

GWRC

18

16

TOTAL

 

115

100

 

11.  Territorial Authorities (eg Hutt City Council) have been assigned sole responsibility for 10 recommendations (9%) and are the named lead agency for a further six recommendations (5%), working with the Three Waters Agency.

12.  Overall GWRC is the lead agency for 84 recommendations (73%) with TAs and the Three Waters Agency responsible for 16 (14%) and 15 (13%) of the remainder, respectively.

13.  The recommendations in Te Mahere Wai (not analysed in detail as yet) are focused on achieving identified outcomes with assigned actions primarily directed at GWRC.

14.  A number of the recommendations in the two documents include a timeframe by which the reporting entity (the Whaitua Committee or Te Kāhui Taiao) would like to see the recommendations actioned.

15.  In the case of the Whaitua Committee WIP, about 50% of the recommendations have a desired implementation date. Of these, 80% are assigned to the 2022 – 2026 period, with ten and nine recommendations assigned to the next two calendar years, respectively.

Some initial considerations of the potential impacts of the implementation of the WIP documents

16.  The possible costs associated with implementation were not a key consideration in the work of either the Whaitua Committee or Te Kāhui Taiao. A discussion of costs is therefore not part of the two WIP documents.

17.  Implementation of the recommendations in the two WIP documents will require actions by all key stakeholders, including GWRC and Hutt City Council. Many of the actions will be implemented by GWRC via their Regional Policy Statement (RPS) and their Natural Resources Plan that Hutt City Council will then have to give effect to/consider respectively in our District Plan, noting that these processes are currently under development.

18.  If the timing of the RPS and our new District Plan are unable to be aligned, the District Plan may need to be amended.

19.  Other recommendations (such as the possible remediation of contaminated land) would need to be implemented by stakeholders via non-regulatory pathways.  Their implementation would come with associated costs and resource requirements that will need to be considered by Hutt City Council.

20.  In addition, a number of the recommendations reflect, and in some cases propose, extending the Three Waters related work programmes agreed with WWL and funded in the current Long Term Plan.

21.  If the Three Waters related recommendations in the WIPs were to be fully implemented, the cost will very likely exceed the current expenditure agreed with WWL to upgrade the city’s water network ($1.3b over 30 years) but the quantum of additional expenditure is not yet known.

22.  In addition, the implementation of a number of the actions assigned, solely or in part to the Three Waters Agency/WWL, could well be affected by the Three Waters Reform process that is currently underway.

23.  In short, the two Whaitua Implementation Plans – which reflect the significantly increased importance given to water by the underpinning National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management [NPS-FM 2020] – will likely involve additional expenditure (and additional specialist technical resources) in order to implement them.

24.  It is not possible however, at this time, to provide an estimate of the likely total costs as this requires further work by officers, both at Hutt City Council and with other Whaitua stakeholder organisations.

Next Steps

25.  The recommendations in the reports will need to be carefully considered by the participating and impacted organisations.

26.  An officers group will be established to provide an initial, high level assessment of the potential impacts on the current Hutt City Council work programme. The group was scheduled to initially meet on 22 November and will aim to provide a briefing to Council in the first quarter of the 2022 calendar year.

27.  As with other Whaitua processes, GWRC will be taking the lead on the implementation process around the recommendations made. However, because of the scale, number and ambitious timeline of the recommendations in the two reports, the best outcome for the key stakeholders, including Hutt City Council, may be for a more joined-up approach around implementation than has been the case for previous Whaitua processes. Officers will discuss this with GWRC.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

28.  No climate change impact assessment has been carried out, as the paper provides only an update on an existing work programme, and presents the reports produced by the Whaitua Committee.  

Consultation

29.  No formal consultation has been undertaken on the reports, albeit community engagement by way of the Whaitua Committee has been at the heart of the process.

Legal Considerations

30.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial Considerations

31.  The financial and resourcing implications of the Whaitua Implementation Reports are not yet clear, and further analysis will be required.

32.  If the Three Waters related recommendations in the WIPs were to be fully implemented, the cost will very likely exceed the current expenditure agreed with WWL to upgrade the city’s water network ($1.3b over 30 years) but the quantum of additional expenditure is not yet known.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

Author: David Burt

Senior Advisor Climate and Sustainability

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

Reviewed By: Jenny Livschitz

Group Chief Financial Officer

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                       1                                                 25 November 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

04 November 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1875)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/5/270

 

Submission to Ministry for Environment consultation

 

Purpose of Report

1.    For the Committee to consider a draft submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document: Te hau mārohi ki anamata Transitioning to a low-emissions and climate–resilient future.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   receives and notes the report;

(2)   agrees to the submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document: ‘Te hau mārohi ki anamata Transitioning to a low-emissions and climate-resilient future’ as attached as Appendix 1 to the report; and

(3)   agrees that, due to the submission deadline of 26 November 2021, the submission be sent by the Mayor or the Chair of the Climate and Sustainability Committee.

 

 

Comment

2.    In 2019, the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act set the scene for a transition to a low carbon future for Aotearoa New Zealand by 2050.

3.    In early 2021, the Climate Change Commission published, for consultation, its draft package of advice to Government on the steps Aotearoa must take to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and address climate change.

4.    Public consultation on this advice took place from 1 February to 28 March 2021 and included a submission from Council in the form of a letter from Mayor Campbell Barry.

5.    The Commission’s final report [Ināia tonu nei: a low emissions future for Aotearoa] detailing the paths Aotearoa can take to meet its climate targets was presented to the Minister for Climate Change and tabled in Parliament in June 2021.

6.    The formal Government response – in the form of an Emissions Reductions Plan [the Plan] – is now due in May 2022, having been delayed from the former release date of 31 December 2021.

7.    However, the Ministry for the Environment has released a consultation document [Te hau mārohi ki anamata Transitioning to a low-emissions and climate-resilient future], to help inform the development of the Emissions Reductions Plan.

8.    In keeping with Council’s submission to the draft advice of the Climate Change Commission in March 2021, officers propose that the Committee makes a high-level submission, as drafted in Appendix 1 to the report.

9.    As submissions need to be received by no later than 26 November 2021 and considering that there is no Council meeting prior to this date, it is proposed that the submission be sent by the Mayor or the Chair of the Climate and Sustainability Committee.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

10.  A climate change impact assessment is not required, as no new initiative or project is proposed. Instead, it is proposed that the Committee makes a submission to the Ministry for the Environment consultation, with a view to encourage strong and clear government action on reducing carbon emissions.

Consultation

11.  As part of the development of our city-wide roadmap, there has been firm support from participants for strong and clear government action on reducing carbon emissions.

Legal Considerations

12.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial Considerations

13.  There are no financial considerations.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Draft submission

24

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: David Burt

Senior Advisor Climate and Sustainability

 

 

 

Author: Jonathan Linders

Advisor Energy and Carbon

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Draft submission

 



                                                                                       1                                                 25 November 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

16 November 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1635)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/5/271

 

Update on Council's solid waste and waste minimisation work

 

Purpose of report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update on various solid waste management and minimisation matters.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the update on various solid waste management and minimisation matters.

 

Background

2.    Council undertakes a range of solid waste management and minimisation initiatives, and this report consolidates information on their status.

3.    However, detailed and regular information on the ongoing development, operation and performance of the Silverstream Landfill is covered in a separate report to the Hutt Valley Services Committee.

Business case regarding the recovery of construction and demolition waste

4.    Hutt City Council has been co-operating with Porirua City Council (PCC) on its work to develop a business case regarding options for the recovery of construction and demolition (C&D) waste. PCC commissioned Morrison Low to undertake this work.

5.    PCC’s work was looking at the potential to use, repurpose and sell resources arising from construction and demolition activities in the wider region, by looking at the establishment of infrastructure to service commercial customers (for example, with skip bin loads to be sorted for increased waste diversion). None of the transfer stations in the region currently cater for significant diversion of materials from this waste stream.

6.    The business case was completed earlier in 2021 and found that establishing a medium scale construction and demolition facility is financially feasible, but there are commercial risks with timber products that do not yet have a completely viable market (eg treated timber).

Procurement for landfill operations and resource recovery park

7.    Hutt City Council has commenced a process to find an experienced and motivated partner to operate Silverstream Landfill and the associated Refuse Transfer Station and Resource Recovery activities with services commencing from early 2023.

Changes at Silverstream transfer station

Resource recovery

8.    Council’s Long Term Plan has funds allocated to make significant changes to the layout of the transfer station at Silverstream Landfill.  Changes are needed to improve upon the current level of service and establish a resource recovery park.  The funding for the resource recovery changes remain subject to the completion of a business case.

9.    However, there are some no-regrets works that are now underway. This includes the construction of a new intersection, which will enable a change to the way waste is loaded out. This will eliminate a significant health and safety risk, by removing a large pit used for loading out waste. Construction is to be completed by March 2022.

Green waste

10.  Since 1 July 2021, green waste is no longer used for landfill cover, and instead is taken to Composting NZ in Kapiti for composting. Based on green waste disposal figures from the last few years, it is likely that about 2,000 tonnes of green waste will be diverted from Silverstream per year.

11.  Note that Hutt City Council’s new opt-in green waste service, with about 5,000 subscriptions at this point, may divert about 1,200 tonnes per year.

Weighing of domestic users of the transfer station

12.  Officers are continuing to work on a change in approach by which vehicles with trailers should be weighed before accessing the transfer station to more accurately reflect actual waste disposed (as opposed to charging based on vehicle type only). This is taking longer than originally expected, as additional preparatory works have had to be implemented, including changes to the kiosk, IT infrastructure, and weigh-station set up. Based on the current programme, weight-based charging may commence in early 2022.

Hazardous waste drop off facility

13.  Officers have been working with Tonkin & Taylor and Waste Management New Zealand (WMNZ) to make significant improvements to the hazardous waste drop-off at Silverstream Transfer Station, including improved material separation and signage, making the site cleaner and more user-friendly. This also covers an increase in staffing to manage the collected materials and to direct users to the correct drop-off locations.

14.  The new drop-off point is now operational, and access to the drop off will be free, albeit only if users bring in only household quantities of hazardous waste and do not bring in any other waste at the same time. For any other waste, regular landfill charges will apply.

15.  Note that Hutt City Council will no longer run an annual hazardous waste collection event and will instead promote the new drop-off point at Silverstream Transfer Station, in conjunction with Upper Hutt City Council (UHCC).

Kerbside Rubbish, Recycling and Green Waste bin service

16.  The kerbside service transition to the bin service is now largely complete and has entered business-as-usual phase, except for the last significant batch of bin exchange requests received after 18 August. There are 980 bin change requests planned and currently being delivered.

17.  We have received an additional 228 bin change requests since 1 October 2021, which are being added on to the current delivery schedule. Any change requests received after 1 October incur a service fee. Residents requesting the change are aware of the service fee.

Kerbside bin service statistics

18.  The below figure shows the amount of material collected in the first few months of the kerbside service, for each service stream. As the service has bedded in, volumes have increased.

19.  With regard to recycling volumes (including glass and mixed recycling) and contamination rates, the below figure shows how the first three months of the new service compares to the last 12 months of the previous service.

20.  The contamination rates for the recycling service are measured by sampling at the processing plant.  For the first few months of the recycling service, the contamination was between 14% and 16%. This is currently above Council’s target, which is less than 10% contamination. (Note: the contamination data for October 2021 is not yet available.  Due to the effects of the COVID-19 lockdown, the August 2021 data was not robust enough for inclusion.)

21.  And finally, the following figure shows the typical composition of the mixed recycling (based on the September 2021 data) that has been collected via the yellow-lid bins. 

22.  In order to reduce contamination, education and behaviour change work is being planned as part of the service getting bedded-in. This includes a bin inspector employed as part of our contract with Waste Management NZ, who inspects bins and their content prior to them being emptied.

23.  The inspector records data at a property level, and leaves feedback at the property by way of green, orange and red tags:

a.   Green tag: no contamination identified, job well done

b.   Orange tag: some contamination identified, household advised of the items wrongly placed in the bin

c.   Red tag: contamination too high; bin is not emptied.

24.  Recycling contamination rates for two territorial authorities (TAs) in the North Island are 14% and 20.5%*, respectively, so our contamination is broadly in line with this. However, one TA in the South Island is at 3.88%, and it has achieved this with a concentrated community engagement exercise for six months to reduce contamination - including education, bin tags and letters to change behaviour.

*TAs sharing the information with us have done so in the spirit of collaboration without being named.

Financial and legal considerations

25.  There are no financial or legal considerations at this time.

Climate change impact and considerations

26.  The work regarding improved resource recovery directly aligns with Council’s desire to reduce emissions at Silverstream Landfill, as it could reduce the amount of organic waste disposed.

27.  The procurement for a new landfill operations contract will have explicit requirements regarding sustainability and the reduction in carbon emissions.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Diljinder Uppal

Solid Waste Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                       1                                                 25 November 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

04 November 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1874)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/5/140

 

Eastern Bays Shared Path - Project Update

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1.       To update the Committee on the Eastern Bays Shared Path Project (the Project).

Recommendations

That the Committee:

 

(1)     notes and receives the report; and

(2)     notes that Council approved the Project to be integrated into the Te Ara Tupua Alliance at its meeting on 1 November 2021.

 

 

Background

2.       In March 2021, the resource consent was initially granted. Although an appeal was lodged, this was resolved in June, meaning the Project is approved to proceed to construction. The Project is now shifting from the consenting stage to the delivery stage.

3.       Total funding currently available to the Project is $30m which includes $15m of Crown Infrastructure Partner (CIP) funding, and $7.5m from Hutt City Council and $7.5M from Waka Kotahi.

4.       Funding for the Project was included in the draft Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021-2031, which went to public consultation in April 2021. Council confirmed funding for the project in the decisions to finalise the LTP 2021-2031.

 

 

Delivery model selection

5.       Council has been exploring delivery model options for construction. The Project team have been planning to start main construction works on the Windy Point and Sunshine Bay sections of the Project in the first quarter of 2022.

6.       The traditional contract approach (NZS 3910 Measure and Value Contract model) and the alliance model have been considered and explored for the construction phase of the Project.

7.       The traditional contract model is usually selected for lower scale (size and value) and low risk projects with low opportunity for design flexibility and innovation. There are minimal programme constraints and stakeholder management issues. The traditional contract model was considered due to the Project’s value (below $50m).

8.       In contrast, the alliance delivery model is a relationship-style arrangement, that brings together the client (owner participant) and one or more parties (non-owner participants) to work together to deliver the project, sharing project risks and rewards. Alliances are usually suited to large scale and high-risk projects, with complex stakeholder issues, difficult environments, social issues, and a need for design flexibility.

9.       Waka Kotahi has recently undergone a robust procurement process for the Te Ara Tupua Project, which identified an alliance delivery model and selected Downer, HEB and Tonkin & Taylor team as its partners to deliver the construction of Ngā Ūranga ki Pito-One section of Te Ara Tupua.

10.     Waka Kotahi selected an alliance delivery model due to the nature of the works involving reclamation and seawalls, working in a highly constrained environment, high value ecology area and managing multiple stakeholder relationships. All these risks support a shared risk delivery model that is flexible and collaborative.

11.     The Eastern Bays Project is very similar in every aspect with the Te Ara Tupua project considering the risks highlighted above, thus there is great opportunity to partner with Waka Kotahi in integrating the Project into the Te Ara Tupua Alliance (the Alliance).

12.     Council approved an alliance delivery model at the Long-Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee at their 1 November 2021 meeting.

Alliance integration and next steps

13.     In July Council and Waka Kotahi signed a Memorandum of Understanding to explore the benefits of integrating the Project into the Alliance. As project best practice, Council requested the Alliance to carry out an independent review of the work to date to ensure that the Project is on the right track to construction delivery.

14.     The Alliance review was carried out in phases. Phase 1 of the integration process was to have an initial high-level review of the Project design, cost, risks, programme and understand the benefits and whether the Project is suitable to be delivered through the Alliance. The Alliance Board confirmed in August that there is great opportunity for integration and recommended to proceed to the next phase. 

15.     Phase 2 of the integration process has completed the following tasks:

a.       complete a design review of the Issue for Tender (IFT) drawings and provide recommendations and plan to get to Issue for Construction (IFC) for Sunshine Bay and Windy Point. Identify risks and forward plan for design of remaining four bays.

b.       explore and investigate value engineering opportunities to mitigate design, cost and constructability risks.

c.       develop a detailed construction methodology and programme.

d.      undertake a detailed parallel estimate and risk quantification for the first two bays and an updated cost estimate to deliver the other four bays.

16.     The Alliance is progressing the designs for the gravity block seawall to develop a robust price and fully understand any consenting and constructability risks. This work will be completed by late November and the Project team will be in a position to present the Alliance’s price proposal to Council to construct the Windy Point and Sunshine Bay sections and a cost estimate for the other four bays.

17.     The Council-Waka Kotahi Agreement will be signed off once the Alliance’s price proposal is accepted by Council. This will enable the Alliance to mobilise and start construction in early 2022.

Climate Change impact and considerations

18.     The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

19.     On 13 October 2021, an extreme weather event resulted in high swells and debris closing off Marine Drive, which cut off access for the Eastbourne community. This type of weather event is expected to continue occurring, which places road users and residents at risk. The existing seawalls and road will also be exposed to further damage if nothing is done, justifying the need to progress the Project as soon as possible.

20.     The Project will help improve the resilience of Marine Drive by replacing the existing seawalls along the route. Although the new seawalls are not a full solution to sea level rise (as the road level will remain the same), they will provide the first step to enabling future adaptation through later upgrades. This approach means that sea level rise can be monitored, and the seawall can be further modified to meet future needs.

21.     In terms of measuring the sustainability performance outcomes of the Project, the Alliance will be utilising the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) Rating Tool.

 

22.     The ISCA rating tool covers:

a.       Management and Policies,

b.       Climate Change,

c.       Resource Efficiency,

d.      Environmental Impacts, Ecology and Waste, and

e.       Community, Heritage and Stakeholder Engagement.

23.     In applying the ISCA tool, the Alliance will be required to document the Project’s performance and submit suitable documentation to the rating tool body for independent assessment.

24.     The assessment is completed at the end of the project (i.e. at the end of the design, end of construction etc.).

25.     Projects are assessed on the level of their performance and the number of credits achieved, earning a final rating. The Alliance is seeking to attain a rating of ‘Excellent.’

26.     The ISCA rating tool is being used on a number of projects across Australia and New Zealand. Examples in New Zealand include the City Rail Link (CRL) in Auckland, the McDougall’s Lift Replacement at Cardrona and the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park.

27.     A CRL example of resource use tracking using the ISCA rating tool is given below.

 

Planning

28.     Draft Management Plans are being progressed to meet requirements of the consent conditions. These are due to Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) and Hutt City Council (HCC) by 10 December 2021 (an extension from the previous due date of 10 September was granted by GWRC and HCC planning officers). 

29.     The Alliance has assumed responsibility for delivering the Landscape and Urban Design Plan and Bay Specific Urban Design Plan. The Project team will be engaging with the community within the coming weeks of November and aims to complete and submit before 10 December 2021 to GWRC and HCC.

30.     The Bird Protection Plan has been completed and submitted to GWRC for certification. The Project team has received comments from GWRC and currently addressing comments and drafting responses.

Consultation

31.     The Project team, through the assistance of the Alliance, carried out the community open day which was well attended on 2 October 2021. The community appreciated the project update and the opportunity to provide feedback on key design elements of the Project. Further community engagement and focussed discussions will be carried by the Project team in line with the Land Use and Urban Design Plan and the Bay Specific Urban Design Plan. 

32.     The Project was also part of a joint iwi engagement hui along with the Te Ara Tupua and Riverlink projects on 19 October 2021 at the Te Tatau O Te Pō Marae in Lower Hutt. This gave the Project the opportunity to consult with iwi and confirm the gifted Maori project name, cultural narrative, and cultural design overlays.

Legal Considerations

33.     There are no legal considerations for this paper from a climate change and sustainability perspective.

Financial Considerations

34.     Council approved the recommendation to delegate to the Chief Executive the authority to enter into an Alliance agreement at its meeting on 1 November 2021.

35.     Council agreed that the approval is limited to the Chief Executive’s delegation for the Project in the Long Term Plan 2021-31.

36.     The updated cost for construction of the first two bays and estimated construction costs for the remaining four bays will be presented to the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee meeting on 16 December 2021.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

Author: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development  


                                                                                       1                                                 25 November 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

02 November 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1634)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/5/272

 

Update on Council's climate change work

 

Purpose of report

1.    Officers provide a regular update on key climate change work in order to implement Council’s organisational carbon target, facilitate a reduction in city-wide emissions, and address climate change impacts.

Recommendation

That the Committee notes the update on various climate change work streams.

Reducing Council’s organisational carbon emissions

Eastbourne summer pool

2.    A contract for the heating plant change has been signed. However, as a result of delays associated with the most recent COVID-19 lockdown, the change will not be completed until early 2022.

Huia Pool

3.    A contract for the heating plant change has been signed. The change is scheduled to be completed in early 2022.

LED street lighting

4.    Between 31 August 2021 and 31 October 2021, 1,790 additional streetlights have been upgraded to LED luminaires. 55% of the city’s streets lights are now LED (7,750 streetlights).

Council’s vehicle fleet

5.    As at 31 October 2021, Council’s vehicle fleet remains at 19 EVs, compared to 31 August 2021. However, total fleet size reduced by one vehicle, down to 69 vehicles, due to the removal of a vehicle with low utilisation. Council’s EV share is now at 28%.

6.    A further three EVs will replace conventional vehicles before Christmas, which will increase Council’s EV share to 32%.

Contracts and procurement

7.    Council contracts a variety of services (eg street cleaning, operating the landfill, etc), and undertakes procurement on a regular basis for its services and capital projects.

8.    Therefore, Council’s procurement function plays a key role in achieving Council’s carbon reduction objectives, by ensuring that in each tender released, our expectations on suppliers to join our carbon reduction effort is clearly outlined both in our messaging and evaluation criteria. There will be carbon reduction targets negotiated with new suppliers and milestones agreed as part of the service delivery, and suppliers will be held accountable for reaching those set carbon reduction targets. Key suppliers will be required contractually to provide Council with their carbon footprint information each year they are under contract with Council.

9.    A recent procurement example is the ‘Maintenance of Reserves’ tender. As well as having a 20% overall weighting for broader outcomes, the messaging within the RFP (and supplier briefing) placed a strong emphasis on our commitments as below:

We support initiatives that protect and enhance the local environment as well as considering global environmental challenges such as climate change.

·    We want suppliers to show how their organisation and operations supports a circular economy in terms of waste minimisation.

·    We want suppliers to show how their organisation can contribute to Council’s target of being Carbon Zero by 2050 and support New Zealand’s carbon reduction commitments, through energy efficiency, use of alternative energy sources and innovative solutions through the supply chain.

·    We want suppliers to recognise their role in supporting and improving biodiversity across the reserves network, through operational practices, innovative supply chain models and promotion of environmental guardianship.

 

10.  Another very important step towards honouring our carbon reduction commitment is to identify all current contracts Council has and the carbon footprint attached to those of significant value; this will enable us to set specific carbon reduction targets that can be included in future tender documents and subsequent contracts.

11.  A project is currently underway (completion date 2nd Quarter 2022) to get in place a contract management system at Council where all contracts are stored and the necessary detail of those contracts captured, this will provide the oversight needed to support this more proactive approach to procurement and contracting.

12.  In the meantime, whilst Council is awaiting the setup of a more robust contract management system, the procurement team is facilitating meetings between the Climate and Solid Waste team and other teams within Council (starting with Transport, being a high emissions area) to roadmap a plan towards gathering key data on the carbon footprint associated with their main contracts and start to build carbon reduction targets into future procurement requirements and subsequent contracts.

Emissions from Silverstream Landfill

13.  LMS Energy has been undertaking a programme of work to improve gas extraction to address shortcomings identified following the installation of the new flare in March 2021. This work has resulted in significant improvements to gas extraction and destruction, as shown in the figure below.

14.  At this stage, and assuming recent gas destruction rates can be maintained, it is likely that Hutt City Council’s landfill emissions liability for 2021 will be significantly lower than in 2020, and close to the minimum liability under the ETS.

15.  However, considering the significant increase in the cost of emission units over the last year (costs have increased to about $65/tCO2-e), Hutt City Council’s ETS costs are higher than in previous years.

Emissions from the closed Wainuiomata Landfill

16.  Council, in its interim Carbon Reduction and Resilience Plan 2021-31, has committed to investigate the feasibility of destroying remaining methane emissions associated with the landfill site.

17.  Investigative work is under way to inform a decision on the viability of a gas collection system and flare. The trial will involve the drilling of five wells into the waste mass, the setup of temporary gas collection pipes, and the installation and operation of a temporary flare to destroy the gas. If viable, more permanent infrastructure would need to be set up, and if a flare was in place by 2022, potentially around 18,000 tCO2-e could be destroyed by 2030.

18.  While this investigation won’t be complete until early to mid-2022, capital investment costs could be in the order of $500,000 to $800,000, with annual operating costs of about $90,000.

19.  Note that the potential addition of a gas collection and destruction system was not included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2023 and additional revenue would be required to fund ongoing costs along with servicing of debt and depreciation if no alternative revenue is identified. However, in order to minimise relying on rates funding, for some costs, Council could consider selling (or borrowing against) its carbon credits that it receives for carbon sequestered on forest land registered under the Emissions Trading Scheme.

Update to Council’s organisational carbon footprint

20.  Whilst Council measures a number of emission sources on an ongoing basis (eg fleet, energy use at facilities, air travel, landfill, etc), Council’s last comprehensive carbon footprint was compiled in 2018, for the 2016/17 year.

21.  Officers have carried out an update to this, and the full report will be available by the end of November 2021. The figure below shows Council’s footprint for 2020/21, with estimated emissions of 61,950 tonnes.

 

22.  In comparison to previous years, Hutt City Council’s net organisational emissions have moderately decreased.  Within the emission profile, some emissions have increased (eg Silverstream Landfill Stage 2), while others have decreased (eg closed landfills, air travel, vehicle fleet).


 

23.  Note that due to a number of changes (eg methodology, scope, emission factors), the results may differ in some cases to data that was previously reported. This includes the carbon footprint report from 2018 (for the financial year 2016/17). Where applicable, emissions data has been recalculated, to ensure consistency.

Reducing city-wide carbon emissions and responding to climate change impacts

Development of a city-wide roadmap

24.  Work on our city-wide roadmap, facilitated by Creative HQ, is now nearing its conclusion, with the draft roadmap document to be completed in December 2021, developed based on the information gathered through our co-design process.

25.  In the context of the current COVID-19 gathering restrictions, the large co-lab originally planned for early November 2021 has had to be cancelled. Instead, the process was adjusted, and has been split into a range of online alignment hui and mini co-labs held in October and November 2021.

Electric vehicle charging stations across Lower Hutt

26.  Over the next 12 months, Council will roll out 20 additional 25kW DC charging stations across Lower Hutt, co-funded by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority.

27.  Charging units are scheduled to be in place at the Seaview Marina by December 2021, with other locations to follow. Prior to the roll-out of charging stations at most other locations, officers will undertake consultation with the community and affected stakeholders.

Climate change risk assessment

28.  Council is collaborating with all the other councils in the Wellington region to develop a regional risk assessment for key climate change impacts. This project will underpin the subsequent regional approach to climate change impacts undertaken by the Wellington Region Climate Change Forum and is carried out as part of the Wellington Regional Growth Framework work programme.

29.  Work is underway to finalise the procurement plan. Following procurement of a suitable consultant, the project is expected to be carried out during the 2022 calendar year.

Climate Change impact and considerations

30.  This report responds directly to the need to reduce carbon emissions, by providing a regular update on Council’s key initiatives. 

31.  The key practical initiatives noted in this report that will positively reduce Council’s carbon footprint include the continued increase in Council’s EV fleet, progress on our workstream to de-carbonise Council facilities, to install LED lights throughout the city and monitoring the reduction of carbon at the landfill.

32.  Council also undertakes work to reduce city-wide emissions for activities where it has little or no direct control, and the development of the city’s road map to zero will play a key role in helping us achieve our objectives.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                       1                                                 25 November 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

29 October 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1574)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/5/141

 

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee Work Programme 2021-2022

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the work programme be received and noted.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Proposed Climate Change and Sustainability Committee work programme 2022

44

    

 

 

 

 

Author: Judy Randall

Democracy Advisor

 

 

Reviewed By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Proposed Climate Change and Sustainability Committee work programme 2022