HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

KOMITI HANGANGA

 Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

 

 

14 September 2021

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 21 September 2021 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

 

Membership

 

 

Cr D Hislop (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr A Mitchell (Deputy Chair)

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY

 

 

INFRASTRUCTURE & REGULATORY COMMITTEE
Membership:		8
Meeting Cycle:		Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:		Half of the members
Membership RMA Hearings:	An independent Commissioner plus a minimum of either 3 or 4 elected members (including the Chair) and alternates who have current certification under the Making Good Decisions Training, Assessment and Certification Programme for RMA Decision-Makers. 
Reports to:		Council

OVERVIEW:

This is an operationally focused committee, overseeing Council’s above and below ground core infrastructure needs, and core regulatory functions. 

The Committee is aligned with the Economy & Development, and Environment & Sustainability, Directorates.

Its areas of focus are:

§  Three waters infrastructure

§  Roading/transport

§  Infrastructure strategy

§  Integrated transport strategy

§  Wharves

§  Environmental consents

§  Regulatory functions including enforcement

PURPOSE:

To deliver quality infrastructure to support healthy and sustainable living, providing efficient and safe transport options, and promoting the city’s prosperity.

To consider matters relating to the regulatory and quasi-judicial responsibilities of the Council under Council’s bylaws and relevant legislation including the following:

§  Building Act 2004

§  Dog Control Act 1996

§  Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987

§  Local Government Act 1974

§  Local Government Act 2002

§  Public Works Act 1981

§  Reserves Act 1977

§  Resource Management Act 1991

§  Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012

DELEGATIONS FOR THE COMMITTEES AREAS OF FOCUS:

§   All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities including the activities outlined below.

§   Develop required strategies and policies. Recommend draft and final versions to Council for adoption where they have a city-wide or strategic focus.

§   Implement, monitor and review strategies and policies.

§   Oversee the implementation of major projects provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§   Oversee budgetary decisions provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

§   Oversee the development and implementation of plans and functions that promote economic wellbeing.

§   Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s Economy & Development Directorate.

§   Undertake the administration of all statutory functions, powers and duties other than those specifically delegated to any other committee or subcommittee, or retained by Council.

§   Conduct any consultation processes required on infrastructure issues before the Committee.

§   Approval and forwarding of submissions.

§   Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

§   The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee. When exercised, the report/minutes of the meeting require a resolution noting that the committee has performed the responsibilities of another committee and the reason/s.

§   If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Communities Committee and/or Climate Change & Sustainability Committee, then the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committees. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

Additional Infrastructure Delegations:

§  Determine roading issues considered by the Mayor and Chief Executive to be strategic due to their significance on a city-wide basis, including links to the State Highway, or where their effects cross ward or community boundaries.

§   

§  Hear objections to specified traffic matters where the community board wishes to take an advocacy role.

§  Make decisions under Clause 11(e) of the Tenth Schedule of the Local Government Act 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965 in respect of temporary road closures, including making decisions on any ancillary matters including, without limitation, approval of temporary “No Stopping” restrictions under Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017. 

§  Undertake hearings on road stopping under the Local Government Act 1974.

§  Make recommendations to Council whether to proceed with a road stopping and the disposal of stopped road, including (where the proposal includes or involves a related acquisition, disposal or land exchange) a recommendation to Council on the acquisition, disposal or exchange.

§  Consider and recommend to Council any request to the Crown that a road is stopped under section 116 of the Public Works Act 1981, and the disposal of the stopped road.

§  Make any resolution required under section 319A of the Local Government Act 1974 regarding the naming of new roads and alterations to street names (other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas).

Additional Regulatory Delegations:

§  Develop any regulations required to achieve Council’s objectives.

§  Approve Council’s list of hearings commissioners under the Resource Management Act 1991, including councillors sitting as hearings commissioners and independent commissioners.

§  Conduct statutory hearings on regulatory matters and make decisions on those hearings2, excluding those conducted under the Resource Management Act 1991, which are delegated to the Hearings Subcommittee and District Plan Hearings Subcommittee.

§  Authorise the submission of appeals to the Environment Court on behalf of Council.

§  Make decisions on applications required under the Development Contributions Policy for remissions, postponements, reconsiderations and objections.  

§  Recommend to Council the list of members approved to be members of the District Licensing Committee under section 192 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

Delegations to make Appointments:

§  The Chair of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, is authorised to appoint a subcommittee of suitably qualified persons to conduct hearings on behalf of the Committee.

§  The Chair of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, is authorised to appoint a Hearings Subcommittee of suitably qualified persons to conduct resource consent and related hearings on behalf of the Committee.

§  The Chair of the Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee is authorised to appoint three people from the list prepared under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 to specific meetings (Chair and two members).

NOTE:

The Ministry for the Environment advocates that Councils offer specialist RMA training in areas of law which are difficult to grasp or where mistakes are commonly made. This is to complement the Good Decision Making RMA training that they run (which is an overview and basic summary of decision making, rather than an in-depth training in specific areas of the RMA). Therefore in order to facilitate this, the RMA training run for councillors that wish to be hearings commissioners is mandatory.

Reasons for the importance of the training:

1.   Hearings commissioners are kept abreast of developments in the legislation.

2. Legal and technical errors that have been made previously are avoided (many of which have resulted in Environment Court action which is costly, time consuming and often creates unrealistic expectations for the community).

3. The reputation of Council as good and fair decision makers or judges (rather than legislators) is upheld.

1            When acting in this capacity the committee has a quasi-judicial role.

 

 


 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Hanganga | Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Tuesday 21 September 2021 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

4.       Proposed New Private Street Names: Subdivision of 201D, 203E, 203B Miromiro Road and 7 Stratton Street, Normandale (21/1314)

Report No. IARCC2021/4/212 by the Subdivision Engineer                               9

Chair’s RecommendationS:

“That the Committee:

 

(1) approves a name for the proposed Private Way 1 attached as Appendix 1    to the report as Koukou Place;

 

(2) approves a name for the proposed Private Way 2 attached as Appendix 1    to the report as Huhu Rise; and

 

(3) approves a name for the proposed Private Way 3 attached as Appendix 1    to the report as Wētā Way.”

 


 

5.       Proposed Road Closure(s) - Hutt Valley Motorsport Club - Port Road Sprints 2021/22 (21/1419)

Report No. IARCC2021/4/213 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations 19

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

6.       Proposed Road Closure(s) - Cam County (Inc) Wellington - Port Road Drags 2021 (21/1409)

Report No. IARCC2021/4/214 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations 29

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

7.       Information Items

a)      Three Waters Update (21/1413)

Report No. IARCC2021/4/215 by the Strategic Advisor                         38

          Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

b)      Regulatory Matters Report (21/1385)

Report No. IARCC2021/4/216 by the Head of Regulatory Services       47

          Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

c)       Infrastructure and Regulatory Work Programme (21/1379)

Report No. IARCC2021/4/120 by the Democracy Advisor                     72

          Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 


 

8.       QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.   

 

 

 

 

 

Toi Lealofi

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR     


                                                                                       9                                                21 September 2021

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

16 August 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1314)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/4/212

 

Proposed New Private Street Names: Subdivision of 201D, 203E, 203B Miromiro Road and 7 Stratton Street, Normandale

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The report seeks approval for appropriate street names for the three private ways of the subdivision at no.201D, 203E, 203B Miromiro Road and 7 Stratton Street, Normandale.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   approves a name for the proposed Private Way 1 shown on the plan attached as Appendix 1 to the report, as suggested below:

(a)    “Koukou”, recommended road type “Place”; or

(b)    an alternate name from the developer’s list of suggestions; or

(c)    an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

(d)    an appropriate name tabled during the meeting; and

(e)    approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report;

(2)   approves a name for the proposed Private Way 2 shown on the plan attached as Appendix 1 to the report, as suggested below:

a)   “Huhu”, recommended road type “Rise”; or

b)   an alternate name from the developer’s list of suggestions; or

c)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

d)   an appropriate name tabled during the meeting; and

e)   approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report;

(3)   approves a name for the proposed Private Way 3 shown on the plan attached as Appendix 1 to the report, as suggested below:

a)   “Wētā”, recommended road type “Way”; or

b)   an alternate name from the developer’s list of suggestions; or

c)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

d)   an appropriate name tabled during the meeting; and

e)   approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

These recommendations are made so the development may proceed to completion as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require formalised street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

 

Background

2.    The subdivision of this site creates 12 residential lots and one balance lot, 12 gaining access off 3 private ways off Miromiro Road and one off Stratton Street.

3.    The responsibility for naming new roads within Lower Hutt lies with the Community Boards or with the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee for areas of the city not represented by Community Boards.

4.    In this case the naming for the proposed road lies with the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee.

Discussion

5.    Considering the fact that “Miromiro” is a Māori bird name, the developer has followed this theme and submitted the following bird/insect names for consideration for the three private ways. Names are listed in order of preference for Private Way 1-3 respectively with one additional suggestion.

a)   Koukou Place
The call of the ruru/morepork, a native owl common throughout Aotearoa in wooded areas including suburbs, roosting by day and active at night. Rurus have frequented the site in the 20 years the developers have lived in the property, roosting in trees at the edge of the boundary, often very loudly heard.

b)   Huhu
Huhu beetles are in abundance on the property.

 

c)   Wētā
Wētā are in abundance on the property.

d)   Torotoro
Māori nickname for the miromiro bird.

6.    Above names meet the requirements of AS/NZS 4819:2011, and have been checked and verified by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) and are acceptable to be used.

7.    Several other suggestions were made namely Ruru, Makomako, and Korimako but were not accepted by LINZ due to existing street names within the 25km threshold.

Options

8.    Options for the naming of the Private Ways 1-3 are:

a)   “Koukou”

b)   “Huhu”

c)   “Wētā

d)   “Torotoro”

e)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name List, attached as Appendix 2; or

f)    an alternate name tabled during the meeting.

9.    Road Types recommended for these private ways are:

a)   Place; or

b)   Rise; or

c)   Way; or

d)   an appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3.

 

10.  If an alternate name is tabled during the meeting, it can be considered for use but will be subject to meeting the requirements of AS/NZS 4819:2011 and gaining LINZ approval. An appropriate backup name must also be recommended in case the alternate name is deemed not suitable.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

11.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

12.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions, and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience. 

 

Consultation

13.  As is normal with the naming of private ways, consultation has been limited to the relevant committee, developer and their community network.

14.  Council’s Principal Māori Advisor has been consulted on the suitability of the names and is satisfied with the suggestions.

15.  The developer has also approached Normandale Residents Association when researching suitable names.

Legal Considerations

16.  The Committee has the delegated responsibility to name the private road.

17.  The new street name is required as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require individual street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

Financial Considerations

18.  There are no financial considerations. The developer is responsible for the necessary street name signs. This will be undertaken by Council’s contractor with the cost paid by the developer.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Subdivision of 201D, 203E, 203B Miromiro Road - Street Naming

13

2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Name List

14

3

Appendix 3 - Extract of Permitted Road Types

17

 

 

Author: Threesa Malki

Subdivision Engineer

 

 

Reviewed By: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

Reviewed By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Subdivision of 201D, 203E, 203B Miromiro Road - Street Naming

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Reserved Street Name List

 


 


 


Attachment 3

Appendix 3 - Extract of Permitted Road Types

 


 


                                                                                      23                                               21 September 2021

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

02 September 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1419)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/4/213

 

Proposed Road Closure(s) - Hutt Valley Motorsport Club - Port Road Sprints 2021/22

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committees approval for the temporary closure of sections of Hutt City Council controlled roads to facilitate the running of the 2021/22 Hutt Valley MotorSport Club - Port Road Sprints.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   notes and receives the report;

(2)   agrees to temporarily close the following sections of road on both Sunday 24 October 2021, and Sunday 23 January 2022, between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm to facilitate the running of the Hutt Valley Motor Sport Club Port Road Sprint events, subject to the conditions listed in the Traffic Impact Report attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

(a)        Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(b)        Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(c)        Meachen Street, Seaview
(the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report; and


(d)        Barnes Street, Seaview
                        (the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and                               Wareham Place), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(3)   agrees to temporarily close the following sections of road (if required) on Monday 25 October 2021 and/or Monday 24 January 2022  between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm for the reserve days associated with the Hutt Valley Motor Sport Club, Port Road Sprint events (subject to the conditions listed in the Traffic Impact Report attached as Appendix 2;

(a)        Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(b)        Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(c)        Meachen Street, Seaview
(the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report; and

(d)       Barnes Street, Seaview
(the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and Wareham Place), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(4)   agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the running of the Hutt Valley Motor Sport Club, Port Road Sprint events on both Sunday 24 October 2021, and Sunday 23 January 2022, (including reserve days – if required), between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm, and impose ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions on the following sections of road;

(a)        Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(b)        Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(c)        Meachen Street, Seaview
(the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(d)       Barnes Street, Seaview
(the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and Wareham Place), as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report; and

(5)   notes that recommendations in this report should not be amended   without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties and         verification from the Council’s Traffic Engineering Manager that the amendment are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic.
For the following reasons:

1.    that the proposed temporary road closures are necessary to accommodate the safe and efficient running of the event for organisers, participants, spectators and the general public; and

2.    that road closures of this type are required to be approved by the Committee in line with Schedule 10, Clause 12 of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Background

2.    The Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for both public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, the Committees approval is required.

3.    Council officers received an application from the Hutt Valley Motor Sport Club for approval to hold their annual Seaview sprint events, which involves the temporary closure of sections of Port Road, Toop Street, Meachen Street, and Barnes Street.

a.   These are annual events, which have been running for a number of years.

b.   Details of the proposed temporary closures and the expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendices 1 and 2 to this report.

4.    At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures, including the required communication and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

6.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

7.    A Council Officer, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable as follows:

a.   The proposed closures, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by Motor Sport NZ), are not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably.
This year as with last, additional focus is being placed on the efficient and safe management of both parking associated with, and spectators attending the event.



8.    The authority to approve requests for road closures is made under Schedule 10, clause 11e, of the Local Government Act 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965. This authority is delegated to the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee.

Options

9.    The Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee have to option to;

a.   approve the proposed temporary road closures (including reserve days) and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions as they appear in this report.

b.   approve the proposed temporary road closures (including reserve days) and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions as they appear in this report, and add additional, or revise existing conditions within the Traffic Impact Report associated with this event.

c.   amend and/or defer the Committee’s decision to the Council meeting on 12 October 2021

10.  Officers recommend Option a, as the traffic effects of the event can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

11.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

12.  The proposed motorsport event will increase city wide greenhouse gas emissions to an unknown extent. The contribution to greenhouse gas emissions will be limited by the short term nature of the event.

13.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate. 

Consultation

14.  A public notice advising that Council is proposing to consider the above closure was published in the Hutt News on Tuesday 31 August 2021 – At the time of writing this report, no objections had been received.

Legal Considerations

15.  Approval is required from either Council or the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of both the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965 for the temporary closure of roads within its jurisdiction.


Financial Considerations

16.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. These events are deemed to be commercial in nature.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Event Aerial

24

2

Appendix 2 - Traffic Impact Report - Port Road Sprints

25

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

Reviewed By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Event Aerial

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Traffic Impact Report - Port Road Sprints

 

Hutt City Council homeAppendix 2

 

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure Impact Report:

Hutt Valley MotorSport Club Port Road Sprints 2021/22
- Port Road - Seaview
- Toop Street - Seaview
- Meachen Street - Seaview
- Barnes Street - Seaview

1.       Description of Event

The Hutt Valley Motor Sport Club has applied to temporarily close;

(a)        Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection),

(b)        Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road),

(c)        Meachen Street, Seaview
(the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road), and

(d)          Barnes Street, Seaview
(the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and Wareham Place), on  Sunday 24 October 2021, and Sunday 23 January 2022 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm for the Annual Seaview (Port Road) Sprints.

The event has the following reserve days;

Monday 25 October 2021 and Monday 24 January 2022 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm

This event is sanctioned by Motor Sport NZ.

 

2.       Council Promotions and Events Team

The City Promotions and Events provided the following comment;

Port Road Sprints

The Port Road Sprints is a well-run event for car enthusiasts. It provides an opportunity for the Hutt Valley Motor Sport Club and its amateur drivers to test themselves on the road in a safe environment. The Sprints are held in the Seaview industrial area twice yearly on weekend or public holiday dates to lessen the impact on local business.

The event delivers social benefits to members of the Motor Sport community and some economic benefits by way of their vehicle up-keep, local contractor services required and a modest event crowd who visit the City and their associated local retail spend. The economic return is estimated to be $50,000 for the city.

3.       Public Notice

The public notice advising that the Council is proposing to consider this closure was published in the Hutt News on Tuesday 31 August 2021.

 

4.       Consultation

This event has the requirement of the event organiser providing proof of consultation prior to the report being presented to the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee.
The consultation for this event will be presented to the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee in September 2021.
Details of all consultation received will be presented as part of the report to Regulatory Committee meeting in September 2021.

As at the date of writing this report, the organisers have gained the signatures of directly affected businesses on Marchbank, Toop, Meachen and Barnes Streets, along with Port Road.

 

5.        Traffic Impact Assessment

Prior Closures

The proposed closure will not result in the road being closed for an aggregate of more than 31 days in any year as set down in Schedule 10, Section 11e of the Local Government Act 1974.

Traffic Impact

In the opinion of Charles Agate, Acting Traffic Engineering Manager, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, the proposed closure, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan, and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by MotorSport NZ), the proposed closures are not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably, subject to the conditions listed below.
This event has become well established within the Seaview area and appears to be generally well accepted by the local retail and commercial businesses who accept the traffic effects as a reasonable trade-off for the benefits provided by the event.
This year (as with last) there is additional focus on the efficient and safe management of parking associated with, and spectators attending the event.
The successful running of the event requires a high level of communication / advertising prior to and during the closures.  
It is noted that the Council reserves the right to modify this opinion at any time.

6.        Conditions of Closure
Subsequent to approval, the applicant will be notified of the decision, and if approved, required to adhere to the following conditions;

·    The access requirements of residents, businesses, emergency services must be taken into account, with suitable policies and procedures documented.

·    The event is to be run in accordance with the MotorSport NZ guidelines and rules.

·    The insurance requirements (as set out in the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965) and MotorSport NZ a met a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled commencement of the event and copies provided to the Councils’ Traffic Engineer.

·    The organiser, in conjunction with Councils’ Road and Transport Division will arrange for an inspection of the road surface prior to, and after the event. Any significant defects resulting from the event shall be repaired by the Council, at the full cost of the applicants.

·    Appropriate notification is to be provided to regular users of Port Road and its surrounds. This will include (but not limited to);

Road Closure Notification Boards to be installed at all closure points a minimum of 14 days prior to the event,

Notification to local Resident Associations of the event, with relevant contact numbers for organisers and on the ground staff.

Signs clearly indicating Port Road is closed to through traffic be erected at its intersections with Marine Drive, Barnes Street and in Port Road adjacent to the Seaview roundabout, and in Meachen Street.

Keeping those businesses directly affected by the closures up-to-date with any changes in a timely manner.

·    Provision of marshals (permanently throughout the event) at every closure point along the entire circuit to provide crowd control.

·    Ensure that adequate radio communication is established from all controlled closure points to the central control.

·    That the applicants comply fully with the directions of the Police to cancel or suspend all events if in the Police’s opinion public safety measures are inadequate or any of the foregoing conditions are not being complied with. All events are to remain suspended until the Police are satisfied the public safety measures are adequate and the foregoing conditions are being complied with.

·    The applicant will act as directed by the Police or by officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The applicant shall allow access for all emergency vehicles

·    The event organiser must apply for a Corridor Access Request (CAR) via Submitica (www.submitica.com) no less than 30 days prior to the event

·    The event organiser must provide to Council a compliant Temporary Traffic Management Plan (TTMP) prepared by a suitably qualified person and be appropriate for both the level of road and the nature of the closure, no less than 30 days prior to the event.

·    All Temporary Traffic Management (TTM) must comply with NZTA’s Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM) and any conditions set down by Councils’ Corridor Manager and/or Traffic Management Coordinator (TMC)

·    The event organiser must gain both CAR and TTMP Approvals a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled event date to ensure the event can proceed.

·    All TTM is to be installed by suitably qualified personnel, under the supervision of a NZTA qualified Site Traffic Management Supervisor (STMS).   

·    The closure is restricted to the roads,  dates and hours as approved by Council.

·    The event organiser must have a valid Health and Safety plan which details how emergency vehicles can gain access to the closure area during the event.

·    The event organiser is required to comply with the directions of both the Police and authorised officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The event organiser is responsible for the management of all work relating to the physical closure of roads and maintaining both the closure and public safety within the closure area.

·    The event organiser is responsible for ensuring closed roads are left in a suitably clean and tidy state following the completion of the event.

 


                                                                                      32                                               21 September 2021

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

01 September 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1409)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/4/214

 

Proposed Road Closure(s) - Cam County (Inc) Wellington - Port Road Drags 2021

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committees approval for the temporary closure of sections of Hutt City Council controlled roads to facilitate the running of the 2021 Port Road Drags.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(1)   notes and receives the report;

(2)   agrees to temporarily close the following sections of road on Sunday 28 November 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm to facilitate the running of the 2021 Port Road Drags event, subject to the conditions listed in the Traffic Impact Report attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

(a)        Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection)
As shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(b)        Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road)
As shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(3)   agrees to temporarily close the following sections of road (if required) on Sunday 5 December 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm for the reserve day associated with the 2021 Port Road Drags event (subject to the conditions listed in the Traffic Impact Report attached as Appendix 2 to the report;

 

(a)        Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection)
As shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(b)        Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road)
As shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(4)   agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the running of 2021 Port Road Drags event on either day (as required), and impose ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions on the following sections of road;

(a)        Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection)
As shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report;

(b)        Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road)
As shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report; and

(5)   notes that recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties and verification from the Council’s Traffic Engineering Manager that the amendment are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic.

For the following reasons:

1.    That the proposed temporary road closures are necessary to accommodate the safe and efficient running of the event for organisers, participants, spectators and the general public; and

2.    That road closures of this type are required to be approved by the Committee in line with Schedule 10, Clause 12 of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Background

2.    The Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for both public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, the Committees approval is required.

3.    Council officers received an application from Cam County (Inc.) for approval to hold their annual drag event which involves the temporary closure of sections of Port Road and Toop Street in Seaview.

a.   This is an annual event, which has been running for over 40 years.

b.   Details of the proposed temporary closures and the expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendices 1 and 2 to this report.

4.    At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures, including the required communication and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

6.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

7.    A Council Officer, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable as follows:

a.   The proposed closures, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by NZHRA), are not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably.
This year as with last, additional focus is being placed on the efficient and safe management of both parking associated with, and spectators attending the event.

8.    The authority to approve requests for road closures is made under Schedule 10, clause 11e, of the Local Government Act 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965. This authority is delegated to the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee.

Options

9.    The Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee have to option to;

a.   approve the proposed temporary road closures (including reserve days) and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions as they appear in this report.

b.   approve the proposed temporary road closures (including reserve days) and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions as they appear in this report, and add additional, or revise existing conditions within the Traffic Impact Report associated with this event.

c.   amend and/or defer the Committee’s decision to the Council meeting on 12 October 2021

10.  Officers recommend Option a, as the traffic effects of the event can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

11.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

12.  The proposed motorsport event will increase city wide greenhouse gas emissions to an unknown extent. The contribution to greenhouse gas emissions will be limited by the short term nature of the event.

13.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate. 

Consultation

14.  A public notice advising that Council is proposing to consider the above closure was published in the Hutt News on Tuesday 31 August 2021 – At the time of writing this report, no objections had been received.

Legal Considerations

15.  Approval is required from either Council or the Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of both the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965 for the temporary closure of roads within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

16.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. These events are deemed to be commercial in nature.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Road Closure Aerial

33

2

Appendix 2 - Port Rd Drags - Traffic Impact Report - 2021

34

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

Reviewed By: Jon Kingsbury

Head of Transport

 

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Road Closure Aerial

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Port Rd Drags - Traffic Impact Report - 2021

 


 


 


 

 


                                                                                      41                                               21 September 2021

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

01 September 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1413)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/4/215

 

Three Waters Update

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report provides an update on Three Waters activities including the capital works programme and specific operating work programmes of interest.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives the report and notes its contents.

 

Background

2.    Wellington Water Limited (WWL) provides Council with regular updates on capital and operating projects and programmes currently funded.  These are summarised in the following paragraphs.

2021/22 Capex Programme

3.    The total programmed budget for 2021/22 for the three waters is $38.6 M including carry-overs.  At the Council briefing on 18 August 2021, WWL indicated that it would be aiming to deliver the capital works programme across the region on a stepped-up basis over the next three years, noting that investment in three waters infrastructure by Councils across the region had increased significantly.  WWL has planned to increase resources on a graduated basis and review delivery processes to help meet this challenge.

4.    WWL indicated that the likely spend able to be achieved this financial year on HCC’s capex programme would be in the range of $28M to $34M. The HCC Programme has two big delivery risks:

a.   The Barber Grove Trunk Main Duplication - a complex major project.

b.   A large number of individual renewal projects which are complex and resource heavy.

5.    The latest COVID-19 lockdown will have had an impact on the programme as under level 4 restrictions all HCC capex projects were halted. Those projects that have the required resources in place to manage working safely have been re-started under level 3 restrictions.

6.    WWL has two separate teams managing the CAPEX programme. The first is the Major Projects team which is responsible for four large projects, being:

a.   Barber Grove to Seaview WWTP Wastewater Trunk Main

b.   Seaview WWTP Wastewater Overflow Discharge (including storage tank)

c.   New Hutt City Central Storage Reservoir (Summit Road)

d.   Petone Collector Sewer

7.    The Major Projects Team also has oversight of the Human Health Mitigation Projects, including Knowing Your Pipes.

8.    The projects managed by this team typically require a number of years to plan and implement.  The following tables show the planned timing of the stages of the projects and some commentary from WWL on progress.

 

9.    The Project Management Office looks after all the other CAPEX works, typically being the annual renewal programme of works.

10.  Overall WWL is projecting at 31 August 2021, an end of year forecast spend of $31.1M.  Actual year to date is $1.9M against a year to date budget of $3.05M. The spend profile ramps up in the second half of the year. The following table provides a summary of the status of the work programme.

 

Critical Assets Assessments

11.  Attached as Appendix 1 to the report is a summary of the results of work done to date on assessing very high criticality assets (VHCA).  The attachment shows the progress of the assessments in two stages being desktop and physical inspection.  All desktop inspections have been completed. 

12.  The physical inspections of wastewater and stormwater pipes, with 138 kilometres to inspect, are behind programme and not expected to be completed until the end of the financial year.  The physical inspections of other asset groups have been completed or are almost complete. At this time no issues that require immediate action have been discovered.

13.  The 1km of critical drinking water pipe, is made up of six key reservoir outlets or railway crossings. The reason why this number overall is so low is due to the amount of built in redundancy in the drinking water network – typically, if a pipe outage occurs WWL can simply re-route water from another location, therefore reducing the impact (and therefore criticality) of the pipe overall. The above six lengths of pipe are the exception, and so need extra attention paid to them. The pipes rated in very poor condition (two sites) are at an age that is greater than their expected lifespan based on their pipe materials. An assessment of when they will be renewed will be undertaken once information from a detailed inspection recently completed as been analysed. The majority of VHCA water pipes across the region are from the Greater Wellington Regional Council bulk network.

14.  The reservoir scoring is based on structural condition. A rating of poor structural condition indicates that intervention is required within the next 10 years. The two reservoirs in poor structural condition are Delaney Reservoir and Naenae Reservoir. Naenae Reservoir has funding within the LTP for its upgrade, with work planned to take place early next year. Now that WWL has the condition grading for Delaney it will be identifying over the next few months works required to upgrade.

Knowing Your Pipes Programme

15.  Attached as Appendix 2 to the report is a summary of the work undertaken across the city under the banner of this programme. The programme is currently operating in Wainuiomata as well as testing in other parts of the City. The initial sub-catchment testing has been completed.  Priority areas have been identified and smoke and dye testing and CCTV inspections undertaken,  WWL is awaiting results of testing and will first liaise with HCC to finalise personalised communications before it makes known results to individual property owners.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  Wellington Water’s work program of work, as described in this report, creates resilience to climate change effects for Lower Hutt.

Financial Considerations

17.  The Capex budget is likely to be underspent at year end in line with WWL advice.

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Very High Criticality Asset Assessments  31 August 2021

42

2

Appendix 2: Knowing Your Pipes Update August 2021

46

 

Author: Bruce Hodgins

Strategic Advisor

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Very High Criticality Asset Assessments  31 August 2021

 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Knowing Your Pipes Update August 2021

 


                                                                                      56                                               21 September 2021

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

27 August 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1385)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/4/216

 

Regulatory Matters Report

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update of regulatory matters arising from the work of the Environment and Sustainability Group.

 

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the information.

 

Background

2.  The report covers the regulatory activities associated with the teams in the Environment and Sustainability Group. In particular, the Regulatory Services and Resource Consents teams.

 

3.  Relevant consents data is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

 

4.  The Regulatory Services team process applications under the Food Act, the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act and the Building Act (building consents, liquor and food licences and District Licensing reports), trade waste applications, bylaws, animal services, and parking services.

 

5.  The Resource Consents team processes consent applications under the Resource Management Act.

 

6.  Environmental Health services are provided for Upper Hutt as well as Lower Hutt.

 

7.  Animal Services are provided for Wellington as well as Lower Hutt.

 

Resource Consents

8.  The rush of applications to meet the 30 June deadline for the previous Development Contributions Policy has resulted in a significant backlog with 36 Resource Consents yet to be allocated for processing (as of 27.08.21).  We also continue to receive the normal number of business as usual applications since 1 July.  With 34 applications received in July and 33 in August.  This is despite level 4 lockdown.

 

9.  In July we issued 32 consents and in August we issued 26 consents.

 

10.  Resource consents over statutory timeframes: of the resource consents mentioned above, 11 in July and 6 in August were issued beyond the statutory timeframe of 20 working days.  All of these resource consents were subdivision consents.

 

11.  Riverlink: The resource consent applications for Riverlink were lodged on 3rd August 2021.  These will be jointly processed with Greater Wellington Regional Council.  The application was publically notified on 25th August 2021.  Submissions close on 22nd September 2021, with a hearing planned to start 24th November 2021.  Consent information is available online here: https://haveyoursay.gw.govt.nz/riverlink-consent

 

12.  Notable resource consents lodged:

·    55 Britannia Street, Petone (UPL additions and alterations of existing social housing)

·    252 Wise Street, Wainuiomata (34 houses)

·    116 Trelawney Road, Wainuiomata (14 houses)

·    76 Antrim Crescent, Wainuiomata (14 houses)

·    48  Udy Street, Petone (30 Townhouses)

·    1 Milne Crescent, Taita (17 Units - Williams Corporation)

·    79 Marsden Street, Melling (New Childcare Centre)

·    33 Treadwell Street, Naenae (demolition and earthworks Naenae Pool)

·    5 Macky Street, Taita (29 units - Williams Corporation).

13.  Recently granted resource consents:

·   370 Stokes Valley Road, Stokes Valley – 17 townhouses

·   18 Gear Street, Petone – Bar

·   10 Biddle Crescent, Taita (30 townhouses – Williams Corporation)

·   Seaview Wharf Renewal

14.  RMA compliance updates

·    Wainuiomata Cleanfill

All the latest compliance related information is now available online here http://www.huttcity.govt.nz/Services/Rubbish-and-recycling/cleanfill/

 

·    A correction needs to be made to the last regulatory committee report which noted that no complaints were received in April – June 2021. It appears that two complaints were received about sediment being tracked onto the road.  In both cases our call centre logged them directly to Intergroup, who promptly sent out a road sweeper to clean the road.  The compliance team were not made aware of the complaints at the time.  We have now set up a process with the call centre to ensure the compliance team is made aware of all complaints in relation to the Cleanfill.  These two complaints have been added to the online portal.

·    In July/August we received four complaints as detailed below.

Confirm #

Received 

Actioned

Complaint 

Action taken

529698

20/07/2021

20/07/2021

Wheel wash not being used correctly. Trucks don't "stand" when wheel wash is being used

E-mail to Head of Climate and Solid Waste which was escalated to operator. Operator advised all companies to use wheel wash properly. 

529699

20/07/2021

20/07/2021

Banging of tail gate on truck

Email to Head of Climate and Solid Waste which was escalated to operator. Operator advised all companies where tail gates bang will be banned after warning.

533294

12/08/2021

12/08/21

Truck movements exceeded by five each way on 31 May 2021

Email sent to Head of Climate and Solid Waste advising an infringement notice to be issued for breach of the number of trucks in one day (condition 9).  I also note that the regulator was not advised of the breach within 24 hours being a breach of condition 4.

533998

19/08/2021

19/08/2021

Cleanfill operating outside of consented hours on 27 May 2021.

Call, text and email to Head of Climate and Solid Waste to follow up with operator what time they started up and finished on 27 May 2021. Evidence provided that they operated <10mins past closing time.  Warning issued.

 

·    Acoustic Engineering Services (AES) were employed by the consent holder to undertake noise monitoring from 29 June – 6th July.  This report was peer-reviewed by Marshal Day on behalf of the regulator and determined that the site was compliant with the noise limits in Condition 12.

·    The independent audit was undertaken in August by The Catalyst Group.  The report is available online.  The report concludes:

The Appendix provides a full assessment of compliance with each consent condition. This assessment has found the consent holder to be non-compliant with Conditions 12 and 15 relating to noise exceedances and the Noise Management Plan (“NMP”), as well as conditions 4 and 9 relating to truck numbers. The consent holder is compliant with all remaining conditions, although some require attention to ensure ongoing compliance.”

 

Building Consents

 

15.  There were 1,798 building consent applications received in the 2020/2021 fiscal year, 80 more than the previous year. In the same period, the total value of work received was $494M, a massive $96M more than the previous year, being a 24% increase.

16.  The table below shows the comparison between the number of consents received and the total value of work over the last three years:

Year

Number of consents

Total value of work

2020/21

1,798

$494,858,084

2019/20

1,718

$398,928,740

2018/19

1,617

$370,257,421

 

17.  In the current year the total number of building consent applications received for July and August is 247, with a total value of work of $72M compared to the same period last year, when we received 373 applications at $117M.

18.  The number of building inspections completed has seen a sustained increase. The graph below shows each month since February 2021 has been consistently higher compared to previous years.

 

 

 

19.  The forecast is that inspection numbers will remain high in the coming months as a result of the high volume of consents being received and granted.

 

20.  The building team responded positively and transitioned smoothly during the Covid lockdown. Building consents were being processed by officers set up to work from home and inspectors were ready to respond to essential inspections. Learnings were taken from previous lockdowns and Council’s Information Technology team provided support during this time.  

 

21.  Building consent applications for processing and inspection numbers remained high prior to the latest Covid lock down, we continue to employ the services of contractors in order to keep up with the work load and ensure we meet our statutory timeframes.

 

22.  The building team continues to work on improvements to complement our BCA accreditation processes. One of these projects is creating a digital consenting framework for processing consents and carrying out inspections. This project kicked off with a focus on optimising processes to ensure we are taking a holistic approach to the improvements that will be implemented.

 

23.  The Building Officials Institute of New Zealand (BOINZ) held their annual conference in Wellington in August. Unfortunately the scheduled three day conference was cut short due to the announcement of a new community case of Covid 19.

 

24.  At the conference, there was a common concern shared amongst Council officers across the country regarding resourcing and the shortage of skilled building officers, particularly given the rampant property development market and increasing workloads.

 

25.  Due to a change in the building code in November 2019, based on liquefaction prone ground, the learnings from the Canterbury earthquakes, and subsequent recommendations made by the Royal Commission of Inquiry, Council is required to review our regional liquefaction hazard information and local seismicity. The process is underway to develop this information and mapping.

 

 

 

Notable Building Consents Received

 

·    Queensgate Mall: Events Cinema, fit out works to new cinema complex and to existing foyer/ticketing, $11.8 M.

 

·    124 Richmond Street, Petone: Housing, stage 1 including two blocks of multi-residential units and refuse room (5 x two bedroom units, 10 x three bedroom units) $4M.

 

·    124 Richmond Street, Petone: Housing, stage 1 single block of multi-residential units (2 x two bedroom units, 6 x three bedroom units) $2.1M.

 

·    16 Bowers Street, Wainuiomata: Housing, multi-residential dwellings comprising of 6 x three bedroom townhouses, $3.3M.

 

·    3 Best Street, Wainuiomata: Housing, 3 x two storey blocks of multi-unit dwellings and 9 x two bedroom units, $1.5M.

 

·    34 Hewer Cresent, Naenae: Housing, multi-residential dwellings 4 x two bedroom semi-detached townhouses, $870K.

 

·    34 Hewer Cresent, Naenae: Housing, multi-Residential dwellings - 6 x three bedroom townhouses, $477K.

 

Earthquake Prone Building

 

26.  We are continuing to receive a steady stream of building consents for seismic strengthening work. There have also been a number of seismic strengthening projects completed across the city. 

 

27.  Recent consents approved for seismic strengthening:

·    1 Meachen Street, Seaview - Certificate of Acceptance for seismic strengthening a mechanical workshop to 100% of new building standard (NBS)

·    Riverleigh residential care home, 1 Connolly Street, Boulcott – Seismic strengthening including additional steel frames to 67%NBS.

 

Swimming Pools

 

28.  We have carried out 25 pool barrier inspections in the period 1 July to 31 August 2021. No inspections were carried out during Covid 19 levels 3 and 4. We are on target to complete inspection of pools in Lower Hutt within the three yearly cycle. We have a small number on non-compliant pools and are working with the property owners to resolve the issues that have been identified.

 

Environmental Health Team

Alcohol

29.  Compliance Visits/Controlled Purchase Operations (CPO)

Licensed premises compliance checks were undertaken during July.

Contested Applications

30.  The hearing for the renewal of the off licence for Thirsty Liquor held in May has not yet been determined by the District Licencing Committee (DLC).

31.  The application for a new on licence for the Abandoned Brewery, Boulcott has been withdrawn. The application raised some opposition from members of the public and there were building upgrades that needed to be made in order to comply with the building code.

Granting and Issuing of Licences

32.  Due to Covid 19, the NZ Police and the Public Health Service have continued to focus their resources on Covid and contact tracing.

33.  As previously reported, on 16 April 2020 Parliament passed an immediate modification order, extending the time frames within which agencies must report on all applications.

34.  That order has again been amended, extending the time frame for reporting by the agencies to 30 working days after 20th September 2021, being 1st November 2021.

35.  This means that the District Licensing Committee are unable to issue new liquor licences, or renew existing licenses without reports from the New Zealand Police and the Medical Officer of Health (MoH).

36.  There are currently six applications unable to be processed further, due to reports not received from the MoH/New Zealand Police.

Bylaws

37.  After completing workshops with affected operators inspections have now commenced under the Appearance Industry Bylaw 2020.

Food 

38.  There are currently 42 verifications that are overdue, up from 15 as last reported. The team is working hard to stay on top of the workload, whilst maintaining training requirements for accreditation.

39.  The Environmental Health team has now recruited a Team Lead Food, who started with council on 18th August 2021.

Noise

40.  Officers continue to review and comment on resource consents and construction noise and vibration management plans. These relate to new developments within the city, which have increased recently.

Litter

41.  There has been an increase in illegal dumping since July.

 

42.  The old Kelson and Wainuiomata recycling station sites have been relatively quiet, but there has been a large increase in dumping on Moores Valley Road and Hebden Crescent. An increase in illegal dumping has been experienced by other Councils moving to a new system, and this usually settles as the new system is embedded.

43.  Only a small number of infringements have been issued due to the mixture of bags and bins in the city. Leniency has been given due to the teething issues associated with the new kerbside system.

44.  Community groups have been active and many had plans for Keep New Zealand Beautiful clean up week, between 25 – 31 October. It is likely these events won’t go ahead if Covid 19 restrictions continue.

Trade Waste

45.  The trade waste team, are managing the workload well with reduced staff numbers. No new contract work is being undertaken at this stage.

Parking Services

46.   The Parking Services team has had a busy few months, issuing 2,143 tickets in July and 1,155 in August 2021. The figures for August were affected by the Covid 19 lockdown, where enforcement was stood down.

 

47.       Prior to lockdown, monitoring of red marker lights on parked heavy trade vehicles continued to find non-compliance around Hutt City. The absence of such lights creates a major safety hazard for motorists during the night and officers are taking a safety first approach and issuing infringements where necessary. 

 

Animal Services

 

Animal Services - Lower Hutt

 

48.       Dog registrations were due on 1 July 2021. There were 10,369 registration reminder letters and invoices sent out in June. The vast majority have now been registered with currently 1,530 unregistered dog remaining – an 85% compliance rate.

49.   The full registration fee is now in place, which is $206.40 for an entire dog and $170.00 for a desexed dog.

50.       Animal Control Officers (ACO) will be working on enforcing compliance by reminding dog owners to register their dogs. As a last resort, enforcement options include issuing a $300 infringement fine and/or seizure of the dog.

 

51.   During Covid 19 lockdown three officers were rostered on to respond to urgent callouts. Others were working from home including administration staff. Officers ensured dogs in our care were well looked after throughout this time.

 

52.  We received a high number of uncontrolled and aggressive dog reports during Covid 19 lockdown which put the community and staff at risk. Officers have responded promptly to these cases, taken action to de-escalate the situation and removed the aggressive dog when needed.

 

Animal Services – Wellington

 

53.   There are 14,067 dogs recorded on the Wellington database of which 11,668 are currently registered – an 83% compliance rate.

54.   The remaining 2,399 unregistered dogs are being followed up by officers and enforcement action taken where requests have been ignored.

Pop-up registrations

55.  Our second round of pop-up registration events for 2021/22 went ahead on Saturday 3 and Sunday 4 July as planned.

56.  They were held at Tawatawa Reserve Dog Park in Island bay and Taylor Terrace Dog Park in Tawa. The events were a success with 86 registrations being processed over that weekend.

57. Dog owners were very pleased that we were running these again and loved the giveaway goodies that they received. Engagement opportunities such as these are always well received and attended by dog owners.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

58.  Work is happening to ensure the next round of dog registration letters and invoices are sent to owners via email rather than on paper through the mail which has traditionally been the case.

59.  As vehicles come up for renewal in the Regulatory Services department, preference for an electrically powered vehicle is always considered as a priority.

 Consultation

60.    There are no consultation considerations.

Legal Considerations

61.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial Considerations

62.  There are no financial considerations.






 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Regulatory Services graphs - August 2021

57

 

 

 

Author: Derek Kerite

Head of Regulatory Services

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Regulatory Services graphs - August 2021

 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 

 


 


 


 



                                                                                      72                                               21 September 2021

Infrastructure and Regulatory Committee

26 August 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1379)

 

 

 

 

Report no: IARCC2021/4/120

 

Infrastructure and Regulatory Work Programme

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the work programme be received and noted.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Work Programme -Infrastructure and Regulatory 2021

73

 

 

 

Author: Toi Lealofi

Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Work Programme -Infrastructure and Regulatory 2021