HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

KOMITI KAUPAPA TAIAO
Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

 

 

15 July 2021

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Thursday 22 July 2021 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

 

Membership

 

 

Cr J Briggs (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr K Brown

Cr S Edwards

Deputy Mayor T Lewis

Cr A Mitchell

Cr S Rasheed (Deputy Chair)

Cr N Shaw

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY


 

CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE
Membership:	8
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Reports to:	Council

HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

 

 

OVERVIEW:

This Committee has responsibility for oversight of Council’s environment and climate change response.

The Committee is aligned with the Environment & Sustainability Directorate.

Its areas of focus are:

§   Oversight of Council’s plan to reach Carbon Zero, including raising awareness of climate-related issues

§   Developing and implementing climate and environmental policies and plans including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters

§   Waste and recycling

 

PURPOSE:

To develop, implement, monitor and review strategies, policies, plans and functions associated with environmental and climate change activities.

 

DELEGATIONS FOR THE COMMITTEES AREAS OF FOCUS:

        All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities including the activities outlined below.

        Develop required strategies and policies. Recommend draft and final versions to Council for adoption where they have a city-wide or strategic focus.

        Implement, monitor and review strategies and policies.

        Oversee the implementation of major projects provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

        Oversee budgetary decisions provided for in the LTP or Annual Plan.

        Oversee the development and implementation of plans and functions that promote environmental wellbeing, including Council’s plan to reach Carbon Zero.

        Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s Environment & Sustainability Directorate.

        Address matters related to ecological protection, the protection of biodiversity, and biosecurity.

        Address matters related to climate change, including raising awareness of climate-related issues, advocating for climate change issues and actions, and championing initiatives that reduce carbon emissions.

        Recommend to Council the acquisition or disposal of assets, unless the acquisition or disposal is provided for specifically in the LTP.

        Conduct any consultation processes required on issues before the Committee.

        Approval and forwarding of submissions.

        Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

        The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee. When exercised, the report/minutes of the meeting require a resolution noting that the committee has performed the responsibilities of another committee and the reason/s.

        If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Climate Change & Sustainability Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Communities Committee and/or Infrastructure & Regulatory Committee, then the Climate Change & Sustainability Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committees. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

 

   


                                                                       6                                                      22 July 2021

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Komiti Kaupapa Taiao

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Thursday 22 July 2021 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

1.       APOLOGIES 

No apologies have been received.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.  

3.       Presentation

Presentation by a Representative of MIRO (21/1117)

A verbal presentation by Mr P Jones

     

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have      

5.       Recommendations to Council -   Te Kaunihera o Te Awa Kairangi - 10 August 2021

a)      Update on Council's Climate Change Work (21/1022)

Report No. CCASC2021/3/166 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste 7

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed”

 

b)      Landfill Fee Exemptions for Charities (21/1066)

Report No. CCASC2021/3/167 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste 56

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed”

 

c)       Options Regarding a New Cleanfill (21/1077)

Report No. CCASC2021/3/179 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste 64

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed”

  

6.       Kerbside Rubbish and Recycling Implementation Project (21/1039)

Report No. CCASC2021/3/180 by the Strategic Advisor                                  98

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

7.       Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee Update (21/1071)

Report No. CCASC2021/3/93 by the Senior Advisor Sustainability and Resilience          101

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

8.       Update on Council's Solid Waste and Waste Minimisation Work (21/1024)

Report No. CCASC2021/3/165 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste     105

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

9.       Committee Work Programme (21/985)

Report No. CCASC2021/3/168 by the Head of Climate and Solid Waste     108

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed”

10.     Information Item

Updates on Council's Biodiversity Action (21/1065) (to be separately circulated)

11.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.   

 

 

 

Judy Randall

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR

           

 

  


                                                                                       7                                                               22 July 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

12 July 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1022)

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/3/166

 

Update on Council's Climate Change Work

 

Purpose of report

1.    Officers provide a regular update on climate change work, in order to implement Council’s organisational carbon target, facilitate a reduction in city-wide emissions, and address climate change impacts.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)        notes the update on various climate change work streams; and

(2)        adopts the interim Carbon Reduction and Climate Resilience Plan, subject to the completion of editorial and design work on the document (see Appendix 1 to the report).

For the reasons outlined in this report.

Electricity and natural gas at Council facilities

Huia pool and Eastbourne summer pool

2.    As part of the Long Term Plan (LTP), Council approved a change to the timing of installing a heat pump at the new Huia pool. Design engineers have been engaged, and design is scheduled to be completed by 30 August 2021. This will be followed by a procurement process for installation, with completion scheduled for March 2022.

3.    Regarding the change in heating technologies at Eastbourne summer pool, design work has been completed and procurement for a suitable contractor will be completed by the end of July 2021. The heat pump is scheduled to be operational by November 2021, in time for the coming summer season.

LED street lighting

4.    As at 30 June 2021 around 5,960 streetlights (42%) have been upgraded to LED luminaires in Lower Hutt, out of a total of 14,200. This is a change of about 860 since the last report from May 2020.

5.    Our contractor is scheduled to install about 500 LED luminaires between July and September 2021.

6.    Progress continues to be severely hampered by supply line constraints, and also luminaire installation rates.

Council’s vehicle fleet

7.    Over the last three months, we have added one further EV to Council’s fleet (now 15 EVs), and reduced the overall size of our fleet by one vehicle (now 71 vehicles). As at 30 June 2021, we had an EV share of 21%.

8.    During July 2021, our EV share will be lifted to about 26%, as we have now taken delivery of a further four EVs to replace conventional vehicles.

Emissions from Silverstream Landfill

9.    The figure below shows the modelled emissions from Silverstream landfill, based on actual and estimated waste volumes going forward. The figure also shows the associated actual emissions liabilities for the last five years, and two scenarios for our future emissions liabilities (in calendar years), depending on the efficiency of gas destruction via the power plant and/or flare.

10.  We are now half way through the 2021 calendar, and while the flare and the work by LMS is now showing improvements to the amount of gas captured and destroyed, the installation has revealed shortcomings in the existing gas collection infrastructure (essentially the infrastructure is forming a bottle-neck for increasing gas extraction to feed the flare). LMS experts have now been able to inspect this infrastructure and have developed a programme of works to increase gas extraction. These works are likely to take most of the rest of the year to complete, and so it is still likely that our emissions liability for 2021 will be of similar magnitude to that in 2020.

11.  Green waste is no longer used for landfill cover, and instead is taken to Composting NZ in Kapiti for composting. This change is expected to reduce emissions at the landfill.

Emissions from the old Wainuiomata Landfill

12.  During 2020/21, Tonkin & Taylor (T&T) carried out further work to estimate remaining emissions from the old Wainuiomata landfill. The figure below shows our revised estimates, with emissions at about 13,000 tCO2-e for 2021.

13.  Officers are planning to carry out a more detailed on-site investigation (eg empirical measurement of gas via test wells) in order to inform any decisions on the viability of a flare. 

14.  The potential impact of a flare on emissions is indicated by the grey shaded area in the figure below, with emissions potentially reducing by 25%-50%. If a flare and gas collection system was found to be feasible and installed in 2022, then about 18,000t CO2-e could potentially be avoided by 2030. However, so far our research has only been desk based, and we want to carry out on site testing to confirm assumptions before advising on the installation of a flare.

City-wide carbon reductions and responding to climate change impacts

Development of Council’s Carbon Reduction Plan

15.  A key output as part of Phase 3 of our Climate Response Programme has been the development of Council’s Carbon Reduction Plan, to capture the work that Council is doing to reduce its own emissions and to assist in facilitating the change across Lower Hutt

16.  The draft plan is enclosed in Appendix 1 to the report, and officers recommend that the Committee recommends its adoption to Council, subject to editorial and design work on the document. The draft plan is based on the work programmes previously agreed (eg as per LTP) and also includes new work identified by officers (as a result of a workshop on 31 May 2021) to maintain the momentum of our work.

17.  It is important to note that this plan is an ‘interim’ plan. This is because it sets out our work programme as we currently know it, but it is likely that revisions will be necessary once the work to develop a city-wide roadmap has been completed.

Development of a city-wide roadmap

18.  The Lead Group has continued to drive the co-design process on the Community Climate Change Response for Lower Hutt.

19.  A key milestone coming up is a Co-Lab event, in order to capture a broad range of interests, sectors, perspectives and ideas.  The Co-Lab is targeting an attendance of up to 250 participants and will focus on how we as a community can respond together (ie what the community, including Council, collectively can do in response to climate change; what will key stakeholders such as large businesses do to reduce their emissions). It will also be important to help determine community priority areas and possible solutions.

20.  The information gained from the Co-Lab event, and also Council’s interim Carbon Reduction Plan will inform the development of a Community Climate Change Response Roadmap. The draft Roadmap is scheduled to be released for consultation with the wider public later in 2021.

Electric vehicle charging stations in the Eastern Bays

21.  The new EV charging stations in Days Bay and Eastbourne are now fully operational. They are operated by Meridian Energy. The station at Days Bay is also equipped with 25kW DC charging equipment (add approximately 100km of driving range with about 40 minutes of charging).

Electric vehicle charging stations across Lower Hutt

22.  Council will roll out 20 additional DC charging stations across Lower Hutt, and Council’s funding application to the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) has been successful. EECA will fund 50% of project costs.

23.  Meanwhile, Council is cooperating with Wellington City Council on a joint procurement to identify a suitable supplier to project manage the roll-out, and operate the charging stations once they are in place. As at 12 July 2021, tender evaluation was still under way.

24.  Note that prior to the roll-out of charging stations at the various facilities, officers will need to undertake consultation with the community and affected stakeholders at the selected locations.





Regional climate change work

25.  On 1 July 2021, the Wellington Region Climate Change Working Group was replaced by the Wellington Region Climate Change Forum. Council’s representatives at the Forum are Cr Mitchell and Cr Briggs.

26.  Subject to confirmation by the Forum, it looks likely that it will align its work with that of the Wellington Regional Growth Framework (WRGF) and its Joint Leadership Committee. This is because two of the projects in the WRGF work programme are aligned with the work of the Forum: the development of a ‘regional approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions’ and the ‘development of a regional approach to planning for and managing climate impacts.’ Both projects are set to get underway in the next 12 months.

27.  In addition, it has been recognised that a regional climate change risk assessment is a necessary precursor to effective regional adaptation planning work. Work is currently underway to finalise the project brief for the risk assessment and to confirm project cost shares and funding sources.

Climate Change impact and considerations

28.  This report responds directly to the need to reduce carbon emissions, by providing a regular update on Council’s key initiatives.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Draft INTERIM Carbon Reduction Plan

12

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Draft INTERIM Carbon Reduction Plan

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


                                                                                      60                                                              22 July 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

12 July 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1066)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/3/167

 

Landfill Fee Exemptions for Charities

 

Purpose of report

1.    To seek approval for a change to the practice of providing landfill fee exemptions to charities.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(1)     agrees to option 2, ie to introduce additional criteria that charities must meet in order to qualify for exemptions from landfill fees from 1 October 2021 (must be registered in Lower Hutt or Upper Hutt AND receive second-hand goods for resale for donation AND be demonstrably affected by illegal dumping where they receive second-hand goods); and

(2)     agrees to extend the offer of free kerbside recycling (via Council’s new recycling service) to Marae based in Lower Hut.

For the reasons outlined in the report.

 

Background

2.    Council has in place fees exemptions for charities at the Silverstream Transfer Station. Charities are allowed 25 tonnes of free rubbish disposal per year; normal gate fees apply after that amount.

Problem definition

3.    There is currently no clear basis and no formal policy for providing an exemption to charities, ie there are no criteria for eligibility other than providing proof the organisation has charitable status. It is also unclear how or when this came about. It has been in place for a number of years.

4.    At present, about 60 charities are eligible for these exemptions, and this covers a range of different organisations (eg Salvation Army, Te Omanga Hospice, Forest and Bird, Habitat for Humanity, Menzshed Upper Hutt, Silverstream Retreat, Upper Hutt Musical Theatre, etc). Appendix 1 to the report provides a list of those that received the exemption in 2020, and the amount of waste disposed.

5.    There may be a case for providing some relief to certain charities. For example, the Salvation Army shops may receive second hand goods, some of which may no longer be usable. In addition, those charities that operate drop-off points can be subject to illegally dumped material. However, it is unclear why other organisations, such as a yoga centre or playcentre would be eligible.

6.    Even if eligibility was justified, it is unclear why some of those organisations would require disposal of up to 25 tonnes, which is a significant volume of waste (effectively a couple of medium size trucks, or between 25 and 75 light vehicle trailer loads).

7.    Neither Porirua City Council (Spicer Landfill) nor Wellington City Council (Southern Landfill) offer any fee exemptions to charities.

8.    The actual opportunity cost for the last three financial years has been about $80k to $90k (ex GST). Assuming a similar take-up to previous years, this opportunity cost is likely to go up to about $100k to $115k, in line with landfill charges and government charges and levies increasing.  Per organisation, the exemption has a value of up to $3,500 plus GST per year for the 2021/22 financial year.

Options

9.    In light of the lack of a clear basis for exempting all charities from landfill fees, the following options have been developed for Council to consider:

Option 1: Continue status quo

10.  In this option, Council would continue with the status quo. However, this option has the following drawbacks.

a.    The need and justification for a blanket exemption is unclear.

b.    The approach is inconsistent with the approaches in Porirua and Wellington. This could lead to charities in other areas opting to take their waste to Silverstream Landfill and Hutt City Council subsidising these organisations.

c.     Council faces opportunity costs from avoided fees, but also faces increasing direct costs from government charges and fees (eg waste levy, ETS charges).

Option 2: Tighter eligibility criteria

11.  In this option, Council would introduce additional criteria that charities would need to meet, in order to qualify for the exemption.

12.  This could involve limiting the free allowance to charities that:

a.    are based in either Lower Hutt or Upper Hutt, and

b.    collect or receive second-hand goods for resale or donation (ie they are involved in the reuse of products or the minimisation of waste),  and

c.     are affected by illegal dumping of materials at their drop-off points.

13.  This option should result in a reduction in the number of eligible charities, and better link the exemption to actual need.

Option 3: Replacing exemption with a discount

14.  In this option, the existing exemption would be replaced with a discount. This could reduce the opportunity cost to Council, and account for at least some of the increasing direct costs from government charges and fees (eg waste levy, ETS charges).

15.  However, unless additional criteria were introduced, the discount would not be linked to need or the location of the organisation.

Option 4: Discontinue with exemption

16.  This option would involve removing the exemption. This would bring our practice in line with Wellington and Porirua. However, the additional cost could present an issue for some charities that are involved in the reuse of second-hand goods where they are affected by illegal dumping.

Preferred option

17.  Officers consider Option 2 the preferred option, as it better aligns the exemption to need.  The change in approach could take effect from 1 October 2021, in order to provide sufficient notice to affected organisations.

18.  Regarding Marae located in Lower Hutt, they could be offered free kerbside recycling to mitigate the loss of the exemption and to encourage waste minimisation.

Risk mitigation

19.  As with any change to current practice, there are some potential risks.

Resource recovery at the transfer station

20.  Council is working with Earthlink Inc to operate a drop-off facility at Silverstream Transfer Station (eg for bric a brac, sports equipment, usable products, etc). Regardless of whether option 2, 3 or 4 is chosen, Earthlink Inc would not be affected by the change.  This is because Earthlink will typically receive goods or products, take them down to Wingate for repair/assessment, and bring back relevant residual material/products. On average, Earthlink removes about 160t (net) from the landfill per year.

Marae

21.  There are some Marae in Lower Hutt that currently utilise the exemption. To mitigate the impact on Marae, they could be offered a free kerbside recycling service, in the same way that the service is offered to early childhood education centres and schools. This approach would also assist these organisations in minimising their waste and associated costs, and help in community education.

22.  However, this could only apply to Marae located in Lower Hutt given Hutt City Council’s recycling service is limited to areas in Lower Hutt. The financial impact of adding Marae to Council’s new recycling service is minimal.

Organisations in Upper Hutt

23.  There are a range of organisations located in Upper Hutt that may feel aggrieved that the blanket exemption is removed. Note that those organisations in Upper Hutt that would meet the proposed criteria (eg involved in second hand goods and affected by illegal dumping) would still be eligible for the exemption. However, others would need to approach Upper Hutt City Council for refunds or rebates, or alternative options such as access to free kerbside recycling.

Timing

24.  Fee exemption forms normally have to be supplied before the beginning of the financial year.  For the current financial year, the exemptions from the last financial year have been rolled over so that they apply until at least 30 September 2021.

Climate change impact and considerations

25.  The change in approach and the roll out of free kerbside recycling to Marae would encourage waste diversion, albeit the effects in terms of avoided carbon emissions are likely negligible.

Consultation

26.  There has not been any consultation on proposed changes to the fee exemptions, albeit where possible we have informed charities that utilise the exemption that the current practice is under review.

Legal considerations

27.  There are no known legal barriers to removing the existing exemptions.

Financial considerations

28.  The change to the current exemption approach will reduce opportunity costs from avoided fees, and better align with Council’s increasing direct costs from government charges and fees (eg waste levy, ETS charges).

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Landfill fee exemptions

61

    

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

Author: Diljinder Uppal

Solid Waste Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Landfill fee exemptions

 

Appendix 1: List of organisations that utilise the exemption

 

CHARITY

Tonnage in 2020

ABBAT TRUST

1.8

BOOTH COLLEGE MISSION SALVATION

0.4

BIRTHRIGHT HUTT VALLEY

20.6

BRAHMA KUMARIS RAJA YOGA CENTR

2.4

BELMONT PLAYCENTRE

0.1

BROOKFIELD OUTDOOR CENTRE

2.2

BROOKFIELD SCOUT CAMP

8.4

CAMP WAINUI TRUST BOYS BRIGADE

0.9

EARTHLINK

OPERATES RESOURCE RECOVERY DROP OFF

EASTBOURNE LIONS CLUB

19.2

FOREST & BIRD (UH BRANCH)

0.2

FRIENDS WHO CARE INCORPORATED

3.0

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

0.8

HUTT CITY WOMEN`S REFUGE

0.2

HEARTH TRUST

1.8

HILLS NZ

4.3

HOPE CENTRE TRUST BOARD

0.2

HUTT CITY CHURCH

4.9

HUTT VALLEY RIDING - DISABLED

0.1

IDEA SERVICES (CHARITY)

0.2

LANE PARK CHURCH

6.7

LOWER HUTT PLAYCENTRE

0.1

LIFE CITY CHURCH

4.3

LIFESWITCH COMMUNITY TRUST

25.0+

MENZSHED UPPER HUTT

2.6

MIX-CONNECTING CREATING LIVING

0.3

NEW LIFE CHARITABLE TRUST

17.4

NEW ZEALAND RED CROSS

15.7

ORONGOMAI MARAE TRUST

7.3

PARERAHO FOREST TRUST

1.9

PINEHAVEN PLAYCENTRE

2.3

RIMUTAKA BAPTIST CHURCH

0.8

KOKIRI MARAE MAORI

2.7

SALVATION ARMY HUTT CITY

25.0+

SALVATION ARMY FAMILY STORE

25.0+

SILVERSTREAM COMMUNITY INC

2.1

SUPERGRANS CHARITABLE TRUST

0.5

SILVERSTREAM RETREAT

0.8

SILVERSTREAM RAILWAY

1.2

ST VINCENT DE-PAUL, PETONE

25.0+

ST VINCENT DE-PAUL, SV

4.6

STOKES VALLEY PLAYCENTRE

2.2

TE OMANGA HOSPICE

25.0+

TOTARA PARK PLAYCENTRE

1.1

UPPER HUTT BAPTIST CHURCH

6.5

UPPER HUTT COMMUNITY YOUTH TRU

1.1

UH COMMUNITY YOUTH TRUST

2.9

UPPER HUTT HOUSING TRUST

16.2

UPPER HUTT MUSICAL THEATRE

0.3

UPPER HUTT UNITING PARISH

2.6

UPPER VALLERY PONY CLUB

0.4

VICTORY CHRISTIAN CENTRE

2.3

WAINUIOMATA PIONEER CHURCH

4.0

WALLACEVILLE PLAYCENTRE

0.2

WINDOWS TRUST

25.0

WAINUI MARAE CHARITABLE TRUST

12.8

YMCA CAMP KAITOKE

12.1

 


                                                                                      68                                                              22 July 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

05 July 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1077)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/3/179

 

Options Regarding a New Cleanfill

 

Purpose of report

1.    To report back on the investigation regarding a potential future cleanfill on Council-owned land.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council :

(1)   notes that Council’s cleanfill at 130 Coast Road will close by no later than June 2022;

(2)   notes the report ‘Lower Hutt cleanfill demand and future site analysis’ from July 2021, prepared by Tonkin and Taylor, which considered the demand for a cleanfill, and potential sites for a future cleanfill on land owned by Council;

(3)   notes that the analysis found that most sites that were assessed are unsuitable for a cleanfill, and while two sites appear to have technical potential, officers consider that they are unlikely to be suitable due to other limitations;

(4)   agrees that Hutt City Council will not pursue the establishment of a replacement cleanfill on any current Council-owned land;

(5)   notes that there will be ongoing demand for a cleanfill facility in the Hutt Valley, particularly due to high levels of residential and commercial construction;

(6)   notes that the absence of a cleanfill facility may have a range of adverse impacts, including increased development costs, and increased difficulty to reduce carbon emissions (eg due to increased transport emissions, and unrealised opportunities associated with the diversion and reuse of materials, such as crushed concrete and aggregate); and

(7)   notes that Council officers plan to work with any relevant parties to identify and investigate a replacement site for a cleanfill to service the Hutt Valley.

For the reasons outlined in the report.

 

Background

2.    The Wainuiomata Cleanfill at 130 Coast Road is the only active remaining cleanfill facility within Council’s administrative boundaries. Operations at this site must cease by 19 June 2022.

3.    Officers commissioned a report from Tonkin and Taylor to confirm whether there may be other sites on Council-owned land that could be suitable as a replacement site. 

A clean fill in the context of waste infrastructure

4.    The Ministry for the Environment (MfE) defines cleanfills as “a low-cost alternative to landfills for inert waste that will have no potentially adverse environmental effect, or only minor effects.” They form part of the waste asset hierarchy, and are sometimes referred to as Class 4 landfills:

a.    Class 1 landfill: Municipal solid waste landfills and most industrial waste landfills (e.g. Silverstream Landfill).

b.    Class 2 landfill: Construction and demolition landfills and some industrial waste landfills.

c.     Class 3 landfill: Managed or controlled fills (which accept cleanfill and some contaminated materials).

d.    Class 4 landfill: Cleanfills.

e.     Closed landfill: A landfill that no longer accepts material for disposal.

5.    Cleanfills are subject to stringent waste acceptance criteria. Accordingly, the material deposited into a cleanfill typically comprises inert construction and demolition materials such as soil, rock, and concrete that will not break down when disposed to ground. These limitations prevent many waste streams and materials being disposed of at a cleanfill, including contaminated soil, timber, plasterboard, municipal waste and garden waste.

Environmental impacts of a cleanfill

6.    While cleanfills can only accept certain inert materials, there can be adverse impacts associated with cleanfill operations, including noise, dust, adverse effects on water quality, and impacts associated with heavy vehicle traffic movements.

7.    In light of these potential adverse impacts, cleanfills are required to manage their potential environmental effects through a range of controls, such as:

a.    Site operating procedures that can reliably control the material being disposed of (thereby ensuring that only appropriate cleanfill material is accepted);

b.    Controls to manage the potential for adverse impacts upon water quality (eg stormwater controls, soakage pits, perimeter bunding and site stabilisation);

c.     Controls to manage the discharge of dust (eg speed limits, sealing access roads and retaining water sources onsite);

d.    Controls to manage noise, traffic and the tracking of material onto any nearby roads (eg vehicle washes, noise limits and associated monitoring and transportation assessments); and

e.     Plans to stabilise and remediate the site following completion.

Cleanfill benefits

8.    An accessible and well-managed cleanfill can provide a range of benefits, as follows:

a.    Development costs: Material disposed at a cleanfill originates from public and private construction projects, such as new residential developments. Access to a cleanfill can directly impact the cost associated with these developments.

b.    Operational costs: Council’s operational teams may require disposal of clean fill material from time to time, such as when clearing slips, and for construction projects. Access to a cleanfill for such material can lower costs for operational teams.

c.     Resource recovery opportunities: There is an opportunity to not only receive material, but to also manage materials for resale that are sought by other developers. This could include crushed concrete and different grades of aggregate and fill material. (This opportunity has not been realised at Council’s current cleanfill at 130 Coast Road.)

d.    Fly-tipping: Provision of a low cost and proximate cleanfill facility can reduce the propensity for fly-tipping of inert materials that Council would otherwise have to pay to uplift and dispose of.

Cleanfill site investigation

9.    In July 2021, Tonkin and Taylor completed a report on the ‘Lower Hutt clean fill demand and future site analysis.’

10.  The report discusses the purpose of cleanfills, the background of Hutt City Council’s involvement in operating the existing cleanfill at 130 Coast Road, and the demand for cleanfill services in relation to projects and developments, such as new residential developments. It also looks at the potential linkages between a cleanfill operation, and increased recovery of construction and demolition waste.

11.  Tonkin and Taylor carried out a site investigation across Lower Hutt, limited to land owned by Hutt City Council. Various criteria were used to narrow down a long list of sites, based on various constraints and limitations (eg must be of a certain minimum size, must not be classed as a scenic reserve or contain areas of significant biodiversity, must not already be in use as a local sports ground, etc).

12.  Following the initial site investigation and site shortlisting, there remained ten sites for more detailed evaluation. Multi-criteria analysis (MCA) was applied to assess sites on four technical criteria.

13.  From a technical perspective, most of the sites were found to be unsuitable, by way of achieving negative scores. Two sites achieved a neutral and positive score respectively, indicating technical potential. However, both still suffer from various limitations, including existing land uses, natural biodiversity, and potential alternative uses.

14.  In addition, the MCA exercise has not yet involved engagement with the community or an assessment of social and cultural impacts associated with the potential establishment of a cleanfill on potential sites.

15.  Therefore, based on this analysis, officers consider that there are no sites on Council-owned land that are currently considered suitable for a future cleanfill operation. Based on this, officers consider that, following the closure of Council’s cleanfill at 130 Coast Road by no later than June 2022, Council will no longer be able to offer a cleanfill service in Lower Hutt on any current Council-owned land.

16.  This conclusion does not mean that there are no suitable sites on private land somewhere in Lower Hutt. Indeed, this could present an opportunity for Council to work in partnership with any relevant parties to identify and investigate a replacement site for a cleanfill to service the entire Hutt Valley. This is because there are a range of benefits to a locally accessible cleanfill that is well managed, especially if it provides for increased resource recovery. Further work would be required to evaluate such options.

17.  If a private operator alone proposed a cleanfill in Lower Hutt, Hutt City Council would only be involved from a resource consent and compliance monitoring process point of view.

Climate change impact and considerations

18.  The lack of a local and proximate cleanfill in the future could increase transport emissions associated with cleanfill material originating from projects and developments in the Hutt Valley, and there may be unrealised opportunities associated with the diversion and reuse of materials such as crushed concrete and aggregate.

Consultation

19.  Consultation with the community on any sites for a future cleanfill has not taken place, and is not considered necessary considering the lack of suitable sites on Council-owned land.

Legal considerations

20.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial considerations

21.  Cleanfills can play an important role in facilitating developments, such as residential developments, large redevelopment projects, and also maintenance activities such as clearing slips. Therefore, the absence of a locally accessible clean fill is likely to increase costs to projects and developers, including Council.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Cleanfill options investigation

69

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Cleanfill options investigation

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

  


                                                                                     100                                                            22 July 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

01 July 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1039)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/3/180

 

Kerbside Rubbish and Recycling Implementation Project

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report provides an update on the status of the project to implement the new kerbside rubbish and recycling services, which commenced on 1 July 2021.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the report.

Background

2.    Council decided on 15 September 2020 to introduce rates-funded weekly rubbish and fortnightly recycling collection services, commencing on 1 July 2021. An opt-in green waste service was also approved.

3.    A Council project team was established to implement the new services and has been working closely with Waste Management Limited (WML) since October 2020 on the project. This is the third update to the Committee.

Bin Roll-Out

4.    The initial bin roll out plan had a six week buffer period to allow for unforeseen circumstances, such as bin delays, poor weather or resourcing issues. The entire six weeks was required in managing late bin delivery due to international shipping delays.

5.    The final shipment of bins from Australia arrived into the warehouse on Tuesday 6 July 2021, with remaining households without bins scheduled for delivery by Sunday 11th July 2021. 

6.    As a result of this delay, contingency plans were activated and 3000 households were delivered rubbish bags to provide an alternative means of rubbish disposal during this hiatus period. A team of Council officers undertook this work over the three day period 23-25 June 2021.  Additionally bags were made available free of charge at all libraries and community hubs for any other household that may have required them.

7.    Arrangements were made with WML so that bags and other receptacles would be picked up for the first two weeks in July in lieu of this situation.

8.    During the past few weeks we have received advice from around 1,000 households that they do not yet have bins.  The details of these households have been collated and forwarded to WML and its bin delivery subcontractor, Rotaform, for actioning.  About a quarter of these are new housing developments that have only recently been added to our database.

9.    Rotaform is reviewing the details of each request to identify those households who since making the request have had the bins delivered and then delivering to all others.  As at 12 July 2021, most of these properties have had their bins delivered to them. As further requests are received they will be forwarded to WML for next day delivery.

Service Provision

10.  The new service provision commenced on 1 July 2021, with WML applying additional resources (vehicles and personnel), to cater for the collection of rubbish bags for those properties that did not yet have their bins. WML also agreed to collect other receptacles for this initial period to ensure all rubbish and recycling put out for collection would be addressed.

11.  WML has also been arranging further collection runs where bins or bags were reported as having been missed.  Some of these missed collections were on rights of way where a collection has not previously been undertaken.  WML has updated its collection runs and staff undertaking these runs, so that this situation is addressed.

12.  Missed collections were also attributed to residents not being used to the new collection run hours, with some streets having earlier starts than would have been previously the case. Communications are being focussed on this issue, encouraging residents to get their bins out early or the evening before pick-up day.

13.  We expect the number of missed collections to decrease as both WML and residents become familiar with the new routine.

14.  There have been some issues with the alternating recycling collections which, while expected, were not helped through the need to re-issue calendars to 18,000 properties.  Residents are being directed to the Council’s toogoodtowaste.nz microsite to verify their recycling collection.  We are also making calendars available at libraries and community hubs for those who may not have home access to the internet.

15.  There are 120 agreed assisted services which WML is managing.  There were a small number of issues that were reported and have since been addressed.

 

 

Internal Resourcing

16.  With the delayed bin roll-out overlapping with the commencement of the new services there has been a large increase in inward communications from residents on a variety of rubbish and recycling issues.  Planned additional temporary staffing to help manage the expected increase in enquiries was insufficient to deal with the scale of the increase and has required further temporary resources to help manage this.  Overflow calls are being handled by the Palmerston North contact centre.

17.  These additional resources are expected to be required for the next few weeks to ensure we can better respond to enquiries as the new services bed in.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

18.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Financial Considerations

19.  The total cost of implementation of the new service is forecast to be just under $1M.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Bruce Hodgins

Strategic Advisor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                     104                                                            22 July 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

12 July 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1071)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/3/93

 

Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee Update

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update regarding the work of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the report.

Background

2.    The Whaitua Committee is nearing the end of its work that began in February 2019 to improve fresh water in the Hutt Valley/Wellington catchment.

3.    The drafting of the project output, the Whaitua Implementation Report (WIP), is nearing completion and is due to be delivered to the Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) in August 2021.

Discussion

4.    The WIP that is currently still under development contains about 100 recommendations and the document will be divided into the following chapters:

§ Upholding Te Mana o te Wai.

§ The National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPS-FM, 2020) context.

§ Challenges and importance of implementation.

§ Fresh water values and environmental outcomes, catchment areas and limits to improve water quality.

§ Recommendations and their rationale.

5.    The wording of some of the recommendations and the context in which they should be viewed is being finalised. The report will also include the Committee’s view on the prioritisation of the implementation work. A near final draft is to be reviewed at a Regional Council workshop on 27 July 2021.

6.    The most recent NPS-FM came into force in September 2020 and is the primary legislation underpinning the WIP. It mandates that degraded water quality must be improved. The NPS-FM and the WIP will have major implications for councils in the areas of Three Waters infrastructure investment and future urban development.

7.    More specifically and currently, the NPS-FM introduces Te Mana o te Wai as a new critical concept. It refers to the fundamental importance of water and recognises that protecting the health of fresh water protects the health and wellbeing of the wider environment, including people.

8.    Te Mana o te Wai is a major adjustment to the way water is to be managed as it provides a new hierarchy of obligations:

§ First, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems.

§ Second, the health needs of people (such as drinking water).

§ Third, the ability of people and communities to provide for their social, economic and cultural well-being, now and in the future.

9.    In addition, while there is mana whenua representation on the Whaitua Committee, the underpinning of the WIP by Te Mana o te Wai saw the establishment of an additional mana whenua group; Te Kahui Taiao. Te Kahui Taiao comprises the four mana whenua Whaitua Committee members and is supported by the project team. The primary purpose of this group has been to provide a mana whenua perspective on the project values, objectives, attributes and recommendations.

10.  The output from the Te Kahui Taiao work is in the process of being socialised with mana whenua before being finalised. This work – Te Mahere Wai – will be a companion document to the Committee’s report.

The timeline for the completion and publication of the WIP

11.  The Whaitua Committee is currently finalising outstanding recommendations and issues.  As at 12 July 2021, the timeline is as follows:

§ 23 July: Draft WIP provided to GWRC.

§ 27 July: Draft WIP reviewed at GWRC workshop.

§ 5 August: Final Whaitua Committee meeting to make any changes to the draft from feedback received.

§ 19 August: GWRC receive Final WIP (pending design and publication).

§ Approximately third week of October:  Joint GWRC/WCC/HCC/UHCC, Mana whenua WIP launch event.

12.  A Whaitua briefing to Hutt City Council on the completed draft WIP is tentatively scheduled for 4 August 2021.

Receipt of the completed WIP by Hutt City Council

13.  The WIP will be provided to the participating local authorities (HCC, WCC, and UHCC) following its receipt by GWRC.

14.  If the projected timeline holds, the WIP will be presented to Hutt City Council’s Climate Change and Sustainability Committee in Cycle 4 (23rd September). This would allow consideration at the Hutt City Council meeting on 12 October 2021 prior to the joint launch event later in October 2021.

Potential implications of the WIP for Hutt City Council

15.  A number of the recommendations are based on requirements arising out of the NPS-FM regulatory framework. Many of the actions will be the responsibility of GWRC to implement and will be incorporated in the Regional Policy Statement and the Natural Resources Plan for the Wellington Region. Hutt City Council’s District Plan would need to be amended to give effect to any changes to the Regional Policy Statement.

16.  Some recommendations will likely involve investigations into various issues. Such work will have resource implications, as will any amendments to the District Plan and associated evaluations required under s32 of the Resource Management Act.

17.  Other recommendations will be outside the regulatory framework (for example around the possible remediation of contaminated land). The implementation of such recommendations will be an issue for Hutt City Council to consider and fund at the appropriate time.

18.  Further recommendations will reflect and, in some instances, propose extending the Three Waters related work programme agreed with Wellington Water Ltd (WWL) and funded in the current Long Term Plan.

19.  If the Three Waters related recommendations in the WIP were to be fully implemented, the cost would likely exceed the current expenditure agreed with WWL to upgrade the city’s water network ($1.3b over 30 years) but the quantum of additional expenditure is not yet known.

20.  However, any such additional water related expenditure will be a decision for Hutt City Council to consider and make at the appropriate time.

Three Waters

21.  In 2020, Central Government launched a programme to reform the existing local government based Three Waters service delivery arrangements. If this is implemented as proposed it has the potential to fundamentally change the existing arrangements including funding and the delivery of agreed work programmes around water services. These changes would encompass the Whaitua Committee recommendations.

Resource Management Legislation

22.  Central Government is also currently reforming the area of resource management legislation. It intends to replace the Resource Management Act with three new pieces of legislation. These reforms will have implications for how councils regulate land use and development including the potential impacts of land use and development on waterbodies and coastal water.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

23.  As this report is an update on existing work, no climate impact assessment has been prepared. However, climate change has been a key consideration for the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee in its work.

Financial Considerations

24.  The recommendations by the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee, as part of the WIP, will likely have financial implications for Hutt City Council. However, the quantum of additional expenditure is not yet known.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

Author: David Burt

Senior Advisor Sustainability and Resilience

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                     107                                                            22 July 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

12 July 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/1024)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/3/165

 

Update on Council's Solid Waste and Waste Minimisation Work

 

Purpose of report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update on various solid waste management and minimisation work streams.

Recommendation

That the Committee receives and notes the update on various solid waste management and minimisation work streams.

Background

2.    Council undertakes a range of solid waste management and minimisation initiatives, and this report consolidates information on their status.

3.    However, the following solid waste and/or waste minimisation matters are addressed in separate reports, as follows:

a.       The update on the work to implement Council’s new rubbish and recycling collection services is covered in a separate report to this committee.

b.       Detailed and regular information on the ongoing development, operation and performance of the Silverstream Landfill is covered in a separate report to the Hutt Valley Services Committee.

Business cases regarding the recovery of construction and demolition waste

4.    Hutt City Council has been co-operating with Porirua City Council (PCC) on its work to develop a business case regarding options for the recovery of construction and demolition (C&D) waste. PCC commissioned Morrison Low to undertake this work.

5.    PCC’s work has been looking at the potential to utilise, repurpose and sell resources arising from construction and demolition activities in the wider region, by looking at the establishment of infrastructure to service commercial customers (for example, with skip bin loads to be sorted for increased waste diversion). None of the transfer stations in the region currently cater for significant diversion of materials from this waste stream.

6.    The business case has now been completed and found that establishing a medium scale construction and demolition facility is financially feasible but there are commercial risks with timber products that do not yet have a completely viable market (eg treated timber). Councils will need to consider the business case further and determine whether to proceed with developing a facility.

Changes at Silverstream transfer station

Resource recovery

7.    Council’s Long Term Plan has funds allocated to make significant changes to the layout of the transfer station at Silverstream Landfill.  Changes are needed to improve upon the current level of service and establish a resource recovery park.  This funding remains subject to the completion of a business case.

8.    However, there are some no-regrets works that are now underway. This includes the construction of a new intersection, which will enable a change to the way waste is loaded out. This will eliminate a significant health and safety risk, by removing a large pit used for loading out waste. Construction is to be completed by February 2022.

9.    With regard to the business case on the resource recovery options for Silverstream, it has now become clear that recovery of construction and demolition waste is not something that can be accommodated at Silverstream Transfer Station, even once more space has been freed up. Therefore, it is likely that a completely new site for a resource recovery park elsewhere in Lower Hutt, which could go beyond catering for domestic customers, could achieve better resource recovery outcomes. Officers will report back on progress.

Green waste and weighing of domestic users of the transfer station

10.  Since 1 July 2021, green waste is no longer used for landfill cover, and instead is taken to Composting NZ in Kapiti for composting.

11.  Officers also previously flagged a change in approach, by which vehicles with trailers should be weighed before accessing the transfer station, to more accurately reflect actual waste disposed (as opposed to charging based on vehicle type only). This is not yet in place, as additional preparatory works have to be scoped and implemented, including changes to the kiosk and weigh-station set up, and IT changes. Officers will report back on progress but are aiming for Waste Management NZ (WMNZ) to have the new approach in place by 31 October 2021.

Hazardous waste

12.  Officers have also been working with Tonkin & Taylor and Waste Management New Zealand (WMNZ) to make significant improvements to the hazardous waste drop-off at Silverstream transfer station, including improved material separation and signage, making the site cleaner and more user-friendly. This also covers an increase in staffing to manage the collected materials and to direct users to the correct drop-off locations. Officers aim to have the new drop off facility in place by the end of August 2021.

13.  Once in place, Council will no longer run its annual hazardous waste collection event, and will instead promote the new drop-off point at Silverstream Transfer Station.

Climate change impact and considerations

14.  The work regarding improved resource recovery directly aligns with Council’s desire to reduce emissions at Silverstream Landfill, as it could reduce the amount of organic waste disposed.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

Author: Diljinder Uppal

Solid Waste Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


                                                                                     110                                                            22 July 2021

Climate Change and Sustainability Committee

23 June 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/985)

 

 

 

 

Report no: CCASC2021/3/168

 

Committee Work Programme

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To seek agreement on the Committee’s recommended work programme during the 2021 calendar year.

Recommendation

That the Committee agrees to the proposed work programme shown in Table 1 contained within the report.

Background

2.    In December 2020, Council established a new Climate Change and Sustainability Committee, to provide for a better focus on environmental issues, and with the following areas of focus:

a.    Oversight of Council’s plan to reach Carbon Zero including raising awareness of climate related issues

b.    Developing and implementing climate and environmental policies and plans including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters

c.     Waste and recycling.

3.    With the establishment of this new committee, Council’s existing Climate Change Working Group was disestablished as at 31 December 2020, as its work was subsumed into that of the new Committee.

Proposed work programme

4.    Officers propose that the Committee considers the following matters and/or reports during the 2021 calendar year.

Table 1

Report

23 September 2021

25 November 2021

Regular update on climate change work programme streams

ü

ü

Report on the scope, process and decision-making approach for an internal low carbon acceleration fund

 

ü

Report on the NZ Government’s response to the Climate Change Commission’s advice, and implications for Lower Hutt and Hutt City Council (timing subject to NZ Government timeframes)

ü

 

Implications for Hutt City Council of the recommendations by the Task-force on climate related financial disclosure

 

ü

Sustainability considerations in RiverLink (eg IS rating tool, plans and progress to date, etc)

ü

 

Sustainability considerations in the Eastern Bay Shared path project (eg IS rating tool, plans and progress to date, etc)

 

ü

Sustainability considerations in the Naenae pool project (eg GreenStar rating tool plans? Design considerations, progress to date, etc)

ü

 

Sustainability considerations for key upcoming procurements (eg how we will achieve carbon reductions through those procurements, how we will minimise waste, etc)

 

ü

Regular update on solid waste management and minimisation work streams

ü

ü

Regular update on the implementation of Council’s new rubbish and recycling services

ü

ü

Report on the final Whaitua Implementation Plan

ü

 

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

5.    No detailed climate impact statement has been prepared, as this report covers administrative matters.  Climate change impacts will be covered in detail in the reports listed above.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Head of Climate and Solid Waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability