HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

Wainuiomata Community Board| POARI HAPORI O WAINUIOMATA 

 

 

7 April 2021

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata,

on:

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 14 April 2021 commencing at 6.30pm

 

 

 

 

 

Membership

 

Gabriel Tupou (Chair)

Dawn McKinley (Deputy Chair)

Terry Stallworth

Gary Sue

Sisi Tuala-Le’afa

Jodie Winterburn

Cr Keri Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz


Community boards – functions and delegations 

 

This document records the delegation of Council functions, responsibilities, duties, and powers to Community Boards. 

The Community Boards have been established under section 49 of the Local Government Act 2002 to represent, and act as an advocate for, the interests of their community. 

The delegations are expressed in general terms.  The delegations shall be exercised with proper regard for the Council’s strategic direction, policies, plans, Standing Orders and its interpretation of its statutory obligations.  The delegations are to be read together with the following propositions.

These delegations are based on the following principles:

·                Issues relevant to a specific community should be decided as closely as possible to that community.  Where an issue has broader implications, i.e. any effects of the decision cross the board boundary, the matter will be decided by Council after seeking a recommendation from the relevant Community Board. This includes any decisions that have strategic importance to the city as a whole, and those that will impact on or create consequences for other parts of the city or the city as a whole. An assessment of issues that fall into this category will be made as part of the corporate agenda process for each meeting cycle. Any uncertainties over interpretation will be referred to the Mayor and Chief Executive to determine in consultation with the relevant Standing Committee and Board Chair;

·                Efficient decision-making should be paramount;

·                Conflicts of interest should be avoided and risks minimised;

·                To ensure processes are free from bias and pre-determination Community Boards should not adjudicate on issues on which they have advocated or wish to advocate to Council;

·                Community Boards should proactively and constructively engage with residents, Residents’ Associations and local community groups on local matters that affect the community they represent, raise with Council issues raised with them by their community, and advocate on behalf of their community.

These delegations:

(a)        recognise that the role of Council is to look after the affairs of the city as a whole, and the role of a Community Board is to represent the interests of its community.

(b)        do not delegate any function, duty or power which a statute (for example section 53(3) and clause 32(1) of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002) prohibits from being delegated;

(c)        are subject to and do not affect any delegation which the Council has already made or subsequently makes to any other committee, Council officer or other member of staff;

(d)       are subject to any other statutory requirements that may apply to a particular delegation;

(e)        are subject to any notice issued by the Council, from time to time, to a Community Board that a particular issue must be referred to Council for decision;

(f)         reflect that decisions with significant financial implications should be made by Council (or a committee with delegated authority);

(g)        promote centralisation of those functions where the appropriate expertise must be ensured; and

(h)       reflect that all statutory and legal requirements must be met.

DELEGATIONS

Engage informally with Council through:

·             Council Briefings - Community Board members are invited to attend all Council Briefings unless the topic is for Council members only and outlined as such on the invitation.

·             Quarterly meetings of the Community Board Chairs with the Mayor and Chief Executive to consider the effectiveness of community representation and the accompanying support mechanisms.

·             Corporate Leadership Team contact, with one senior officer assigned as the contact person to attend each Community Board meeting and provide liaison with Council.

·             Elected Member Support – Democratic Services hopes to establish a position that will provide seamless liaison between Council, staff and Community Boards.

·             Corporate agenda process for each meeting cycle, providing information on the Council’s work programme for the year broken down by cycle.

Provide their local community’s input, through preparing reports or submissions, on:

·             Council’s Long Term Plan and/or Annual Plan.

·             Council’s policies, programmes (including the District Roading Programme) and bylaws.

·             Changes or variations to the District Plan.

·             Resource management issues which it believes are relevant to its local community, through advocacy.

·             The disposal or acquisition of significant assets.

·             Road safety including road safety education within its area.

·             The review of Local Community Plans as required.

·             Any other issues a Board believes is relevant to its local area.

Reports may be prepared by the Board and presented to Council Committees, along with an officer’s recommendation, for consideration.

Any submissions lodged by a Board require formal endorsement by way of resolution.

Standing Order 21.16, Community Board and Youth Council Participation in Meetings of Council and Standing Committees, makes provision for the Chair of a Community Board (or their representative as advised by the Chair prior to the meeting) to participate in discussion on any matters which are of interest to a particular ward area at meetings of the Standing Committees of Council, but there are no voting rights or rights to move or second motions. The rules of debate applicable to members of the Council apply to the Community Board representative. Notification of the intention to exercise speaking rights and identification of the relevant agenda item are to be provided to the Chair prior to the meeting. In exceptional circumstances Board representatives may be invited to participate on specific subjects at meetings of the full Council, at the discretion of the Council Chair.

 

Co-ordinate with Council staff:

·             Local community consultation on city-wide issues on which the Council has called for consultation.

Provide input to officers on:

·             Roadworks, water supply, sewerage, stormwater drainage, waste management and traffic management for its local area.

·             Parks and reserves and associated public facilities, recreational facilities and community activities within its local area.

Develop:

·             Community Response Plans in close consultation with the Wellington Region Emergency Management Office, emergency organisations, the community, residents’ associations, other community groups, and local businesses, for review on an annual basis.

Promote:

·             Recreational facilities and opportunities in its area with a view to ensuring maximum usage.

·             Arts and crafts in its area.

Grant:

·             Local community awards.

Appoint:

·             A liaison member or, where appropriate, representatives to ad hoc bodies, which are involved in community activities within the Board’s area, on which a community representative is sought.

·             Portfolio holders who will have responsibility for reporting back to the Board on the topics assigned.


Endorse:

·         Amendments to the Eastbourne Community Trust Deed (Eastbourne Community Board only).

Decide:

In the Community Board’s area:

·             Naming new roads and alterations to street names.

·             Official naming of parks, reserves and sports grounds within the provisions of Council’s Naming Policy. Note [1]

·             Removal and/or planting of street trees within the provisions of Council’s Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan where a dispute arises that cannot be resolved at officer level.  Note [2]

·             The granting of leases and licences in terms of Council policy to voluntary organisations for Council owned properties in their local area, for example, halls, but not including the granting of leases and licences to community houses and centres.

·             The granting of rights-of-way and other easements over local purpose reserves and granting of leases or licences on local purpose reserves.

·             The granting of leases and licences for new activities in terms of Council policy to community and commercial organisations over recreation reserves subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and land managed as reserve subject to the provisions of the Local Government 2002, in their local area.  (Note: renewal of existing leases and licences will be reported once a year to the appropriate Council Committee).

·             The allocation of funding from the Community Engagement Fund in accordance with Council’s adopted guidelines (attached as Appendix 1).

·             Expenditure of funds allocated by the Council to the Board from the Miscellaneous Budget to cover expenditure associated with the activities of the Board.  The Chair to approve expenditure, in consultation with the Board, and forward appropriate documentation to the Committee Advisor for authorisation.  Boards must not exceed their annual expenditure from the Miscellaneous Budget.

·             The allocation of funding for the training and development of Community Board members, including formal training courses, attendance at seminars or attendance at relevant conferences.

Resource Management Hearings:

·             Each Community Board may have one suitably trained member available for selection to sit on the Hearings Subcommittee for notified resource consent applications. This will require the member to hold current certification under the Making Good Decisions Training, Assessment and Certification Programme for RMA Decision-Makers. No Board member shall be eligible for selection if the Board has made a submission on the matter to be decided.

NOTE: The Ministry for the Environment advocates that Councils offer specialist RMA training in areas of law which are difficult to grasp or where mistakes are commonly made. This is to complement the Good Decision Making RMA training that they run (which is an overview and basic summary of decision making, rather than an in-depth training in specific areas of the RMA). Therefore in order to facilitate this, the RMA training run for elected members who wish to be hearings commissioners is mandatory.

Reasons for the importance of the training:

§  Hearings commissioners are kept abreast of developments in the legislation.

§  Legal and technical errors that have been made previously are avoided (many of which have resulted in Environment Court action which is costly, time consuming and often creates unrealistic expectations for the community).

§  The reputation of Council as good and fair decision makers or judges (rather than legislators) is upheld.

 

Consider and make recommendations to Council on:

·             Particular issues notified from time to time by Council to the Community Board, including roading issues within the Community Board’s area.

·             Roading issues considered by the Mayor and Chief Executive to be strategic due to their significance on a city-wide basis, including links to the State Highway, or where their effects cross ward or community boundaries.

·             Parks, reserves and sports ground naming for sites that have a high profile, city-wide importance due to their size and location and/or cross ward or community boundaries.

·             Representatives to any Council committee, subcommittee, subordinate decision-making body, working group, or ad hoc group on which a Community Board representative is required by Council.

·             The setting, amending or revoking of speed limits in accordance with the Hutt City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2015, including the hearing of any submissions.


 

appendix 1 – community engagement fund

criteria

The fund is for local activities and events that directly benefit the local community. 

 

To be eligible for funding the organisation must be a charitable trust or an incorporated society and the activity must take place within the Hutt. 

 

Each of the city’s seven wards receive funding according to the number of residents within its boundaries. For each resident there is an allocation of 40 cents. 

The ward allocations are listed below:

Ward

Amount

Eastbourne

$2,366

Petone

$6,250

Wainuiomata

$8,607

Central

$9,320

Eastern

$8,461

Northern

$7,644

Western

$6,201

Applications must support the Local Community Plan, if there is one, and also core Council business as identified in the Long Term Plan.

Decisions

Each Community Board decides the funding applications within its area. Boards are free to distribute their funding in a single large allocation or spread it over a number of smaller ones.

What can be funded

·         purchase of office equipment

·         food and catering costs

·         community festivals

·         youth group events and projects run by the elderly or citizens associations

·         art projects that are not part of the core curriculum

·         advertising, promotion costs

What won’t be funded

Activities that:

·         promote an organisation’s religious, ethical, commercial or political views

·         involve buying land or buildings or carrying out maintenance on buildings 

·         duplicate services that are already covered by Council or by government agencies eg, health or education providers

·         have already begun or have already finished

·         involve the redistribution of funds to others at the applicant’s discretion

·         involve fundraising or legal costs

·         involve capital investments or trust funds

·         go towards prize money

·         are operational costs eg, salaries, wages, rent, power

Funding rules

Successful applicants must:

·         use funds only for the approved purpose and in accordance with any terms and conditions set by Council

·         use funds by June 30 of the following year

·         let Council’s funding officer know immediately if any difficulty or potential difficulty arises that may compromise the service or project

·         lay a complaint with Police if any funds are stolen or misappropriated, and then notify Council

·         allow Council to audit the use of the funds should it wish to do so

·         recognise Council’s  support in all publicity material, annual reports and similar publications

·         complete an Accountability Report no later than six weeks after completing the project. This should outline how the funds were used and how the community benefited

·         make a presentation to the funding group showing how the event met its objectives.

Council’s Community Funding Advisor is available to support and assist community groups when making applications through the Council’s online grants system.

 

 

    


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Wainuiomata Community Board | Poari Hapori o Wainuiomata

 

Meeting to be held in the Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata on

 Wednesday 14 April 2021 commencing at 6.30pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       PRESENTATIONS

a)      Presentation on Council's proposed Long Term Plan 2021-31 (21/479)

Verbal presentation by Kara Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development, Hutt City Council

b)      Presentation by Local Councillor from Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) (21/480)

Verbal presentation by Local Councillor from Greater Wellington Regional Council.

c)      Presentation on the Greater Wellington Long Term Plan (21/490)

Presentation by Cr Josh van Lier from Greater Wellington Regional Council.

d)     Presentation on Wainuiomata Town Centre Framework and Streetscape Plan (21/489)

Verbal presentation by:

·      Dan Males, Local

·      Chris McDonald, McIndoe Urban

·      Gary Craig, Head of City Growth, Hutt City Council

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.   

 

5.       Minutes

Meeting minutes Wainuiomata Community Board, 17 February 2021              11

          Meeting minutes Extraordinary Wainuiomata Community Board, 1 March 2021  27

6.       Committee Advisor's report (21/437)

Report No. WCB2021/2/46 by the Democracy Advisor                                    32

7.       Wainuiomata Reserve Review (21/559)

Report No. WCB2021/2/54 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner   36

8.       QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.   

 

 

 

 

Toi Lealofi

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR

          


                                                                      26                                         17 February 2021

 

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Wainuiomata Community Board | Poari Hapori o Wainuiomata

 

Minutes of a meeting held in the Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata on

 Wednesday 17 February 2021 commencing at 6.30pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Cr K Brown

Ms D McKinley (Chair)

 

Mr T Stallworth

Mr G Sue

 

Mrs J Winterburn

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  Mr G Tupou and Ms S Tuala-Le’afa

 

IN ATTENDANCE:       Mayor Campbell Barry (part meeting)

                                          Cr J Briggs

Ms H Oram, Director Environment and Sustainability

Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development

Mr D Simmons, Traffic Asset Manager

Ms K Stannard, Head of Democratic Services (part meeting)

                                          Ms T Lealofi, Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

1.       APOLOGIES

Resolved: (Ms McKinley/Mr Sue)                                             Minute No. WCB 21101

“That the apologies received from Mr Tupou and Ms Tuala-Le’afa be accepted and leave of absence be granted.”

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.

 

Speaking under public comment, Mr M Shierlaw expressed concern at the noise test report conducted by an unqualified noise test controller at the Wainuiomata Cleanfill. He tabled a letter from The Acoustical Society of New Zealand, attached as pages 18 and 20 to the minutes and three recommendations for the Board to consider to Council, attached as page 21 to the minutes.

 

 

Resolved: (Ms McKinley/Cr Brown)                                         Minute No. WCB 21102

“That Standing Order 15.2 be temporarily suspended to allow public comment to be extended beyond 30 minutes.”

 

Speaking under public comment, Ms T Leota expressed concern at the proposed establishment of a vape shop to be established in the Wainuiomata community. She said this was not setting a good example for the youth.

 

Speaking under public comment, Ms S Moffat spoke to her statement, attached as page 22 to the minutes.

 

Mr Sue expressed support for updated progress information received by Council regarding the Wainuiomata Cleanfill.

 

Speaking under public comment, Ms J Wootton expressed concern regarding residents residing in rural areas not receiving updates on the rubbish collection.

 

In response to a question from a member of the public, the Director Environment and Sustainability advised Council officers had engaged with residents on Coast Road to advise of Council’s decision.

 

3.

Mayor's Address

Mayor Barry read out his Mayoral statement attached as pages 16 and 17 to the minutes.

4.

Presentation by Local Councillor from Greater Wellington Regional Council

Cr Josh van Lier was an apology for the meeting.

5.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

          There were no conflict of interest declarations.

6.       Minutes

Resolved: (Ms McKinley/Mr Stallworth)                             Minute No. WCB 21103

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Wainuiomata Community Board held on Wednesday,
4 November 2020, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

 

7.

Committee Advisor's report (21/14)

Report No. WCB2021/1/6 by the Democracy Advisor

 

Resolved: (Ms McKinley/Cr Brown)                                  Minute No. WCB 21104

“That the report be noted and received.”

 

8.

Proposed New Public Street Name: Wainuiomata Mall Redevelopment at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata (21/18)

Report No. WCB2021/1/14 by the Traffic Engineer

 

Speaking under public comment, Mr T Kells expressed support for naming the new public street Harry Martin Lane. He outlined the work Mr Martin had undertaken in the Wainuiomata community.

Speaking under public comment, Ms N Coleman supported the comments made by Mr Kells.

Speaking under public comment, Ms L Olsen and Ms A Puketapu elaborated on the meaning of Raukura. A video was played of Kaumatua Kara Puketapu. Mr Puketapu expressed the importance of the name Te Ara Raukura and why it was important to use a Te Reo Māori name for the street.

Speaking under public comment, Ms J Sylvester expressed concern that Mr Reg Moore’s name was not shortlisted for consideration of the new street name. She spoke to the statement attached as page 23 to the minutes.

Speaking under public comment, Mr H Taitui spoke to the statement attached as page 24 to the minutes.

Speaking under public comment, Mr P Rangitaawa spoke to the statement attached as pages 25 to 26 of the minutes.

Speaking under public comment, Ms D McIvor expressed support for naming the new street Harry Martin Lane. She outlined the work Mr Martin undertook for the Wainuiomata community.

Speaking under public comment, Mr S Tanaki expressed support for naming the new street a Te Reo Māori name. He expressed the meaning of Hapori Lane which meant ‘We are the community of Wainuiomata’.

Speaking under public comment, Mr J Tumou supported the comments made by Mr Tanaki. He elaborated on the meaning of the Hapori Lane name. He said the meaning had a community connection being connected as one.

Speaking under public comment, Mr L Wananga expressed support for naming the new street Hapori Lane.  He also expressed support for the comments made by Mr Tanaki.

Speaking under public comment, Mrs T Samuels expressed support  for naming the new public street Hapori Lane. She said Hapori celebrated ordinary people who served the community.

Speaking under public comment, Ms S Luana expressed support for naming the new public Hapori Lane, Te Ara Ruakura or Te Ara Ngākau.  She said Te Reo Māori name should be used for the new street name.


Speaking under public comment, Ms K Saigis expressed support for naming the new street Hapori Lane. She advised she was an educational leader who believed educating students on the importance of street names and the meaning behind them.

Speaking under public comment, Ms C Eddy expressed support for naming the new street Harry Martin Lane. She outlined the work Harry Martin had undertaken over the years for the Wainuiomata community.

The Traffic Asset Manager elaborated on the report.

Ms Winterburn expressed concern that the Board had insufficient time to consult with the community. She expressed support for naming the new street Harry Martin Lane. She outlined the work and commitment Mr Martin had contributed to the Wainuiomata community. She acknowledged the petition from Wainuiomata High School students proposing 50% street name be considered in Te Reo Māori.

Mr Sue expressed support for Te Ara Raukura.  He elaborated on the meaning of the name.  He supported the comments made by Ms Winterburn. He noted the importance of acknowledging Mr Martin and the work he had undertaken in the community.

In response to a question regarding process for an existing street name,  the Traffic Asset Manager said there was a process that needed to be undertaken for an existing street name change.

Mr Stallworth expressed support for the new public street Harry Martin Lane.  He outlined the work Mr Martin contributed to the community.  He acknowledged the petition from Wainuiomata High School students proposing 50% of street names be considered in Te Reo Māori.

Ms McKinley expressed support for naming the new public street Harry Martin Lane and Te Ara Ngākau. She elaborated on the meaning of Ngākau which represented the heart of Wainuiomata.

Cr Brown expressed support for the comments of previous speakers regarding naming the new street Harry Martin Lane. She noted the petition from the Wainuiomata High School students with regardto their aspiration to have 50% street names in Te Reo Māori. She outlined Council’s Naming Policy review. She noted the importance of working partnership with Mana Whenua.  She expressed support for the Hapori Lane and Te Ara Raukura submissions. She said the meaning was significant and it stood with mana.

In response to a question from a member regarding Council’sName Policy review, the Traffic Asset Manager said the review would be considered for future policy changes.

 

MOVED: (Ms McKinley/Mr Stallworth)

 

“That the Board approves a street name for the new Public Road (attached as Appendix 1 to the report) as Harry Martin Lane.”

 

AMENDMENT MOVED: (Cr Brown/Gary Sue)

 

“That the Board approves a street name for the new Public Road as Hapori Lane.

 

The amendment was declared LOST on the voices.

 

moved: (Ms McKinley/Mr Stallworth)                                        Minute No. WCB 21105

“”That the Board:

(1)     approves a street name for the new Public Road (attached as Appendix 1 to the report) as Harry Martin Lane; and

 

(2)     approves the appropriate road type as shown in the list attached as Appendix 3 to the report.”

The meeting adjourned at 8.31pm and resumed at 8.37pm.

9.

2021 NZ Community Board Conference (21/111)

Memorandum dated 29 January 2021 by the Senior Democracy Advisor

 

Resolved: (Ms McKinley/Cr Brown)                                  Minute No. WCB 21106

“That the Board:

1)    notes the Community Board’s Conference will be held in Gore from 22-24 April 2021, attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum;

2)    notes the estimated cost of attending the conference per Board member is approximately $2,000.00;

3)    notes that the Training Policy for Community Boards adopted by Council at its meeting held on 26 March 2019, attached as Appendix 2 to the memorandum; and

4)    agrees that Ms Dawn McKinley attends the 2021 New Zealand Community Board Conference.”

10.        a)

Chair's Report (21/31)

Report No. WCB2021/1/7 by the Chairperson

 

 

Resolved: (Ms McKinley/Cr Brown)                               Minute No. WCB 21107

“That the report be noted and received.”

 

11.     QUESTIONS   

          There were no questions.

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 8.40pm.

 

 

 

D McKinley

CHAIR

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 14th day of April 2021

MAYOR’S STATEMENT

 

Community Board Statement - February 2021

 

Kia ora koutou katoa.  Firstly can I extend a bit of a late public Happy New Year to everyone.

 

As everyone knows, 2020 was a tough year on many fronts.  Everyone thoroughly deserved a restful and relaxing break over summer.

 

COVID-19

 

In light of yesterday's news, there is potential that the tough times may continue in our city. 

 

It is important that as community leaders we set a good example of public health behaviour and encourage others to do the same. 

 

Please use your networks to encourage our residents to scan QR codes, wash and sanitise hands, and maintain social distancing. 

 

And as always, check on your friends and family, and encourage ‘local’. These are stressful times, particularly for our small businesses, and it’s important that we all have each other’s back. 

 

10 year plan 

 

With the uncertainty we live in at the moment, this makes this year’s 10 year plan so important for our city. 

 

The growth Lower Hutt is experiencing is exciting and creates enormous potential for our city, but we have to be honest and confront the significant challenges that come with that.

 

Growth is putting pressure on our transport infrastructure with more people sitting in traffic. More homes means more pressure on our already ageing water infrastructure, and increases the risks of pipes failing.  

 

That’s why this 10 year plan is all about getting the basics right for all of our people -- we’re doubling our capital investment over the next ten years, with a major focus on our city’s infrastructure. 

 

We simply cannot wind up investment in infrastructure and kick the can down the road. Having an infrastructure network under pressure, coupled with the effects COVID-19, could seriously put our city at risk. 

 

Pre-engagement 

 

I’m happy to say that the focus of investing in our infrastructure got the support in our 10 year plan pre-engagement phase, with the community agreeing that this is a major priority for Lower Hutt. 

 

The community also provided feedback on our other priorities: housing, the environment, an innovative economy, connected communities, and financial sustainability. 

 

Financial sustainability

 

The latter is vital to this plan. Affordability is front of mind, as we recognise that COVID-19 has been tough on our community, and made the economic outlook more uncertain.

 

To achieve this necessary investment, we are proposing an overall 5.9% increase in rates revenue for 2021/22 – this equates to $2.50 per week per residential household.  Over half of this will be invested directly back into our critical three waters infrastructure.   

 

Conclusion

 

This 10 year plan is for our people here in Lower Hutt, and we will be seeking their feedback. On March 22, Council will meet to check off the consultation document for the 10 year plan, and will then put that out to the public on March 29 till May 3. 

 

As community board members, I encourage you to use your networks to get the consultation document out to as many people in our city. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The President The Acoustical Society of New Zealand

PO Box 1181

AUCKLAND 1140

 

Max Shierlaw

 

22 January 2021

 

Dear Max,

 

RE: Misconduct complaint- Wainuiomata Council Clean fill Assessment July 2020

 

I am the Chair of the Disciplinary Panel appointed to investigate your allegations of misconduct by Tonkin + Taylor in the Wainuiomata Clean fill noise assessment against the conditions of Resource Consent RM190050 (the July 2020 Report). The panel is comprised of three Council members of the Acoustical Society of New Zealand (ASNZ). This letter follows and is supplementary to the email correspondence between you, Mr Whitlock (ASNZ Secretary) and myself on this matter over the last few months.

 

I write to advise you of the decision of the Disciplinary Panel. This letter sets out the process for the investigation of the complaint, our determination and disciplinary measures and the rights of appeal.

 

The complaint

 

Your complaint alleges misconduct in respect to Rule 6 and Rule 9 of the ASNZ Rules of Conduct and Disciplinary Measures. Rule 6 and Rule 9 require that:

 

6.         When called upon to give an opinion in a professional capacity members shall give an opinion that is objective and reliable to the best of their ability.

 

9.         In respect of a professional relationship, whether with employer or client, a member shall disclose any financial or other interest they may have which constitutes a conflict of interest.

 

The complaint investigation process

 

Rule 12 of the ASNZ Rules of Conduct and Disciplinary Measures sets out the process for investigating any complaint of alleged improper conduct or breach of the Rules of Conduct. The ASNZ Council followed this process, including forming the Disciplinary Panel to study the evidence and request more facts as required to make a determination.

 

The details of the complaint were first communicated to Tonkin + Taylor on 29 October 2020 and they responded to the ASNZ dated 4 November 2020.

 

Following a detailed review of the available information, the Disciplinary Panel found substance to the complaint regarding Rule 6 (for the reasons set out in the following section). No substance to the complaint made in respect of Rule 9 was found.

 

The sub-committee then followed step F (i) of the Rules of Conduct which directs that:

 

(f)        If the complaint is considered by the council to have substance then the Council shall:

 

(i)         Advise the affected member and invite the member to make further submissions within 5 working days

 

The Disciplinary Panel emailed Tonkin + Taylor on 11 December 2020 inviting them to make further submissions within five working days. They responded on 18 December 2020. The Disciplinary Panel reconvened on 14 January 2020 to further discuss the alleged misconduct in light of the further submissions to determine whether the complaint was indeed justified and if so, the appropriate disciplinary measures.

 

Determination on Rule 9

 

Rule 9 of the ASNZ Rules of Conduct and Disciplinary measures require that:

 

9.         In respect of a professional relationship, whether with employer or client, a member shall disclose any financial or other interest they may have which constitutes a conflict of interest.

 

The Disciplinary Panel’s investigation has found no substances to the complaint made in respect of Rule 9. This complaint has been dismissed by the Disciplinary Panel.

Determination on Rule 6

Rule 6 of the ASNZ Rules of Conduct and Disciplinary Measures require that:

 

6. When called upon to give an opinion in a professional capacity members shall give an opinion that is objective and reliable to the best of their ability.

 

Based on our thorough review of the information available, the Disciplinary Panel upholds the complaint relating to Rule 6.

 

The Disciplinary Panel’s issues with the July 2020 report include (but are not limited to):

 

•          The regular incorrect use of specific terminology from NZS6802,

 

•          A failure to demonstrate how some measurements had been adjusted in accordance with NZS6802 despite the conclusion that compliance with the consent conditions was achieved (for example measurement 2 at location 2)

•          Generally, based on the information within the July 2020 report, it was not possible to conclude with any reasonable degree of confidence that compliance with the consent conditions was achieved

 

Disciplinary Measures

 

The authors of the July 2020 Report are not full Members of the ASNZ. The Member status in the ASNZ can be held by a person only, and not a company. In strict terms, the Disciplinary Panel are not able to apply the Rules of Conduct to the authors of the report or Tonkin & Taylor.

 

However, Mr Darran Humpheson of Tonkin + Taylor made it clear in his correspondence to us that he took ultimate responsibility for the report stating, “Darran Humpheson performed the final technical review of the report.” The Disciplinary Panel have therefore directed its response and findings to Mr Humpheson.

 

Rule 12(g) of the ASNZ Rules of Conduct and Disciplinary measures directs that:

g          If the complaint is upheld the Council shall immediately advise the complainant and the affected member, and any or all of the following measures may be imposed by the Council:

 

•          Suspension of membership for a notified period

•          Expulsion from the Membership of the Society

•          Reprimand

•          The Council shall have the discretion to inform interested parties.

 

The Disciplinary Panel has determined that the breach of Rule 6 in this case does not warrant either a suspension or expulsion from the Acoustical Society of New Zealand.

 

However, the Disciplinary Panel considers that it is appropriate to reinforce the importance of complying with the Rules of Conduct, and in particular Rule 6. The Disciplinary Panel has written to Mr Humpheson and have provided a reprimand in accordance with Rule 12 of the Rules of Conduct.

 

Rights of appeal

 

Rule 12(h) outlines Mr Humpheson’s rights to appeal against our decision as follows:

(h) The affected member may appeal against the decision of the Disciplinary Panel and/or Council. The Council shall appoint an Appeals Panel of at least three long standing members with experience in the relevant field. The Appeals Panel shall reassess the evidence and request more evidence as necessary. The decision of the Appeals Panel shall be final and binding.

 

Please contact me if you have any further questions or require any clarification on the points made in this letter.

 

 

Yours sincerely

 

Jon Styles

President

The Acoustical Society of New Zealand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questions submitted to Wainuiomata Community Board Feb 2021

 

Given the responsibility of the WCB to act as an advocate for the interests of their community can each member of the Board please let us know what they have done to advocate for the community regarding the ongoing non-compliance of the Wainuiomata Cleanfill (officially recognised through both audits, noise testing and industry review).

For transparency each Board member can answer each question, please respond in the minutes to the following questions:

 

1)      Please describe how have you personally “proactively and constructively engaged with residents” on the Wainuiomata Cleanfill matters that affect the local community?

 

2)      Please describe how you personally have raised these issues with Council?

 

3)      Please describe how you have advocated for the community regarding the Cleanfill.

 

Background: The last three noise tests show exceedances of noise which is demonstrable of ongoing noise breaches of the conditions of the consent. This noise affects resident living near the cleanfill. HCC own the cleanfill and their inability to adhere to consent conditions or liaise with residents in a meaningful and timely manner is of concern to neighbours and affects our wider community. Ongoing non-compliance of consent conditions affects all residents.

We affected residents have been raising our concerns with the Wainuiomata Community Board repeatedly, we’d like to hear the specifics regarding how you have been advocating for us.

 

-          The last audit showed both noise exceedances and non-compliance re: lack of community consultation/involvement of the CLG

 

-          The first noise test was not conducted in an appropriate manner according to acoustics industry guidelines and has been found to be wrong.

 

-          Peer reviews of noise testing have found that the noise testing has “not been determined correctly”, shows other condition breaches and show that the data has been potentially misrepresented to residents.

 

I was asked at the Board meeting to supply evidence of the breaches, wrong reporting and peer reviews. They are attached, please review them thoroughly and respond with the plan of how you plan to advocate for your community on these serious issues affecting us.

 

Kind regards,

Sally-ann,

Resident & Affected party

 

 

 

 

I am totally shocked that Reg Moore's name has not been short listed for a street name.

 

Reg entered politics as a Councillor for the Hutt County Council in 1966, and if my information is correct, he served on this local body until the reforms of 1989.

 

Reg Moore was the first ever Chairperson of this very board from 1989 to 2001, and deputy Chair from 2001 to 2004.

In total Reg served something like 44 years serving this community, on various local government boards and council.

As chairperson of this board in 2006 I was given the task of organising the celebration of Reg's 40 years in Local Government. This was not an easy task, there were a couple of obstacles I had to overcome. Reg being a very private person, and he didn't like council wasting money having social functions. With some gentle persuasion and heaps of negotiations I was able to achieve my goal.

 

In the early years of Reg’s political career he never got paid for attending meetings. He did tell me that he spent many evenings out at meetings leaving his wife at home to cope with the home front.

 

Reg was very giving of his knowledge and always helped newcomers to the board. If you wanted to know anything about the history of Wainuiomata or flooding just ask Reg. Also, Reg was an amazing researcher, give him a project to get his teeth into he was like a dog with a bone.

In 2002 Reg received the Member of New Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM) for services to the community.

 

What better way to acknowledge the contribution that Reg has made to this community and especially this board than name a street after him.

 

 

Julie Sylvester

17-2-2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wainuiomata Community Board meeting 17 February 2021

Item 9: Proposed New Public Street Name: Wainuiomata Mall Redevelopment at 18 The Strand and Proposed New Private Street Name: 80 Parkway, Wainuiomata

Statement from Poropiti Rangitaawa

Tēnā koutou Te Pori Hapori o Wainuiomata (the Community Board of Wainuiomata).

Tēnā koutou Te Hapori o Wainuiomata (The community of Wainuiomata).

Tēnā koutou ki ngā Hapori o tēnā o tēnā o tēnei whenua o Aotearoa me Tawāhi hoki (I greet you the communities here, over there, around New Zealand and also over the sea).

Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou katoa.

Who am I? Poropiti Rangitaawa. I am the great great grandson of Te Kaeaea, the chief of Ngāti Tama from the Northern tribe of Taranaki. He is buried at Te Puni Street Peto-one. I am a shareholder of the Port Nicholson Block in Petone. He wanted the best for his people, for his Iwi, for his community to a pathway of survival, a pathway of hope for Ngāti Tama.

I am a shareholder of Parihaka in Taranaki. Tohu Kākahi rāua ko Te Whiti o Rongomai ngā manu e rua. They wanted the best for the iwi, for the community.

I was born in Whākahurangi (Stratford), the southern part of Taranaki so I am Taranaki katoa.

Suggested road name: Hapori Lane

This represents two languages – Māori and Pakeha. ‘Hapori’ means ‘community’ (Māori dictionary) and ‘Lane’ (English dictionary, called Google) means ‘a narrow road, pathway, byway, footpath or passage way.’

But if you break the word ‘Hapori’ down:

‘Hā’ means breath, essence, health, taste

‘Pori’ means supporter, people, tribe.

The breath that supports, the breath of the tribe, the breath of the people.

Hapori Lane – representing everyone (every race, tribe, language, nation, culture and religion, young, old and those that passed away and you).

Most names around Wainuiomata have street names of a certain person or family name or some history to it but we don’t have a community name. We have Wainui or Wainuiomata.

But Hapori Lane has the whole community of people and a perfect place and name.

A question: What brings people together? It is food. Titiro atu (look up) to the sign above my head that comes from this library: ‘Community Space’

Hapori Lane:

1.Play
2. Laugh
3. Eat
4. Create
5. Unite as one Hāpori Lane

Nō reira

Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou katoa.

 

 

 

         


                                                                      31                                                1 March 2021

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Wainuiomata Community Board | Poari Hapori o Wainuiomata

 

Minutes of an extraordinary meeting held in the Wainuiomata Library, Queen Street, Wainuiomata on

 Monday 1 March 2021 commencing at 6.30pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Mr G Tupou (Chair)

Ms D McKinley (Deputy Chair)

 

Mr T Stallworth

Mr G Sue

 

Ms S Tuala-Le’afa (via audio-visual)

Mrs J Winterburn (via audit visual)

 

Cr K Brown

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  There were no apologies.

 

IN ATTENDANCE:       Mayor Campbell Barry
Cr J Briggs

Ms J Miller, Chief Executive

                                          Mr M Jennings, Principal Māori Advisor

                                          Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development

                                          Mr D Simmons, Traffic Asset Manager 

                                          Ms K Stannard, Head of Democratic Services

Ms T Lealofi, Democracy Advisor

                                          Mr M Ackroyd, Service Desk Analyst (part meeting)

                                         

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

The Chair opened the extraordinary meeting with a Karakia.

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

There were no apologies.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.

3.

Notice of Motion - 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata (21/287)

Memorandum dated 25 February 2021 by the Head of Democratic Services

 

Speaking under public comment, Ms Jane Hanson expressed concern with members breaking their vote after five days due to a group of people believing that the new public road name at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata should be Māori. 

Speaking under public comment, Ms Margaret Willard acknowledged both sides of the debate in naming the public road at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.   She endorsed the previous public speaker’s comments.  She asked that, to enable both sides to work towards mutual understanding, the Board did not revoke its decision made at its meeting held on 17 February 2021 and instead worked with Council over naming the Queen Street Reserve. 

Speaking under public comment, Ms Ngaire Lambourne spoke about Wainuiomata being as one community supporting each other and working together.  She asked that ‘Harry Martin’ be retained for 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.  She suggested members consider setting up a Walk of Fame, similar to Petone’s Walk of Champions.

Speaking under public comment, Mr Hepetema Taitua expressed support for Hapori Lane as ‘Hapori’ resonated with the Wainuiomata community and how the community was perceived.  He highlighted that Hapori’ translated to community.  He acknowledged the petition, signed by 40 people, supporting Hapori Lane for the new road name at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.

Speaking under public comment, Ms Tuli Sagaga spoke of being moved by the outcome of the Board’s last meeting in terms of naming rights. She expressed support for the new road name at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.

Speaking under public comment, Mr Poropiti Rangitaane expressed support for Hapori Lane for the new public road name at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.  He advised that ‘Hapori’ represented people of every nation, brought people together, working in unity and leaving no-one behind.

Speaking under public comment, Ms Ann Pibal advised members to change Queen Street and name it something else.

Speaking under public comment, Ms Elle Abel believed that there was not enough consultation with the community about street names.  She considered that there needed to be more conversations before the Board made a decision.   She asked members for better consultation with the community to ensure the community had its say.

In response to a question from a member, Ms Abel advised that a sensible timeframe for consultation would be approximately two-three weeks.

Speaking under public comment, Mr Greg Hawkins advised that he did not live in Wainuiomata but worked in the Wainuiomata community.  He expressed support for Hapori’ for the new road name at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.

Speaking under public comment, Ms Tute Porter-Samuels expressed support for ‘Hapori’ for the new road name at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.  She acknowledged the work that the community had undertaken to make the community a better place.

Speaking under public comment, Mr Kura Moeahu, Chairman of Te Rūnanganui o Te Āti Awa ki Te Upoko o Te Ika Re Rungata expressed support for ‘Te Ara Raukura’ for the new road name at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.  He spoke of being tired of people talking on their behalf and talking on behalf of Māori with the voice of mana whenua often being silenced due to colonisation over time.  He elaborated on the story in chronological order of his ancestors.  He highlighted the word ‘Raukara’, which the women wore, was a symbol to remind how each one of us must act towards each other.  He said that over a period of time mana whenua had welcomed, with open arms, many iwi.  He spoke of mana whenua working in partnership, in unison and working alongside other iwi.  He expressed support for Wainuiomata High School presenting its petition supporting Māori names to Mayor Barry and the Board at an earlier meeting.

The Chair thanked members of the public for taking the time to share their views.

 

The motion was taken in parts.  Parts (1)-(3) were declared CARRIED on the voices.

 

Resolved(Mr Tupou/Mr Sue)                                      Minute No. WCB 21101(2)

“That the Board revokes resolution (1) Minute No. WCB 211014 approving a street name for the new Public Road, Wainuiomata Mall Development at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata as Harry Martin Lane made at its meeting held on 17 February 2021.”

 

Resolved(Mr Tupou/Mrs Winterburn)                                    Minute No. WCB 21102(2)

“That the Board:

(1)   considers a replacement street name for the new Public Road, Wainuiomata Mall Development at 18 The Stand, Wainuiomata; and

(2)   notes that officers have prepared a report recommending an appropriate new road for use of the name Harry Martin.”

4.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS     

          There were no conflict of interest declarations.

5.

Proposed New Public Street Name: Wainuiomata Mall Redevelopment at 18 The Strand and Proposed New Private Street Name: 80 Parkway, Wainuiomata (21/282)

Report No. WCB2021/1/52 by the Traffic Asset Manager

 

The Traffic Asset Manager elaborated on the report.

In response to questions from members, the Traffic Asset Manager advised there was a process to go through for changing street names and officers were working their way through reviewing Council’s Naming Policy.  He also advised that the remaining preferred street names had been confirmed with Land Information New Zealand and would be added to the Reserved Street Name list.  He highlighted that it was the Board’s decision on the priority for the names on the Reserved Street Name list.

Cr Brown acknowledged the work undertaken previously by submitters submitting street names for the road.  She expressed support for the name ‘Te Ara Raukura’ for the proposed new road at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.  She advised that the main point for her was the students from Wainuiomata High School speaking passionately at a previous Board meeting for increasing Māori street names across the City and in particular Wainuiomata.  She noted that the Board had endorsed the request.   She advised that mana whenua did not always assert their choice of names but in this case they had a well sorted name.  She believed that ‘Te Ara Raukura’ held a lot of mana and was a beautiful name with significance.

Ms Winderburn apologised to mana whenua for any offence caused at the last Board meeting perceived or otherwise.   She advised that it was her intention to serve the community with the best of her heart and ability, with the information at hand.  She apologised for any hurt and disrespect.  She expressed support for ‘Te Ara Raukura’ for the proposed new road at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata.  She advised that ‘Raukura’ (white feather) was a symbol of peace and unity. 

Mr Stallworth spoke of his journey of discovering the significance of ‘Te Ara Raukura’.  He advised that he could relate to the importance of having land named after a person.  He spoke of living in Wainuiomata and liking the togetherness of the community.  He also spoke of the importance of honouring and acknowledging Harry Martin and believed this would be done by naming 80 Parkway after Harry Martin. He expressed support for ‘Te Ara Raukura’ for the proposed new road at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata because it tied the community to the land. 

Ms McKinley advised that there was no disrespect intended to any group when she cast her vote at the Board meeting held on 17 February 2021 for the road to be named Harry Martin.  She also advised that at the last Board meeting the street naming process was followed in accordance with Hutt City Council’s Street Naming Policy.  She spoke of the distress and upset after the last Board meeting and the division that had been caused in the community.  She welcomed the review of Council’s Street Naming Policy.   She said that the reason for not agreeing to revoke the Board’s resolution made at its meeting held on 17 February 2021 was because it undermined the democratic process. 

 

Mr Sue said that it was a shame that the matter had come to the point of dividing the community.  He expressed concern that too many people in the community had hidden behind their phones or computers criticising members who had spent a lot of time helping the community.  He highlighted that a true community would not be fighting over the matter.  He advised that it was a good time to review the consultation process around naming street names.  He acknowledged the work undertaken by Ms McKinley.

The Chair advised that the officer’s recommendations honoured both the Treaty partnership between Her Majesty The Queen and also the iwi.  He also advised that the officer’s recommendations honoured the late Harry Martin.

 

Resolved: (UNANIMOUS)  (Mr Tupou/Mrs Winterburn)        Minute No. WCB 21103(2)

“That the Board:

(1)   notes the seven preferred names for the proposed new Public Road at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata;

(2)   notes the endorsement by Te Rūnanganui o Te Āti Awa for the name ‘Te Ara Raukura’ for the proposed new Public Road at 18 The Strand, Wainuiomata;

(3)   approves “Te Ara Raukura” as the street name for the proposed new Public Road as
18 The Strand, Wainuiomata; and

(4)   approves “Harry Martin Lane” as the street name for the proposed new Private Road at
80 Parkway, Wainuiomata.”

For the reason that the respective developments can progress to the issuing of titles and to allow utilities connections to be made.

6.       QUESTIONS   

          There were no questions.

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 7.40pm with a Karakia.

 

 

 

G Tupou

CHAIR

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 14th day of April 2021

   


                                                                                      34                                                           14 April 2021

Wainuiomata Community Board

17 March 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/437)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2021/2/46

 

Committee Advisor's report

 

 

 

 

1.    The purpose of the report is to update the Board on items of interest.

 

Recommendation

That the report be noted and received.

 

Council’s current consultation and Community Engagement

10 Year plan 2021-2031

2.    Have your say on our proposed 10 year plan.  It’s about getting the basics right and putting in place strong foundations for the future – that is why there is a focus on increased investment in our infrastructure and services that support all of our people and city to thrive.

3.    Have your say between 6 April and 6 May 2021. Then the Mayor and Councillors will consider all feedback, which will inform the final plan in July 2021. This can be viewed on the Council website: http://www.huttcity.govt.nz/Your-Council/Have-your-say/Consulting-on/10-year-plan-2021-2031/

District Plan Review

 

4.    We’re in early stages of reviewing our District Plan – the city’s rule book for development and how land is used. It affects every resident of Lower Hutt. Have your say by clicking on the link: https://haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/district-plan-review

 

 

 



Wainuiomata Town Centre and Framework and Streetscape Plan

 

5.    We are now ready to share a concept plan with stakeholders and the Wainuiomata community and seek feedback on different elements of the design. This can be viewed on the Council website: http://www.huttcity.govt.nz/Your-Council/Have-your-say/Consulting-on/wainuiomata-town-centre-framework-and-streetscape-plan/

Waiu Dog Park update

6.    The fencing materials arrived last week, so fencing work will now be starting;

7.    Maintenance on the carpark has been worked on whilst waiting for the fencing materials;

8.    Access to the stream has been created via some crafty earthworks;

9.    The process for naming the park is the same process as that for a street; the process has begun – it is generally a 4-6 week process, and then this goes through the Council meeting cycle ; and

10.  The opening date has been set for 15 May 2021.

2020/21 Administration and Training Budget

 

11.  The Board is allocated $8000.00 per annum, comprised of:

-     Miscellaneous Administration                                 $5,000.00

-     Training                                                                     $3,000.00

12.  The following is the Board’s expenditure as at March 2021

           

Miscellaneous Budget

Training

Budget

Balance remaining

 $2,120.96

$3,000.00

-          Advertising            $1,206.00

-          Catering                  $136.48

-          Miscellaneous        $673.04

 

 

-          Training                  $ 478.26

 

-

Balance remaining

$105.44

$2,521.74

 

 

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: WCB Actual Expenditure 2020 21 - 14 April 2021

35

 

 

Author: Toi Lealofi

Democracy Advisor

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: WCB Actual Expenditure 2020 21 - 14 April 2021

 


                                                                                      40                                                           14 April 2021

Wainuiomata Community Board

01 April 2021

 

 

 

File: (21/559)

 

 

 

 

Report no: WCB2021/2/54

 

Wainuiomata Reserve Review

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To seek endorsement for the adoption of the “Review of Reserves, Wainuiomata” incorporating changes to the recommendations, following feedback received from further consultation.

 

Recommendations

That the Board recommends that the Committee:

(1)   notes that, as requested by the Board, there has been further consultation with rural residents to inform this review;

(2)   notes that the changes made in the recommendations section of the review are in-line with consultation feedback; and

(3)   adopts the “Review of Reserves Wainuiomata” as an official Parks and Reserves plan.

For the reasons to put into effect the recommendations outlined in the review.

Background

2.    In 2013 Council completed a review of reserve land on the Lower Hutt valley floor to establish the extent to which reserve provision is needed ensuring that it meets current and future demand. That review omitted Eastbourne, Stokes Valley and Wainuiomata.

3.    In response to growth pressures and proposed housing developments in Wainuiomata  officers felt it was prudent to undertake a similar review of Reserve land in Wainuiomata to ensure the network was supporting the needs of local residents. As such, planning design management company PAOS Ltd (formerly Parks and Open Spaces Ltd) was commissioned in March 2019 to commence this review.

4.    A draft document was produced and made available for the public during the consultation process undertaken from July 2019 to December 2019. Consultation generated 409 individual submissions in which the majority of responses provided positive feedback on the Review document.

5.    While feedback and ideas submitted during the consultation phase have been implemented into the Review document, the final Review document remains largely unchanged.

6.    This document will provide guidance for future decisions on investment in asset management as part of the Annual and Long Term Planning process. 

Discussion

7.    The document’s main purpose is to consider all reserve land holdings in the Wainuiomata District with a view to assessing its continued purpose, value, and function.  This is particularly important given the increasing housing pressures and consequential population growth. 

8.    Reserves play an integral role, among other things, in providing valuable and flexible open space for both passive and active recreation, and formal and informal use.  Alongside a biodiversity function they provide relief from the urban landscape while enhancing the natural environment.

9.    The public submission process identified a number of main themes, which have been considered and adopted where relevant in the Review document (under the Suggested Actions in the Review Document attached as appendix 1 to the report). The top five themes include.

a.   Increased number of mountain bike tracks

b.   Improved maintenance of reserves and facilities

c.   More bins and improved rubbish removal

d.   Increased signage and promotion

e.   And, increased number of walking tracks



10.  A key opportunity is the retention and development of a “Green Heart” of the civic centre through Queen Street Reserve.  This reserve was identified as a key reserve in the network particularly, in relation to it being viewed as a central landing platform for the ‘Black Creek’ path network concept.

11.  Queen Street Reserve had previously been considered by Council as a possible site for housing development. This is no longer the case. The current work being undertaken to improve the streetscape in the Queen Street area reflects the findings of this review, that the Reserve be developed as a “Green Heart” of the civic centre.  This work is expected to improve the amenity of Queen Street Reserve.

12.  The main outcomes/recommendations from the Review documents are:

a.    To create safe routes for walking and cycling by creating more paths and identifying current access restrictions., including improving the visibility of the ‘Black Creek’ network;

b.    Make existing reserves more attractive and functional by adding educational, recreational and cultural elements including way finding signs and signs generally, reserve activation activities, improved drainage to allow for use all year round and the removal of barriers for access;

c.     Ensure the importance of reserves in the community is considered  where housing intensification is happening and that they continue to be retained, developed and strategically located;

d.    Meet demand for reserve land by allocating more open/ green space, especially in areas where reserve land is lacking or there are higher levels of socio-economic deprivation.

13.  The review also notes there is an opportunity to assess the reserve value of Tipperary Grove in Glendale, given it has limited amenity and the area is already well-served for reserves. The land is well-positioned for development to help meet the current demand for housing. As noted earlier, the provision of additional reserves in the community needs to be considered in areas where housing intensification is happening.

14.  It should be noted that demographic and population data from the 2013 Census was used in the draft Review document as this was the most recent available at the time.  This estimated the population of Wainuiomata at circa 16,749. The 2018 Census data is now available and estimate the population of Wainuiomata in 2020 to be circa 19,850. This likely increase was considered at the time the review was done and officers are of the view that this does not significantly impact any of the recommendations.

 Options

15.  Recommend to Council that the “Review of Reserves Wainuiomata” be adopted as an official Parks and Reserves plan.

16.  Do not recommend to Council at this time that the “Review of Reserves Wainuiomata” be adopted and provide further direction to officers.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

17.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

18.  Council’s reserves network plays an essential role in the response to climate change, including helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and supporting biodiversity. We are regularly reviewing the way reserves are managed and maintained to ensure any negative impact on the environment from this activity is reduced.

Consultation

19.  A public consultation process was undertaken in the preparation of the draft and final Review document.

20.  Consultation was undertaken through direct and indirect engagement.  This included:

a.    Information stands at Wainuiomata Community Hub;

b.    Surveys sent by email, print, social media, and intercept surveying;

c.     Advertising in the news and on the Hutt City Council’s website; and

d.    Mail drops to rural residents.

Legal Considerations

21.  The Review of Reserves Wainuiomata promotes Section 10 of the Local Government Act provides, in part, that local government is to meet the current and future needs of communities for good-quality local public services.  This document reflects the needs and desires of the Wainuiomata community.

Financial Considerations

22.  Any financial considerations will be considered as a part of the future asset management planning process with project and budget commitments being proposed during the Annual or Long Term Planning process. 

Other Considerations

23.  The Review document complements the spatial planning recently undertaken by Council.  This document was a part of the wider set of information used during the spatial planning sessions particularly, in relation to the Queen Street road network considerations.

24.  The Review document promotes the goals in other Council strategies such as:

a.    Go Outside and Play;

b.    Tākaro to Play;

c.     Council’s Long Term Plan

d.    The Reserves Strategic Directions; and

e.     The Walking and Cycling Strategy.

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Revised Review of Wainuiomata Reserves 19 August 2020

41

2

Appendix 2: Wainuiomata Reserves Review Consultation Report December 2019

69

 

Author: Tyler Kimbrell

Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marcus Sherwood

Head of Parks and Recreation

 

 

Reviewed By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Revised Review of Wainuiomata Reserves 19 August 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Wainuiomata Reserves Review Consultation Report December 2019

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 

 



[1] This excludes sites that are considered high profile, significant on a city-wide basis due to their size and location, or where the site crosses ward or community boundaries.

[2] The Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan is available from Council’s Parks and Recreation Division.