HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee meeting to be held in the
Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt
on

 Monday 21 December 2020 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

 

SUPPLEMENTARY ORDER PAPER

 

 

Public Business

 

 

 

    

  6.       recommendations to council – 21 December 2020

 

i)       Updated Urban Plus Limited Statement of Intent (20/1762)

Memorandum dated 18 December 2020 by the Director Economy and Development         2

iv)     Long Term Plan 2021-2031: Non-Financial Aspects (20/1667)

Appendix 1 – Draft Statements of Service Performance and related key
performance indicators                                                                                26

 

 

 

 

Kate Glanville

SENIOR DEMOCRACY ADVISOR

 

 

          


MEMORANDUM                                                   2                                                 21 December 2020

Our Reference          20/1762

TO:                      Chair and Members

Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee

FROM:                Kara Puketapu-Dentice

DATE:                18 December 2020

SUBJECT:           Updated Urban Plus Limited Statement of Intent

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide context to the updated Urban Plus Limited (UPL) Statement of Intent (SOI) that is being distributed to Subcommittee members and explain what has changed since the version distributed with Subcommittee agenda.

Background

2.    On 15 October 2020 UPL received a Letter of Expectation (LOE) from Council outlining a change in direction and new strategic priorities to inform an updated SOI.

3.    In response to the LOE the UPL Board approved an updated SOI for 2020/21 – 2022/23 at their Board meeting on 19 November 2020, this is the version that was included in agenda for the 21 December 2020 Subcommittee meeting.

4.    Given the existing funding restraints and competing priorities officers advised UPL that it would be helpful to consider how their work program can be adjusted to reduce the peak funding requirements in the SOI.

5.    UPL have since made adjustments to their SOI, which were approved by the Board at their Board meeting on 18 December 2020, this is the updated version attached as Appendix 1 to the memorandum.

Summary of changes

6.    Alterations have been made to development project timelines which have which have delayed the associated expenditure.  The impact of these alterations is that significant expenditure on the largest of UPLs development projects has been delayed until after proceeds from other development projects are forecast to be realised, therefore reducing the peak funding requirement.  This balances funding requirements against delivery of LOE priorities.

7.    The previous version of the SOI included a peak funding requirement of $44m in June 2022.  This peak, plus a contingency for strategic acquisitions and any unforeseeable variations against development project timelines resulted in UPL signalling a need for a borrowing facility of up to $55m being sought.

8.    The alterations to development project timelines in the updated SOI have resulted in the peak funding requirement being reduced to $34m in April 2023.  This peak, plus a contingency for strategic acquisitions and any unforeseeable variations against development project timelines mean that the borrowing facility being sought has been reduced to $42m.

9.    In the 2020/21 year it is the borrowing requirement is not expected to exceed the current $22m limit.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Revised UPL GROUP Statement of Intent 2020-2023 - December 2020

4

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Jo Miller

Chief Executive

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Revised UPL GROUP Statement of Intent 2020-2023 - December 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

                     

 


OUR VISION FOR HUTT CITY

A city where everyone thrives

WHAT: We want Lower Hutt/Te Awa Kairangi to be a city where everyone thrives.  We are committed to a pathway of partnership, collaboration and support with and for our people and to improved wellbeing for all.

WHY: We recognise the distinctive and diverse communities that make up Lower Hutt/Te Awa Kairangi and are committed to supporting our communities to address the challenges and make the most of the opportunities that arise for them.  We aim to secure the foundations of our city by investing in getting the basics right and creating a city that is residents enjoy and that attracts innovators and new business and employment opportunities.

HOW: We are focused on achieving improvements across the four well beings and grouped our key activities accordingly.

 

The Four Wellbeings

The Local Government (Community Well-being) Amendment Act 2019 restored the four aspects of community well-being. The reintroduction of these wellbeings - social, economic, environmental and cultural - recognises the work local councils do to deliver wellbeing outcomes for their communities. It also explicitly acknowledges the broader role local councils have in fostering liveable communities rather than simply being providers of “core services”.

Lower Hutt/Te Awa Kairangi is a city of diverse cultures and communities with passionate people with strengths and considerable energy, creativity, expertise and potential on which to build. The city also faces challenges with many in our communities experiencing poor health and well-being, poor educational attainment, higher unemployment and low incomes and higher vulnerability to crime.

 

We work actively alongside and for our community to ensure that everyone has an opportunity to thrive socially, economically and culturally and live in an environment that is nurtured and remains life sustaining for future generations.

 

We have grouped activity structure under each of the wellbeings and identified the Groups of Activities that contribute to the key wellbeing outcomes council is seeking to influence.  Our approach to measuring progress against these key outcomes has changed in response to our shift to aligning our Groups of activities in this way.

 

 

Four Wellbeings Outcome Framework

 

The alignment of our Groups of Activities with the four wellbeing is supported by a performance framework that identifies outcome indicators (the wellbeing outcomes we would expect to see in a city where everyone thrives) supported by key performance indicators (the contribution to improving those outcomes that council activities and services council delivers). The performance framework uses measurements that enable evaluation of progress towards improving results across the four wellbeings and achieving council’s six priorities.

 

Four Wellbeings Framework

Economic Wellbeing

Environmental Wellbeing

Social Wellbeing

Cultural Wellbeing

Priorities

Infrastructure

Innovative Economy

Housing

Financial sustainability

Protecting our environment

Connected communities

Diverse and inclusive (connected communities)

Outcome indicators

·        Population growth and composition

·        Number and type of dwellings

·        Number of cycle/walking trips per person per day

·        Reducing car use per capita – trips per day

·        Unemployment

·        Job seekers

·        Consumer spending

·        Visitor numbers

·        GDP

·        Economic diversity

 

·       Housing affordability index

·       Annual GDP

·       Increased housing supply

·       Housing register

·       Dwelling typology

·       Emergency Housing

·       Rates affordability

·       Infrastructure condition

·       Debt level

·       Surplus/break- even/deficit

·        Waste to landfill reduction

·        Carbon emission reduction

·        Flood management

·        380 litres per day l/p/d per resident (mandatory measure)

·        Healthy water supply and waterways

·        WHO index for cultural wellbeing

·        Primary health care enrolments

·        Sense of community involvement

·        Early childhood centre enrolments and providers

·        Barriers to healthcare

·        Educational achievement

·        Physical activity

·        Acceptance of cultural diversity

·        Rich and diverse arts scene

·        Civic participation

·        Community engagement

Example of output measures (see SSP document for all KPIs)

 

KPI’s developed for LTP  with service delivery managers

Climate change

 

 

 

Council's carbon footprint New measure 2021-22

Lower than previous year by 5% or more

 

Key performance indicators

 

The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure performance (what we do) and link to the outcomes we are trying to achieve for the city (why we are doing it) and were developed with service delivery managers to ensure that the KPIs:

 

·         Align with Council’s six key priorities

·         Are central to improving performance, that is, they can be used by managers at least quarterly to inform decision making and make service/performance improvements to respond to results

·         Are directly controllable by Council and measure the outcomes that we can directly influence

·         Are measurable and can be measured at least quarterly.

The activities measured by these KPI’s are those that Council is highly likely to deliver in the long term and those that lend themselves most directly to ensuring clear alignment can be made between the KPIs measuring performance (what we do) and the outcomes we are trying to achieve for the city (why we are doing it). 

 

STRATEGIC HIERARCHY DIAGRAM HERE


 

ECONOMIC WELLBEING

 

WHAT: Lower Hutt/Te Awa Kairangi is a growing city. We need to ensure we have high quality infrastructure that supports our people to receive basic services (like water), to move around and to enjoy our community facilities.  We will focus investment on three waters infrastructure and transport projects that connect our neighbourhoods, reduce congestion, and put us on a path to reduced carbon emissions. We will work to ensure we have affordable housing for a changing and growing population.  Protecting our environment by reducing the amount of rubbish and plastic products in our streets, stormwater system, harbour and beaches is vital.  Illegal dumping of rubbish is an ongoing problem and costs ratepayers many thousands of dollars every year. 

The Groups of Activities contributing to Economic Wellbeing are:

Infrastructure

Our draft Infrastructure Strategy outlines our long-term approach to ensuring we have good basic infrastructure on which to build a sustainable future.  To do this we must invest more in our three waters infrastructure, focus our investment in transport on connecting communities and enabling an innovative and diverse economy, meet all our legislative requirements and respond to the needs and the expectations of our community, now and into the future. The draft Infrastructure Strategy (the Strategy) enables and informs asset management planning and ensures decisions are made in the most efficient and effective way possible.

 

Three Waters: Over the next 10 years will focus our investment on our three waters infrastructure - drinking water, stormwater, and wastewater - to support our rapidly growing city, help us to prepare for climate change and ensure we have good basic infrastructure.

Transport: We will continue to invest in easy, safe, multi-modal transport choices to support community connectedness including the Eastern Bays Shared Path, and RiverLink and achieving the Cross Valley Connection.  The draft Infrastructure Strategy outlines our investment needs, options and intentions and we are currently developing an Integrated Transport Strategy. 

 

WHY

The future presents both challenges and opportunities for our infrastructure. The strategy focusses on where improvements can be made in response to the key challenges and opportunities we face:

 

 

 

·         Looking after and renewing the existing infrastructure which is ageing;

·         Developing new infrastructure to meet the demand for growth;

·         Ensuring a sustainable water supply;

·         Improving the health of our urban waters;

·         Responding to climate change (mitigation and adaption)

·         Responding to seismic resilience and urban flooding challenges.

The Strategy goes beyond the scope of our asset management plans and provides a strategic view of Council’s infrastructure by setting vision, principles and goals, and maintaining consistency across different asset groups.  Significant issues and opportunities, options for managing the issues and the implications of these options are outlined in the draft Infrastructure Strategy.

 

Infrastructure activities are responsible for managing the community's infrastructural assets in the form of the water supply, wastewater and stormwater networks, roading, and landfill activities.  The following activities fall under Infrastructure:

·        Water Supply

·        Wastewater

·        Stormwater

·        Roading and accessways

·        Solid Waste

Infrastructure activities play a broad role in meeting the current and future needs of our communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services and performance of regulatory functions. 

A number of operational policies and plans reflect how these activities work towards Council’s strategic objectives related to infrastructure, including:

·        Asset Management Plans – we have asset management plans in place for all activities that have a significant asset base. This includes Transport Activity Management Plan, and Water, Wastewater and Stormwater Service Plans. These plans are essential in improving the design, development and management of infrastructure and setting out how we will deliver these services in a cost effective and sustainable manner.

 

·        Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2017-2023 – a regional joint plan outlining Councils’ commitment to work together to promote an efficient waste management and minimisation. It outlines the strategy for the region, a regional action plan, individual council action plans, and supporting information.

For every activity we have provided a description of what we do, why we do it, the effects of that activity on community wellbeing, the services we provide, how we measure the success of our services, the major projects we have planned for the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2028, the income expected for the year to 30 June 2028, and a Funding Impact Statement for each group. 

City Development:

WHAT

We will take a fresh approach to economic development by:

·        doing more with others in the housing sector to build the right type of homes for Lower Hutt Te Awa Kairangi residents

·        continuing our work to address Homelessness in our city with our central government, mana whenua and community partners

·        harnessing the talents of business, education, research and science communities in Lower Hutt Te Awa Kairangi

·        attracting job creators and innovators to  provide more local job opportunities

·        championing our unique quality of life we have because of our easy access to recreational green spaces, river - Te Awa Kairangi and Harbour – Te Whanganui a Tara

WHY

Attracting and providing services for business and visitors is necessary for the city’s economic development. By supporting the business sector and promoting Hutt City as a business location and vibrant city, we generate benefits for local enterprises and our residents.  We have a unique quality of life because of our easy access to recreational green spaces, river - Te Awa Kairangi and Harbour – Te Whanganui a Tara and this is an opportunity to attract job creators and innovators to the city.


 

Solid Waste: We will implement the new approach to recycling and rubbish services. We are focused on reducing the carbon footprint of the Silverstream Landfill as well as reducing the amount of waste put into the landfill to increase its longevity and protect ratepayer’s investment.

WHAT

We manage contracts for the collection of the city’s refuse and recycling, and own and operate a landfill at which people and businesses can dispose of residual waste.

WHY

Solid waste management is necessary for the health and quality of life of the community, the local economy and the environment.  We are implementing a new, modern system for our weekly kerbside collection service for general waste and recycling. We also provide a landfill on Reynolds Bach Drive and Silverstream.

CONTRIBUTION TO WELLBEING

These groups of activities play a broad role in meeting the current and future needs of our communities for good quality local infrastructure, housing, good urban design and local public services.  These activities mainly contribute to the city’s economic wellbeing.  A thriving economy is a strong and diverse one where existing businesses grow, all members of our community benefit from a strong economy and we attract increasing numbers of visitors.

 

An accessible and connected city that is easy to move connects people in many ways from access to the digital world to actively engaging with and participating in arts, cultural, sports and other recreational and leisure activities.  A healthy, well-designed and attractive built environment that protects and enhances our environment quality of life will also attract job creators, innovators and entrepreneurs to the city.  A modern solid waste system promotes environmental wellbeing in particular through our by contributing to a healthy natural environment and public health.

Significant negative effects and their mitigation

Water Supply: Potential negative effects associated with this activity include the degradation of watercourses due to the rate of extraction of water, and degradation of habitats affected by construction or management requirements for water sources are potentially significant negative effects.   GWRC is responsible for the extraction, treatment and supply of water into the city’s water supply system. Extraction is managed to ensure that potential adverse effects are minimised to acceptable levels. We contribute towards managing the demand for water and therefore the requirement to develop new water sources through water conservation programmes, playing a leading role (through Wellington Water Ltd) in regional initiatives to manage the demand for water in the Wellington region, and supporting a bulk water charging system that incorporates incentives for water conservation.

Storm water: the discharge of contaminants in stormwater to watercourses, and flooding when the capacity of the stormwater system is exceeded, are potentially significant negative effects.  Pollution prevention programmes, road cleaning programmes and debris pits incorporated in the majority of inlets to the stormwater system all assist in minimising the entry of contaminants, and are supplemented by our monitoring regime. The stormwater system is designed to standards which reflect the level of risk at different locations and are comparable to design standards in other New Zealand cities. The asset development programme progressively addresses gaps between the current levels of protection and target design standards. We also work with GWRC with respect to flooding issues associated with watercourses under Regional Council management.

Waste water: The discharge of odours from the wastewater infrastructure, overflows from the wastewater system that are at variance with the cultural values of mana whenua and degradation of watercourses due to overflows from the wastewater system, are all potentially significant negative effects.  Discharges to air are controlled through the resource consent process and rules in the Regional Air Quality Management Plan. The discharge of odours from the wastewater infrastructure is unlikely to be of an extent that would cause environmental degradation but may be offensive to the community. Odour control systems have been fitted to parts of the wastewater infrastructure where odour problems have been experienced. Reports of odour are monitored through the HCC Request for Service system and through reports from the wastewater system maintenance and operations contractor.

Areas where overflows due to wet weather overloading of the wastewater system have been experienced are being progressively upgraded using a combination of measures. These include reducing wet weather discharges from private drains, upgrading pipelines and the provision of wet weather storage. Upgrading is carried out through the asset renewal programme, which provides for the replacement of every wastewater pipeline as it reaches the end of its useful life, and through the asset development programme, which reflects long term demand projections for the wastewater system.

Transport: Looking at the potential for negative effects associated with this activity, the potential environmental effects of growing transport demand include intensification of water runoff due to road construction, water runoff pollution from road traffic, particulates from heavy road vehicles, air emissions from road transport and associated health impacts, traffic noise and vibration, community severance relating to heavy traffic on strategic and arterial routes, loss of productive and recreational land taken for transport infrastructure, visual intrusion of roads and degradation of amenity values, and public health risks associated with traffic accidents. Transport planning considers, and includes actions to mitigate, these adverse effects.

 

In addition, we carry out crash reduction studies and remedial work on those areas with a high number of crashes. Works are undertaken every year to minimise traffic delays and as a result air pollution. We are also active in promoting alternative means of transport.

City Development: Looking at the potential for negative effects associated with this activity, focusing on low value economic sectors could divert attention and resources from those sectors that have the potential to provide greater long term value for the city and our events may cause delays through traffic diversions and road closures.

 

Solid waste: Looking at the potential for negative effects associated with this activity, environmental effects caused through failure to comply with resource consent conditions has been identified as a possible risk that is addressed through our management techniques and best practice standards. Failure to provide effective recycling and refuse collection services could lead to increased littering.

WHAT WE’VE ALREADY ACHIEVED

·         Support from Central Government ($27 million of co-funding from the COVID Response and Recovery Fund) to help our rebuild of Naenae Pool

·         The investment in shared pathways including the Eastern Bays Shared Pathway and Riverlink

·         Homelessness Strategy – as part of a city-wide partnership Councils has Hutt City Council has committed to funding three actions over the next three years and is working with and funding local organisations to deliver these actions. The actions focus on prevention of homelessness and providing immediate support to our community who are or are at risk of being homeless

·         District Plan Change 43 which goes someway to addressing housing supply issues in the city by providing for a greater range of housing types

·         Reflecting the need to ensure we have affordable housing for a changing and growing population in the strategic priorities of our CCO Urban Plus Limited.

·         A system for rubbish and recycling that works for everyone and that contributes to cutting carbon emissions and reducing the amount of waste going to landfill.

·         The partnership between Hutt City Council, Kahungunu Whānau Services, Te Rūnanganui o Te Āti Awa, and Council-owned organisation, Urban Plus Limited, is the first of its kind in the country and sets out a framework for building and delivering warm, safe and affordable homes to those Lower Hutt households in desperate need of a home.


 

Statements of Service Performance – Water Supply

 

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives, contributions and services

Economic wellbeing

Water supply

What we do

We provide a sustainable and high-quality water supply to our community for domestic and commercial use. We buy bulk water from Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC), then distribute it to the community through our water supply network. We regularly monitor the water quality and plan for the city’s future water supply, including any maintenance and upgrades needed to maintain the required service.

Water quality issues and security of the water supply, are a major focus of Wellington Water Limited (acting on behalf of all the territorial authorities in the Wellington metropolitan area).

Plans are being put in place to address the forecast impacts of climate change on our water infrastructure, and address the investment shortfall for the ‘Three Waters’ infrastructure.  In Lower Hutt/Te Awa Kairangi, around 60% of the city’s water infrastructure needs to be renewed in the next 30 years. On top of that, the city is expecting significant population growth in that time.

Addressing the significant financial challenges of ensuring we have a high-quality, affordable and durable water network is a priority for Council.

Why we do it

In supplying high-quality, affordable water, we contribute to:

                our community’s health

                community safety (through the water supply system’s fire-fighting capability)

                support residential, business and industrial development.

 

 

 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Water supply

Water supply

Drinking water supply complies with part 4 of the drinking-water standards (bacteria compliance criteria)

Drinking water

Environmental

Full Compliance - 100%

Full Compliance - 100%

Drinking water supply complies with part 5 of the drinking-water standards (protozoal compliance criteria)

Drinking water

Environmental

Full Compliance - 100%

Full Compliance - 100%

Number of complaints for drinking water per 1000 connections

Drinking water

Environmental

13

≤ 140 per 1000 connections

Where the local authority attends a call-out in response to a fault or unplanned interruption to its networked reticulation system, the following median response times measured:

·         Attendance for urgent callouts: from the time that the local authority receives notification to the time that service personnel reach the site

Drinking water

Environmental

99 minutes

≤ 60 minutes

·         Resolution of urgent callouts: from the time that the local authority receives notification to the time that service personnel confirm resolution of the fault or interruption

Drinking water

Environmental

7.4 hours

≤ 4  hours

·         Attendance for non-urgent callouts: from the time that the local authority receives notification to the time that service personnel reach the site

Drinking water

Environmental

113 hours

≤ 36 hours

·         Resolution of non-urgent callouts: from the time that the local authority receives notification to the time that service personnel confirm resolution of the fault or interruption

Drinking water

Environmental

13 days

≤ 15 days

Average drinking water consumption per resident per day

Drinking water

Environmental

389 l/p/d

≤ 345 litres per day

Percentage of real water loss from networked reticulation system

Drinking water

Environmental

19%

≤ 18%


 

Statements of service performance – Wastewater

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives, contributions and services

Economic wellbeing

Wastewater

What we do

We provide a pipe network that takes household and commercial effluent to the Seaview Wastewater Treatment Plant, which treats it to public health and environmental standards.

Opened in November 2001, the resource consents under which the treatment plant now operates ensure that all relevant standards are adhered to, and that full compliance with the Resource Management Act 1991 is achieved. The plant’s operation has led to a significant improvement in the environment. We regularly undertake maintenance and upgrades to maintain the required service levels.

Why we do it

By collecting, treating and disposing of wastewater, we provide a service to residents and businesses that supports development in the city and protects the physical environment and our community’s health.

 


 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Wastewater

Wastewater

Dry weather wastewater overflows per 1000 connections

Environmental

4.2

0 per 1000 connections

Number of complaints per 1000 connections

Environmental

19

≤ 30 per 1000 connections

Where the territorial authority attends to sewerage overflows resulting from a blockage or other fault in the territorial authority’s sewerage system, the following:

 

 

·         Attendance time: from the time that the territorial authority receives notification to the time that service personnel reach the site

 

Environmental

86 minutes

≤ 60 minutes

 

 

·         Resolution time: from the time that the territorial authority receives notification to the time that service personnel confirm resolution of the blockage or other fault

 

Environmental

3.8 hours

≤ 6 hours

 

 

Compliance with resource consents for discharges from wastewater system

 

Environmental

No enforcement action - 100% compliance

No enforcement action - 100% compliance


 

Statements of service performance – Stormwater

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives, contributions and services

Economic wellbeing

Stormwater

What we do

We provide a stormwater drainage pipe network to manage the surface water run-off from urban catchments, providing flood protection and control. Our objective is to achieve the best possible balance between the level of protection and the cost to our community.

This includes maintaining and upgrading assets to maintain the required service levels. Wellington Water has identified the need for significant investment in Lower Hutt’s ‘Three Waters’.

Why we do it

Most of the development in Lower Hutt is concentrated on flat valley plains with the potential for flooding. We need to control stormwater to protect our community’s health and safety and minimise property damage. A comprehensive stormwater system is the most efficient way to do this.

 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Stormwater

Stormwater

Achieve water quality at main recreational beaches: percentage of days that monitored beaches are suitable for recreational use during bathing season – 1 Dec to 31 Mar

Environmental

100%

90%

Number of flooding events

Environmental

1

0 flooding events

Number of habitable floors affected by flooding events

Environmental

0.16

0 per 1000 connections

Number of complaints about stormwater system performance

Environmental

10

≤ 30 per 1000 connections

Median response time to attend a flooding event, measured from the time that the territorial authority receives notification to the time that service personnel reach the site

Environmental

264 minutes

≤ 60 minutes

Compliance with resource consents for discharges from stormwater system

Environmental

1

No enforcement action - 100% compliance


 

Statements of service performance – Transport

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives and contributions

Economic wellbeing

Transport

The Transport Group manages programmes of work required to maintain, operate and renew our transport system. It is part of a continuous improvement process of our transport infrastructure. It has a focus on safety, better travel options, improved freight connections and climate change mitigation.

 

 

Activity

Introduction to services

Road Assets

What we do
We look after the operation and renewal of the road assets, including road pavements and surfacing, structures (bridges, retaining walls, and seawalls) footpaths and drainage assets. We manage our assets through a renewal programme which includes condition rating assessment, deterioration modelling, age and traffic volume and loading considerations and physical inspection.

 

Why we do it

Having the road corridor in public ownership ensures that all our residents have appropriate access to property and freedom of travel throughout Lower Hutt.

Our work provides a safe, resilient and efficient transport system which supports the economic and social life of the city. We aim to optimise whole of life costs while providing an appropriate level of service.

 

 

 

Traffic Assets

What we do

We manage the operation and renewal of traffic assets on the city’s transport system. In general, this includes assets within the road corridor and on or above the road surface such as signs and markings, traffic signals, safety barriers, parking meters, streetlights etc. Works programmes are formulated through best asset management practices and are in response to evidence based requests for improvements.

Why we do it

Traffic assets ensure people and vehicles can travel efficiently and safely. We want to provide a safe, resilient and efficient transport system which supports the economic and social aspirations of the city. We aim to optimise whole of life costs while providing the appropriate level of service. Traffic asset renewal is strategically aligned with national, regional and city objectives.

Roading Maintenance & Infrastructure contracts

What we do

We undertake street and amenity cleaning, vegetation control, maintenance of road signs, road marking, graffiti, street lighting, repair and maintenance of all existing roads, footpaths and associated assets. This includes all assets on road reserves that serve a purpose for our community. They encompass 480km of road network and 630kms of footpaths, access ways, service lanes and carparks. 

We carry out operations using maintenance contracts that cover a range of technical expertise, procured by open tender. When a contract is formed we develop and manage best practice partnerships with contractors to achieve desired outcomes for NZTA and Council. Best practice may include supporting local business, the living wage, diversity in the workplace and a low carbon footprint. It also includes engaging with local iwi where applicable and value for money.

Why we do it

Roads, footpaths and access ways are an essential service and lifeline for our community and require high levels of service with a user friendly network to ensure the safety of our pedestrians and road users. For this reason our aim is robust and accessible assets maintained and cleaned to a high standard to support positive economic and community outcomes.

Road safety services

What we do

We manage Road Safety programmes and interventions to improve the road safety performance across the Lower Hutt transport system. Safety issues are identified via a number of methods including statistical analysis, direct reporting and risk assessments.

Why we do it

Programmes and interventions are designed to eliminate risk and/or mitigate the consequence of events to improve safety performance.

Parking enforcement services

What we do

We ensure the safety and convenience of the community in and around Lower Hutt by enforcing parking regulations and vehicle standards regulations which ensures all drivers of vehicles have equal opportunity to use parking facilities in Lower Hutt.

As well as ensuring the compliance of stationary vehicles in the city, we respond to requests from the public regarding safety, inconvenience and nuisance problems that involve stationary vehicles. We have special focus on safety around schools as well and the safety of all Lower Hutt residents.

Why we do it

The Land Transport Act delegates the responsibility of enforcement of stationary vehicle offences to Territorial Authorities. Parking enforcement and education will contribute to a safe community and ensure fair and equitable access for vehicle owners.

 

Active modes

What we do

We manage the Cycleway/Shared Path and Connectivity projects for Lower Hutt. We also improve accessibility infrastructure for vulnerable and mobility impaired transport users.

The Eastern Bays Shared Path project has been awarded a $15m Government grant as part of the ‘Shovel Ready’ economic stimulus package. Construction is expected to commence by July 2021.

Why we do it

The Cycleway/Shared Path projects align with national, regional and city priorities and objectives.

Accessibility improvements for our vulnerable and mobility impaired transport users are prioritised via a programme that recognises demand - around hospitals, aged care facilities, shopping centres etc. - and need, based on survey and inspection results.

 

 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Transport

Road Assets

The average quality of ride on a sealed local road network, measured by smooth travel exposure

Roading

Economic

81%

Hold or improve rating

Traffic Assets

Travel time on key routes

Traffic

Economic

New measure 2021-22

TBC

(awaiting baseline data)

Travel time reliability

Traffic

Economic

New measure 2021-22

TBC

(awaiting baseline data)

Roading Maintenance

Percentage of sealed local road network that is resurfaced

Roading

Economic

3.5%

> 2%

Percentage of footpaths that fall within  the service standard for footpath condition

Economic

98%

> 90%

Percentage of customer service requests relating to roads and footpaths which are responded to within the timeframe

Economic

95%

90% responded to within 48 hours

Infrastructure contracts

Audits of contracts - physical work

Economic

New measure 2021-22

> 90% meet standards as per contract

Audit of contracts - contractual obligations

Economic

New measure 2021-22

> 90% meet obligations as per contract

Road safety services

The change from previous financial year in number of fatalities and serious injury crashes on the local road network

Road Accidents

Economic

184

Number = Previous year - 1%

Road risk rating - Percentage that have a high/high rating

Road Accidents

Economic

New measure 2021-22

≤ 5%

Parking enforcement services

Percentage of safety issues that are responded to within 30 minutes

Social

New measure 2021-22

> 90%

Active modes

Length of cycleways/shared path

Social

New measure 2021-22

10% greater than previous year


 

Statements of service performance – City Development

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives and contributions

Economic wellbeing

City Development

We take a lead role in promoting Lower Hutt’s growth and development by:

·         Creating a business-friendly environment

·         Facilitating the expansion and creation of local business and employment

·         Increasing tourism and events

·         Contributing to regional growth through regional economic development

·         Providing quality online and digital experiences for our customers

·         Building our reputation and community as a hub for cutting-edge science, engineering and technology business

·         Providing opportunities for businesses to partner with Council and community

 

Activity

Introduction to services

Urban Design

What we do

We take a lead role in the urban design, spatial planning and master planning of our city and town centres

Why we do it

The intentional design and planning of our city and town centre is crucial to ensuring a cohesive and functioning city. By planning and designing with our communities, iwi and stakeholders we can translate their aspirations alongside the advice and input of urban design and development experts into implementable actions and activities that enable our city and all of its people to thrive.

Business support and city growth

What we do

We work with local and regional business partners and communities and leverage government funding opportunities.

Why we do it

Attracting and providing services for business and visitors is needed for the city’s economic development. By supporting the business sector and promoting Lower Hutt as a business location and vibrant city, we generate benefits for local enterprises and our residents.

Future projects planned

Housing

What we do

We take a lead role in supporting the development of more warm, safe, dry and affordable homes in our city. We are engaged in a number of actions to increase the supply of quality homes in the city, including:

 

  • enabling a range of housing types and densities through the District Plan;
  • working with our housing company Urban Plus Ltd to increase the supply of housing that it provides and extend the range of households that it supports through rental housing;
  • a partnership with Te Rūnanganui o Te Āti Awa to begin delivering homes for households in need.

 

Council is working with partners to respond to homelessness and housing hardship. We are funding local organisations to prevent homelessness and help people access settled homes.

Why we do it

The housing of the people in our city has been identified by Council as a key priority. Housing has a major impact on people, providing for improved quality of life, stability, better health outcomes. Ultimately, a home enables whānau/families and individuals to have a greater say over determining their own wellbeing and future.

District Plan

What we do

We develop, review, implement and monitor the District Plan. Engagement occurs with the community and stakeholders when reviewing, monitoring and changing the District Plan. Parties with particular interest in the District Plan include property owners, developers, interest groups, and network utility operators.

In addition, the Resource Management Act includes specific obligations for engaging with mana whenua.

Why we do it

The District Plan meets Council’s obligations under the Resource Management Act 1991. The Resource Management Act requires Council to monitor, review and change the District Plan in response to national/regional policy direction and to address significant resource management issues in the city.

Our work contributes to providing for urban growth to meet current and future housing and business land needs. It ensures the environment is sustainably managed, including important resources such as biodiversity and heritage. It provides for effective provision of infrastructure and leisure and wellbeing opportunities.

The District Plan affects everyone in the community as it influences where people live and work, and how their local community develops.

 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

City development

Urban Design

Measures within RiverLink & various spatial plans e.g. Seaview Gracefield, Petone 2040

Economic, social

Business support and city growth

Measures within Economic Development Plan

Economic, social

Housing

Measures within Urban Plus KPI's & Homelessness Strategy

Economic, social

District Plan

Measures are within District Plan

Economic, social, environmental and cultural


 

Statements of service performance – Solid Waste

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives and contributions

Environmental wellbeing

Solid waste

Solid waste activity promotes environmental wellbeing, in particular through our Environmental Sustainability Strategy and the Regional Waste Management and Minimisation Plan. It contributes primarily to community outcomes of healthy people and a healthy natural environment.

 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Solid Waste

Disposal / Landfills

No resource consent-related infringement notices received from GWRC

Environmental

0 notices - 100% compliance

0 notices - 100% compliance

Refuse services

Number of litter complaints

Environmental Issues

Environmental

New measure 2021-22

Previous year less 10%

Audit of sample sites

Environmental Issues

Environmental

New measure 2021-22

Improve on previous year

Recycling services

Percentage of kerbside recycling that is contaminated and diverted to landfill

Sustainable Living

Environmental

New measure 2021-22

≤ 10%

Tonnes of kerbside recycling collected

Sustainable Living

Environmental

7,025

Previous year plus 2%

 


 

Social and Cultural Wellbeing

 

WHAT: The Groups of Activities contributing to Social and Cultural Wellbeing are:

 

Community Partnering and Support: We will invest in delivering an holistic approach  to neighbourhoods, partnering with the community to enhance the opportunity for Council and Councillors, Community Boards and community service providers to work together to improve results on the ground.  We will invest in working with communities to stimulate local sources of power and optimise the impact of our collective effort across our shared spaces.

 

We will broker partnerships at community level supporting existing networks and groups that connect people and, where needed, the development of new networks.  We will focus investment on:

 

·         Activities that develop partnerships and networks within and across our neighbourhoods and communities.

·         Activities that develop community capacity and enable greater self-determination

·         Community funding to support community endeavours

·         Delivering community safety leadership

·         Ensuring our people are prepared for emergencies together with our regional partners.

Open Spaces, Parks and Reserves: We own more than 5,300 hectares and manage around 3,000 hectares of parks, reserves, bush-clad hills, beaches, walkways, tracks, sportsgrounds and playgrounds, and around 12,500 street trees.  We also own and manage the city’s wharves.

Connectivity, creativity, learning, and recreation: We will work with the community to activate our shared spaces through activities that support wellbeing with a focus on physical and mental health, literacy, arts, culture and heritage, digital technology and civic participation.  This includes providing the following:   

·        Three community hubs and five libraries that provide a range of Council and other services in the neighbourhoods of Central Hutt (CBD), Moera, Naenae, Taita, Stokes Valley, Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata. This includes a single city-wide library service, as well as heritage collections and services based at Petone Community Library.  They provide opportunities for learning, social and leisure activities, practical help and advice, and contribute to growing social capital.

·        Two museums, the Dowse Art Museum and the Petone Settlers Museum, which are open to the public at no charge with the exception of special exhibitions

·        Six swimming pools (once Naenae has re-opened), nine community halls and three community gyms

·        World-class facilities for sport and recreation, in partnership with Hutt City Community Facilities Trust, including Walter Nash Centre, Ricoh Sports Centre and Naenae Bowls Centre.

·        A range of community based recreational programmes and events designed to remove barriers to participation and encourage residents to engage in recreational activities

WHY:

 

Our neighbourhoods and communities give us a sense of place and purpose. Council’s role is to support and enable neighbourhoods and communities to thrive - to be safe, connected, healthy, inclusive and resilient. Thriving neighbourhoods and communities are enabled and supported to determine their own future, and are connected - to the support they need, to opportunities for training and work and to participation in the digital world.

 

Open spaces, parks, reserves, sportsgrounds, street gardens and street trees help make our city an attractive place to live and provide places for recreation and gatherings, as well as bump space. Participation in sport and recreation plays a key role in improving the physical and psychological well-being of individuals and builds social capital by bringing communities together and creating a sense of pride and belonging.  

 

Community hubs and libraries support community learning, literacy and recreation. They are well placed to support the educational development of the young people who will be future ratepayers, particularly in terms of access to technology. The educational role of museums lies at the core of their service to the public. People of all ages come to learn and be inspired by the collections, exhibitions and displays created by museums through their research and scholarship. 

 

CONTRIBUTION TO WELLBEING

 

These Groups of Activities have Social and Cultural Wellbeing at their heart and also contribute to economic wellbeing. Activities focus on is increasing opportunities for people to access information, arts and cult. ure, recreational and sporting activities enabling them to celebrate our diversity as a city. Activating our partnerships with mana whenua and iwi is central to achieving an outcome of to optimising the impact of our collective effort across our shared places and spaces.

 

Significant negative effects and their mitigation

There can at times be negative effects associated with activities that provide a place where people can congregate and are vulnerable to the risks associated with any public space. Some of the pool and recreational areas and programmes offered could potentially expose participants to the risk of injuring themselves however these risks are mitigated through the presence of trained staff.  There are systems in place to manage flora and fauna disturbance during works and the hiring/use of community facilities to manage community safety.

 

WHAT WE’VE ALREADY ACHIEVED

 

·         We have worked with our community and Kainga Ora to help bring a new community together in the 700 new homes currently being built in Epuni. 

·         Naenae Voice of the Community project enabled people in Naenae to be actively involved in the planning of their future town centre

·         In the last year we had over one million visits to our libraries, just under a million visits to our community hubs, and 600,000 visits to our pools

·         Community partnerships have enabled 100 brand new bikes to be given away to children needing them but unable to afford it

COVID-19 RECOVERY PLAN

 

Covid 19 was the big news in the last quarter of 2019 and, due to the COVID-19 level 3 and level 4 lockdown restrictions, our economy contracted by 11% pa in the June 2020 quarter – the first time the city’s economy has contracted since 2014.  While the contraction in the city’s economy has resulted in a rise of 8.7% in the number of Jobseeker Support recipients to just over 4,336 in the June 2020 year – the highest since our series began in 2010 – this rise is lower than the 19% rise nationally.  This reflects the fact that Lower Hutt City’s economy is has been reasonably sheltered from the worst effects of COVID-19 on sectors such as tourism and international education.

 

Council has approved its Covid Recovery Plan on 8 December 2020.  Our Recovery Plan has two main areas of focus – the wellbeing of our people, especially those who are most vulnerable to the health and social impacts of COVID-19, and the recovery of our economy.  This Recovery plan was developed through workshops and discussion with mana whenua, community and business leaders and social and community groups and they continue to be involved in the planning and delivery of recovery.

 

While our vision for a thriving city has not changed, our approach, priorities and investment may need to. Some changes have already been made. This plan includes more immediate initiatives, and thinking which feeds into the development of our Long Term Plan 2021-31 and includes an initial set of regional Recovery Indicators. This will be further developed to include medium and longer-term impacts of the pandemic.  A further $257,556 will be allocated to community initiatives responding to COVID-19 and aligned to the principles of a circular economy, and that this will be approved by the Chief Executive in consultation with the Mayor and Standing Committee Chairs, as per COVID-19 protocols.

 

 

WHAT WE’VE ALREADY ACHIEVED

 

·         In the last year we had over one million visits to our libraries (as well as 413,000 online visits), just under a million visits to our community hubs, 600,000 visits to our pools and over 180,000 visits to our museums.

·         In October the Dowse Art Museum re-opened the refurbished Te Āti Awa taonga Nuku Tewhatewha, a pātaka built in 1856, in partnership with whānau and iwi representatives.

·         We have worked with our community and Kainga Ora to help bring a new community together in the 700 new homes currently being built in Epuni. 

·         Naenae Voice of the Community project enabled people in Naenae to be actively involved in the planning of their future pool and town centre..

·         Community partnerships have enabled 100 brand new bikes to be given away to children needing them but unable to afford it.


 

Statements of service performance – Community partnering and support

 

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives and contributions

Social and cultural wellbeing

Community partnering and support

For our city to thrive we need neighbourhoods and communities that are safe, connected, healthy, inclusive and resilient.  We partner with neighbourhoods and across communities to:

·         Prioritise and facilitate initiatives that improve equity and quality of life for those that need it most.

·         Manage, distribute and allocate Council’s community funding

·         Facilitate and support city safety initiatives

·         Manage the operations of community hubs and the provision of halls for hire by the community.

Activity

Introduction to services

Community funding, Community hubs, Community partnerships

What we do

We work across communities to enable, facilitate and support community led initiatives and solutions to local issues.  We use community forums and interactions to establish a community voice on specific issues and work on issues with groups and agencies across Lower Hutt to develop strong relationships

We operate three community hubs and 12 community halls. Our community hubs offer a mix of community, Council and agency led activities and services. Council’s focus is on library, arts and recreation programmes while community and agency initiatives offer wellbeing focussed services and programmes.

We facilitate and support the delivery of volunteer services to keep our city safe using a partnership approach to crime prevention and community reassurance.

 We administer community funding and connect community groups and individuals to funding streams.

 

Why we do it

·         Initiatives to support social and cultural wellbeing improve community connectedness and a sense of belonging across communities.

·         Funding and funding advice enable community organisations and individuals to deliver locally driven responses to issues and opportunities.

·         City safety initiatives improve safety outcomes across the city.

·         Community hubs and halls provide a safe inclusive space for the community.  They create the conditions and connections for the community to have an opportunity to thrive.

 

 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Community partnering and support

Community funding

Percentage of successful applicants who received a score of 80% or more of the maximum score available

Social

New measure 2021-22

80%

Community hubs

Number of hubs who met visitor number targets

Social Connection

Social

2 of 3

X of X

(where X = number of hubs operated by HCC)

Number of visits per year to:

Walter Nash

Social Connection

Social

517,236

750,000

Wainuiomata Community Hub

Social Connection

Social

303,778

300,000

 

 

Koraunui Stokes Valley

Social Connection

Social

178,144

250,000


 

Statements of service performance – Open spaces, parks and reserves

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives, contributions and services

Social and cultural wellbeing

Open spaces, parks and reserves

What we do

We provide, develop, maintain and protect a reserve network which contributes to a healthy natural environment and improves the health and wellbeing of residents and the city. We manage sportsgrounds, civic parks, neighbourhood parks, bush reserves, cemeteries, playgrounds, the foreshore and street trees and gardens.

Why we do it

Our reserves and natural spaces:

·         Help to conserve landscapes that give the city character and protect natural and cultural features. As parts of our city become more densely developed, protected areas of public open space will become increasingly important.

·         promote effective ecosystem services which reduces the need for new infrastructure development and reduces the burden on current infrastructure. Reserves contribute to the city’s ability to recover from events such as storms, flooding and earthquakes.

·         attract businesses, residents and visitors and contribute to the city’s economic wellbeing.

·         contribute to an enjoyable urban life where people can take part in recreation and sport, create their own outdoor fun and participate in community life. Open spaces create spaces for informal gatherings and chance encounters and compensate for the loss of private open space in higher density residential areas.  This supports good physical and mental health.

 

 

 


 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Open Spaces, Parks and Reserves

Open spaces, Parks and reserves

Number of days Council owned/maintained grass sportfields are closed

Social

New measure for 2021-22

≤ 20 days

Number of days Council owned/maintained artificial turf sportsfields are closed

Social

New measure for 2021-22

≤ 20 days

 


 

Statements of service performance – Connectivity, creativity, learning and recreation

Activity

Introduction to services

Libraries

What we do

We manage five community libraries and three libraries in community hubs. We provide the opportunity for our residents to build literacy skills by reading what they find interesting or entertaining. We focus on developing and providing access to library collections across a variety of formats, subject areas and genres, to inform and inspire a range of the city’s residents.

Our services include:

·         SMART library services, providing Lower Hutt residents with free access to the lending collections of partner libraries.

·         Two clubhouses that provide tamariki and rangatahi with free access to supportive safe spaces equipped with creative technologies.

·         A heritage centre that collects stories and histories of our local communities across Lower Hutt

·         A range of formal and informal learning opportunities for residents of all ages and stages of life through a variety of programmes and events. Each library provides public computing equipment, access to the internet and library staff support.

Why we do it

We seek to ensure all residents thrive by creating and sustaining a community of readers. Increased literacy rates lead to improved education outcomes, better employment opportunities and a thriving resilient city. We provide the opportunity for residents to connect with one another and with their local communities supported by library-provided programmes, events and learning opportunities. We focus on equity and accessibility as principles to help us deliver our services for all people in our communities.

 

Recreation programmes

What we do

We aim to encourage, enable and support our residents to be physically active, improve health and enhance the wellbeing of individuals, whanau and communities. Our focus is on the development and growth of programmes, projects and other community activities which meet local needs and support residents’ opportunities for health and wellbeing. We prioritise programmes and projects where barriers to participation are high.

Our activity includes the provision of services at Pelorus Trust Sportshouse which enables sporting organisations to be housed together for collective impact, and support for Fraser Park Sportsville to enable it to thrive as a community facility.

Why we do it

Sport, play and recreation play a key role in creating happier, healthier people, a better-connected community and a stronger economy. It improves the physical and psychological wellbeing of individuals and can transform our communities.

 

Swimming pools and fitness

What we do

We deliver swimming pool services, fitness suites, swim city swim school and programmes related to these activities. The facilities provide spaces where residents and visitors can recreate, relax and connect, improve fitness and health, build water confidence and the ability to swim and have fun. We have five aquatic facilities and two fitness suites spread throughout Lower Hutt that have a positive influence on how we deliver our services to each of our unique communities.

Why we do it

We strive to positively contribute to the development of physically active and healthy communities through increasing participation in aquatic recreation and leisure. Aquatic and fitness facilities contribute to the city’s health and vitality by:

·         Providing recreation opportunities that enhance health and wellbeing

·         Increasing social interaction and a sense of belonging

·         Providing learn to swim programmes

·         Attracting visitors and providing economic benefits to the city

 

Art and museums

What we do

We operate the Dowse Art Museum, Petone Settlers Museum, Little Theatre, Community Arts and provide oversight of Council’s public art collection. We run education classes and workshops for all ages including school groups, seniors, minority and cultural groups. There are public programmes such as talks, workshops and events linked to deeper engagement with exhibitions or social and cultural topics. We also manage community projects that support local artists.

The Dowse has up to 25 exhibitions per year and develops exhibitions that tour to other galleries. It operates a retail store, houses a café, and has spaces that can be hired for events.

The Petone Settlers Museum is a landmark building and houses permanent and changing exhibition displays that reflect Petone and the wider Lower Hutt stories.

The Little Theatre is a fully equipped performing arts venue with café, used for a variety of functions including dance, music, film and presentations.

Community Arts, through the Community Arts Advisor, works with community groups, individuals and artists through Lower Hutt communities and Council facilities. It provides an opportunity for our local communities to access the arts through workshops, funding, presentations and professional advice.

Lower Hutt has over 25 public sculptures in its care and undertakes numerous murals and temporary activations.

Why we do it

Our museums and art spaces enable all citizens to thrive through access to information, knowledge, arts and cultural facilities that support and enrich individuals and the community. People’s lives are positively affected by participation in recreational and cultural activities. They enhance cultural life, diversity, wellbeing and promote civic pride and community values so that the city will achieve better social and economic outcomes and be more resilient in the future.

Future projects planned for the Dowse Art Museum

·         A redevelopment of the collection storage space

·         A redevelopment of the museum’s website

·         Development of a fit for purpose learning centre

Promotions and events

What we do

We attract people to Lower Hutt by supporting our events community to deliver vibrant events to our city and inspire community pride.

·         We provide opportunities for business to partner with Council and the community, create a business-friendly environment, provide quality online and digital experiences to our customers and build our reputation as a hub for cutting edge science, engineering and technology business.

·         We work alongside eateries, retailers, accommodation providers, tourism operators and our regional neighbours and build campaigns to attract people to the Hutt Valley.

·         We attract events, tournaments, concerts and conferences to the city to bring life and vibrancy to our economy, fill accommodation and help our venues thrive.

·         Our events work is guided by the need to celebrate diversity, culture, history and our future while activating the CBD and suburban centres.

Why we do it

Attracting and providing services for business and visitors supports the city’s economic development and community wellbeing. By supporting the business sector and promoting Lower Hutt as a business location, tourist destination and vibrant city, we generate benefits for local enterprises and our residents.

An upgrade of the existing Flag Tracks system across the city.

 

 


 

Key Performance Indicators

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-2020

Target 2021-22

Connectivity, creativity, learning, and recreation

Libraries

Number of libraries who met visitor number targets

Social Connection

Social

New measure 2021-22

X-1 of X

(where X = number of libraries operated by HCC)

Number of visits per year to:

·         Eastbourne Community Library

Social Connection

Social

63,360

75,000

·         Wainuiomata Community Library

Social Connection

Social

222,602

220,000

·         Moera Community Library

Social Connection

Social

29,909

40,000

·         Petone Community Library

Social Connection

Social

147,910

140,000

·         Taita Community Library

Social Connection

Social

167,566

275,000

·         Naenae Community Library

Social Connection

Social

122,184

140,000

·         War Memorial Library

Social Connection

Social

303,955

350,000

Use of WiFi at Libraries and Community Hubs

Telecommunication

Social

New measure 2021-22

TBC

(awaiting baseline data to determine target)

Swimming pools and fitness

Number of pools who met visitor number targets

Health

Social

New measure 2021-22

X of X

(where X = number of pools operated by HCC)

Number of visits per year to:

·         Stokes Valley Pool

Health & Physical Activity

Social

New measure 2021-22

Greater than or equal to previous year

·         Huia Pool

Health & Physical Activity

Social

New measure 2021-22

Greater than or equal to previous year

·         Eastbourne Summer Pool

Health & Physical Activity

Social

New measure 2021-22

Greater than or equal to previous year

·         McKenzie Summer Pool

Health & Physical Activity

Social

New measure 2021-22

Greater than or equal to previous year

·         Wainuiomata Summer Pool

Health & Physical Activity

Social

New measure 2021-22

Greater than or equal to previous year

Number of Fitness Suite Members

Health & Physical Activity

Social

New measure 2021-22

Greater than or equal to previous year

Art and Museums

Number of Museums who met visitor number targets

Cultural

New measure 2021-22

X of X

(where X = number of museums operated by HCC)

Number of visits per year to:

Dowse Museum

Cultural

198,944

190,000

Petone Settlers Museum

Cultural

8,959

10,000

 


 

Environmental Wellbeing

 

WHY: Our environment is facing some major challenges, and we recognise that there is insufficient emphasis on the environment in our existing plans. We want to shift the focus from trying to fit the environment around us, to fitting within our environment.  Council is committed to the role it has to play in achieving a reduction in carbon emissions in the city. This includes reducing the amount of waste produced in the city and going in to the landfill. Our unique land and water-based native ecosystems are threatened by pollution, introduced species, predation, depletion, competition, fire-risk, reduction in available habitat, land development, stormwater and wastewater management, natural hazards and climate change.

 

WHAT: The Group of Activities that contribute to Environmental Wellbeing are:

 

Sustainability and Resilience: The Sustainability and Resilience activity focuses on the opportunities and risks we face in regard to our environment. It looks for strategies to address potential issues, and provides short-term, mid-term and long-term solutions for change by:

 

·        taking leadership as an ambassador for environmental best practise

·        enhancing community engagement and collaboration

·        working in partnership with local businesses and organisations

·        managing our own response to environmental issues.

Council has established an organisational Zero by 2050 carbon target. In addition to setting an organisational target, Council has agreed a plan to prioritise to community-focused actions in order to reduce city-wide greenhouse gas emissions, in line with the proposed New Zealand net Zero by 2050 target”.

Reducing our water consumption is vital. We currently consume 380 litres per day per resident per day is which is unsustainable. Having enough water for everyone in the future will rely on more water efficient appliances and water conservation and fair distribution between households, industry, agriculture and the environment.

 

We take a lead role in supporting and enabling our city and its residents to adopt more sustainable lifestyle and business models and practices now and in the future. We work as part of the Wellington Region Climate Change Working Group to address various climate change challenges, such as sea level rise.  This activity includes implementing environmental policies and plans for Hutt City’s sustainable development, including environmental education and promotion.

 

 

Biodiversity (also see Open Spaces)

 

This focus area incorporates the health and wellbeing of our natural and semi-natural environment, including ecosystems, flora and fauna and open space. Work that Council undertakes on land it is responsible for is aligned to national strategies for biodiversity and plant conservation.  Council has an overarching strategy for reserves management (‘Reserves Strategic Directions’) with further detail set out in the ‘Urban Forest Plan’ and ‘Bush Reserve Management Plans’. These documents guide the way Council manages land and habitats on Council land.

 

Consents and Regulatory Services: This activity is fundamental to achieving a clean, healthy, attractive and sustainable environment for residents and visitors. It is also a legal requirement for Hutt City Council.  This activity includes:

 

·        providing resource management and building consents and inspections

·        regular monitoring to ensure compliance with legislative requirements, the District Plan, resource and building consent conditions and bylaw requirements

·        inspections of business and food premises, certifications, and liquor licensing bylaw compliance

·        pollution and trade waste control

·        monitoring beaches to promote and protect public health and safety

·        monitoring and controlling noise and hazardous substances

·        animal control services

·        parking enforcement.

Consents and regulatory services have an operational focus involving timeframes set out in legislation. The main pieces of legislation are the Local Government Act 2002, Food Act 2014, Health Act 1956, Dog Control Act 1996, Litter Act 1979, Bylaws Act 2004, Sale of Alcohol Act 2012, the Wild Animal Control Act 1977, the Gambling Act 2003, Building Act 2004, Resource Management Act 1991, Bylaws Act 1910, Forest and Rural Fires Act 1977, and the Hutt Valley Drainage Act 1967. This is not a complete list as we’re also bound by general legislation.

 

Emergency management: The city must be prepared to cope in the event of a Civil Defence emergency. Our approach to emergency management is based on the principles of reduction of risk, readiness, response and recovery.  Emergency Management activities are carried out to meet the requirements of the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Act 2002. The Act promotes the sustainable management of hazards, the safety of the public and protection of property. It also provides for planning and preparation for emergencies and for response and recovery in emergencies. The Act also requires local authorities to coordinate regional planning, programmes and activities, provides for the integration of national and local emergency management planning and activity, and encourages a coordinated approach. This activity includes:

·        educating people about the risks they face and how to prepare for emergency events;

·        maintaining the Wellington Region CDEM Group’s Emergency Operation Centres so they can be quickly activated to manage an emergency event; and

·        working with central government, emergency services, welfare groups, lifeline utilities and a wide range of interested and affected organisations on emergency management issues

Effects on community wellbeing

The Sustainability and Resilience activity focuses on the opportunities and risks we face in regard to our environment and works with our communities to develop plans to address potential issues providing short, medium and long-term solutions for change. This approach engages communities in developing options for their future while at the same time addressing city wide issues.  The health and wellbeing of our natural and semi-natural environment, including ecosystems, flora and fauna and open space is central to the wellbeing of our environment.

Consents and Regulatory Services contributes primarily to our community outcomes of a safe community, a strong and diverse economy, an accessible and connected city, healthy people, a healthy natural environment, and a healthy and attractive built environment. Looking at the potential for negative effects associated with this activity, people’s perceptions of personal freedom can be reduced through the need for regulatory activities for the benefit of the wider community and can be interpreted by the users of those services as causing costs and delays.

The Emergency Management activity promotes economic and social wellbeing in particular through encouraging sustainable practices and preparedness to cope in the event of a Civil Defence emergency.

Significant negative effects and their mitigation

Looking at the potential for negative effects associated with this activity, some sustainability practices to some such as the drive to reduce waste and introduce modern waste management practices may seem for some to be expensive, time consuming and an infringement on personal freedoms. Emergency management response and recovery activities may also have a temporary adverse effect on community and environmental wellbeing while social systems and infrastructure are being rebuilt following an emergency event. An ineffective, under performing emergency management response has the potential to cause catastrophic and/or long lasting negative effects on all four wellbeings.  Meet the requirements of the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Act 2002 and coordinated regional planning, programmes and activities, provides for the integration of national and local emergency management planning and activity, and encourages a coordinated approach reducing the opportunity for local failure. Ineffective sustainability initiatives could lead to increased resource usage, waste and detrimental impact on the environment. Initiatives are focused on achieving maximum impact for resource expended.

WHAT WE’VE ALREADY ACHIEVED

To help achieve these goals and obligations we have:

·         Put energy and carbon reduction plan in place at our facilities

·         Appointed a new energy advisor jointly funded by the Energy Efficiency & Conservation Authority

·         Updated our Council’s vehicle fleet with 13 fully electric vehicles. Council has also been working to register forestry to earn carbon credits. The registration under the Emissions Trading Scheme of about 87ha in East Harbour Regional Park has been completed and is now earning carbon credits. The potential net present value over the next 30 years is between $263,000 and $444,000, depending on carbon price assumptions.

·         Our communities’ drinking water achieved full compliance with drinking water standards

·         To ensure the resilience of our water supply the Taita Reservoir has been seismically strengthened to withstand a 1 in 2500 year earthquake, and the Kelson Grove stormwater main was renewed

·         Working with our community to protect Regulatory Services

·         Building and resource consents – numbers and growth in demand?

·         Healthy homes – we have given advice to X homeowners on how to conserve energy and make their homes warmer and dryer.

 


 

Statements of Service Performance

 

Wellbeing link

Group

Introduction to objectives and contributions

Environmental wellbeing

Regulatory services

This activity is focused on regular monitoring to ensure compliance with legislative requirements, the District Plan, resource and building consent conditions and bylaw requirements to support a well-functioning city and includes:

•        providing resource management and building consents and inspections

•        inspections of business and food premises, certifications, and liquor licensing bylaw compliance

•        pollution and trade waste control

•        monitoring beaches and rivers to promote and protect public health and safety

•        monitoring and controlling noise and hazardous substances

•        monitoring and enforcement action in relation to earthquake prone buildings to ensure compliance with the Building Act

•        animal control services

•        parking enforcement

•        providing free eco-design advice to encourage warm, dry and sustainable buildings

•        onsite compliance schedule auditing to ensure specified systems (e.g. fire alarms, lifts) are performing in accordance with relevant building regulations

•        onsite auditing of domestic swimming pool barriers to ensure they are safe and fit for purpose.

A clean, healthy, attractive and sustainable environment for residents and visitors is fundamental to a well-functioning city where people treat each other and their environment with respect. Council also has legal responsibilities to deliver many of these services.

Activity

Introduction to services

Building consents and resource consents

What we do

This activity comprises three teams – the Environmental Support Team, the Building Team (both Building Consent Authority responsibilities and Territorial Authority responsibilities) and the Resource Consents Team which includes the LIM team.

These teams are responsible for the regulatory and compliance functions for building work in Lower Hutt, for general advice to the public on consenting matters, for co-ordinating LIM applications for Council and for advice on environmentally sustainable residential design & products.

The performance of these activities has an operational focus involving timeframes set out in legislation.  The key legislation that the activities are governed by are:

·               Resource Management Act 1991 (resource management functions)

·               Building Act 2004 (building functions; including weathertight homes, earthquake prone buildings, building warrant of fitness, accreditation requirements)

·               Local Government Act 2002 (right of way approvals, general enforcement duties)

·               Local Government Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LIMs, Official Information Requests)

Why we do it

Our aim is that Lower Hutt residents have a platform to thrive by creating a safe and resilient community. We achieve this by making good decisions that provide for urban growth and a sustainable environment, applying appropriate regulatory measures that promote a safe, healthy and attractive built environment.

Public health

What we do

The Trade Waste team exists to protect public health in areas of sewage, stormwater and chemical hazards. It registers all commercial properties that discharge liquid waste and charges the users of the system to cover the cost of conveying, treating and disposing of their waste.

We audit 690 known trade waste discharges to the sewerage system in the Hutt Valley, and manage overland storm water and sewage inspections.

 

Why we do it

We want a safe community and healthy people. We aim to protect the environment by ensuring wastewater and stormwater comply with the relevant legislation.

Animal control

What we do

The Animal Services team is responsible for the monitoring and enforcement of regulations under the Dog Control Act so that residents are safe, annoyance factors are minimised, and the welfare of animals is protected.

Why we do it

It is a legal requirement to manage dog control activities within the Council’s jurisdiction. Through the administration of dog registrations and the management of safety and nuisance factors around dogs and other animals, we want to achieve a safe community and healthy people.

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicator

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Regulatory services

Building consents

Building consents issued within the statutory timeframe

Housing Affordability & Business Consents

Economic

100% within 20 days

100% within 20 days

Resource consents

Code of compliance certificates issued within the statutory timeframe

Housing Affordability

Economic

100% within 20 days

100% within 20 days

Animal control

Number of community education programmes carried out

Social

New measure 2021-22

Equal to or greater than previous year

Percentage of dog attack responded to within 30 minutes

Social

95%

95%


 

Statements of service performance – Sustainability and resilience

Activity

Introduction to services

Climate change

What we do

We work to engage with the community on climate change, in particular the development of:

·         a pathway to reduce city wide emissions to net zero by 2050; and

·         a pathway to how we should respond as a community to forecast climate impacts, such as sea level rise.

Why we do it

Climate change will result in impacts affecting all or some communities in Lower Hutt. Impacts such as increased rainfall intensity may result in flooding in different areas of the city. For Council’s emission reductions or sustainability improvements to be meaningful, the whole of Council and Lower Hutt must ultimately align with good practice.

This activity enables the delivery of carbon emission reductions, in line with Council’s organisational zero by 2050 carbon target and Council’s Energy and Carbon Reduction Plan 2020-24. It delivers on a range of Council commitments such as developing a city wide carbon reduction plan, and actions under Council’s Environmental Sustainability Strategy 2015.

Biodiversity

What we do

We protect and enhance indigenous biodiversity in Lower Hutt by working alongside community groups and landowners, and managing and restoring habitats in Lower Hutt bush reserves.

Our programmes include:

·      Planting of indigenous plants – seasonal planting of indigenous plants into Council gardens and natural spaces to help enrich and increase the ecological value of those spaces.

·      Pest Plant Programme – The worst weeds affecting Lower Hutt are targeted on public or private land to reduce their spread and minimise adverse effects on established indigenous ecosystems.

·      Pest Tree Programme – Pest tree species are ranked and targeted for removal, prioritising the destruction of pines but also responding to problem trees as they arise.

·      Percy Scenic Reserve ex-situ conservation collection – The propagation and maintenance of endangered plants also serves as an education and research resource.

·      Indigenous Biodiversity Fund – This scheme supports private landowners to protect and enhance native habitats on their land.

·      Predator Free Hutt Valley – This is an umbrella organisation for Te Awa Kairangi’s important neighbourhood trapping groups.  New groups are being added and supported by Lower Hutt’s Community Reserve Ranger.

·      Supporting community groups and environmental initiatives – More than a dozen community groups and trusts are supported.

·      Fire access tracks and ponds – Increase the ability of fire services to act quickly to protect both indigenous forests and residents’ properties.

Alongside these, we strive to integrate the protection of indigenous biodiversity in spatial plans and neighbourhood development.

Why we do it

We aim to mitigate the threats to indigenous biodiversity such as climate change, land use intensification, predators and invasive pests. Protecting and enhancing indigenous biodiversity improves the physical, mental and spiritual wellbeing of residents. It also encourages visitors who come to the City to enjoy the high quality tracks, beaches and reserves. Demand for this work comes from passionate residents and from legislative requirements such as the Reserves Act 1977 and the Resource Management Act 1991.

Emergency management

What we do

The Emergency Management team provides local capability is to manage an effective response to emergencies and continue to develop, implement and monitor city wide emergency management plans, input to all regional plans and strategies, and promote community preparedness for emergencies.

Local emergency management is supported by Wellington Region Civil Defence and Emergency Management (WREMO) which provides training, advice and resource in the Emergency Management Office. At a local level, there is a community resilience team that co-ordinates the reduction, readiness, and response in the community with programmes such as Community Response Plans, Community Hub guides, Business continuity planning and the ‘Your Earthquake Planning Guide’ (delivered to every residential property in Lower Hutt last year).

Hutt City Council has joined with all city and district councils in the region to form a Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Group under the CDEM Act of 2002.

Why we do it

The Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 requires local authorities to plan and provide for civil defence emergency management within its district, and to be able to function to the fullest possible extent, even though this may be at a reduced level, during and after an emergency. Every local authority must be a member of a CDEM Group that has functions relating to relevant hazards and risks, and a range of activities. The desired outcome is for a safe, resilient, heathy, strong and inclusive community.

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

Group of Business Unit Activities

Business Unit Activities

KPI's and targets for LTP

Outcome Indicators

Wellbeing

Actual performance 2019-20

Target 2021-22

Sustainability and resilience

Emergency management

Percentage of Community Resilience Plans that are more than 24 months old

Social

New measure 2021-22

100%

Climate change

Council's carbon footprint

Environmental

New measure 2021-22

Lower than previous year by 5% or more