HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

Regulatory Committee

 

 

16 November 2020

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Monday 23 November 2020 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

Membership

 

 

Cr D Hislop (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr J Briggs

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

Cr A Mitchell (Deputy Chair)

Cr S Rasheed

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY

 

 


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

REGULATORY COMMITTEE
Membership:	10
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Membership RMA Hearings:	An independent Commissioner plus a minimum of either 3 or 4 elected members (including the Chair) and alternates who have current certification under the Making Good Decisions Training, Assessment and Certification Programme for RMA Decision-Makers. 
Reports to:		Council

PURPOSE:

To consider matters relating to the regulatory and quasi-judicial responsibilities of the Council under Council’s bylaws and relevant legislation including the following:

·         Local Government Act 1974

·         Public Works Act 1981

·         Reserves Act 1977

·         Resource Management Act 1991

·         Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012

Determine:

 

      Undertaking the administration of all statutory functions, powers and duties within its terms of reference, other than those specifically delegated to any other committee or subcommittee, or retained by Council.

      Consideration of matters related to the preparation and ongoing monitoring of the City of Lower Hutt District Plan, with the exception of a full review of the Plan.

      Preparation of required Changes and Variations to the City of Lower Hutt District Plan for Council approval to call for submissions.

      Recommending for Council approval any Proposed District Plan, Plan Changes and Variations recommended from the District Plan Hearings Subcommittee prior to notification.

      Make recommendations to Council on private District Plan Change requests for Council to accept, adopt or reject.

      Approve Council’s list of hearings commissioners under the Resource Management Act 1991, including councillors sitting as hearings commissioners and independent commissioners.

      Conduct statutory hearings on regulatory matters and make decisions on those hearings2, excluding those conducted under the Resource Management Act 1991, which are delegated to the Hearings Subcommittee and District Plan Hearings Subcommittee.

      Authorise the submission of appeals to the Environment Court on behalf of Council.

      Hear objections to specified traffic matters where the community board wishes to take an advocacy role.

      Make decisions under Clause 11(e) of the Tenth Schedule of the Local Government Act 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965 in respect of temporary road closures, including making decisions on any ancillary matters including, without limitation, approval of temporary “No Stopping” restrictions under Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017. 

      Undertake hearings on road stopping under the Local Government Act 1974.

      Make recommendations to Council whether to proceed with a road stopping and the disposal of stopped road, including (where the proposal includes or involves a related acquisition, disposal or land exchange) a recommendation to Council on the acquisition, disposal or exchange.

      Consider and recommend to Council any request to the Crown that a road is stopped under section 116 of the Public Works Act 1981, and the disposal of the stopped road.

      Make any resolution required under section 319A of the Local Government Act 1974 regarding the naming of new roads and alterations to street names (other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas).

      Make decisions on applications required under the Development Contributions Policy for remissions, postponements, reconsiderations and objections.  

      Recommend to Council the list of members approved to be members of the District Licensing Committee under section 192 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

The Chair of the Regulatory Committee, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, is authorised to appoint a subcommittee of suitably qualified persons to conduct hearings on behalf of the Committee.

The Chair of the Regulatory Committee is authorised to appoint three people from the list prepared under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 to specific meetings (Chair and two members).

 

General:

      Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s regulatory activities.

      Approval and forwarding of submissions on matters related to the Committee’s area of responsibility.

      Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

 

2 When acting in this capacity the committee has a quasi-judicial role.

 

NOTE 1:

 

Council makes decisions to notify District Plan Changes and Variations and call for submissions, on the recommendation of the Regulatory Committee.

District Plan Hearings Subcommittee members are appointed by the Chair, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, and comprise elected members and/or independent commissioners. All District Plan Hearings Subcommittee members must be certified under the Making Good Decisions programme.

District Plan Hearings Subcommittee makes recommendations to the Regulatory Committee for recommendation to Council on proposed District Plan provisions and matters raised in submissions.

Council makes its decision on the provisions and matters raised in submissions. The Council decision may be appealed to the Environment Court.

Council gives final approval to make District Plan changes operative, in accordance with clause 17 of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

 

NOTE 2:

 

The Ministry for the Environment advocates that Councils offer specialist RMA training in areas of law which are difficult to grasp or where mistakes are commonly made. This is to complement the Good Decision Making RMA training that they run (which is an overview and basic summary of decision making, rather than an in-depth training in specific areas of the RMA). Therefore in order to facilitate this, the RMA training run for councillors that wish to be hearings commissioners is mandatory.

 

Reasons for the importance of the training:

1.     Hearings commissioners are kept abreast of developments in the legislation.

2.     Legal and technical errors that have been made previously are avoided (many of which have resulted in Environment Court action which is costly, time consuming and often creates unrealistic expectations for the community).

3.  The reputation of Council as good and fair decision makers or judges (rather than legislators) is upheld.

 

    


                                                                       5                                       15 September 2020

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Regulatory Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Monday 23 November 2020 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.       

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.     

4.       Minutes of the Objection to a Menacing Dog Classification Hearings Subcommittee dated 3 September 2020 (20/1145)

Minutes dated 3 September 2020                                                                            8

5.       Minutes of the Proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee dated 22 October 2020 (20/1418)

Minutes dated 22 October 2020                                                                            22

6.       Recommendation to Council - 8 December 2020

Proposed Private District Plan Change 47: Major Gardens, Kelson - Rezoning to General Residenital Activity Area and General Recreation Activity Area (20/1277)

Report No. RC2020/6/264 by the Senior Environmental Policy Analyst 64

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

  

7.       Proposed New Private Street Name: Subdivision of LOT 328 Durham Crescent, Fairfield (20/1257)

Report No. RC2020/6/265 by the Traffic Engineer                                          161

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be discussed.”

 

8.       Proposed New Private Street Name: Subdivision of 31-40 Barber Grove, Moera (20/1462)

Report No. RC2020/6/295 by the Traffic Engineer                                          172

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be discussed.”

 

9.       Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Jackson Street, Buick and Elizabeth Streets - Petone Rotary Fair - February 2021 (20/564)

Report No. RC2020/6/266 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations    182

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

10.     Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Huia Street & Huia Place - Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon - March 2021 (20/1379)

Report No. RC2020/6/267 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations    191

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

11.     Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Burden Avenue - Love Wainuiomata Community Christmas Parade 2020 (20/1393)

Report No. RC2020/6/268 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations    201

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

12.     Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Evans Street - Stokes Valley Rotary Christmas Parade 2020 (20/1394)

Report No. RC2020/6/269 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations    209

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

13.     Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Everest Avenue - Naenae Community Christmas Party 2020 (20/1402)

Report No. RC2020/6/270 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations    216

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

14.     Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Victoria Street, Petone - Filming - December 2020 (20/1425)

Report No. RC2020/6/296 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations    225

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

15.     Regulatory Matters (20/1440)

Report No. RC2020/6/289 by the Executive Assistant, Environment and Sustainability  237       

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

16.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.   

 

 

Kathryn Stannard

HEAD OF DEMOCRATIC SERVICES

          


                                                                                       8                                                 23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

01 October 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1145)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/121

 

Minutes of the Objection to a Menacing Dog Classification Hearings Subcommittee dated 3 September 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the report of the meeting held on 3 September 2020 be adopted.

 

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Objection to a Menacing Dog Classification Hearings Subcommittee Minutes - 3 September 2020

9

    

 

 

  


Attachment 1

Objection to a Menacing Dog Classification Hearings Subcommittee Minutes - 3 September 2020

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

OBJECTION TO MENACING DOG CLASSIFICATION
Hearings Subcommittee

 

Minutes of a Meeting held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road,
Lower Hutt on

 Thursday 3 September 2020 commencing at 2.000pm

 

 

 PRESENT:

Cr S Edwards (Chair)

Cr B Dyer

 

Cr A Mitchell

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  Crs Hislop and Brown

 

IN ATTENDANCE:       Mr B Cato, Chief Legal Officer

Mr G Stuart, Head of Regulatory Services and Emergency Management (part meeting)

Mr K Te Kawa, Senior Animal Control Officer (part meeting)

Mr M Devine, Animal Control Officer (part meeting)

Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker

 

Mr C Packer, Dog Owner

Mr D Packer, Dog Carer

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

APPOINTMENT OF CHAIR

 

The Chief Legal Officer called for nominations for Chair.

Cr Edwards was nominated by Cr Dyer and seconded by Cr  Mitchell.

 

RESOLVED:  (Cr Dyer/Cr Mitchell)                                                              Minute No. HSC 20501

“That Cr Edwards chairs the Objection to a Menacing Dog Classification Hearings Subcommittee meeting on 3 September 2020.”

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

 

RESOLVED:  (Cr Edwards/Cr Mitchell)                                           Minute No. HSC 20502

“That the apologies from Crs Hislop and Brown be accepted and leave of absence be granted.”

 

2.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

          There were no conflict of interest declarations.

3.

Hearing for objection to menacing dog classification (20/974)

Report No. HSC2020/5/186 by the Senior Animal Control Officer

 

Objection

The objection was received from Mr C Packer, dog owner, to the classification of his dog “Dusty” as a menacing dog under section 33A of the Dog Control Act 1996 (“the Act”).

Statutory Considerations

In terms of the Dog Control Act 1996, section 33A of the Act provides that a territorial authority may classify a dog as a menacing dog if –

(1)   This section applies to a dog that—

(a)   has not been classified as a dangerous dog under section 31; but

(b)   a territorial authority considers may pose a threat to any person, stock, poultry, domestic animal, or protected wildlife because of—

(i)  any observed or reported behaviour of the dog; or

(ii) any characteristics typically associated with the dog's breed or type.

(2)   A territorial authority may, for the purposes of section 33E(1)(a), classify a dog to which this section applies as a menacing dog.

(3)   If a dog is classified as a menacing dog under subsection (2), the territorial authority must immediately give written notice in the prescribed form to the owner of—

(a)   the classification; and

(b)   the provisions of section 33E (which relates to the effect of classification as a menacing dog); and

(c)   the right to object to the classification under section 33B; and

(d)   if the territorial authority's policy is not to require the neutering of menacing dogs (or would not require the neutering of the dog concerned), the effect of sections 33EA and 33EB if the owner does not object to the classification and the dog is moved to the district of another territorial authority.

Section 33B provides dog owners with an opportunity to object to the classification.  It requires the territorial authority, in considering any objection, to have regard to the evidence which formed the basis for the original classification, any steps taken by the owner to prevent any threat to the safety of persons and animals, the matters advanced in support of the objection and any other relevant matters.

Section 33E specifies the restrictions which apply to a dog classified as menacing.  Section 33EA confirms that a menacing classification for a dog is enforceable across the whole of New Zealand.  Section 33EB provides for a Council to require neutering of dogs classified as menacing.  Section 33EC lists the offences and consequences should a dog owner not comply with the classification requirements. 

The Hutt City Council’s Dog Control Policy 2015 in section 3.5, specifies that all dogs who have been classified as menacing, must be neutered or spayed:

“3.5 MENACING DOGS – REQUIREMENT TO BE NEUTERED

3.5.3 It is Council policy in all cases where dogs are classified as menacing because of their breed (ie because they are one of the breeds of dogs specified in the 4th Schedule to the Act) or behaviour to require evidence that the dog has been neutered or is unfit to be neutered by the specified date.”

The territorial authority may uphold or rescind the classification, and is required by section 33B(3) of the Act to give notice of its decision and the reasons for its decision to the owner as soon as practicable.

Evidence on behalf of Council’s Animal Services

The Senior Animal Control Officer elaborated on the report.  He explained that to classify a dog as menacing required an officer’s report and investigations detailing the menacing act a dog had performed.  He added that as a result of investigations by the reporting Animal Control Officer, the decision had been made that the dog (Dusty) had performed a menacing act by running some distance, crossing a creek, rushing up a bank at a person with a dog on lead and injuring that dog.

The Senior Animal Control Officer advised a menacing dog classification required that whenever such a dog was in public, it must be muzzled.  He directed the members attention to the sworn affidavits attached to the officer’s report.  He said that the address Dusty resided at was the home of a responsible dog owner, and that Dusty was microchipped and registered.  He acknowledged that the carer of Dusty, Mr D Packer, had paid the vet bill of the dog who was injured.

The Animal Control Officer advised that Dusty’s behaviour could have resulted in an infringement notice being issued.  He did not believe punitive justice was appropriate.  He advised that in order to ensure such behaviour from Dusty did not occur again, the menacing dog classification was imposed. 

In response to a question from a member, the Animal Control Officer referred to sections 57 and 57A of the Dog Control Act.  The sections detailed actions an Animal Control Officer could take to seize a dog if an attack occurred or if a dog rushed at a person or other animal.

In response to questions from a member, the Animal Control Officer advised he regarded the incident to be worthy of a menacing classification.  He stated that Dusty was not on a lead, was not under control, had rushed some distance, crossed a creek and run up a bank to confront the other dog and its owner and had injured that dog.  He reported that the owner of the dog was shaken and did not know if Dusty was going to attack her or her dog.  He acknowledged dogs play fight but he maintained Dusty had attacked the other dog.  He clarified that he believed Dusty was a potential threat when in a public place if not muzzled.

In response to a question from a member, the Senior Animal Control Officer advised there were many reported incidences involving dogs dealt with each year, and that a high number might result in a menacing classification being imposed.  He explained there were many factors which were taken into account for each complaint received.  He considered the circumstances of the particular incident did warrant a menacing dog classification being imposed.

In response to a question from a member regarding the responsible dog owner (RDO) classification, the Senior Animal Control Officer confirmed the classification related to the property.  He said the RDO classification had been removed from the property. He added the dog owner could reapply for a RDO classification after one year. 

Mr D Packer confirmed he now had to pay full dog registration fees for both dogs living at the property.

In response to a question from a member regarding the outcomes if members were to rescind the menacing classification, the Senior Animal Control Officer confirmed that the responsible dog ownership classification would be immediately reinstated.  He clarified that a menacing dog classification could be imposed by deed or breed.

Evidence of the Complainant

The complainant’s written affidavit and written statement of the original phone call reporting the incident were read by all members.

Evidence on behalf of the Dog Owner

The dog carer, Mr D Packer, explained Dusty was a family pet who had been living in his household for the past six years.  He added Dusty had been brought up with children and had never attacked any person or animal before.  He advised he was responsible for walking Dusty and that they frequented the reserve behind his property.  He stated the reserve was usually empty of other people but that over the Covid-19 lockdown period, when the incident occurred, it had been frequented more by  dog walkers.  He added that he allowed Dusty off lead in the reserve, a permitted activity as the reserve was a dog exercise area, and that whenever he spotted another person or dog Dusty was put back on her lead.  He clarified Dusty was quite boisterous often approaching, barking and running in circles around other dogs. 

Mr D Packer outlined the circumstances of the incident.  He explained he usually tried to take Dusty for a walk when there were no other dogs or people around.  He stated on the day they were approximately 50m north of his property gate and he let Dusty off her lead as there were no people around.  Approximately 60m from his  property gate he saw the complainant with a dog on a lead, coming towards them.  He called Dusty, but the dog did not respond and continued to run across the creek and up to the complainant and her dog.  He acknowledged this should not have occurred, and that once the dogs had finished barking and racing around each other, he called Dusty again and the dog responded.  He then put Dusty back on her lead.  He noted the complainant was shaken, he called to her across the creek to apologise and to ask if she could check her dog.  He checked Dusty.  He advised they both stated there were no apparent injuries. 

Mr D Packer reported being surprised that there was a report of an injury.  He questioned the inconsistencies of the complainant only finding blood on her dog a couple of days later after it rolled in the grass.  He had read in the documentation that the complainant stated she found blood on her dog after the incident and assumed it must have been from Dusty.  He recalled she had not mentioned that at the time.  He questioned how it could be proven the blood two days later came from the altercation with Dusty and not from some other event. 

In response to questions from a member, Mr D Packer acknowledged that Dusty should not have been off lead and was not under control.  He maintained the noise the dogs were making made it difficult for Dusty to hear him, and that once the barking stopped, Dusty returned to him.  He confirmed the dogs pranced around each other and he did not witness Dusty flying into the side of the other dog.  He referred members to the tabled vet report, attached as pages 8-9 to the minutes, which indicated a 5mm laceration to the front left shoulder of the other dog  and damage to the surrounding muscle. 

In response to a question from a member, Mr D Packer advised he now checked the reserve was empty before taking Dusty for her walk.  He tabled photographs of the reserve and the dog Dusty attached as pages 10-12 to the minutes.  He added they undertake recall training every day, and attached the muzzle to Dusty whenever she left the property. 

Mr C Packer, dog owner of Dusty, advised it was very difficult to watch Dusty attempt to play with a muzzle on, and that she responded positively to commands.

In response to a question from a member, Mr D Packer advised he had not crossed the creek and that the incident had occurred when he was approximately 100m away.

Mr C Packer confirmed the responsible dog ownership classification had been attached to his parents address where Dusty lived and was registered to.

Response on behalf of Council’s Animal Services

In response to questions from a member, the Senior Animal Control Officer referred members to the complainant’s written statement and confirmed that even if there had been no injury, the actions of Dusty warranted a menacing dog classification.  This was bassed on her rushing at the complainant and her dog in an uncontrolled manner in a public place.  The Senior Animal Control officer conceded that without an injury, there remained a possibility a menacing classification might not have been issued for this incident.  He added the classification would prevent a bite attack occurring in the future.

The Animal Control Officer confirmed the complainant was still distressed two days after the incident when he spoke with her.  She advised she would not walk in the reserve again.  He pointed out that injuries could still occur from an attack from a muzzled dog, notably from claws.

Mr C Packer questioned which dog “snapped” first, and that the other dog might also have been responsible for the incident.  He asked why his dog was being punished, and whether all dogs who run at people should be required to be muzzled.

The Chair thanked all parties for their attendance and submissions.  He advised a decision would be released within 15 working days. 

The meeting adjourned at 2.49pm. The dog owner/carer, the Head of Regulatory Services and Emergency Management, the Senior Animal Control Officer and Animal Control Officer left the meeting. 

Deliberations

In considering the matter, members had regard to the following:

·    the statement of evidence which formed the basis of the classification;

·    steps taken by Dusty’s owner, Mr C Packer, and carer, Mr D Packer, to prevent any threat to the safety of persons and animals;

·    the matters submitted in support of the objection;

·    the matters raised by the complainant; and

·    all the other relevant information provided.

Members agreed that the classification of menacing dog was carried out according to the law.

Members expressed disappointment that the complainant was not present to provide her account of the incident. Members noted the following:

·  that Dusty was not under control at the time of the incident and Mr D Packer acknowleged this was an error of his judgement;

·  that dogs often run at each other;

·  the issue of who the agressor was, either Dusty rushing at the complainant and her dog or the other dog snapping, was not clarified;

·  the existence of blood or otherwise at the time of incident could not be clarified;

·  that Dusty and her carer treated the reserve as an extension of their property and that it was usually empty;

·  inconsistencies in the accounts of the incident, the delay between the incident and it being reported and the complainant taking her dog to a vet;

·  that dog owners and their controlled animals should feel safe whereever they walked; and

·  that it could not be guaranteed that Dusty would not act in a menacing way in the future. 

Members were advised that the purpose of a menacing dog classification was to protect people and other animals.

Members noted that Dusty’s carers could reapply for the responsible dog ownership classification after one year and that Dusty would remain muzzled for the rest of her life when in a public place. 

Members noted the actions carried out by Dusty’s owner and carer by checking the reserve was clear before entering and undertaking regular recall training.  Members did not consider these actions went far enough to reassure them that Dusty was not a threat to the safety of any person or animal.

 

Members requested officers inform all dog owners about what “a dog being under control” actually meant, and the clear consequences of what the outcome was of not having a dog under control, namely a menacing dog classification and compulsory muzzling.

 

Resolved:           (Cr Edwards/Cr Dyer)                                    Minute No. HSC 20503

“That the Subcommittee:

(i)         notes the provisions of the Dog Control Act 1996 which apply to classification of a dog as a menacing dog;

(ii)        notes the evidence of the Animal Control Officer which led to the classification being imposed;

(iii)       notes the verbal and written objection by the owner of the dog;

(iv)       notes the written evidence of the complainant;

(v)        notes any other matters relevant under Section 33B of the Act; and

(vi)       pursuant to section 33B(2) of the Dog Control Act 1996 upholds the menacing             classification of the dog Dusty.”

Reasons

·    It is acknowledged that the dog owner/carer has taken some steps to minimise the likelihood of a further incident, however, they are not considered sufficient to ensure that Dusty is not a threat to the safety of the public or other animals;

·    The decision is made for the safety of the public and other animals; and

·    Council needs to uphold the law.

    

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 3.23 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cr Edwards

CHAIR

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 23rd day of November 2020

 


Clinical Notes:_

 


Date:     9 MAY 20 11:25

Vet:     AW_K

Weight: 36,00                              Temperature 39.4

Desc:        Reason: D - abcess?


 

 

Scores: Body 5                  Dental -1


 

History: A few days ago while walking near canal was attacked by another dog. No obvious wounds, haemorrhage at the time. Today when rolling in dirt o noticed bleeding from L elbow. No significant lameness observed.

Been well otherwise no significant change in DUDE, demeanour.

Physical Exam:

Muzzled for wound care and PE as reactive to palpation.

Eyes - Corneas clear, no discharge, no conjunctivitis or blepharopasm noted. Pupils symmetrical Ears - No ceruminous debris obvious externally, no odour, no erythema noted

Nose - No discharge noted

Oral - Mucous membranes pink, moist, CRT <2 sec. Thorough oral exam not performed as muzzled. Teeth - Muzzled for exam - dental exam not performed.

Lymph nodes - No pain, asymmetry or lymphadenopathy noted of the submandibular, prescapular or popliteal

lymph nodes

Cardiovascular - Normal heart rate and rhythm, no pulse deficits, no murmur identified Respiratory - No abnormalities noted in rate, effort or on auscultation

Abdomen - No abnormal masses or foci of pain identified on abdominal palpation Musculoskeletal - Ambulating well on all four limbs, a full ortt)ppaedic exam was not performed Genitourinary - No discharge or abnormalities noted                                                    ··

Integument - ~5mm dermal laceration caudal LF just proximal to olecranon. Surrounding musculature (distal triceps) firm mass-effect. No other wounds palpable/visualised.

Neuro - Mentation normal. A full Neuro exam was not performed

 

 

 

 

AssessmenUProblem list:

Puncture wound+/- (secondary abscessation and rupture). Soft tissue trauma and haemorrhage.

Plan:

Clipped surrounding fur, cleaned w/ chlorhexidine solution. Flushed underrun tissue w/ 50ml sterile hartmann's solution. Debrided wound margins.

Rx: carprofen sid x 7 days. Clavulox bid x 7 days.

Advised o to keep clean and avoid wound. 0 to monitor for pain, discharge.

 

Drugs Dispensed:

 


Drug Quantity    Drug Name and Instructions

7                                                                                                                          Canidryl 100mg Tabs: Give ONE (1) tablet ONCE daily. ALWAYS GIVE WITH FOOD. Contact clinic if any vomiting or diarrhoea.                               _


14                            Juroclav Tablet 500mg: Give ONE (1) tablet TWICE daily.         ··\



View south from our back gate, to corner (60-70m)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


                                                                                      22                                                23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

04 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1418)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/122

 

Minutes of the Extraordinary Proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee dated 22 October 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the report of the meeting held on 22 October 2020 be adopted.

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Minutes of the Extraordinary Proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee - 22 October 2020

23

    

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Minutes of the Extraordinary Proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee - 22 October 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


                                                                                      68                                                23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

20 October 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1277)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/264

 

Proposed Private District Plan Change 47: Major Gardens, Kelson - Rezoning to General Residenital Activity Area and General Recreation Activity Area

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report presents the recommended decision of the hearing panel on Proposed Private District Plan Change 47: Major Gardens, Kelson - Rezoning to General Residential Activity Area and General Recreation Activity Area.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(i)         receives the report and recommendation of the Hearing Panel dated 2 October 2020, acting under delegated authority pursuant to Section 34A of the Resource Management Act 1991, for the hearing of submissions and further submissions on Private District Plan Change 47;

(ii)        notes the process under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) for Proposed Private District Plan Change 47: Major Gardens, Kelson - Rezoning to General Residential Activity Area and General Recreation Activity Area;

(iii)       approves Private District Plan Change 47 in accordance with Clause 29 of Schedule 1 to the Resource Management Act 1991 as recommended in the report by the Hearing Panel and attached as Appendix 1 to the report;

(iv)      adopts the recommended decision on Private District Plan Change 47 and the further evaluation and reasons for that decision set out in the report by the Hearing Panel contained within Appendix 1 to this report; and

(v)       resolves to publicly notify its decision on Private District Plan Change 47 within 10 working days of this decision, and to service the decision on the applicant and submitters.

For the reasons that the hearing panel has considered the issues and all submissions on Proposed Plan Change 47, and where appropriate, has modified the notified provisions of the proposal in response to submissions and based on the evidence provided to the hearing panel.

 

Background

2.    Urban Edge Planning Ltd, on behalf of FLY Building Ltd, lodged a private plan change request with Council on 24 April 2019. The purpose of the request was for a change to the District Plan to rezone land at Major Drive and Kaitangata Crescent, Kelson to a combination of General Residential Activity Area and General Recreation Activity Area.

3.    At its 30 July 2019 meeting, Council resolved to accept the private plan change request, and instructed officers to commence the plan change process for a private plan change, as set out in the First Schedule of the RMA.

4.    The proposal was publicly notified for submissions on 13 August 2019. Seven submissions were received, (two submissions in support of the proposal, two in opposition, and three neutral submissions).

5.    A summary of the decisions requested in submissions was publicly notified on 1 October 2019, to provide for further submissions. Three further submissions were received. Following receipt of submissions, the applicant sought to resolve issues raised in submissions. Through this process (including the subsequent hearing), the requestor amended the proposal. The amendments were:

a.       Removal of a relatively small area near the end of Liverton Road from the proposal.

b.       Rezoning areas referred to as ‘the finger’ (a vegetated gully, near the eastern end of the site) and ‘the inundation wetland’ (at the north-east corner of the site) to General Recreation Activity Area, rather than General Residential Activity Area.

c.       Amendment to Policy 11.1.2(c), for engineering practices to maintain or improve ecological values of onsite streams and downstream receiving environments from stormwater runoff resulting from subdivision of the land.

d.      For the rule on subdivision of the sites, new matters of discretion on:

i.          Measures to control reverse sensitivity effects in relation to noise on the adjoining properties within the Rural Residential Activity Area.

ii.         Measures to maintain the ecological values of the indigenous vegetation in the area to be rezoned General Recreation Activity Area, including protection through legal mechanisms and on-site measures to manage edge effects during adjacent development.

e.       Minor amendments to improve clarity of some provisions.

6.    Council appointed an independent hearing panel to hear the application and submissions and make a recommendation to Council. A hearing on the proposal, with the independent hearing panel, was held on 26 August 2020 at the Lower Hutt Events Centre. The hearing panel has assessed the evidence presented at the hearing and has now prepared a recommended decision which is attached (Appendix 1 of this report).

7.    The hearing panel’s overall recommendation is as follows:

5.1       Based on our consideration of all the material before us, including the section 42A report from the Council’s advisors, submissions, further submissions, evidence presented at the hearing and following consideration of the requirements of section 32AA and other relevant statutory matters, and for the reasons we have set out above in Sections 3 and 4 [of the hearing panel’s Recommendation Report], we recommend to the Council that:

a.         the plan change be accepted as notified, and as further amended prior to, during and subsequent to the hearing, as set out in Appendix 2 [of the hearing panel’s Recommendation Report];

b.         that all submissions on the plan change be accepted or rejected to the extent that they correspond with that conclusion and the matters we have set out in the preceding report sections (and as summarised in Appendix 1 [of the hearing panel’s Recommendation Report]); and

c.          pursuant to Clause 10 of the First Schedule of the Resource Management Act 1991, Council give notice of its decision on submissions to Plan Change 47

Options

8.    The decision before Council is to either adopt or reject the hearing panel’s recommendation to approve Proposed Plan Change 47, including the recommended amendments to the notified text and recommended decisions on submissions.

9.    If Council decides to adopt the recommendation as the Council decision, the availability of the Council decision will be publicly notified in the Hutt News. At the same time a copy of the public notice and information about how to lodge an appeal will be served on the applicant and all submitters, in accordance with clause 29(6) of the First Schedule of the RMA.

10.  Any person who has made a submission on Proposed Plan Change 47, and the requestor of the proposed plan change, have the right to appeal to the Environment Court in respect of:

a.         A provision/matter included or excluded in the proposal, or

b.         A provision which the decisions of Council proposed to include or exclude in the plan change.

11.  A submitters’ right to appeal is limited to the provision or matter in the person’s submission on the proposed plan change.

12.  If Council decides to reject the recommendation of the hearing panel the process would at least go back to the hearing stage.  All submitters and the requestor of the proposed plan change would have to be re-heard, either in front of the same hearing panel or by newly appointed hearings commissioners.  This would cause additional costs and time delays.  Council does not have the option of making changes to the hearing panel’s recommendation because Council has not heard the evidence presented at the hearing and to change the recommendation would not demonstrate fairness or natural justice to the submitters.

13.  If no appeals to the decision on the plan change area are received, then that concludes the process and no further action is required. If one or more appeals to the plan change are received, then Council would need to defend this decision in the Environment Court.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

14.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

15.  Full public notification and involvement in the plan change process has occurred in the processing of the plan change, as required by the RMA. The decision of Council will be publicly notified and a copy of the decision and recommendation report will be available on Council’s website.

Legal Considerations

16.  To date all legal considerations under the Resource Management Act 1991 have been taken into account and all processes carried out within the requirements of the Act.

Financial Considerations

17.  The costs with processing the Private Plan Change request are passed on to the applicant. There are no financial considerations at this stage. There would be additional costs if the decision is appealed.

18.  If Council decided to not adopt the recommendation of the hearing panel, there would be significant additional costs associated with repeating all or part of the process, such as rehearing matters.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Report and Recommendations of Hearing Panel on Private Plan Change 47

69

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Nathan Geard

Senior Environmental Policy Analyst

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Hamish Wesney

Head of District Plan Policy

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Report and Recommendations of Hearing Panel on Private Plan Change 47

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

  


                                                                                     164                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

16 October 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1257)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/265

 

Proposed New Private Street Name: Subdivision of LOT 328 Durham Crescent, Fairfield

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To seek approval for an appropriate street name for the new private road in the new subdivision of LOT 328 Durham Crescent, Fairfield.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    approves a name for the new private road in the new Subdivision of LOT 328 Durham Crescent, Fairfield, attached as Appendix 1 to the report, as suggested below:

a)   “Kawakawa” suggested road type “Road/Te Ara o”; or

b)   “Kōtukutuku” ” suggested road type “Road”; or

c)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

d)   an appropriate name tabled during the meeting;

(ii)   approves an appropriate back up road if the name selected is tabled during the meeting; and

(iii)  approves the appropriate road type (as permitted by the New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4819:2011) as shown attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

These recommendations are made so the development may proceed to completion as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require formalised street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

 

Background

2.    Stage 3(5) – Subdivision of LOT 328 Durham Crescent, Fairfield by Kāinga Ora will create one new private road with 13 new dwellings, 11 gaining access off the new private road and two gaining access off Durham Crescent, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to the report.

3.    The responsibility for naming new private roads within Lower Hutt lies with the Community Boards or, in this case, with the Regulatory Committee for areas of the city not represented by Community Boards.

4.    The subdivision cannot proceed to completion without approved street names and legalised street addresses.

Discussion

5.    The developer has requested that the Committee consider the following names (in order of their preference). Both are names of native plants are present in the Eastern Hills.

a)   Kawakawa” - kawakawa, pepper tree, (Macropiper excelsum) is a small, densely-branched tree with heart-shaped leaves. Found throughout the North Island and as far south as Banks Peninsula. Used for ceremonies, including removing tapu and for medicinal purposes. (source: maoridictionary.co.nz)

b)   Kōtukutuku” - tree fuchsia (Fuchsia excorticata) is a tree with light brown, flaky bark and leaves which drop off in winter. Dark purplish red flowers occur over spring and are followed by dark purple berries popular with birds. Found throughout Aotearoa/New Zealand. (source: maoridictionary.co.nz)

6.    These names were selected in consultation with Kura Moeahu.

7.    Background information submitted during the naming of Harakeke Lane which includes the names Kawakawa and Kōtukutuku is attached as Appendix 4 to the report.

8.    Both names have been checked with Land Information New Zealand and are acceptable to use.

9.    In the event that the name selected by the Committee is one tabled during the meeting, then an appropriate back up road name should also be selected to prevent delays to the development. This back up name should be selected from the approved names on the attached Reserved Street Name List, as these have already been approved by LINZ.

10.  The Reserved Street Names List includes two more approved (native plant) names that have been reserved for use by Kāinga Ora, including:

a)   Kānuka; and

b)   Puawānanga.

 

11.  The developers have requested the use of Kānuka be avoided at this stage if possible.

Options

12.  The suggested names for the private road meets the requirements of the New Zealand Standard, is approved by Land Information New Zealand, and can be considered for adoption;

a)   Kawakawa; or

b)   Kōtukutuku

13.  Recommended options for Road Types are;

c)   Road; or

d)   Te Ara o.

14.  Alternatively, the board could select a name from;

e)   the Reserved Street Names List attached as Appendix 2, which contains names reserved for Kāinga Ora upon their request; or

f)    other names tabled during the meeting.

15.  Other names tabled during the meeting can be considered for use as above but are subject to the requirements of the New Zealand Standard and must have a backup name, in case it is not suitable.

16.  An appropriate road type must be selected (as permitted by the New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4819:2011) attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

17.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

18.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions, and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.     

Consultation

19.  The developer has consulted with Kura Moeahu on behalf of Te Āti Awa and the wider Taranaki Whānui.

20.  Officers have consulted with Council’s Principal Māori Advisor, who has confirmed the suitability and spelling of the preferred street name.

Legal Considerations

21.  The Committee has the delegated responsibility to name the private road.

22.  It is important that new streets are named early in the development stage as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require individual street addresses, in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

Financial Considerations

23.  There are no financial considerations. The developer is responsible for the necessary street name signs. This will be undertaken by Council’s contractor with the cost paid by the developer.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 Subdivision of LOT 328 Durham Crescent, Fairfield - Street Naming Plan

165

2

Appendix 2 Reserved Street Name List

166

3

Appendix 3 Permitted Road Types from LINZ

168

4

Appendix 4 Background and Context submitted by Kainga Ora

170

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Threesa Malki

Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 Subdivision of LOT 328 Durham Crescent, Fairfield - Street Naming Plan

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 Reserved Street Name List

 

 

Name

Suburb

Background

Additional info

Te Umumamaku

Waiwhetu

Name of an old cultivation clearing within close vicinity of Waiwhetu. LINZ OK 27-4-18

DOC/18/64421

Robinson

Hutt City

Joseph Robinson (1814 –1879) was originally from Kent. He and his brother James came to New Zealand at the beginning of the 1830s. They are supposed to have arrived in Te Whanganui a Tara or Port Nicholson sometime in 1831, via Sydney. Some have even dated it earlier at 1822-1823. Joseph established himself as a boat builder close to the mouth of the Hutt River, not far away from Hokoikoi Pa on the western side of the river. LINZ OK 5-3-20

DOC/11/18810

Grieg

Wainuiomata

In memory of Thomas Grieg Henry. Shifted to their home in Norfolk St in 1962 back when Wainuiomata was called Nappy Valley. Chairman of Pencarrow Home and School Assn., involved in projects with Riddiford Lions Club, Meals on Wheels etc.  Received civic award for his volunteer work. (making contact with the family for consent would require additional research and investigation) LINZ OK 5-3-20

DOC/17/6017

Waterford

Wainuiomata

As Parkway is through a swamp, the existing Parkway reservoir is a feature, and fed by a water main through the subdivision. LINZ OK 5-3-20 CANNOT BE ROAD TYPE OF DRIVE

DOC/16/88412

Additional name from the parkway Rise

Pedersen

Wainuiomata

Former owner of section 5, Parkway. Further investigation required. LINZ OK 5-3-20

 

DOC/16/88412

Additional name from the parkway Rise

Harry Martin

Wainuiomata

In memory of the only mayor of Wainuiomata albeit for a short period of only one year. He served on the county council for 11 years. He was an unwavering community supporter for many years. LINZ OK 28-1-20 NOTE: THERE IS MARTIN GROVE, NORMANDALE (APPROX. 7KMS)

DOC/20/1235

Ibbotson

Wainuiomata

After Reverend Charles Ibbotson who was the original owner of Section 5 of Belmont Survey District approximately where 80 Parkway is located today. (Historical figure (circa 1800’s) therefore making contact with the family would require additional research and investigation)  LINZ OK 31-1-20

DOC/20/1235

Te Ngaengae

Naenae

Te Ngaengae is the original name of the Naenae area which used be a swamp. Our school moteatea talks of the historical landmarks pertaining to Te Ngaengae, which was gifted to our school kapa haka group in 2018, by one of our local elders Kura Moeahu.  LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Renata

Naenae

In memory of Tuahine Renata, a Maori teacher who for many years spent her career at Naenae Primary School and dedicated her life to the revival of te reo me ona tikanga in the community through the Maori immersion class Kohanga Te Rā.  LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Te Hōpua

Naenae

Te Hopua in english means the pool. Our immersion class Kohanga Te Rā can be likened to a Maori language pool for students wanting to be immersed in te reo me ona tikanga. We see Kohanga Te Ra as the central learning hub of our Maori community of Naenae. LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Te Mako

Naenae

This was the name of a Pa in Naenae. LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Hēmi Tōpine Te Mamaku

Belmont

The chief who led the attack on Boulcott Farm in 1846. He constructed a ridgetop pā site on the Pareraho trail in what is now Speedy's Reserve (between Hill Road and Kelson). He adopted the name Hemi Topine (James Stovin) later after conversion to Christianity.LINZ OK 7-6-19

DOC/19/75663

Te Mamaku

Boulcott

Background as above. He was known as Te Mamaku at the time of the attack. LINZ OK 8-5-20

DOC/20/36382

Ngāti Hāua-te-rangi

Belmont

The iwi of chief Te Mamaku and the warriors LINZ OK 27-5-19

DOC/19/75663

Rākaiwhakairi

Ngāti Kahukuraāwhitia

Belmont

Early hapū of Ngāti Ira who were some of the earliest to live in this part of Heretaunga (the Hutt Valley)  LINZ OK 22-5-19

See http://www.wcl.govt.nz/maori/wellington/ngawaahipipitea.html

See para 5 of Appendix 2 of this report: http://iportal.huttcity.govt.nz/Record/ReadOnly?Tab=3&Uri=4004447

DOC/19/75663

Caverhill

Belmont

"Caverhill owned block 9, one of the original blocks carved up by the NZ Company. Block 9 covers most of Hill Rd and the Pa site and a lot of Speedy's reserve. He was in the volunteers back in the 1800's like a lot who settled these hills. So I'd like to nominate him too. Caverhill Way maybe?" LINZ OK 5-3-20

DOC/19/75663

Roy Hewson

Petone

In memory of Roy Hewson who served a fifteen-year stint as the Principal of Petone Central School, elected to Petone Borough Council and established the Petone Junior Borough Council. In addition to these, his tenure at the Council, including as Deputy Mayor of Petone, he was also involved in founding the Jackson Street Programme and the Walk of Champions.  LINZ OK 18-2-20

DOC/20/15661

Ed Perry

 

In recognition of Edmund (Ed) Coombes Perry who served

Hutt City Council for 25 years. He became Deputy Town Clerk in 1957 and Town Clerk in 1962 until his retirement in 1977.

(Reserved for UPL developments) LINZ OK 2-4-20

DOC/20/29675

Van Baarle

 

After Willem van Baarle who migrated to New Zealand in the 1950’s. van Baarle is Dutch and represents a significant group of immigrants who settled in Lower Hutt and it is a reminder of the influence and origins of the immigrants who are part of Lower Hutt’s history. (Reserved for Public Roads) LINZ OK 6-6-19

DOC/19/101630

Kākā

 

bird names   LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Chaffinch

 

bird names  LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Rosella

 

bird names   LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Tulip

 

Plant name  LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Kōtukutuku

Fairfield

Native plants particularly relating to the Eastern Hills (Reserved for Kāinga Ora developments) LINZ OK 26-6-20

DOC/20/68717

Kānuka

Kawakawa

Puawānanga

 

 

Although there is an emphasis on the names proposed by the developer (as long as they meet LINZ requirements) the final decision is up to the Committee on the final name.

Names with an important contribution to the City and Events are favourable.

 


Attachment 3

Appendix 3 Permitted Road Types from LINZ

 


 


Attachment 4

Appendix 4 Background and Context submitted by Kainga Ora

 


 


                                                                                     176                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

10 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1462)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/295

 

Proposed New Private Street Name: Subdivision of 31-40 Barber Grove, Moera

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To seek approval for an appropriate street name for the existing right of way in the subdivision of 31-40 Barber Grove, Moera.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    approves a name for the existing right of way in the subdivision of 31-40 Barber Grove, attached as Appendix 1 to the report, as suggested below:

a)   “Ripeka” suggested road type “Way/ Te Ara o”; or

b)   “Wai Mārama” suggested road type “Lane/ Te Ara o”; or

c)   an alternate name from the Reserved Street Name list, attached as Appendix 2 to the report; or

d)   an appropriate name tabled during the meeting; and

(ii)   approves an appropriate back up name if option (i)a), (i)b), or (i)d) is selected; and

(iii)  approves the appropriate road type (as permitted by the New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4819:2011) as shown attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

These recommendations are made so the development may proceed to completion as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require formalised street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

 

Background

2.    The subdivision of 31-40 Barber Grove, Moera creates 12 new dwellings, all gaining access off Barber Grove. 

3.    Address allocation has been accepted by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) in a way that requires the 10 existing units (odd numbers 1 through 19 in Appendix 1) to be addressed off the existing right of way. Therefore the existing right of way requires naming.

4.    The responsibility for naming new private roads within Lower Hutt lies with the Community Boards or, with the Regulatory Committee for areas of the city not represented by Community Boards.

5.    Although the responsibility for naming in this case normally lies with the Petone Community Board, the naming needs to be approved by the Regulatory Committee as the developer did not notify that naming was required until after the last Petone Community Board meeting of the calendar year 2020. The next Petone Community Board meeting is not scheduled until 15 February 2021.

6.    The subdivision cannot proceed to completion without approved street names and legalised street addresses.

Discussion

7.    The developer has requested that the Committee consider McArdle Lane after Owen McArdle, who owned the land next to Henry Barber and had portions of it taken for river control. Owen died in 1908 and the land was transmitted to his wife Mary Anne McArdle and later sold off.

8.    When an individual’s first name and/or surname is to be used as a street name the person must be deceased and the name is typically not used unless a family member can be contacted to confirm they are happy with its use.

9.    The developer was unable to provide any family contacts. Council’s Family History Specialist has investigated the McArdle family history however due to time constraints a contact could not be traced to request consent for the use of the name.

10.  Therefore, this name (McArdle) is not recommended as a street name option for this development.

11.  Given the limited time available, officers sought suggestions for appropriate street names from the Petone Community Board and Jackson Street Programme, as representatives of the local community. Deputy Mayor Lewis, on behalf of the Petone Community Board, suggested naming option 11(a) below.  The Jackson Street Programme suggested naming option 11(b) below:

a)   Ripeka - This area of Moera and Waiwhetu already has family names associated to of one of Lower Hutt’s earliest settlers, Joseph Robinson (name on the Reserved Street Name List). Presently there are streets named after his daughter Harena and his wife Kauamo in Moera and it would be fitting to include his other daughter Ripeka.

(Harena Way is the private road of the subdivision opposite 31-40 Barber Grove. The naming was approved by Petone Community Board on 22 June 2020.)

The family had given consent for the use of “Ripeka” at the time of the naming of Harena Way.

b)   Wai Mārama - The name was suggested due to the vicinity to the river, and the translation for Moera being ‘Sleeping in the Sun’, and that sun and water are both important elements in the Māori culture.

12.  All names have been forwarded to LINZ to check for suitability and their approval is pending.

13.  In the event that LINZ comments had not been received prior to the meeting and the Committee selects one of the above suggestions, or the name selected by the Committee is one tabled during the meeting, an appropriate back up road name should also be selected to prevent delays to the development.

14.  This back up name should be selected from the approved names on the attached Reserved Street Name List, as these have already been approved by LINZ.

Options

15.  The following names meet the requirements of the New Zealand Standard, and can be considered for adoption;

a)   Ripeka; or

b)   Wai Mārama

16.  Recommended options for Road Types are;

c)   Way; or

d)   Lane; or

e)   Te Ara o.

17.  Alternatively, the board could select a name from;

f)    the Reserved Street Names List attached as Appendix 2; or

g)   other names tabled during the meeting.

18.  Above name suggestions and other names tabled during the meeting can be considered for use as above but are subject to LINZ approval and meet requirements of New Zealand Standards, therefore must have a backup name, in case it is not suitable.

19.  An appropriate road type must be selected (as permitted by the New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4819:2011) attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

20.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

21.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions, and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.        

Consultation

22.  The developer has suggested a street name (McArdle), however there has been insufficient time to locate descendants to allow this name to be approved for use.

23.  Due to the limited time available, further consultation was limited to the Petone Community Board and Jackson Street Programme as representatives of the local community.

24.  The family of Ripeka Robinson have previously indicated support for the name Ripeka to be used.

25.  Officers have consulted with Council’s Principal Māori Advisor, who has confirmed the suitability and spelling of the suggested street names.

Legal Considerations

26.  The Committee has the delegated responsibility to name the private road.

27.  The new street name is required as a variety of utility connections and other administrative bodies require individual street addresses in order for the necessary connections to be provided.

Financial Considerations

28.  There are no financial considerations. The developer is responsible for the necessary street name signs. This will be undertaken by Council’s contractor with the cost paid by the developer.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 Subdivision of 31-40 Barber Grove, Moera - Street Naming Plan

177

2

Appendix 2 Reserved Street Name List

178

3

Appendix 3 Exract of Permitted Road Types

180

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Threesa Malki

Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 Subdivision of 31-40 Barber Grove, Moera - Street Naming Plan

 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 Reserved Street Name List

 

 

Name

Suburb

Background

Additional info

Te Umumamaku

Waiwhetu

Name of an old cultivation clearing within close vicinity of Waiwhetu. LINZ OK 27-4-18

DOC/18/64421

Robinson

Hutt City

Joseph Robinson (1814 –1879) was originally from Kent. He and his brother James came to New Zealand at the beginning of the 1830s. They are supposed to have arrived in Te Whanganui a Tara or Port Nicholson sometime in 1831, via Sydney. Some have even dated it earlier at 1822-1823. Joseph established himself as a boat builder close to the mouth of the Hutt River, not far away from Hokoikoi Pa on the western side of the river. LINZ OK 5-3-20

DOC/11/18810

Grieg

Wainuiomata

In memory of Thomas Grieg Henry. Shifted to their home in Norfolk St in 1962 back when Wainuiomata was called Nappy Valley. Chairman of Pencarrow Home and School Assn., involved in projects with Riddiford Lions Club, Meals on Wheels etc.  Received civic award for his volunteer work. (making contact with the family for consent would require additional research and investigation) LINZ OK 5-3-20

DOC/17/6017

Waterford

Wainuiomata

As Parkway is through a swamp, the existing Parkway reservoir is a feature, and fed by a water main through the subdivision. LINZ OK 5-3-20 CANNOT BE ROAD TYPE OF DRIVE

DOC/16/88412

Additional name from the parkway Rise

Pedersen

Wainuiomata

Former owner of section 5, Parkway. Further investigation required. LINZ OK 5-3-20

 

DOC/16/88412

Additional name from the parkway Rise

Harry Martin

Wainuiomata

In memory of the only mayor of Wainuiomata albeit for a short period of only one year. He served on the county council for 11 years. He was an unwavering community supporter for many years. LINZ OK 28-1-20 NOTE: THERE IS MARTIN GROVE, NORMANDALE (APPROX. 7KMS)

DOC/20/1235

Ibbotson

Wainuiomata

After Reverend Charles Ibbotson who was the original owner of Section 5 of Belmont Survey District approximately where 80 Parkway is located today. (Historical figure (circa 1800’s) therefore making contact with the family would require additional research and investigation)  LINZ OK 31-1-20

DOC/20/1235

Te Ngaengae

Naenae

Te Ngaengae is the original name of the Naenae area which used be a swamp. Our school moteatea talks of the historical landmarks pertaining to Te Ngaengae, which was gifted to our school kapa haka group in 2018, by one of our local elders Kura Moeahu.  LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Renata

Naenae

In memory of Tuahine Renata, a Maori teacher who for many years spent her career at Naenae Primary School and dedicated her life to the revival of te reo me ona tikanga in the community through the Maori immersion class Kohanga Te Rā.  LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Te Hōpua

Naenae

Te Hopua in english means the pool. Our immersion class Kohanga Te Rā can be likened to a Maori language pool for students wanting to be immersed in te reo me ona tikanga. We see Kohanga Te Ra as the central learning hub of our Maori community of Naenae. LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Te Mako

Naenae

This was the name of a Pa in Naenae. LINZ OK 3-7-19

DIV/19/2760

Hēmi Tōpine Te Mamaku

Belmont

The chief who led the attack on Boulcott Farm in 1846. He constructed a ridgetop pā site on the Pareraho trail in what is now Speedy's Reserve (between Hill Road and Kelson). He adopted the name Hemi Topine (James Stovin) later after conversion to Christianity.LINZ OK 7-6-19

DOC/19/75663

Te Mamaku

Boulcott

Background as above. He was known as Te Mamaku at the time of the attack. LINZ OK 8-5-20

DOC/20/36382

Ngāti Hāua-te-rangi

Belmont

The iwi of chief Te Mamaku and the warriors LINZ OK 27-5-19

DOC/19/75663

Rākaiwhakairi

Ngāti Kahukuraāwhitia

Belmont

Early hapū of Ngāti Ira who were some of the earliest to live in this part of Heretaunga (the Hutt Valley)  LINZ OK 22-5-19

See http://www.wcl.govt.nz/maori/wellington/ngawaahipipitea.html

See para 5 of Appendix 2 of this report: http://iportal.huttcity.govt.nz/Record/ReadOnly?Tab=3&Uri=4004447

DOC/19/75663

Caverhill

Belmont

"Caverhill owned block 9, one of the original blocks carved up by the NZ Company. Block 9 covers most of Hill Rd and the Pa site and a lot of Speedy's reserve. He was in the volunteers back in the 1800's like a lot who settled these hills. So I'd like to nominate him too. Caverhill Way maybe?" LINZ OK 5-3-20

DOC/19/75663

Roy Hewson

Petone

In memory of Roy Hewson who served a fifteen-year stint as the Principal of Petone Central School, elected to Petone Borough Council and established the Petone Junior Borough Council. In addition to these, his tenure at the Council, including as Deputy Mayor of Petone, he was also involved in founding the Jackson Street Programme and the Walk of Champions.  LINZ OK 18-2-20

DOC/20/15661

Ed Perry

 

In recognition of Edmund (Ed) Coombes Perry who served

Hutt City Council for 25 years. He became Deputy Town Clerk in 1957 and Town Clerk in 1962 until his retirement in 1977.

(Reserved for UPL developments) LINZ OK 2-4-20

DOC/20/29675

Van Baarle

 

After Willem van Baarle who migrated to New Zealand in the 1950’s. van Baarle is Dutch and represents a significant group of immigrants who settled in Lower Hutt and it is a reminder of the influence and origins of the immigrants who are part of Lower Hutt’s history. (Reserved for Public Roads) LINZ OK 6-6-19

DOC/19/101630

Kākā

 

bird names   LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Chaffinch

 

bird names  LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Rosella

 

bird names   LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Tulip

 

Plant name  LINZ OK 18-2-20

 

Kōtukutuku

Fairfield

Native plants particularly relating to the Eastern Hills (Reserved for Kāinga Ora developments) LINZ OK 26-6-20

DOC/20/68717

Kānuka

Kawakawa

Puawānanga

 

 

Although there is an emphasis on the names proposed by the developer (as long as they meet LINZ requirements) the final decision is up to the Committee on the final name.

Names with an important contribution to the City and Events are favourable.

 


Attachment 3

Appendix 3 Exract of Permitted Road Types

 


 


                                                                                     185                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

09 June 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/564)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/266

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Jackson Street, Buick and Elizabeth Streets - Petone Rotary Fair - February 2021

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Committee’s approval for the temporary closure of roads to facilitate the running of the 2021 Petone Rotary Fair event.

Recommendations

That Council:

(i)    notes and receives the information;

(ii)   notes that the recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(iii)  agrees to temporarily close the following roads, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report (attached as Appendix 1 to the report):

Petone Rotary Fair – 2021: Saturday 20 February 2021 between the hours of 6:00am to 6:00pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

a)    Jackson Street,Petone (the section of road between the intersections of Cuba and Victoria Streets);

b)    Buick Street, Petone (the section of road between the intersections of Jackson and Elizabeth Streets);

c)    Buick Street, Petone (the section of road between  the intersections of Jackson and Adelaide Streets); and

d)    Elizabeth Street, Petone (the section of road from the intersection of Jackson Street, heading 50 metres north); and

(iv) agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following roads:

Petone Rotary Fair – 2021: Saturday 20 February 2021 between the hours of 6:00am to 6:00pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

a)    Jackson Street, Petone (the section of road between the intersections of Cuba and Victoria Streets);

b)    Buick Street, Petone (the section of road between the intersections of Jackson and Elizabeth Streets);

c)    Buick Street, Petone (the section of road between  the intersections of Jackson and Adelaide Streets);

d)    Elizabeth Street, Petone (the section of road from the intersection of Jackson Street northwards for 50 metres); and

e)    Victoria Street, Petone (the section of road from the intersection of Jackson Street, southwards for 22 metres).

For the reason that the proposed temporary road closures are necessary to accommodate the safe and efficient running of the event for organisers, participants and the general public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    Council has received an application from the Petone Rotary Club, for approval to hold the Hutt News Petone Rotary Fair 2021, an event involving temporary road closures and temporary ‘No Stopping’ restrictions as detailed in recommendations above. Details of the event and the expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

4.     At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.     Processes have been established to implement these procedures including the required communications and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

6.     For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be inconsiderately parked, it is necessary for Council to also pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event allows for the legal removal of vehicles at the direction of the event organiser, and administered by Council’s Parking Enforcement Officers.

7.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

8.    This is an annual event and the proposed closures have been approved in the past.

9.    Council’s Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Petone Rotary Fair – 2021: The proposed closures, if implemented according to an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

10.  The proposed closures, if implemented in accordance with the proposed Traffic Management Plan and in accordance with any specific conditions set by the Traffic Engineer, should not result in any unreasonable impact on traffic.

11.  Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closures during this event will be a safety concern and therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

12.  Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

13.  Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the event will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed

Options

14.   The Committee can;

 

a.    approve the proposed temporary road closures and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions.

 

b.    amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the Council meeting on 8 December 2020, so as to give officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on to impact to traffic and the network.

 

15.   Officers recommend Option a, as the effects of the events can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

17.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate.     

Consultation

18.  A public notice advising that Council is proposing to consider these closures was published in the classifieds section of the Hutt News on
Tuesday 22 September 2020 – No correspondence was received.

19.   This event has the requirement of the event organiser providing proof of consultation with emergency services and public transport operators by
24 December 2020.

 

20.   This is the final year of the Councils agreement with Petone Rotary, whereby consultation with local retailers is to occur every three (3) years.

21.  Organisers have met with the current and new chair of the Jackson Street Programme, and believe that there are no issues of concern.

Legal Considerations

22.  Approval is required from either Council or the Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads (for events) within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

23.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. This event is deemed to be of community benefit in nature.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

186

2

Appendix 2 - Aerial

190

    

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

Reviewed By: Marian Radu

Senior Traffic Engineer

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Aerial

 


                                                                                     195                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

02 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1379)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/267

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Huia Street & Huia Place - Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon - March 2021

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Committee’s approval for the temporary closure of roads to facilitate the running of the 2021 Hutt City Weet-bix Kids TRYathlon event.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes and receives the information;

(ii)   notes that the recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(iii)  agrees to temporarily close the following roads, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report (attached as Appendix 1 to the report):

Sanitarium (Hutt City) Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon – 2021: Wednesday 17 March 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

a)      Huia Street, Hutt Central (the length of the street from its intersection with Laings Road, to its intersection with Myrtle Street); and

b)      Huia Place, Hutt Central (the length of the street from its intersection with Huia Street, to its end); and

(iv) agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following roads:

Sanitarium (Hutt City) Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon – 2021: Wednesday 17 March 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm:

a)      Huia Street, Hutt Central (the length of the street from its intersection with Laings Road, to its intersection with Myrtle Street;)

b)      Huia Place, Hutt Central (the length of the street from its intersection with Huia Street, to its end);

c)       Laings Road, Hutt Central (Huia Pool side) (between Huia and Myrtle Streets);

d)      Myrtle Street, Hutt Central (Huia Pool side) (between #18 and Laings Road);

e)       Bellevue Road, Woburn (Hutt Recreation side) (between Woburn Road and Huia Street); and

f)       Woburn Road, Woburn (Hutt Recreation side) (between Wai-iti Crescent and Bellevue Road)

 For the reason that the proposed temporary road closures are necessary to accommodate the safe and efficient running of events for organizers, participants, spectators and the general public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    Council received an application from SMC Events as organisers of the Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon, with the support of Council’s City Promotions and Events Division for approval to hold the 2021 event which involves temporary road closures and parking restrictions as detailed above.

4.     The Sanitarium (Hutt City) Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon is located at the Hutt Recreational Ground in Lower Hutt. The TRYathlon will begin with the swim leg in the heated indoor pool at Huia Pool where the pool is 25m in length. The Transition area is located a short distance from the pool in the Hutt Recreational Ground. The bike leg is around the streets surrounding the Hutt Recreational Ground, and the run leg is around the Hutt Recreational Ground itself.

5.     At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

6.     Processes have been established to implement these procedures including the required communications and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

7.     For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be inconsiderately parked, it is necessary for Council to also pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event allows for the legal removal of vehicles at the direction of the event organiser, and administered by Council’s Parking Enforcement Officers.

8.     This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

9.    This is an annual event and the proposed closures have been approved in the past.

10.  The Councils Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Sanitarium (Hutt City) Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon – 2021: The proposed closures, if implemented according to an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

Options

11.   The Committee can;

a.    approve the proposed temporary road closures and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions.

b.    amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the Council meeting on 8 December 2020, so as to give officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on to impact to traffic and the network.  

12.   Officers recommend Option a, as the effects of the events can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

13.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

14.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate.  

Consultation

15.  A public notice advising that Council is proposing to consider these closures was published in the classifieds section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 22nd September 2020 – No correspondence was received.

Legal Considerations

16.  Approval is required from either Council or the Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads (for events) within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

17.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. This event is deemed to be of community benefit in nature.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

196

2

Appendix 2 - Aerial

200

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marian Radu

Senior Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Aerial

 


                                                                                     204                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

02 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1393)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/268

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Burden Avenue - Love Wainuiomata Community Christmas Parade 2020

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Committee’s approval for the temporary closure of Burden Avenue, Wainuiomata as part of the running of the Love Wainuiomata Community Christmas Parade event.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes and receives the information;

(ii)   notes that the recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(iii)  agrees to temporarily close the following road, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report (attached as Appendix 1 to the report):

Love Wainuiomata Christmas Parade – 2020: Saturday 28 November 2020 between the hours of 6:30am to 11:00am (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

Burden Avenue, Wainuiomata (from the intersection of Coast/Main Road to the end)

(iv)  agrees to temporary rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose (where required) a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following road:

Love Wainuiomata Christmas Parade – 2020: Saturday 28 November 2020 between the hours of 6:30am to 11:00am (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

Burden Avenue, Wainuiomata (from the intersection of Coast/Main Road to the end); and

(v)   notes that access for residents and businesses along Burden Avenue will be managed throughout the closure period.

For the reason that the requested road closure is deemed necessary to facilitate the safety of organisers, participants, residents and the general public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    Every year Wainuiomata has a very popular Community Christmas Parade.

4.    The parade assembles in Burden Avenue, then travels along Main Road, turns into Wainuiomata Road then finishes once it has turned right into the Wainuiomata Shopping Centre Carpark (off Wainuiomata Road – beside the Real estate Agents).

5.    It is necessary to formally close Burden Avenue to through traffic to ensure the safety of those readying for the parade. Local residents can still be escorted into/out of the closure.

6.    Council at its meeting of 12 August 2008 approved a procedure for Council to follow and comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

7.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures including the required communications and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

8.    For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be a safety concern, it is also necessary for Council to pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event, the roads is subject to a ‘No Stopping’ restriction.

9.    Council can then erect temporary signage and its Parking Enforcement officers can attend the event and authorise the removal of any offending vehicles.

10.  This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures. 

Discussion

11.  This is an annual event and the proposed closures have been approved in the past.

12.  Council’s Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Love Wainuiomata Community Christmas Parade – 2020: The proposed closures, if implemented according to an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

13.   Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closures during this event will be a safety concern and therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

14.   Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

15.   Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the event will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed.

Options

16.   The Committee can;

a)    approve the proposed temporary road closures and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions.

b)    amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to an unscheduled additional Regulatory Committee meeting to be held prior to 28 November 2020, so as to give officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on to impact to traffic and the network.  

17.   Officers recommend Option a), as the effects of the events can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

18.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

19.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions, and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.     

Consultation

20.  The public notice advising that the Council is proposing to consider this closure was published in the classifieds section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 22 September 2020 – No correspondence was received.

21.  Public notice of any decision to close roads will be advertised in The Hutt News.

Legal Considerations

22.  Approval is required from either Council or the Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

23.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. This event is a community event.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report

205

2

Appendix 2: Aerial

208

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marian Radu

Senior Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report

 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Aerial

 


                                                                                     212                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

02 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1394)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/269

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Evans Street - Stokes Valley Rotary Christmas Parade 2020

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Committee’s approval for the temporary closure of Evans Street, Stokes Valley as part of the Stokes Valley Rotary Christmas Parade event.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes and receives the information;

(ii)   notes that the recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(iii)  agrees to temporarily close the following road, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report (attached as Appendix 1 to the report):

Stokes Valley Rotary Christmas Parade – 2020:
Saturday 5 December 2020 between the hours of 12 noon to 1:00pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

Evans Street, Stokes Valley (entire length between Stokes Valley Road and George Street);

(iv)  agrees to temporary rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose (where required) a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following road:

Stokes Valley Rotary Christmas Parade – 2020:
Saturday 5th December 2020 between the hours of 12 noon to 1:00pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

Evans Street, Stokes Valley (entire length between Stokes Valley Road and George Street); and

(v)   notes that access for residents and businesses along Evans Street will be managed throughout the closure period.

For the reason that the requested road closure is deemed necessary to facilitate the safety of organisers’, participants, residents and the general public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    Every year Stokes Valley has a very popular Christmas Parade.

4.    The parade assembles in Kamahi Street, and then travels along Stokes Valley Road, turning into Evans Street.

5.    It is necessary to formally close Evans Street to through traffic to ensure the safety of those floats and participants of the parade once it has finished.

6.    Council at its meeting of 12 August 2008 approved a procedure for Council to follow and comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

7.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures including the required communications and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

8.    For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be a safety concern, it is also necessary for Council to pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event, the roads is subject to a ‘No Stopping’ restriction.

9.    Council can then erect temporary signage and its Parking Enforcement officers can attend the event and authorise the removal of any offending vehicles.

10.  This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures. 

Discussion

11.  This is an annual event and the proposed closures have been approved in the past.

12.  Council’s Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Stokes Valley Rotary Christmas Parade – 2020: The proposed closures, if implemented according to an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

13.   Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closures during this event will be a safety concern and therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

14.   Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

15.   Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the event will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed.

Options

16.   The Committee can;

a)    approve the proposed temporary road closures and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions.

b)    amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to an unscheduled additional Regulatory Committee meeting to be set prior to 5 December 2020, so as to give Council officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on to impact to traffic and the network.  

17.   Officers recommend Option a), as the effects of the events can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

18.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

19.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions, and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.     

Consultation

20.  The public notice advising that the Council is proposing to consider this closure was published in the classifieds section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 22 September 2020 – No correspondence was received.

21.  Public notice of any decision to close roads will be advertised in The Hutt News.

Legal Considerations

22.  Approval is required from either Council or the Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

23.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organizer. This event is a community event.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

213

2

Appendix 2 - Aerial Map

215

    

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

Reviewed By: Marian Radu

Senior Traffic Engineer

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Aerial Map

 


                                                                                     220                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

03 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1402)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/270

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Everest Avenue - Naenae Community Christmas Party 2020

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Committee’s approval for the temporary closure of Everest Avenue, Naenae as part of the Naenae Community Christmas Party event.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes and receives the information;

(ii)   notes that the recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(iii)  agrees to temporarily close the following road, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report (attached as Appendix 1 to the report):

a)    Naenae Community Christmas Party – 2020:
Saturday 12 December 2020 between the hours of 3:00pm to 9:30pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

Everest Avenue, Naenae (entire length between Vogel Street and Treadwell Street);

(iv)  agrees to temporarily close the following road (if required) for the reserve day associated with the event, subject to the conditions listed in the attached  Traffic Impact Report (attached as Appendix 1 to the report):

a)    Naenae Community Christmas Party – 2020:
Saturday 12 December 2020 between the hours of 3:00pm to 9:30pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

Everest Avenue, Naenae (entire length between Vogel Street and Treadwell Street);

(v)   agrees to temporary rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose (where required) a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following road:

a)    Naenae Community Christmas Party – 2020:
Saturday 12 December 2020 between the hours of 3:00pm to 9:30pm (attached as Appendix 2 to the report):

Everest Avenue, Naenae (entire length between Vogel Street and Treadwell Street); and

(vi)  notes that access for residents and businesses along Everest Street will be managed throughout the closure period.

For the reason that the requested road closure is deemed necessary to facilitate the safety of organisers, participants, local businesses and the general public.

 

Background

2.    Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    The team at The Oasis Hutt City Newlife Church have applied to Council to hold a Community Christmas Party on Everest Avenue in Naenae.

4.    Council at its meeting of 12 August 2008 approved a procedure for Council to follow and comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures including the required communications and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

6.    For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be a safety concern, it is also necessary for Council to pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event, the roads is subject to a ‘No Stopping’ restriction.

7.    Council can then erect temporary signage and its Parking Enforcement officers can attend the event and authorise the removal of any offending vehicles.

8.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures. 

Discussion

9.    This is a new event, however historically the Naenae Festival ran a smaller event on Everest Avenue up until 2016.

10.  Council’s Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Naenae Community Christmas Party – 2020: The proposed closures, if implemented according to an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

11.   Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closures during this event will be a safety concern and therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

12.   Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

13.   Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the event will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed.

Options

14.   The Committee can;

a)    approve the proposed temporary road closures and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions.

b)      amend and defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the Council meeting to be held on 8 December 2020, so as to give Council officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on to impact to traffic and the network.  

15.   Officers recommend Option a), as the effects of the events can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

17.  The decision will not increase greenhouse gas emissions, and will not be affected by a changing climate. There are no opportunities in this decision to reduce emissions or build resilience.     

Consultation

18.  The public notice advising that the Council is proposing to consider this closure was published in the classifieds section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 22 September 2020 and again on the 27 October as a result of an increased footprint – No correspondence was received.

19.   The organisers have consulted with those businesses that front Everest Avenue, and have their signed support for the proposed closure associated with the event.

20.  Public notice of any decision to close roads will be advertised in The Hutt News.

Legal Considerations

21.  Approval is required from either Council or the Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

22.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organizer. This event is a community event.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

221

2

Appendix 2 - Aerial

224

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marian Radu

Senior Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Aerial

 


                                                                                     231                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

04 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1425)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/296

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure - Victoria Street, Petone - Filming - December 2020

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Regulatory Committees approval for the temporary closure of sections of Victoria Street, Petone for the purposes of filming.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)           notes and receives the information;

(ii)          notes that the recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, and verification from Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment(s) are not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic;

(iii)         agrees to temporarily close the following roads, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report (Appendix 1):

(a)     Quick as a Wink Ltd - Filming: (Appendix 2)
Wed 9 - Thurs 10 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am
Thurs 10 - Fri 11 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am
Fri 11 - Sat 12 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am

1)       Victoria Street,Petone
(the section of road between no. 50 and Hutt Road)

(b)     Quick as a Wink Ltd - Filming: (Appendix 2)
Wed 9 - Thurs 10 Dec: 10pm to 6am
Thurs 10 - Fri 11 Dec: 11pm to 6am
Sat 12 Dec: 1am to 6am

1)       Victoria Street,Petone
(the section of road from Union Street to no. 50)

(iv)         agrees to temporarily close the following sections of roads, subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Report (Appendix 1) (if required) for the reserve weather days associated with the event:

(a)     Quick as a Wink Ltd - Filming: (Appendix 2)
Tue 15 – Wed 16 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am
Wed 16 – Thurs 17 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am
Thurs 17 – Fri 18 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am
Fri 18 - Sat 19 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am

1)       Victoria Street,Petone
(the section of road between no. 50 and Hutt Road)

(b)     Quick as a Wink Ltd - Filming: (Appendix 2)
Tue 15 - Wed 16 Dec: 10pm to 6am
Wed 16 – Thurs 17 Dec: 10pm to 6am
Thurs 17 – Fri 18 Dec: 11pm to 6am
Sat 19 Dec: 1am to 6am

1)         Victoria Street,Petone
(the section of road from Union Street to no. 50)

(v)       agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed event, and impose a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following roads:

(a)        Quick as a Wink Ltd - Filming: (Appendix 2)
Wed 9 - Thurs 10 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am
Thurs 10 - Fri 11 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am
Fri 11 - Sat 12 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am

1)         Victoria Street,Petone
(the sections of road between Union Street and Hutt Road)

(vi)      agrees to temporarily rescind (if required) the existing parking restrictions during the weather cover dates (as required), and impose a ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction on the following roads:

(a)        Quick as a Wink Ltd - Filming: (Appendix 2)
Tue 15 - Wed 16 Dec: 10pm to 6am
Wed 16 – Thurs 17 Dec: 10pm to 6am
Thurs 17 – Fri 18 Dec: 11pm to 6am
Fri 18 - Sat 19 Dec: 7:30pm to 6am

1)         Victoria Street,Petone
(the sections of road between Union Street and Hutt Road)

(vii)     notes that traffic will be managed through both the Jackson Street and Campbell Terrace intersections during the closure period(s).

For the reason that the proposed temporary road closures are necessary to accommodate the safe and efficient running of the filming for the production team, participants and the general public.

 

Background

2.    The Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, council approval is required.

3.    Council has received an application from Quick as a Wink Ltd, for approval to film a TV show which will involve both temporary road closures and temporary ‘No Stopping’ restrictions as detailed in recommendations above. Details of the event and the expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

4.     At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

5.     Processes have been established to implement these procedures including the required communications and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

6.     For those events where vehicles remaining on roads are considered to be inconsiderately parked, it is necessary for Council to also pass a resolution that, for the duration of the event allows for the legal removal of vehicles at the direction of the event organiser, and administered by Council’s Parking Enforcement Officers.

7.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

8.    Noise and working at night:
Filming activities shall comply with the District Plan noise limits for the activity area in which they are located except that on a maximum of 10 days within each Filming activity (of up to 30 days) any noise resulting from Filming activities shall not exceed 70dBA L10 between the hours of 7.00am and 10.00pm measured at any point within any other site in a Residential, Commercial or Business Activity Area and at any point within the notional boundary of any dwelling in a Rural Activity Area.
Maximum 58dBA 7.00am - 10.00pm
Maximum 45dBA 10.00pm - 7.00am 

Discussion

9.    Council’s Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

Quick as a Wink Ltd – Filming; the proposed closures, if implemented according to an approved temporary traffic management plan and associated conditions are not likely to have an unreasonable impact on traffic or the network.

10.  Any vehicles remaining within the proposed road closures during filming will need to be removed for filming purposes, therefore temporary No Stopping restrictions are required to enable these vehicles to be removed.

11.  Where existing parking restrictions are in place, these are to be temporarily rescinded to facilitate the temporary No Stopping restrictions.

12.  Temporary Traffic Management Plans prepared for the filming will show how traffic safety and flow will be managed around the closure area.

13.  Councils City Promotions and Events Team note;
‘This request is from a major film production that is based primarily in Lower Hutt and Council’s Promotions and Events Team have been working with location managers facilitating several film locations across the city. Lower Hutt is a part of the regional film friendly Wellington partnership.  Each year, film and television companies who choose to film here contribute millions of dollars to the economy and provide hundreds of jobs to residents in the region. With regard to its contribution towards Council’s strategies and policies, and the event is consistent with the objectives and outcomes of these strategies’.

Options

14.   The Regulatory Committee can;

a.  Approve the proposed temporary road closures and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions.

b.  Amend and Defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the Ordinary Council meeting on 8th December 2020, so as to give Council Officers time to assess the proposed amendments and offer an assessment on to impact to traffic and the network.  

15.  Officers recommend Option a, as the effects of the filming can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

17.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate.      

Consultation

18.  A public notice advising that Council is proposing to consider these closures was published in the classifieds section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 10 November 2020.

19.  The locations department of Quick As A Wink Ltd has been working closely with Victoria Street residents and businesses in order to understand their needs over the proposed filming period. This has included multiple visits and conversations with businesses and residents.

 

20.  Overall, the response has been very positive, with businesses and residents being notified through letter drops and conversations with the location departments’ team early on.

 

21.  Quick as a Wink Ltd are specifically working with the owners and/or managers of Speights Ale House, The Vic Tavern, Mexico, Sal’s Pizza and McDonald’s as businesses who may see a high impact.

 

22.  Quick as a Wink Ltd are in constant communication with these businesses for continued consultation and have tailored the closure times to suit their needs.

 

23.  The Petone Community Board was notified via its chairperson (Pam Hanna) as the initial request was received after the Boards meeting on 2 November 2020.

 

24.  The Board supports the road closure request based on the consultation undertaken and currently on-going.

 

25.  Jackson Street Programme was also consulted; however at the time of writing this report no response had been received.

Legal Considerations

26.  Approval is required from either Council or the Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) for the temporary closure of roads (for filming) within its jurisdiction.

a.         Local Government Act  1974
Schedule 10:- Conditions as to stopping of roads and the temporary prohibition of traffic on roads
Temporary prohibition of traffic
11.The council may, subject to such conditions as it thinks fit (including the imposition of a reasonable bond), and after consultation with the Police and the New Zealand Transport Agency, close any road or part of a road to all traffic or any specified type of traffic (including pedestrian traffic)—
(e ) for a period or periods not exceeding in the aggregate 31 days in any year for any exhibition, fair, show, market, concert, film-making, race or other sporting event, or public function: - provided that no road may be closed for any purpose specified in paragraph (e) if that closure would, in the opinion of the council, be likely to impede traffic unreasonably.
11a the council shall give public notice of its intention to consider closing any road or part of a road under clause 11(e); and shall give public notice of any decision to close any road or part of a road under that provision.


27.   Section 14k of the City of Lower Hutt District Plan notes;
Filming is considered to be a commercially driven business with short, unpredictable timelines. It is usual for Filming to occur during normal business hours and to not involve a large number of public participants. Filming often involves the commercial use of public resources. Filming is also recognised as being a unique industry and therefore needs to be managed in a flexible manner while ensuring any adverse effects are managed to an acceptable level.

28.   Section 14K 2.1.1 of the City of Lower Hutt District Plan deems Filming as a Permitted Activity as follows;

a.   Duration:
The total occupation of the site for Filming activities shall not exceed 30 consecutive days.

b.   Structures:
 All associated structures and buildings shall comply with the permitted conditions in the Activity Area they are occupying and with the General Rules. 

c.    Noise:
Filming activities shall comply with the District Plan noise limits for the activity area in which they are located except that on a maximum of 10 days within each Filming activity (of up to 30 days) any noise resulting from Filming activities shall not exceed 70dBA L10 between the hours of 7.00am and 10.00pm measured at any point within any other site in a Residential, Commercial or Business Activity Area and at any point within the notional boundary of any dwelling in a Rural Activity Area.
The notional boundary is defined as a line 20 metres from any side of a dwelling, or the legal boundary of the site where this is closer to the dwelling.
[
Within the General Business Activity Area, all activities must not exceed 65dBA, measured at the boundary of the site on which the activity takes place.
Maximum 58dBA 7.00am - 10.00pm
Maximum 45dBA 10.00pm - 7.00am] 

d.   Light spill and glare:
All Filming activities shall comply with the light spill and glare rules as they apply to the Activity Area in which the proposed Filming is located. 

e.    Dust and wind blown debris:
All Filming activities shall be undertaken in such a manner to avoid nuisance from dust or other wind blown debris at or beyond the site boundary. 

f.    General Rules:
Compliance with all other General Rules. 

Financial Considerations

29.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate organisation. This event is deemed to be commercial in nature.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

232

2

Appendix 2 - Aerial map

236

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marian Radu

Senior Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

Approved By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 - Traffic Impact Report

 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Aerial map

 


                                                                                     245                                               23 November 2020

Regulatory Committee

05 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1440)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/6/289

 

Regulatory Matters

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update of regulatory matters arising from the work of the Environment and Sustainability Group. 

Recommendations

That the Committee receives and notes the information.

 

Background

1.    The report covers the regulatory activities associated with the divisions in the Environment and Sustainability Group.  In particular, the Environmental Consents, Regulatory Services and Sustainability and Resilience Divisions.

2.    Environmental Consent data is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.  Enforcement actions data for Animal Services is attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

3.    The Environmental Consents division processes consent applications under the Resource Management Act, the Food Act, the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act and the Building Act (resource and building consents, liquor and food licences and District Licensing reports), as well as LIMs and property enquiries under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act.  The Environmental Consents division offers an Eco Design Advisor service across the city.

4.    Environmental Health services are provided for Upper Hutt City Council as well as Lower Hutt.

5.    The Regulatory Services Division deals with trade waste applications, bylaws, animal services, parking and emergency management. 

6.    This division provides Animal Services for Wellington City Council as well as Lower Hutt.

Environmental Consents:

Building

7.    The number of building consent applications received in October 2020 was 136, with a total value of work $40,992,979.  This is compared to October 2019, where Council received 146 applications with a total value of $19,667,994.  Although there were fewer applications in the current year, the complexity of the work is higher, reflected in the increase in value of work by 108%.  

 

8.    We are continuing to receive a steady stream of building consent applications lodged, as a result of medium density subdivisions across the city. We have received recent applications for developments ranging in size from 12 to 89 dwellings per site.

 

9.    We are currently working with our IT team to investigate alternative systems for processing building consents and carrying out building inspections. The aim is to streamline processes and provide consistency for our customers.

 

10.  Notable building consents received:

·      38 Tyndall Street, Waiwhetu - 23 town houses constructed over three stages; stage 1: site works, drainage and retaining walls; stage 2: 12 townhouses; stage 3: a further 11 townhouses. Total value of work, $7.2M

·      Rudolf Steiner School - Stage 2 for superstructure of 500m2 two storey classroom block. Value of work,  $2.5M

·      Seaborne Development, 11 Cuba Street (previously known as the Alsco site) – Applications received for five residential blocks, each containing between 3 – 7 townhouses. Total value of work,  $5.4M

·      Wilford Primary School, Petone - Internal refurbishment of hall,  including a partial re-clad, upgrading fire doors, kitchen and bathroom alterations.  Value  of work, $100K

·      79 The Esplanade ( John’s fish market site) - Seismic strengthening, base build works to ground floor, office fit-out to level 1 and 2. Value of work, $1.1M

·      239 Taita Drive (corner of Percy Cameron Street)Hutt Valley Gymnastics have lodged an application for a new 864m2 gymnasium.  Value of work, $1.4M

·      Saint Michaels School, Taita – alterations and upgrades to administration office, toilet blocks and library.  Value of work, $450K

 

Earthquake prone buildings

 

11. We have received more than the average number of building consent applications for seismic strengthening recently, and are working with the applicants and their engineers to issue these consents.  We are pleased that property owners are working to resolve the earthquake prone status of their buildings.

12. Recently issued building consents for seismic strengthening include both the Little Theatre and Walter Nash Stadium.

Swimming Pools

13. We have undertaken 53 swimming pool inspections during September and October, and a total of 118 since 1 July 2020. We are continuing to work with property owners to resolve any outstanding issues. We are still seeing general non-compliance with indoor pools, that were previously exempt under the Fencing of Swimming Pool Act 1987, but are now captured by the Residential Pool provisions of the NZ Building Code.

14. In the lead up to summer, we are preparing pool safety messages to be advertised through our Council website to raise awareness about the dangers of non-compliant pools. Key messages will be targeted at above-ground pools that pop up around the City in the warmer months and are often unsafe.

Eco Design service

15. Our Eco Design Advisor has undertaken 28 assessments of existing buildings in the months of September and October. 

 

16. Our EDA was involved in co-ordinating Council’s submission on the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employments climate change consultation. The consultation focused on improving outcomes for emissions, improving energy efficiency and sustainable practices in the construction sector.

 

17. General feedback was given that appropriate industry wide training and upskilling is required and that we are supportive of change that reduces carbon emissions and promotes more sustainable building practices.

 

Resource Consents

18.  Resource consent application numbers have remained constant.  However as is the case with building consents applications, the complexity and scale of the projects is increasing, as can be seen by the applications discussed below. In September we issued 37 consents and received 33, during October we issued 32 and received 28 applications.

 

19.  The Environment Court recently granted consent to Summerset to build a retirement village consisting of 205 units and 42 cottages at 32A Hathaway Avenue, Boulcott.

 

20.  The consent was originally lodged in 2018 and was referred directly to the Environment Court at the request of the applicant.  Council officers have recently met with the applicant’s consultant to discuss how the conditions will be met. It is expected that building consents will be lodged in the coming months.

 

21.  Notable resource consents lodged:

 

·        47 Victoria Street, Alicetown - 14 townhouses at the Alicetown shops, corner of Beaumont Avenue.

·        29-31 Waiwhetu Road – 14 townhouses over three residential blocks. Development is made up 6 x 2 bedroom units and 8 x single bedroom units.

·        1-5 Moores Valley Road, Wainuiomata – Mixed use re-development of Moore’s Valley Road shops with retail below and residential units above.

·        70 Maungaraki Road, Korokoro – 13 lot undersized subdivision on rural residential land.

·        11 Hillary Court, Naenae – Convert studio building into a boarding house with 30 habitable single bedroom units.

·        318 Oxford Terrace, Epuni – A combined land use and subdivision lodged for 28 townhouses.

·        7 Tunnel Grove, Gracefield –78 various sized industrial units making up the Thames Pacific Park complex, total floor area 4000m2.

·        16 Queen Street, Wainuiomata – 4 Residential apartments above existing shops in the town centre.

·        246 Wise Street, Wainuiomata – Greenfield development to subdivide land for 40 detached dwellings.

·        489 Riverside Drive, Fairfield – Land use and subdivision consent lodged for 14  townhouses.

 

22.     Recently granted resource consents:

 

·      128 Molesworth Street, Taita - Urban Plus Limited development for 19 dwellings. This development is in partnership with Kahungunu Whānau Services, Te Rūnanganui o Te Āti Awa, and, is the first of its kind in the country.

·      38 Tyndall Street, Waiwhetu – Comprehensive development of 23 townhouses at the rear of the existing house.

·      42 Cambridge Terrace, Waiwhetu – 6 townhouses.

·      131 Cuba Street, Petone – 9 single level, 1 bedroom units.

·      71 The Esplanade, Petone – Seismic strengthening of an industrial building situated next to an Urupa.

·      239 Rata Street, Naenae – 14 houses, a mixture of detached dwellings and multi residential units.

 

23.     Resource Management Act compliance updates:

 

·     “Tiny house” – 14 Molesworth Street, Taita

       The tiny house remains on site, the owner is proposing to move the building within the site to comply with the requirements of the district plan.  Compassionate consideration due to Covid-19 was given to extend the timeframe for compliance until 24 December 2020. 

 

·     Chilton Saint James School

Officers are continuing to monitor noise levels emanating from sports activities at Chilton Saint James School. Further noise monitoring is being undertaken by an expert engaged by the school. Once this report is submitted, a review will be carried out and any remedial action will be discussed in conjunction with the complainant.

 

·     Wainuiomata Cleanfill

The cleanfill operation is being regularly monitored by Council’s RMA Monitoring and Enforcement Officers to assess compliance with the resource consent.  A table listing complaints received since the previous regulatory report and the corresponding action taken is listed below.

 

Noise monitoring has been undertaken by Council to ascertain compliance with the noise limits listed in consent condition. This is in response to complaints received regarding machinery and truck movements on site and concern that consented noise levels are being exceeded.  Currently, acoustic reports are being assessed and will be subject to an independent peer review.

 

Table of complaints received since 24 August 2020

Received 

Actioned

Complaint 

Action taken

27/8/20

27/8/20

Dust on road

Dust on road from trucks leaving site. Consent holder had road cleaned

7/9/20

7/9/20

Material on road

Some material on road. Consent holder had road cleaned

17/9/20

17/9/20

Dust from the site

Dust on road from trucks leaving site. Consent holder had heavier material laid to stop dust rising.

 

Land Information Memoranda (LIMs)

 

24. Officers attended a workshop organised by LGNZ/DIA, the theme of the workshop was ‘painting a picture of practices regarding LIMs’.

 

25. We received positive feedback about Hutt City’s processes and the comprehensive content of our LIM reports.

 

26. Discussions were had regarding creating a national LIM template and making LIM’s compulsory.

 

27. It was also discussed that LGNZ should take a more active role in promoting LIMs, provide more guidance on what a LIM should include and keep Councils up to date with natural hazard research, etc. As a result, DIA is producing a report for central government.

 

28. The limited housing stock and a hot property market has not adversely affected LIM application numbers. Higher than average LIM application numbers have been received for each month from July through to October 2020. We are getting multiple customers applying for LIM’s for the same property. The fast track option is also becoming more popular as shown in the table below.

 

Period, July - October

LIM’s

% Fast tracked

2 LIM’s for the same property

3 LIM’s for the same property

2018

357

29%

4

 

2019

334

34%

8

 

2020

412

36%

25

2

 Environmental Health

Alcohol

 

29.  Compliance Visits/Controlled Purchase Operations (CPO)

 

After hours compliance visits were carried out during October, with all ten premises checked being compliant.

 

30.  Contested Applications

 

       Manager’s Certificate Renewal

 

·      The hearing scheduled for September 2020 for the renewal of a manager’s certificate was cancelled due to it being withdrawn by the applicant. The application for renewal was opposed by police and the licensing inspector, due to the applicant having numerous and recent convictions.

 

Granting and Issuing of Licences

 

31.  On 17 April 2020, Central Government announced an amendment to the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2020. This means that Council is unable to issue new liquor licences, or renew existing licenses without reports from the New Zealand Police and the Medical Officer of Health (MoH). Those agencies have an additional 30 working days to report, after the epidemic notice is lifted. The notice has now been extended to 23 December 2020, and due to there being no working days between 20 December and 15 January, (under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2014), the deadline for reporting is now 2 March 2021.

 

32.  This timeframe has delayed the processing of one application for the renewal and variation of an on licence for the Palliser Hotel, Wainuiomata. The MoH has not reported on this application, officers are regularly following up with MoH for a response.

Bylaws

 

33. The Appearance Industries Bylaw was approved by Council in September 2020, and takes effect as of September 2021. Operators will then be required to apply for registration of their premises.

 

34. The one year lead-in gives officers time to undergo training, establish an inspection regime, and hold training workshops for those operators affected. Officers have completed training and are working closely with Councils with an operative Bylaw including Auckland City and Masterton District Councils. 

 

Litter

 

8.    The Naenae recycling station has been disestablished and the area is now being used for car parking. This has effectively stopped people ‘fly tipping’ in that location and it does not appear to have pushed illegal dumping to other locations.

 

Regulatory Services

 

Animal Services

27.     Dog registration started on 8 July 2020.  Hutt City Council has 10,100 dogs to be registered this year. To date (3/11/2020) 9,620 dogs have been registered, with around 970 opting for the doggone tag.

 

28.     The remaining 465 dog owners will be followed up by Animal Service Officers as debtors.

 

29.     Animal Services receive regular calls regarding feral deer and pigs coming out of the bush onto urban properties causing substantial damage to gardens and lawns in Wainuiomata, Naenae, Stokes Valley and Eastbourne. We currently have a cage trap set on a property in Point Howard.

 

Trade Waste

30.     On 27 October 2020 there was a significant pollution incident at Seaview Marina. 

 

31.     The source of the contamination was tracked back to a commercial site in Seaview. The offending product was a 10 litre container of concentrated fluorescein that had been picked up by a rubbish truck. The container had been punctured while it was being compacted on the truck.

 

32.     The truck was driven to a facility consented for the discharge of trade waste. The load was discharged to find the source. After some rain, the fluorescein leaked from the yard and through the stormwater system to the marina.

33.     Staff at the site attempted to stop the leaking.

 

34.     Greater Wellington Regional Council is reviewing the information supplied by our Trade Waste Officers to determine if prosecution is required.

 

35.     The Trade Waste team have begun an inflow project in Upper Hutt for Wellington Water.

 

Parking Services

36.     The New Zealand Offence Codes charges’ descriptions for expired warrants of fitness and certificates of fitness for parking offences have been updated nationally. The purpose of the update is to make the description of the offence, which appears on the infringement, more easily understood by the recipient. For example the current description for no warrant of fitness is “no evidence of current vehicle inspection- private vehicle.  This now reads “No evidence of current warrant of fitness”.  

 

37.     Parking revenue took a considerable hit over the Covid-19 period, partly because central government gave the public an extension of time to renew their warrants of fitness and registrations (from 1 January 2020 to 10 October 2020).  Media from central government warned the public that tickets would be issued by local authorities after that time.

 

38.     In Lower Hutt, 1500 safety tickets were issued in the last 20 days of October to owners with vehicles with expired registrations/warrants of fitness.  This is $30,000 more this month, compared to the same month last year.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

48.       The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

49.     Consultation was undertaken when statutorily necessary.

Legal Considerations

50.     Legal considerations are undertaken under the appropriate legislation.

Financial Considerations

35.  No financial considerations needed

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appexdix 1: Environmental Consent graghs at the end of October 2020

246

2

Appendix 2: Regulatory Services Graphs at the end of October 2020

268

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Karen Piper

Executive Assistant, Environment and Sustainability

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appexdix 1: Environmental Consent graghs at the end of October 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Regulatory Services Graphs at the end of October 2020