HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

Community and Environment Committee

 

12 November 2020

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

Thursday 19 November 2020 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

Membership

 

 

Deputy Mayor T Lewis (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr D Bassett

Cr J Briggs (Deputy Chair)

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

Cr D Hislop

Cr C Milne

Cr A Mitchell

Cr S Rasheed

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY

 

 


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

 

COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE
Membership:	13
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Reports to:	Council

 

PURPOSE:

 

With an operational focus, to monitor the contribution made by strategies and policies implemented by Council to promote the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of the city’s communities in the present and for the future. This includes delivering quality infrastructure to support healthy and sustainable living, providing efficient and safe transport options, promoting the city’s prosperity and making the city a desirable and attractive place, providing facilities and recreational opportunities that support quality living and healthy lifestyles, protecting biodiversity, supporting the cultural wellbeing of residents, and considering how climate change may impact on these areas.

 

Transport, Infrastructure and Sustainable Growth:

        Provide direction to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee on strategies and policies required for the sustainable growth and development of the city, including economic, transport and infrastructure development, and matters to be addressed in the full review of the City of Lower Hutt District Plan.

        Monitor implemented strategies and policies to assess their contribution towards achieving Council’s objectives.

        Oversee the implementation of spatial planning activities in the city.

        Determine roading issues considered by the Mayor and Chief Executive to be strategic due to their significance on a city-wide basis, including links to the State Highway, or where their effects cross ward or community boundaries.

        Recommend to Council the acquisition or disposal of assets, unless the acquisition or disposal is provided for specifically in the LTP.

Environment and Climate Change Response:

        Provide direction to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee on required environmental strategies and policies.

        Monitor and review implemented strategies and policies to assess their contribution towards achieving Council’s objectives.

        Address matters arising from issues raised relating to climate change.

Community Development, Facilities and Housing:

        Provide direction to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee on strategies and policies required to address community wellbeing.

        Monitor and review implemented strategies and policies to assess their contribution towards achieving Council’s objectives.

        Advocacy in conjunction with relevant community organisations on matters related to the health and social/cultural wellbeing of communities.

        Adopt, and agree amendments to, open space or reserve management plans.

        Make any decisions under open space or reserve management plans that are not otherwise delegated.

        Grant leases, licences, rights of way and easements in terms of Council policy for Council owned properties that are either open space under the District Plan or reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. This delegation, except the granting of leases and licences to Council owned community houses/centres in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, is sub-delegated to the community boards in those areas.

        Official naming of parks, reserves and sports grounds within the provisions of Council’s Naming Policy, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas, except where the sites have a high profile, city-wide importance due to their size and location and/or cross ward or community boundaries.

        Removal and/or planting of street trees within the provisions of Council’s Operational Guide for Urban Forest Plan, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas.

        Matters arising from the activities of Community Houses, other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas.

 

General:

        Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s operational activities.

        Conduct any consultation processes required on issues before the Committee.

        Approval and forwarding of submissions on matters related to the Committee’s area of responsibility.

        Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

 

    


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Community and Environment Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Thursday 19 November 2020 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

Cr J Briggs.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.       

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have      

4.       Recommendation to Council - 8 DECEMBER 2020

Enabling Investments through Income from Carbon Credits (20/1258)

          Report No. CEC2020/6/277 by the Manager, Sustainability and Resilience                7

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

5.       Recommendation to Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee – 30 November 2020

Fraser Park Sportsville (20/1300)

Report No. CEC2020/6/275 by the Head of Parks and Recreation                  15 

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

 

6.       Update on Council's Climate Change Work (20/1249)

Report No. CEC2020/6/278 by the Manager, Sustainability and Resilience    63

          Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

7.       Naenae Spatial Plan (20/1427)

Report No. CEC2020/6/276 by the Director Economy and Development     126

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

8.       Creating a Plan for Community Funding (20/1320)

Report No. CEC2020/6/279 by the Principal Policy Advisor                          139

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

9.       Williams Park Management Plan - Process and Engagement Strategy (20/1423)

Report No. CEC2020/6/280 by the Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner 150

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

10.     Application for a lease and licence to occupy for Honiana Te Puni Reserve as a part of the Te Ara Tupua Project (20/1431)

Report No. CEC2020/6/290 by the Reserves Asset Manager                          163

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

11.     Parks and Gardens - Work Programme Update (20/1354)

Report No. CEC2020/6/282 by the Team Leader Parks                                  171

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”


 

12.     Director's Report - Neighbourhoods and Communities Group (20/1269)

Report No. CEC2020/6/281 by the Director Neighbourhoods and Communities Group 180

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

13.     Information Items

a)      Cross Valley Transport Connections (CVTC) Update (20/1470)

Memorandum dated 11 November 2020 by the Head of Transport      187

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

b)      Community and Environment Committee Work Programme (20/1421)

Report No. CEC2020/6/123 by the Acting Committee Advisor            189      

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

14.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debbie Hunter

Acting Democracy Advisor

 

 

          


 

Community and Environment Committee

03 November 2020

 

File: (20/1258)

 

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/277

 

Enabling Investments through Income from Carbon Credits

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide a briefing on the opportunities associated with the carbon credits Council earns for some of its forests, and to obtain agreement on the preferred approach.

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that Council:

(i)    notes that sequestering carbon in forests on Council-owned land can provide a new funding source for making the transition to zero carbon and/or improving biodiversity;

(ii)   agrees that any funds associated with the carbon credits earned by Council will go to projects that produce the largest carbon reduction benefits and/or biodiversity improvements, with funding decisions made by Council or a relevant committee (Option 3 contained in the report);

(iii)  notes that in order to enable decision making by Council, officers could set up an internal low carbon acceleration investment fund to identify worthy projects;

(iv) agrees that officers develop the formal scope, process and decision-making approach for an internal low carbon acceleration fund, and report back to Council for agreement in 2021; and

(v)  agrees that at least 2,000 emission units (or 20% of total units earned, whichever is higher) be held in reserve, in order to account for future liabilities associated with risks, such as fires.

Background

2.    The NZ Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) covers a range of sectors, including transport and electricity, but it also includes forestry on the supply side. This means forest owners that register and meet the relevant criteria can gain New Zealand Units (NZUs) in recognition of the carbon sequestered by their trees (1 NZU represents 1 tonne of CO2 equivalent). These units (or carbon credits) in turn have monetary value.

3.    The opportunity to earn carbon credits is tied to various conditions, including the size and height of a forest, and when it was established.

4.    In simple terms, forests that were already in place prior to 1 January 1990 (pre-1990 forests) cannot earn carbon credits, albeit they may be subject to a carbon liability (that is, Hutt City Council would need to surrender carbon credits if it chose to cut down those forests without replanting). Indigenous and exotic forests that were established (or left to naturally return to forest) after 31 December 1989 (post-1989 forests) can earn carbon credits for annual growth in carbon stocks.

Carbon credits from forest on HCC owned land

5.    An initial assessment by Carbon Forest Services Ltd in early 2019 indicated that about 950ha of land owned by Hutt City Council could be eligible for earning carbon credits.  Two applications under the ETS for eligible forest land (approximately 130ha combined) have already been successful. Field assessments for the remaining post-1989 forests owned by HCC are currently underway. If registration were successful, emission units would be received for these also.

6.    The number of emission units earned over time would vary in line with the state of maturity of the forest, as illustrated in Figure 1. The value of the emission units, in turn, would depend on the carbon price.

Figure 1: Estimated issuance of NZUs for 92 hectares of 18-year old native forest

What could happen with the resulting carbon credits?

7.    HCC has already received 2,150 emission units for forest land already registered. At a carbon price of $35 per tCO2e, those units have an estimated value of about $75,000. If registration for half of the remaining forest land is successful, then HCC could receive a further 9,500 units. This means that by early 2021, HCC could possess up to 11,650 units with a potential value of about $400,000. Further funds would be available in future years, in line with the number of annual credits received based on forest growth.

8.    Therefore, it is timely to consider what to do with these units. In principle, there are three options.

 

Option 1: Offsetting

9.    Generally, there are two markets for carbon credits. In the “compliance” market, companies or other entities buy carbon credits in order to comply with the relevant requirements under the NZ ETS. For example, Hutt City Council has to buy NZUs in order to meet its obligations for the Silverstream Landfill under the ETS. However, a “voluntary” market also exists, whereby individuals or companies purchase carbon credits to “offset” their own greenhouse gas emissions. For example, an individual might purchase carbon offsets to compensate for the greenhouse gas emissions caused by personal air travel.

10.  Hutt City Council could use the carbon credits from its forests to (at least partially) “offset” its emissions. Ideally this should be done after all emission reduction opportunities have been realised.

11.  In terms of HCC’s organisational net Zero by 2050 target, it is very likely that at least some offsetting will be required to achieve net zero emissions, as some emissions may be unavoidable (eg landfills continue to emit for some time, even when they have closed).

12.  However, if applied at the present time, a key draw-back of this approach is that this would do nothing to reduce Council’s actual emissions in the long-term (such as by helping fund initiatives to switch fuels at Council facilities or for services). Furthermore, Council would be faced with an on-going cost to either purchase offsets, or alternatively miss out on the opportunity cost of units from its own carbon forestry activities. Therefore, this approach is not recommended.

Option 2: Meeting Silverstream Landfill’s obligations under the ETS

13.  Council owns Silverstream landfill and the methane emissions from that landfill are already subject to the ETS. In 2019, Council had an emissions liability of approximately 16,000 units. The carbon credits earned from Council’s carbon forestry activities could be used to meet (a share of) Silverstream Landfill’s on-going emission liability.

14.  However, this approach is not recommended for the following reasons:

a.       It would create distortions, in that the landfill’s costs would be lower than they otherwise would be, and it would reduce the incentive for Council to maximise opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions arising from that landfill (eg, maximising gas destruction or reducing organic waste going into the landfill).

b.       It would do nothing to help Council reduce its emissions in the long term, such as by helping fund initiatives to switch fuels at Council facilities or electrify services.

c.       Carbon credits from indigenous forests tend to attract premium prices in the voluntary market from carbon buyers wanting to assist in indigenous forest recovery. Prices for those units can be up to 25% higher than for NZUs used in the compliance market.

 

Option 3: Using income from carbon credits for investments

15.  Hutt City Council established an organisational Zero by 2050 carbon target in 2018. The target is very challenging and implies reducing our organisational emissions by 20% by 2025, and by 40% by 2030. While there will be opportunities to reduce carbon emissions that also result in cost savings (eg by improving efficiency), it is clear that reducing emissions to zero will require significant investment (eg decarbonising all of Council’s activities beyond what may be cost effective). This implies that additional funding may be required, which means that it will compete with other Council priorities.

16.  If the earned carbon credits are sold (or borrowed against), half of the funds could be used to facilitate Council’s carbon reduction initiatives, with a focus on those that are not yet cost effective on their own. The remaining half of the funds could also be used to fund step-changes in biodiversity improvements.

17.  This approach is recommended as it offers the most long-term value to Council, particularly as carbon credits associated with indigenous forests can attract premium prices.

18.  In terms of identifying worthy projects for investments, I recommend this be done by setting up an internal low carbon acceleration fund with funding going to those projects that produce the largest carbon reduction benefits and/or biodiversity improvements based on a range of criteria.

19.  Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) has set up such a fund, using the carbon credits associated with some of its indigenous forests. Please refer to Appendix 1 for an overview of the Carbon Acceleration Fund at GWRC. Their fund is available to internal projects in order to facilitate a transition to a net zero carbon organisation, and provides an opportunity to fund worthy projects that would otherwise not be viable. GWRC recently confirmed funding for two projects to increase carbon sequestration on GWRC managed land with a combined value of approximately $2 million.

20.  In terms of carbon reductions at HCC, funding could be used for a range of projects, such as accelerating the uptake of electric vehicles and decarbonising our large service contracts (such as street cleaning, servicing of Council assets, etc).

21.  In terms of biodiversity, funds could be used to fence off areas to speed up biodiversity recovery, or eradicating rather than just controlling pests in an area.

22.  Some potential projects may have value for both biodiversity improvements and carbon reductions. For example, by facilitating the replanting of retired grazing land in Belmont Regional Park, it should be possible to achieve biodiversity improvements, while those forests could also be registered under the ETS in order to generate further funds for transitioning to zero carbon.

23.  Decisions on funding relevant projects, via an internal low carbon acceleration fund, could be made by Council or a relevant committee. If Council is interested in this approach, then officers could develop the formal scope, process and decision-making approach for such a fund, and report back to Council for agreement.

Additional considerations

24.  Considering the value of carbon credits is likely to be higher in the future than at present, it may be beneficial for Council to borrow funds against this asset, as opposed to selling credits.

25.  If credits are sold, then it would be beneficial to retain a certain number of credits, to account for potential future liabilities (eg a fire that destroys a forest). Whether carbon credits would have to be re-paid depends on whether the forest is replanted, or left to regrow in a certain amount of time. In order to account for potential replanting costs, a minimum of 2,000 emission units could be held in reserve to manage that risk. The number of units held in reserve could increase to 20% of emission units earned over time, in order to reflect any increase in the amount of forest registered under the ETS and/or the amount of units that have already been earned.

26.  Assuming that all the land that was previously identified as potentially eligible can be registered under the ETS, and taking into account a 20% reserve, then about $320,000 in funding could be available.

27.  It will be important to use any available funds diligently, considering that the amount of funding is ultimately limited and tied to the total amount of carbon that can be captured in registered forests. Therefore, funds could be limited to use for enabling a step-change, rather than business as usual operational expenditure.

28.  Finally, under option 3 it would be difficult to directly compare the relative merits of carbon reduction projects and biodiversity improvements.  Net present value and/or the cost per tonne of carbon avoided can be used to assess the value for money in a carbon reduction project. There is no comparable metric for biodiversity projects. For simplicity, 50% of total available funds over the next 30 years could be earmarked for carbon reduction investments, and 50% for biodiversity investments, unless there is a good business justification (eg, there may be increased need for investment in a particular area, in line with opportunities arising).

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

29.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

30.  Indigenous and exotic forests that were established or left to naturally return to forest on HCC owned land after 31 December 1989 (post-1989 forests) can earn carbon credits for annual growth in carbon stocks.

31.  If the earned carbon credits are sold (or borrowed against), half of the funds could be used to facilitate Council’s carbon reduction initiatives, and the remaining half of the funds could also be used to fund step-changes in biodiversity improvements.

Financial Considerations

32.  The report sets out three options of what to do with carbon credits earned on relevant forest land registered under the ETS.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Overview of the Carbon Acceleration Fund at GWRC

13

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Manager, Sustainability and Resilience

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 



 

 


Community and Environment Committee

22 October 2020

 

File: (20/1300)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/275

 

Fraser Park Sportsville

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To update Council on the work of the Fraser Park Working Group including a proposed revised operating model for the Ricoh Sports Centre (RSC) and to seek direction from Council on future funding for Fraser Park Sportsville (FPS).

Recommendations

That the Committee recommends that the Long Term Plan/Annual Subcommittee:

(i)      notes and receives the report;

(ii)     notes the report from the Working Group attached as Appendix 1 to the report;

(iii)    notes that, on balance, officers support the option put forward by the Fraser Park Sportsville Board (FPS) of entering a new agreement for three years with increased funding allocations;

(iv)    notes the request for funding from FPS attached as Appendix 3 to the report;

(v)     agrees to an increase of $134,814 in the funding grant payable to FPS in the current financial year 2020/21 (making the total for the year $234,814);

(vi)    agrees funding for FPS over the next three years of:

(a)       2021/22 - $201,388;

(b)       2022/23 - $156,154; and

(c)        2023/24 - $124,147

(vii)   agrees that any funding request for 2024/25 and beyond is reviewed in 2023;

(viii)  agrees to forgive the current debt of $75,309.11 owed to Council by FPS;

(ix)    agrees to a possible additional payment to FPS of up to $57,402 (reduced by any end of year surplus), to enable payment of outstanding debts to other parties;

(x)     notes that funding recommendations in the report are supported by Hutt City Community Facilities Trust (CFT);

(xi)    notes that additionally CFT is proposing to forgive $45K outstanding from the FPS founding member clubs fundraising contribution to the facility build; and

(xii)   agrees that officers work with FPS and CFT on a formal funding agreement which incorporates clauses on improved governance, outcomes and financial reporting requirements and regular review periods including an annual review of financial grants.

For the reasons that the proposed option provides the best opportunity to achieve the strategic intent of the Ricoh Sports Centre, the centre is still in a settling in period and has been faced with numerous challenges during this time, and the centre has shown improved operating performance over recent months.

 

Background

2.    The Sportsville model promoted by Sport NZ sees sports clubs and organisations combine resources and work together to share costs and services and develop new ideas. In some cases this may result in the renovation or development of combined facilities.

3.    For the clubs and organisations it eases financial pressure from reduced memberships and other revenue streams, dwindling volunteer resources, and the burden of having to maintain and/or build new facilities. For Council it promotes community governance and enables efficient rejuvenation, rationalisation and provision of facilities which drive and promote participation in sport and physical activity contributing to community wellbeing.

4.    FPS involves the following sports organisations - Avalon Rugby Club, Hutt Valley Dodgers Softball Club, Hutt City Squash, Hutt Valley Softball Association, Lower Hutt City Football Club, Naenae Hockey Club, Taita District Cricket Club and Wellington Regional Hockey Stadium Trust.

5.    Fraser Park itself is considered a regionally significant site, being centrally located and the largest sports park in the Wellington region. As such the development of a purpose built high quality sports centre was seen as important to support local clubs and the wider sport and recreation needs of the local community (building social capital), but also as a site which could attract significant regional and national events to the city(economic benefit).

6.    The Community Facilities Trust (CFT) a Council owned Charitable Trust, in collaboration with FPS and Council, developed and built the Ricoh Sports Centre in response to this.

7.    As detailed in the previous report to the committee in July, Council agreed to invest $9.3M towards the facility’s projected cost of $12.2M and additionally agreed a $2M underwrite. Due to variations to contract and an extension of time claim the final cost of the facility was $13.603m.

8.    The building was completed and opened to the public in March 2019 with CFT owning the building and FPS entering into a tenancy arrangement.

9.    The FPS Board submitted a business case for the running of RSC to Council in May 2017 which was approved. It stated that ‘FPS through RSC would create a net present value for the community of at least $24,890,351 (over 10 years)’. 

10.  The business case included some estimates and assumptions and officers noted at the time that there were a number of challenges and risks. Officers also noted that new facilities take approximately 12-18 months from opening to obtain a status of stability in terms of operations.  Cash deficits were forecast for the first four years, not exceeding $50K per annum.

11.  Officers noted that ‘should FPS be unsuccessful Council would be unlikely to let such a significant facility fail. It could choose to operate the facility itself or seek interest from other external organisations experienced at running such facilities’.

12.  Council agreed to a 5 year funding agreement with FPS in 2017 for operation of RSC with a review proposed after 3 years:

·        $150k in 2018/2019

·        $125k in 2019/2020

·        $100k per annum 2020/2021 – 2022/2023

Operating the Facility

13.  As has been highlighted in previous reports to Council there have been numerous challenges faced by FPS in operating RSC which have impacted the ability to deliver on the original business case including:

i.   Delay in opening meaning staff costs were carried for an extended time before revenue generation was able to occur.

ii.  Scope and design changes which affected the operating costs and capacity for some revenue generating activities.

iii. Loss of key staff prior to and soon after opening.

iv. Lack of buy in to the business model of founding member clubs.

v.  Effect of COVID 19.

14.  A more detailed analysis is provided in the FPS Working Group Paper (attached as Appendix 1 to the report). These are also referenced in the ‘Lessons learned’ presented to Council on 7 October 2020.

15.  These challenges resulted in Council undertaking some of the management functions of RSC for a 12 month period which ended in July 2020. 

16.  In July 2020 Councillors were informed of the financial challenges in a paper to the Community and Environment Committee. This included agreement between officers, CFT and the FPS Board that the original operating model outlined in the business case for the RSC has not worked in the way envisioned. 

17.  Councillors requested that a working group be established to explore alternative operating models and make a recommendation on the way forward.

18.  It was also requested that a briefing be held involving Councillors, officers and the FPS Board to further understand the issues. This was held on October 7 2020 at RSC and included presentation of a ‘lessons learned’ document and further financial information which had been requested by Councillors.

Discussion

Working Group

19.  The working group was comprised of the following members:

FPS - Colin Stone, Peter Hegarty, Wendy Edwards, Liz LeProu

HCC - Mark Curr, Marcus Sherwood and Cr Naomi Shaw

Hutt City Community Facilities Trust - John Strahl

Founding Clubs/Organisations - Dave Gillespie (Taita District Cricket), Polly Martin (Avalon Rugby Club), Sam Allen (Hutt Valley Dodgers Softball Club), Josh Bird (Naenae Hockey Club), Paddy Simpson (Lower Hutt City Football Club), Russell Hasselberg (Hutt City Squash Club), Nick Cooper (Hutt Valley Softball Association), Lisa Jones (Wellington Hockey)

Independent - Nicky Sherriff (Sport Wellington), Julian Todd (Sport NZ - Chair of Working Group)

20.  The Working Group Terms of Reference is attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

21.  The Working Group Report is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

Working Group Recommendation

22.  After exploring several alternatives, the working group is recommending an enhanced version of the current operating model as the best way forward.

23.  They consider it important to maintain the original strategic intent of the project in having Governance sit with community and clubs. They believe their ability to access community and charitable funding is an advantage, along with the retention of existing knowledge, experience and skills.

24.  FPS believes the working group has been a catalyst for greater collaboration and engagement which has reinvigorated the membership. This has seen an improved financial performance in recent months, as detailed in the Working Group Report.

25.  This operating model requires increased funding from Council, both in the current financial year and in the LTP 2021/31. FPS is seeking agreement from Council to increase its operating grant as follows:

Options

26.  As with all investments it makes, Council should consider the risks and benefits of the proposal and weigh these against any alternatives available, including ‘do nothing’ which in this case means no change to the operating grant currently agreed.

27.  Council must also acknowledge that as owners of the building (through CFT) there are ongoing capital and building maintenance costs they will incur regardless of what model is adopted.

Assessing operating models

28.  The Working Group paper provides a table of eight different governance and operating models which could be applied to the running of RSC. These can be simplified to:

i.        Council in-house operation

ii.       Private Contractor

iii.      Community Led – through Sportsville or other club structure

iv.     A mixture of these

29.  To assess these options, officers have reduced them to three approaches and rated them against criteria which reflect the original intent of the development of RSC.

Criteria

Council

Contractor

Sportsville

Community leadership and ownership

Medium

Low

High

Sense of ‘home’ for clubs

Low

Low

High

Community access

High

High

Medium

Financial stability

High

Medium

Low

Proven performance

Medium

High

Low

Attract regional/national events

Medium

Low

Medium

Leverage volunteers

Low

Low

Medium

Sponsorship/other funding potential

Low

Medium

High

Potential to increase participation in Physical Activity to support wellbeing

High

High

High

 

30.  Based on this analysis, the option which has the greatest opportunity of achieving the outcomes sought is a Sportsville or similar model where community leadership and ownership, and volunteerism are optimised.

31.  In terms of Council’s future strategic intent in LTP 2021/31, this also aligns best with the emerging theme of asset-based community development - stimulating local sources of power in the community to optimise the impact of our collective effort.

32.  CFT also advise that this option best aligns with the original intent for which multiple sponsors provided funding.

33.  The disadvantage of this option is an initial increased cost to Council and less financial stability (in spite of recent improved financial performance in the last 3 months) at a time when Council’s finances are challenged.

Analysis of Proposed Budget

34.  At the October 7 briefing, Councillors requested that sensitivity testing be carried out on the budget for the new proposed operating model. FPS’s proposed budget is included in Appendix 2 and outlined below. The enhanced operating model includes tighter control on operating costs, increased financial monitoring and an aggressive revenue generation strategy.

35.  As RSC has only been operating for 18 months and changed its business model three months ago, there is no trend data, making it difficult to assess risk and achievability.

36.  Officers have been able to do basic analysis on current performance year to date data (YTD), including forecasting performance to year end and sensitivity analysis of revenue generation. 

37.  While the YTD performance of RSC shows a positive balance of $77k, officers have forecast a net year-end deficit of $127K, due to a number of annual expenses (including lease costs) yet to be paid.  Officers have also taken a conservative approach in predicting income flows despite YTD being ahead of target.

38.  This forecast position is still on par with the proposed budgeted loss of $134K for 20/21.

39.  Officers have also examined the risk potential of achieving the proposed budget with the limited information available. We have only focussed on revenue as this is the largest risk category with most operating costs fixed.

40.  Using this analysis, officers have assessed a possible additional deficit of $86K as a worst case scenario. 

41.  Additionally, as at 28 October 2020, FPS has an outstanding debt to Hutt City Council of $75,309.11, including GST. This includes the fee from the Management Contract ($36,895.83). Officers recommend writing this debt off regardless of which option is chosen, as it is unlikely to be paid in any future scenario.

42.  There is also $45K outstanding from the FPS founding member clubs fundraising contribution to the facility build. CFT propose forgiving this as part of this decision.

43.  FPS advises that it currently has other debts totalling $57,402, which, if not addressed, will undermine its ability to operate to budget this year and beyond.

44.  FPS is currently tracking positively against their proposed budget and may have scope at year end to address part or all of this debt. However if any debt remains, officers propose providing a further grant in this financial year to ensure they can balance their budget. (not beyond $57,402)

45.  Due to the residual risks and financial uncertainty, if this proposal is progressed officers recommend a formal funding agreement is entered into which should include:

i.        that the FPS Board engage an additional Board member with business/financial skills, in consultation with council officers

ii.       regular (quarterly) reporting to Council on both financial and non-financial performance, through the Community and Environment Committee;

iii.      An annual review ahead of Council operating grants being confirmed.

Other options

46.  If Councillors do not support this option, they could choose to select an alternative operating model or choose to ‘do nothing’, which would mean continuing to provide the operating grant as agreed.

Alternative operating model – Council in-house operation

47.  Council could expect to generate similar revenue, however operating costs would be higher, given Council’s more risk-averse nature, particularly in relation to staffing. Council would be less able to leverage volunteer hours and attract significant sponsorship or grants.  Offsetting this is the financial stability of Council, the ability to leverage expertise across Council and its proven record in providing similar recreation and community facilities (albeit at a higher cost).

Alternative operating model – Private contractor

48.  This option can’t be fully tested until a tender for operations is issued however initial conversations suggest that a contractor may/would expect the following:

·    no lease or building associated costs (FPS plan to pay rent to CFT from 20/21 onwards)

·    no utilities costs

·    an under-write for any losses incurred for an initial period (likely 2 years)

·    capital contribution from Council towards any renovations or additional equipment proposed.

49.  Operational cost to Council for this scenario could range from $200-$300K excluding any potential underwrite or capital contribution.

Do nothing option

50.  At current Council funding levels, FPS advise they would likely be unable to operate beyond June 2021. They would likely be forced to end their lease and the building would either close and/or operations fall back on Council, either long-term or until an alternative operating model is agreed.

 

Preferred option 

51.  Based on this information, on balance officers support the option put forward by the FPS Board of entering a new agreement for three years with increased funding allocations.

52.  Officers have assessed that this option provides the best opportunity to achieve the strategic intent of the Ricoh Sport Centre and aligns best with Council’s current strategic approach to community development.

53.  Officers note the disadvantage of this option is increased cost to Council at a time when finances are challenged. Officers have taken into consideration that RSC centre has shown improved operating performance over recent months.

54.  If at any time FPS is unable to deliver to the agreed funding levels, Council could choose to further explore one of the alternative operating models outlined here.

55.  It is important to note that while this option would be a positive outcome for FPS it does not address all of the concerns that have been raised by founding member clubs. These remaining concerns will continue to be worked on by all parties.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

56.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

57.  When Ricoh Sports Centre opened in early 2019 Council commissioned a benchmarking exercise against the requirements of the New Zealand Green Building Council’s (NZGBC) Green Star rating system. The rating system is comprised of nine holistic impact categories; Management, Indoor Environment Quality, Energy, Water, Materials, Land Use and Ecology, Emissions & Innovation.

58.  The investigation determined that the building would not have received a Green Star certification (at least 4 stars). It only achieved the equivalent of about 2 out of 6 six stars, although the building could have achieved a better rating, if relevant factors been considered during the design stage.

59.  With regard to potential energy efficiency improvements at Ricoh Sports Centre, note that Council now has in place an Energy and Carbon Reduction Plan 2020-24, which sets targets for improving energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions, and outlines key projects and activities to achieve them. Now that the Ricoh Sports Centre has been open for just over 12 months, a baseline has been developed for the facility in order to benchmark its future performance, and identify savings opportunities.

Consultation

60.  The proposed funding for FPS will be consulted on as part of the LTP 2021/21 public consultation.

Legal Considerations

61.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial Considerations

62.  There are no additional financial considerations.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Fraser Park Sportsville Working Group Report 2020

25

2

RSC Operating Model Working Group TOR Final

45

3

FPS Funding Request to HCC Nov 2020

48

 

 

 

Author: Marcus Sherwood

Head of Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 

 

Approved By: Jo Miller

Chief Executive

 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


TERMS OF REFERENCE – RICOH SPORTS CENTRE WORKING GROUP

Background

Fraser Park Sportsville was developed as a partnership between Hutt City Council and a group of founding member clubs, and is now governed by an independent Board.

It involves the following sports organisations - Avalon Rugby Club, Hutt Valley Dodgers Softball Club, Hutt City Squash, Hutt Valley Softball Association, Lower Hutt City Football Club, Naenae Hockey Club, Taita District Cricket Club and Wellington Regional Hockey Stadium Trust.

In May 2017 the FPS Board submitted a business case to Council for the development and operation of a facility, which is now Ricoh Sports centre.

The Hutt City Community Facilities Trust (CFT), a Council owned charitable trust, led the construction project on behalf of Council and are now the landlords for the facility, with FPS as tenants.

Council agreed to provide annual operating grants as follows:

·      $150K in the first year (18/19)

·      $125K in the second year (19/20)

·      $100K in each of the following three years (20/21 – 22/23)

Council agreed for funding to be reviewed after three years of RSC operating. As a condition of the funding, FPS was required to formally report to Council on an annual basis its annual report and progress against the Business Case.

In May 2018 the facility was officially opened. Since then it has had ongoing financial difficulties due to a number of factors and has required significant additional support from Council. The FPS Board and Council agree that the original operating model outlined in the business case is not working, and should be reviewed.

To manage the short-term financial pressures, Council has agreed to FPS drawing down half ($50K) of its 2020/21 operating grant on July 1 2020.

As at 30 June 2020, FPS’s rent arrears to CFT for RSC will total $151k excluding GST. Recognising the financial challenges, CFT has proposed a plan to forgive the 19/20 rent arears. 

CFT has also proposed forgiving the 20/21 rent, on the condition that FPS can agree a longer-term operating model and budget with Council.

The FPS Board and founding member clubs remain committed to making their collaboration a success. Council is committed to supporting them to do this, and to ensuring use of Ricoh Sports Centre is optimised for the benefit of the clubs, the surround community and the wider Lower Hutt community.

Outcome sought:

The outcome sought is sustainable long-term operating model for Ricoh Sports Centre, which can be put forward for consideration of future Council funding (LTP 2021/2031), which balances:

i.    the core needs and aspirations of member clubs and the FPS Board

ii.    affordability for Council (inc CFT)

iii.   value for money for rate payers

iv.   the contribution from, and benefits to, the wider community

v.   the risk appetite of all parties

Objectives:

·      To involve key stakeholders – FPS Board, founding clubs, HCC, CFT

·      To involve others from the wider sector who can contribute to the conversation (inc Sport NZ, Sport Wellington)

·      To use the original agreed business plan as a starting point

·      To consider a range of models which can achieve the outcomes sought

·      To obtain input from those whose expertise in relevant areas

·      To propose one agreed option, or alternately options, for consideration of funding by HCC in October 2020

Approach and timeline:

Date

Event

Responsible

July 7 -  20

Draft ToR circulated for input from founding member clubs and agreed

FPS Board, HCC

By July 22

Agree make-up of Working Group and invite participants

FPS Board, HCC

From July 25

Working group meets (when TDB), options developed, preferred option/s agreed

Organised by HCC, independent chair agreed by HCC and FPS Board

(this may result in more than one option being put to Council representing scaled levels of support)

September 2

Workshop with Council

Organised by HCC/FPS Board

By September 20

Meeting with FPS Board and clubs to discuss outcome

Organise meeting – FPS Board

 

October/Nov  (date TBC)

Paper to Community and Environment Committee (Nov 19), and then to Council (to consider funding for 2021-2023 LTP).

Led by HCC, FPS Board to present (this will include reporting back for 2019/20)

 

In scope:

·      Operating model for Ricoh Sports Centre

·      Operating grant provided by HCC

Out of scope:

·      FPS Board/member club structure/constitution (should this come into question in operating models considered by the Working Group, this will be referred to the FPS Board to resolve)

·      FPS/CFT lease arrangements

The Working Group will include:

·      an independent chair as agreed by FPS Board and HCC

·      representatives of FPS (4), Founding Member Clubs (1 from each), HCC (3), CFT, Sport Wellington, Sport NZ

·      other representatives of the wider sport and rec community as agreed by FPS Board and HCC

·      Resource from HCC for advice and support as needed

 

 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Community and Environment Committee

10 November 2020

 

File: (20/1249)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/278

 

Update on Council's Climate Change Work

 

Purpose of Report

1.    Officers provide a regular update on climate change work, in order to implement Council’s organisational carbon target, facilitate a reduction in city-wide emissions, and address climate change impacts.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes the update on various climate change work streams;

(ii)   notes that officers have developed businesses cases for emission reduction projects that can be considered by Council during the development of the next Long Term Plan 2021-31, and that these business cases were endorsed by Council’s Climate Change Working Group;

(iii)  endorses the business cases (attached as Appendices 1-3 to the report) for consideration by the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee; and

(iv) notes that a lead group made up of community representatives has commenced its work to co-design the process for engaging with the community on climate change, with a view to develop city-wide pathways for reducing emissions and responding to climate change impacts.

For the reasons as outlined in this report.

Background

2.    In December 2018, Council established an organisational carbon target to net zero by 2050 (refer PRC2018/5/314), and officers have been asked to report back regularly on progress toward that target and wider climate change work.

Electricity and natural gas use at Council facilities

Wainuiomata pool cover

3.    For Wainuiomata summer pool, a business case for a cover for the main outdoor pool was completed, showing estimated savings of about 56 tCO2 per year or 290,000 kWh in energy per year. A capital expenditure proposal with a pay-back period of about four years was included in the paper to the Long Term Plan / Annual Plan Subcommittee on 24 September 2020. The proposal was approved by Council.

4.    The installation of the new cover is scheduled to be completed before the start of the pool season 2020/21.

Business case to transition pools out of gas

5.    A detailed business case has been completed for moving from gas to electricity for heating Council’s aquatic facilities: Eastbourne, the original Huia Pool and Fitness facility & Huia extension, and Stokes Valley.

6.    The case shows that by making this switch, Council would realise emission reductions of about 520tCO2 per year, and about 1.97GWh in energy savings. The estimated investment required is about $2 million over seven years. The Net Present Value of this proposed investment is positive. The business case is included in Appendix 1.

7.    The order of change could be as follows:

a.    Eastbourne in 2021/22 (replace gas boiler with heat pump)

b.    Huia extension in 2022/23 (add heat pump for heating the pool, while HVAC remains on gas for now)

c.     Original Huia Pool and Fitness facility in 2025/26 (heat pumps for the water heating, HVAC on a packaged heat pump unit)

d.    Stokes Valley in 2027/28 (pools on heat pump heat recovery, HVAC on air source heat pump)

8.    The pool at Wainuiomata could follow in 2029/30, and changes at McKenzie could follow that.

9.    If fully implemented as scheduled, these changes would significantly reduce Council’s emissions associated with the use of natural gas, and avoid over 14,600 tCO2 by 2050.

10.  A capital expenditure proposal for this programme of work has been included in the paper to the Long Term Plan / Annual Plan Subcommittee on 30 November 2020.

11.  With regard to Naenae Pool, all options previously presented to Council assumed that the latest low-carbon technology be used in the future.

Business case to change heating plant at Dowse Museum

12.  Officers have undertaken work to consider the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of moving from gas to electricity for heating the Dowse art Museum.

13.  The Dowse is responsible for approximately 7% of Council’s natural gas consumption, and the most significant carbon savings will be achieved by changing the natural gas heating to lower-carbon heating technologies.

14.  Replacement of the existing gas boiler and chiller at the Dowse with a heat pump chiller would result in:

a.       energy savings of about 462,000 kWh per year – which equates to an energy cost saving of about $22,000 per year, and

b.       emission reductions of about 127 tCO2 per year – which equates to about 4% of Council’s energy-related emissions

15.  Total avoided carbon emissions would amount to 3,600 tonnes by 2050. The estimated investment required is about $600,000. The Net Present Value of this proposed investment is positive.

16.  A copy of the business case is included in Appendix 2, and a capital expenditure proposal has been included in the paper to the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee on 30 November 2020.

LED street lighting

17.  Around 4,300 streetlights (30%) have been upgraded to LED in Lower Hutt, out of a total of 14,200.

18.  In terms of further progress in our replacement programme, the supply of luminaires has been adversely affected by COVID-19, as some components are produced in China.  Overall, there remains a risk that supply and installation rates will not be sufficient to complete the rollout of luminaires this financial year.

Vehicle fleet

19.  In the last three months, no new EVs have been added to Council’s fleet. However, due to further work to improve vehicle utilisation, it has been possible to remove one further petrol vehicle from Council’s fleet, avoiding future replacement costs.

20.  As at 10 November 2020, Council operates 74 vehicles, including 13 EVs. This represents an EV share of over 17%.

Capital goods, purchased goods and services (procurement)

21.  Officers have completed contract negotiations with the preferred supplier of rubbish and recycling kerbside collection. A contract was signed in November 2020.

22.  The new service is scheduled to commence in July 2021, with 50% of collection trucks operating fully electric. The agreement also includes a requirement for the service to become 100% electric in 2024.

Landfills

Silverstream

23.  Council is in final negotiations with LMS energy, for them to install and operate a flare under contract with Council. The installation of the flare is scheduled to be completed before the end of 2020. The flare would complement the existing power plant on site, and maximise gas destruction efficiency.

Closed Wainuiomata landfill

24.  An assessment of gas generation potential at the closed Wainuiomata landfill concludes that it is likely to have relatively low emissions in terms of flaring potential. Additional work is needed to understand costs, benefits, and risks (eg actual gas yield could decrease faster than predicted).

City-wide carbon reductions and responding to climate change impacts

Community engagement

25.  A lead group made up of community representatives has commenced its work to co-design the process for engaging with the community on climate change, with a view to develop city-wide pathways for reducing emissions and responding to climate change impacts.

26.  A first meeting took place on 4 November 2020, facilitated by Creative HQ Ltd. Once the process has been co-designed, the actual engagement with the community is scheduled to commence in early 2021.

Charging stations in the Eastern Bays

27.  Officers undertook investigations into potential public electric vehicle charging stations in the Eastbourne and Days Bays areas. Community consultation was undertaken, with the community showing support for this initiative.

28.  A decision paper regarding this project was considered by the Traffic Subcommittee on 10 November 2020. The charging stations could be operational in early 2021.

Business case for accelerating the roll out of EV charging opportunities in Lower Hutt

29.  Transport emissions account for over half of the city's overall emissions.

30.  In order to help facilitate continued growth (and indeed accelerated growth) in the number of people switching from petrol or diesel fuelled vehicles to electric vehicles (EV), a significant increase in the number of charging stations available to EV drivers is required in Lower Hutt.

31.  The key benefits and associated objectives of an increase in the number of charging stations for transport in Lower Hutt are as follows:

a.    Facilitate continued and accelerated growth in the number of EVs in Lower Hutt, by increasing confidence in those people considering purchasing an EV

b.    Reduction in carbon emissions associated with the transport sector in Lower Hutt, as a result of more people switching to EVs sooner than would otherwise be the case.

32.  Officers have developed a business case for a potential project to roll out medium-speed (25kW) DC charging stations at ten locations in Lower Hutt.

33.  Over 10 years, assuming a capital investment of $370,000, the roll out of 20 medium speed DC charging stations across the city could be cost-neutral to Council (e.g. 2x units at 10 sites), while at the same time enabling more drivers to switch to EVs. Total carbon savings range between 184tCO2 and 9,677tCO2 per year. The preferred option assumes that 50% of the total project funding of $740,000 would come from the NZ Government (via the Low Emissions Vehicle Contestable Fund) and/or the private sector.

34.  A copy of the business case is included as Appendix 3.

35.  A capital expenditure proposal has been included in the paper to the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee on 30 November 2020.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

36.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Financial Considerations

37.  As noted in the report, officers have developed businesses cases for emission reduction projects that can be considered during the development of the next Long Term Plan 2021-31. These projects have been included in a report on financial aspects to the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee on 30 November 2020.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Business Case - Decarbonisation of HCC pools

68

2

Appendix 2 - Business Case - Decarbonisation of the Dowse

88

3

Appendix 3 - Business Case - EV Charging in Lower Hutt

102

    

 

 

 

Author: Jörn Scherzer

Manager, Sustainability and Resilience

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Environment Committee

04 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1427)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/276

 

Naenae Spatial Plan

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to highlight the preferences and feedback currently being provided through the community engagement process as well as the advice from the expert consultant team to inform the Naenae Town Centre Spatial Plan.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes that consultation on the Naenae Town Centre Spatial Plan concludes on 18 November 2020;

(ii)   notes that once engagement has been finalised and feedback analysed, officers will prepare a report seeking endorsement at the December Council meeting to progress specific features as part of the next stage of work, which will better inform where and how the $9M could prioritised and spent; and

(iii)  notes that the current preference of options being promoted by community and the expert consultant team for the Naenae Town Centre Spatial Plan include:

(a)   Rātā to Vogel Streets extension – service lane for supermarket (with auto bollards);

(b)   shared space extension of Hillary Court (including disability, parent parks for supermarket and pool);

(c)   supermarket on site of the former pool;

(d)   retail on Everest Avenue, anchored by supermarket and pool;

(e)   community facilities centred to activate the heart of Hillary Court;

(f)    retention of current library;

(g)   expanded square/plaza between library and the old Post Office; and

(h)   potential overbridge to the Railway Station and Oxford Terrace.

 

Background

2.    In April 2019 the Naenae Olympic Pool was closed to the public due to seismic issues.

3.    Following extensive community engagement in December 2019 Council agreed to progress, subject to funding, a proposal to build a new pool and fitness suite on the site of, or adjacent to, the current pool. This required an amendment to the Long Term Plan and a consultation document was prepared with a projected capital cost of $54M. 

4.    Council also directed officers to urgently start work on a Spatial Plan for the wider Naenae town centre, and agreed to retain the $9M already budgeted for a community hub in Naenae to invest in other projects, as determined by the Naenae Town Centre Spatial Plan (Spatial Plan).

5.    The approach for the development of the Spatial Plan was informed by the process used to develop the Petone 2040 Spatial Plan. The Spatial Plan team included the Eastern Ward Councillor, a Community Group of four representatives, a Council officer project team and an expert consultant team which included economic, movement and urban design specialists. 

6.    The Spatial Plan Team has undertaken a number of community engagement sessions over two phases and engaged with over 100 people including school students from both Naenae Intermediate and Naenae College, business/retail shop owners, iwi and wider members of the Naenae community (inter alia). Community engagement is currently still underway and will conclude on the 18th of November.

7.    Once community engagement is concluded and final feedback is analysed, a paper will be brought to the December Council meeting seeking endorsement to progress specific features as a part of the next stage of work, which will more specifically inform where and how the $9M could be expended. 

Discussion

8.    The Spatial Plan will show and describe how the Naenae town centre and new pool may be configured in a way that speaks to the community’s social, cultural, economic and environmental aspirations whilst also applying best practice in urban form and design. Therefore, the Spatial Plan is informed by data, evidence and the community voice. The expert consultant team consisted of urban design, transport and economic development specialists.

9.    In order to bring the voice of the community the Spatial Plan Team led out two phases of community engagement. Phase one included a series of community meetings where people identified the things they wanted to see as a part of the Spatial Plan. The key opportunities / aspirations noted by the community were:

a.    A desire for a new pool and gymnasium

b.    For Hillary Court to be fixed and better looked after

c.     A supermarket that services the Naenae community

d.    Retail and shopping options – supporting local shops and stores

e.     The clear expression of culture, art, identity and people of Naenae

f.     People living in Naenae town centre – creating a heart

g.    Better connections and access ways i.e across the railway track

h.    The development of a community space

10.  After further analysis the key themes, opportunities and aspirations noted through phase one of the engagement process, were developed into concept designs by the expert consultant team which were tested at a Community Group meeting.

11.  The concept images which were tested at the community are attached at Appendix 1 to the report.

12.  Some of the high level feedback from the community meeting is noted below:

a.    There were mixed views from the participants around a supermarket. Some supported the status quo of retaining and seeking to enhance the local retail and grocery stores, others however supported a supermarket but noted the importance of affordability. Others noted a desire for a supermarket but did not want council to sell reserve land to provide for one.

b.    The participants generally supported the introduction of new access ways, crossings over the railway line (overbridge or level crossing) and the creation of a new road between Rātā and Vogel Streets as well as a pedestrian extension of Hillary Court on to Mildenhall Reserve

c.     There was general support for the provision of housing but there were some concerns about height and location

d.    There was general support for the development of a community facility in the centre of Hillary Court

e.     The concept of a plaza in the centre of Hillary Court was generally supported

f.     The reorientation of parking on Everest Ave was generally supported

13.  Taking on board the input from this meeting the Spatial Plan Team developed a series of concept images that related to the specific components as a part of the phase two engagement. The concept images are attached at Appendix B.

14.  As was noted above the Spatial Plan team is currently undertaking engagement with the community on these concepts (at Appendix B). The engagement includes community meetings, an open day, an online survey and also a leaflet drop to be filled out and returned to allocated drop off points noted in the leaflet.

15.  The current preference of options being promoted by community and the expert consultant team for the Naenae Town Centre Spatial Plan are described at ‘Naenae Spatial Plan Working Concept 2020 Image 2 attached as Appendix 2 to the report which shows:

a.    Rātā St to Vogel St extension – service lane for supermarket (with auto bollards)

b.    Shared space extension of Hillary Court (including disability, parent parks for supermarket and pool)

c.     Supermarket on site of the former pool

d.    Retail on Everest Avenue, anchored by supermarket and pool

e.     Community facilities centred to activate the heart of Hillary Court

f.     Retention of current library

g.    Expanded square/plaza between library and the old Post Office

h.    Potential overbridge to the Railway Station and Oxford Terrace

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

16.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

17.  Consultation is currently underway and concludes on 18 November 2020

Legal Considerations

18.  There are no legal considerations.

Financial Considerations

19.  There are no financial considerations.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix A - Concept Images

130

2

Appendix B - Naenae Spatial Plan Working Concept 2020 Image 2

134

    

 

 

Author: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Jo Miller

Chief Executive

 





 







                                                                                     144                                               19 November 2020

Community and Environment Committee

28 October 2020

 

 

File: (20/1320)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/279

 

Creating a Plan for Community Funding

 

Purpose of Report

1.    Seek agreement on the approach and timetable for creating a Community Funding Plan.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes and receives the report;

(ii)   notes the work undertaken to date; and

(iii)  agrees to the proposed approach and timetable, with a report to Council on the proposed Community Funding Plan in April 2021.

In early 2020, officers completed phase 1 of re-configuring Council’s community funding plan. Phase 2 is to create a community funding plan to support Council’s strategic direction in the longer-term.

 

Background

2.    Council invests significant resources in communities across the city. This includes funding facilities, infrastructure and amenities, and services, as well as funding community organisations. The community funding plan focusses specifically on the discretionary funding that Council has available to build on the strengths of communities, focus on equity, and enable people and communities to shape their futures.

3.    In early 2020 officers completed phase 1 of re-configuring and targeting of community funding. That process included:

a.    integrating the new Council priorities and aspirations into the existing Community Funding Strategy – effective for the funding round that began 1 July 2020;

b.    reviewing names of the current funding streams to ensure they reflect priorities and aspirations of the new Council; and

c.     reviewing processes to ensure oversight by the Corporate Leadership Team (CLT).

 

4.    This work resulted in a shift in the vision for the funding, targeting, and a re-configuration of the funding streams. See Appendix 1 – Community Funding Strategy 2020-2021.

5.    Officers are now exploring possible approaches Council might take with community funding for the longer-term, including, connecting the funding to the purpose, vision, and role, agreed by Council in October 2020,[1] principles of the plan, and the amount of funding available and how it is allocated.

6.    Using the four wellbeings – social, economic, environmental, and cultural – as a framework and focusing on enabling and strengthening the communities that most need support; phase 1 established the three priorities below for Council’s community funding. These priorities will be used to inform phase 2. Wellbeing means that people are able to lead fulfilling lives with purpose, balance, and meaning to them.

i.   Those who work closely with communities and harness volunteer power

 

·   Build from our strengths: everyone has a contribution to make; proactively involve people who often get ignored; value our local community assets - using what you’ve got to help get what you want; 

·   Building participation and a sense of belonging

 

ii.  Those with an equity focus - where it’s needed most

 

·   Equity is about fairness and we acknowledge that some of our community are struggling, and in need of a hand up in order to thrive in our city;

·   Increasing access to opportunities and resources.

 

iii.   Those who enable people and communities

  

·   Work with diverse people and sectors: foster connections between groups that don’t usually work together; support aspirations of local whānau, hapu, and iwi; build relationships between neighbours; residents are actively involved in their communities;

·   Strengthening local leadership.

 

7.    The current priorities align well with the direction agreed by Council as part of the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 to develop its role to enable communities to shape their own future, without constraining or prescribing interventions or approaches that communities can take.

Discussion

 

8.    Community funding contributes to delivering Council’s purpose of ensuring that our city and all our people can thrive and is key in developing Council’s work of enabling communities to shape and determine their future. (See LTPAP2020/6/218: Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 – purpose, vision, and engagement)

9.    Phase 2 approach

i.    Review the funding that Council allocates for community purposes and explore the approaches taken by other funders;

ii.   Using discussion groups and individual meetings, engage with individuals, organisations, and groups, about the approach to community funding.

 

10.  Officers are currently designing the engagement and this work is likely to continue during November and include initial conversations to inform the methods to be used. Engagement is currently timetabled to begin in late January and February 2021. A report to Council on the proposed community funding plan is expected by April 2021.

11.  The first part of this work has begun and officers are exploring the funding that Council allocates to communities from all Council teams and budgets. Discussion about this aspect is continuing and currently the following funds have been identified:

Funding under Council’s Community Funding Strategy 2020-2021

·   Kākano

·   Mauri Ora

Funding that Council currently identifies under Community Funding eg on the website

·   Social Development Fund

·   Community Projects Fund

·   Scholarships (Tuia – youth mentoring, Weltec and Pasifika)

·   Community Resilience Fund

·   Built Heritage Incentive Fund

·   Community Arts and Culture Fund

·   Events Support Fund

·   Naenae Town Centre Activation Fund

·   Community Engagement Fund

·   Creative Communities Scheme Fund

Funding provided to specific groups through the Annual Plan/Long Term Plan

·   Volunteer Hutt

·   Love Wainuiomata

·   E Tu Public Art Fund

 

12.  A number of the above funds have a specific focus or are funds that Council administers on behalf of another organisation. Engagement will explore Council’s approach to community funding overall ie consider Council’s support for communities beyond the current Kākano and Mauri Ora funding streams, and recognise this wider funding as part of the community funding plan.

13.  The work will consider whether or not some of the regional funding that Council currently invests should be included under the plan.

14.  Engagement will explore different approaches to allocating Council’s discretionary funds. Some organisations have stopped funding via grant programmes and, through ongoing environmental scanning and research, identify communities, organisations, and individuals with whom to partner. Examples to explore are also approaches that seek to fund collaboration and partnership including with direct involvement from people in neighbourhoods designing connected and integrated interventions. This links with Council’s aim of working in partnership with communities to enable them to shape their own future and the proposal in the draft Hutt City Council Covid Recovery Plan to develop more high trust relationships where appropriate. The engagement will also explore whether the plan should include seeking opportunities for working with other funders to co-fund and commission initiatives.

15.  Alongside funding there are other roles that a funder can play to achieve greater impact from their investment. These could include supporting capacity and capability building, and developing relationships with communities and funding partners. The engagement will also explore the staff capacity and capabilities that Council needs to ensure its funding role is effective. 

16.  Officers are currently designing the engagement component of this work. The approach includes first speaking to mana whenua, to follow-up discussions held in phase 1, and subsequently with organisations and individuals with whom Council already works in areas across the city as well as other audiences. Key areas for discussion identified thus far are:

(i)    How should Council funding be used to address longer-term priorities by investing in community drivers of change?

(ii)   Considering the identified challenges e.g. reducing inequity, improving outcomes for tangata whenua, environmental sustainability, strengthening local capacity, community cohesion, and belonging, the foci for funding could include:

 

·        activities and infrastructure that enable participation and social cohesion;

·        developing community and social networks that facilitate belonging and enhance resilience;

·        a particular focus on supporting the defined priority population groups;

·        initiatives that empower community self-determination, support community planning, enable community-led development and encourage civic participation by a broad range of stakeholders.

 

(iii)  How do we ensure that, alongside community organisations, people in neighbourhoods and communities are part of designing interventions and making decisions?

(iv)  Exploring the approach to allocating funding. This could include:

·        Open and contestable funding;

·        Expressions of interest – identify the outcomes and enable applicants to identify ways of achieving these;

·        Seeking relationships and partnerships rather than grant programmes;

·        Co-funding and commissioning – partnerships with other funding providers.

 

(v)   How do we balance ‘proven’ with ‘promising’? Approaches could include:

·        Providing opportunities to scale support to effective organisations with proven impacts (longer-term, high-trust support)

·        Supporting innovation and testing new methods and solutions

 

(vi)   What is Council’s role alongside funding?  A range of largely nonfinancial roles and activities can help funders to achieve more impact from their investment. These include:

·        Support capacity and capability-building for key organisations, leaders and influencers, to enhance their impact.

·        Developing and managing effective relationships with communities and funding partners, which involve working in ways that are culturally responsive and developing partnerships with iwi and tangata whenua.

 

(vii)  How do we learn and build evaluation into funding?

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

 

17.  The approach to community funding will need to take account of the direction agreed by Council to consider the need to adapt to climate change and protect and enhance environment and biodiversity.

Consultation

18.  Not applicable.

Legal Considerations

19.  Not applicable

Financial Considerations

20.  There are no financial considerations at this stage.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Community Funding Strategy 2020-2021

145

 

 

 

 

Author: John Pritchard

Principal Policy Advisor

 

 

 

 

Author: Melanie Laban

Head of Community Projects and Relationships

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Wendy Moore

Head of Strategy and Planning

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 



 


 


 


 


Community and Environment Committee

04 November 2020

 

 

File: (20/1423)

 

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/280

 

Williams Park Management Plan - Process and Engagement Strategy

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To begin the planning process for the future Williams Park Management Plan.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes and provides feedback on the engagement strategy and work plan; and

(ii)   recommends that the planning process for the Williams Park Management Plan begin.

For the reasons outlined in the objectives in the engagement strategy and work plan.

 

Background

2.    The first management plan for Williams Park was adopted in 1981 and an updated management plan was adopted in 1991.

3.    In 2003 an “omnibus” of reserve management plans were adopted that generally guides the management of specific types of reserves e.g. sportsground reserves, neighbourhood reserves, foreshores and esplanades etc.

4.    The omnibus of reserve management plans superseded the 1991 Williams Park Management Plan.

5.    It is the opinion of officers that Williams Park has its own management plan because it is a multi-use facility with areas used for sport, leisure and facilities.

6.    A management plan at its core is a set of policies, rules, and regulations that identifies the type of activities that can take place on the Park.

7.    Reserve Management Plans are required under the Reserves Act 1977.

Discussion

8.    Future development principles and policies related to Williams Park will be influenced by community feedback provided during the engagement process.

9.    Policies and management frameworks are meant to represent best management practices and community goals.

10.  This management plan will begin in the middle of spring, and the summer holidays will play a factor in the timeliness of submissions. Because of this, the timeframe to submit during the initial round of submissions will be extended by a month and a half.

11.  The creation of this management plan fulfils goals set forth in the Reserves Strategic Directions and the Parks and Reserves asset management plans to update, and create where necessary, reserve management plans.

Options

12.  Agrees that the planning process for a Williams Park management plan begin.

13.  Does not agree that the planning process for Williams Park begin. Williams Park will continue to be managed under the omnibus of management plans.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

14.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

15.  A reserve management plan can contribute to improving climate change resilience by providing sound policies and management frameworks.

Consultation

16.  Consultation is required under the Reserves Act 1977.

17.  The proposed consultation plan is detailed in the “Engagement and Workplan Strategy.”

18.  The first round of consultation will be extended from 2 months to approximately 3.5 months to account for summer holidays.

19.  At its meeting on 3 November 2020, the Eastbourne Community Board resolved to endorse the recommendations contained in the officer’s report.

Legal Considerations

20.  A reserve management plan and the process for creating a reserve management plan must adhere to guidelines in the Reserves Act 1977.

Financial Considerations

21.  There are no financial considerations at this time.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Williams Park Management Plan Engagement Strategy and Workplan 2020 (Draft)

153

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Tyler Kimbrell

Parks, Reserves and Recreation Planner

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marcus Sherwood

Head of Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Environment Committee

04 November 2020

 

File: (20/1431)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/290

 

Application for a lease and licence to occupy for Honiana Te Puni Reserve as a part of the Te Ara Tupua Project

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek approval to issue a lease to Wellington Rowing Association and licences to Waka Kotahi for parts of Honiani Te Puni Reserve, as part of the Te Ara Tupua project.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)      notes that these leases and licences contribute to a regionally important transport project, which would be severely impacted without approval;

(ii)     notes that the request is generally consistent with Council policy;

(iii)    agrees to issue a licence to occupy to Waka Kotahi for the area outlined in Appendix 1 attached to the report, for the duration of the construction of the shared pathway (approximately three years) and agrees to exclude the public from the area for the same period; and

(iv)    agrees to issue a lease for the area attached as Appendix 2 to the report to Wellington Rowing Association.

For the reason that the land is required temporarily to enable a major infrastructure project to proceed.

 

Background

2.       Honiana Te Puni Reserve was created in 2009 in accordance with the Port Nicholson Block (Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika) Claims Settlement Act 2009 from what was formerly called the Korokoro Gateway site – a Stewardship Area under the Conservation Act 1987.

3.       Korokoro Gateway, which is now identified as Honiana Te Puni Local Purpose Reserve is vested in the trustees of the PNBST.  The reserve is classified as a local purpose reserve, pursuant to the Reserves Act 1977. 

4.       Hutt City Council is the administering body of the reserve for the purposes of the Reserves Act 1977.  This means Council has the functions, obligations, and powers of an administering body under that Act, as if the reserve were vested in the Council under Reserves Act.

5.       Te Ara Tupua is a regionally significant project that will deliver a safe and efficient walking and cycling route between Wellington and Lower Hutt. Te Ara Tupua is being delivered in three sections. Two sections are already largely delivered, being the completed Hutt Road section and the under-construction Pito-One to Melling section. The final section to be delivered, Nga Ūranga ki Pito-one (Ngauranga to Petone), is currently progressing through the planning approvals stage.

6.       Honiana Te Puni Reserve will be the key gateway to the Ngā Ūranga ki Pito-One section of Te Ara Tupua, providing an opportunity to enhance the cultural and community amenity of the Reserve.

7.       For Honiana Te Puni Reserve, the Project will be delivered in two stages.

8.       Stage 1: Construction and Enabling Works: This will include using the western side of the Reserve as a construction yard area during the construction of Ngā Ūranga ki Pito-One. The design process has included collaborating with recreational users of the Reserve to develop a modern, purpose-built community building for water sports recreation (rowing and water skiing) on the eastern side of the Reserve (the Integrated Clubs Building), to be constructed in advance of the establishment of the construction yard. Alongside that building and parking area, Taranaki  Whānui has the option to erect the Tāwharau Pods, featuring three architectural pods to provide a cultural amenity and activity area

9.       Stage 2: Restoration and Identity: This will include removing the construction yard activity and rehabilitating that western side of the Reserve. The western side of Honiana Te Puni Reserve will be landscaped and completed as the gateway to Ngā Ūranga ki Pito-One. This will include the relocation of the Tāwharau Pods (if Taranaki Whānui decides to erect these) to the western side of the Reserve to integrate with the shared path as a gateway place and placement of cultural sculptures. As a future opportunity, Taranaki Whānui may also decide to erect a new multi-purpose whare on the western side of the Reserve to provide a place of cultural identity, meeting of people and cultural opportunity.

10.     Taranaki Whānui has had a lead role in developing the Concept Design for Honiana Te Puni Reserve. Applications for resource consent for the development proposed in the Reserve are being sought as part of the package of authorisations for the Project under the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-Track Consenting) Act 2020, lodged in October 2020.

11.     Council has a statutory management role to manage the land, Honiana Te Puni alongside the land owners Taranaki Whanui.

12.     To ensure the project is managed smoothly and to facilitate the use of the Reserve:

a.    Waka Kotahi is seeking a licence from HCC for a part of the reserve at the western end.  This will be used as a construction site for a period of up to 3-years and will enable Waka Kotahi to safely undertake the works for this stage of the project.

b.    As a part of the process, the Rowing and Ski Clubs must be relocated and therefore, approval to issue a lease for an area of land measuring m2 at the eastern end of Honiana Te Puni is also being sought.

Discussion

13.     The project is scheduled to commence in 2021 with a series of preliminary works taking place. 

14.     This includes the establishment of a construction zone for the staging of the works.  This area will be located at the western end of Honiana Te Puni.  The site will be used for storage as well as enabling plant and machinery.  The space will be reinstated upon completion.

15.     Public access to this area will be limited.  The plan attached as Appendix 1 identifies the construction zone. 

16.     Traffic management will provide appropriate signage to communicate how to access and move safely within the Reserve.

17.     Public use of the eastern end of Honiana Te Puni will continue to be available.

18.     The Wellington Rowing and Water Ski clubs will need to be relocated.  The project provides that a new purpose-built integrated building will be constructed (see Figure 3-2 below) to accommodate these clubs at the eastern edge of Honiana Te Puni.

19.     The new facility will become a permanent recreational asset on the Reserve and has been designed in consultation with Taranaki Whānui, Hutt City Council, Wellington Rowing Association and Wellington Water Ski Club.

20.     A new publicly available 54 bay parking area located next to the integrated building will be created to replace those removed by the construction yard on the western half of the Reserve. The main access point will continue to be the current vehicle entrance off The Esplanade.

21.     The anticipated 3-year construction programme is likely to result in disruption to the Reserve, through increased traffic, noise and limitations on public use. The longer lasting impact on the reserve will be hugely positive for the site, for Taranaki Whanui and for the general public.  There will be improved transport connections, landscaping, cultural expression and natural character.

22.     Taranaki Whanui is keen to have increased cultural expression opportunities through place-making, whare construction, and sculptures.  Taranaki Whanui and Council have agreed on an intent to jointly facilitate a Reserve Management Plan for the reserve, in order to guide future use, design and management opportunities.

Options

23.     The Committee can:

a.       Decline the request to issue the concessions – a lease to Wellington Rowing Club, and a licence to occupy to Waka Kotahi to enable the work to safely proceed.  Such a move will be inconsistent with current policy and indeed, contrary to the wishes of Taranaki Whanui. 

b.       Approve the request.  This will enable a regionally significant project promoted by Taranaki Whanui and supported by Council and Waka Kotahi to proceed.  The finished project will provide a substantial attraction and asset to the residents to be a part of and enjoy.  

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

 

24.     The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

25.     The full project considers mitigations for sea level rise and provides for active transport.

Consultation

26.     The reserve is classified as a Local Purpose Reserve, for community and Cultural purposes.  Under the Reserves Act 1977, consultation is not required for issuing of a lease or licence. 

27.     While Council’s process provides that it publicly consult, Waka Kotahi intends to carry out a series of open days at the site to inform locals and give an opportunity for them to contribute and understand the project in a more informal way.  Officers are supportive of this approach as is Taranaki Whanui, the land owners and project partners.

Legal Considerations

 

28.     Council is guided by the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.  The request for a concession is consistent with the statutory provisions of the Reserves Act. 

29.     Council’s generic lease and licence documents will be used for this proposal.

30.     It is proposed that an initial lease term (for the integrated sports facility) of 5 years, with a right to renewal with a maximum 30 year term, be approved. 

31.     The issuing of a licence will be for a term of up to 3-years. 

 

Financial Considerations

 

32.     Pursuant to Council’s Private Use of Reserves Policy the Rowing Club will pay a lease charge of approximately $956 + GST per year.  This is based on a floor area of 378m2.  

33.     All works including the new construction of the integrated building, landscaping to the Eastern end and reinstatement will be funded by Waka Kotahi.  Council is not required to fund any part of the Te Ara Tupua project.

34.     Some elements of the final design are undetermined and proposed to be funded by Taranaki Whanui, these being the Tāwharau Pods and whare.

Other Considerations

 

35.     The project is regionally significant and has been fast-tracked under the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-Track Consenting) Act 2020. The submissions process and potential hearings could heavily impact the timing of the project.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1:  Construction site area

168

2

Appendix 2 - sports clubs lease area

169

3

Appendix 3:  plans of the Eastern part of the reserve

170

 

 

 

 

Author: Janet Lawson

Reserves Asset Manager

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marcus Sherwood

Head of Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 


Appendix 1:  Area (outlined in Red) proposed to be used by Waka Kotahi for construction works and public excluded for approximately three years until the project is completed. 


Appendix 2: Area proposed (highlighted in green) to be leased to the Wellington Rowing Association for the integrated sports building.

 


Appendix 3:  Aerial diagram showing the Eastern end of the reserve and a visual representation of the proposed integrated clubs building.

 

 

 


Community and Environment Committee

30 October 2020

 

File: (20/1354)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/282

 

Parks and Gardens - Work Programme Update

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report provides an update on asset renewals and work programme for the Parks and Gardens Division.

Recommendations

That the Committee:

(i)    notes the Parks and Gardens Division’s 2020/21 work programme;

(ii)   notes the current Reserves maintenance contracts, which includes the Cemeteries and Trees contracts is currently being reviewed for tender;

(iii)  notes that the Parks Asset Management Plan is currently being updated as part of the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021/31 process, and a summary will be considered at the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee in November 2020; and

(iv) notes that there is pressure on the current funding provision in the LTP for parks asset renewals and that in November officers will provide options on how this will be managed in the future, including reviewing asset life cycles, reducing levels of service, culling assets, increasing funding or a combination of the these options.

For the reason(s) that it informs elected officials on the Parks Activity generally, and provides additional context to issues of funding. 

 

Background

2.    The Chair of the Community and Environment Committee asked officers to provide an update on the 2020/21 and future work plan for projects and operational asset renewals programme for the Parks and Gardens Division.  Officers were also asked to comment on budgets and challenges.    

3.    The details of this report follow a similar themed report presented to the Community Plan Committee in 2018 where information at a high level on each of the main asset groups is summarised. 

4.    As a result of that report Council approved a $350,000 budget increase in operational maintenance for various asset groups (e.g. hard surfaces, playgrounds, park furniture).   The budget related to asset maintenance and not asset renewal.

Discussion

5.    The key task of the Parks and Reserves Activity is to provide, develop, maintain and protect a reserve network which contributes to achieving a healthy natural environment and improves the health and well-being of residents.

6.    Council’s reserve network consists of 349 individual reserve properties totaling 2781 hectares.  It forms part of a wider network of reserve land of almost 19,000 hectares, including the Remutaka Forest Park and Belmont and East Harbour Regional Parks that is within the City’s boundaries. 

7.    Parks and Reserves assets are diverse and managed to varying levels of service depending on their status and use. Appendix 1 provides a high level summary of parks and gardens assets.

Work Plan Update 2020 – Capital Projects

8.    The following table provides a summary update on the major capital projects for the Parks team identified in the 20/21 Annual Plan:

20/21 Annual Plan

Budget $000

General Scope

Timeline

Comment

Improve Levels of Service

 

Bell Park Development

$250k

Provides for the construction of an all-weather multi-use court

Construction schedule - January to May 2021

Ignite Sport will be involved in the design and development

Wharves Refurbishment (Days Bay)

$2.2m

Complete structural replacement

Due for completion Feb 2021

Total budget cost of $4.5m (over 2 years).

Fraser Park reinstatement

$250k

Construction of sand amended field

Schedule – March to June 2021

Liaising with resident sports clubs – football, rugby and cricket – to agree on field location

Manor Park Cycle Trail

$370k

Shared pathway along the rail corridor between Golf Rd and Silverstream rail bridge 

March to July 2021

Working alongside Waka Kotahi (NZTA), GWRC, Manor Park Golf Club and Wellington Water. Design completed.  Resource consent to be applied for. Land use permission from Kiwi Rail required. Total anticipated project costs for stage 1 is $1m. Waka Kotahi contribution of $500k to be prioritized for expenditure 2020; GWRC contribution of $150k.  Stage 2 not funded.

Valley Floor Review Implementation

$420k

Naenae Park - Proposal to construct an all-weather walking track around the perimeter of the park and a pedestrian bridge linking Waddington Drive with the park

February to June 2021

Working through consent requirements.  Community information and sharing to be completed once final design has been completed

Toilets Upgrade

$140k

New build

Final year of funding

Currently allocated towards an accessible toilet in Hutt central.  There is a funding shortfall and the project is under review

Te Aroha Matauranga facility - Te Whiti Park

$900k

Construction of multi-use facility adjoining HCC facility at Te Whiti Park

February 2021 to June 2021

Partnership project with Taranaki Whanui to construct a multi-use space extension to the changing rooms. 

Capital to Replace Existing Assets

 

Parks Hard Surface Renewal

$250k

Resealing; pot hole repairs

July 2020 to June 2021

Annual budget to maintain surfaces at current levels.  Work is prioritized based on condition.  Sites identified for work in 20/21 include Hutt Rec, Taita Cemetery, Fraser Park, Wise Park, Delaney Park

Playgrounds

$355k

Playground replacements at:

·    Taieri Crescent, Kelson

·    Purser Grove, Epuni

·    Matuhi St, Tirohanga

·    Moera Reserve

 

 

 

Dec to Feb

 

Oct to Nov

 

Feb to May

 

April to June

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sportsgrounds Buildings Renewal

$220k

Various maintenance items

July 2020 to June 2021

Annual budget to maintain facilities at current levels.  Building maintenance prioritized based on condition.  Sites identified include Delaney Park, Richard Prouse, Hutt Rec, Petone Rec

Operating Projects

 

Hutt Valley Tennis – Mitchell Park

$500k

 

 

Officers continue to work with the Association.  Project likely to be carried over as additional funding options are being investigated.

Biodiversity Assistance for Private Landowners

$200k

Funding opportunity for residents adjoining 

 

First year’s operation in 2020.  135 applications for assistance received and being reviewed/approved

Demolition of Fraser Park Grandstand

$300k

Demolition of grandstand and reinstate site

Nov

Toilet and changing room use transferred to Sportsville facility.  Grandstand is untenanted.  

Dog Park - Wainuiomata

$450k

Creation of a dog park in Waiu Street Reserve land, Wainuiomata

Dec to March 2021

Parks providing support to Animal Control for this project.  Preferred tenderer identified.  Work to commence Nov/Dec.

Skate Parks

$52,000

 

 

 

$40,000

 

Naenae – construction of wooden half-pipe

 

Wainuiomata – improvement to existing surface

 

 

 

 

March to June

·    Consultation completed. Decision on location awaiting outcome of spatial plan (temporary solution awaiting overseas delivery)

 

·    Community has contributed $5k towards work

 

Future work plan

9.    Officers are in the process of updating the Parks Asset Management Plan, which will be considered by the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee in November 2020. This will inform the future work plan.

10.  The Plan aligns with Council’s emerging strategic goals. It includes proposed levels of services for parks, managing risks, future demand (eg demographic and societal changes) planning, and financial strategies to manage funding streams to avoid spikes in funding requirements. 

11.  The major capital projects funded in the current 2018-2028 LTP are:

 

·    $800,000 for safety work on Petone Wharf

·    $500,000 for improvements at Williams Park, Days Bay

·    $250,000 to complete a further stage of the development at Wainuiomata Garden of Remembrance

·    $250,000 to develop Meadow Bank Reserve on the Western Hills.

·    $2,250,000 to extend the Akatarawa Cemetery 2024-27.

·    $8,000,000 to refurbish Petone Wharf in 2032/33. 

 

12.  Officers are working with the community to develop a Reserves Management Plan for Williams Park which will inform the work scope at this Park.  

 

13.  Long term funding for the replacement or renewal of specific asset groups is allocated.  The budget allocation is as noted in the 20/21 work plan and covers hard surfaces ($250k), buildings (220k), park furniture ($60k), playgrounds ($255k) and Valley Floor Review ($200k). 

 

14.  Officers are also seeking additional funding through the LTP process for:

 

·   Demolition of most of Point Howard Wharf (safety risks).

·   Additional funding for Petone Wharf.

·   Bringing forward funding for Akatarawa Cemetery extension.

 

Work Plan - Operational Work Streams                                                               

Maintenance Contracts

15.  The maintenance for all assets groups is outsourced to external maintenance contractors.  The Parks area can be broken down essentially into three main maintenance contract groups as summarised in the table below. Contract maintenance is planned on a “whole of site” basis where a contractor is responsible for all assets within the site (and asset group).

16.  Parks maintenance contracts in recent years have been awarded for a maximum term of 10-years.  This allows Council and the contractor to manage the maintenance of assets strategically, while allowing, for example, the contractor to investment in plant and machinery, provide longer term workforce opportunities, set up local supply chains.

17.  The sportsgrounds contract was tendered and awarded in September 2020.  The Reserves Maintenance contract is due to expire in 2021 and the Horticultural contract has a final expiry date of 2023. All contracts have renewal provisions with contract terms set up around a 5+3+2 year tenure.  All tender processes and contracts now include the principles of procurement for wider impact.

 

Current Contract Value*

Contract Start

Contract Expires

Comment

Sports grounds

$2,490,000

September 2020

August 2030

 

Horticultural Parks and Gardens

$2,051,000

October 2013

September 2023

 

Reserves, Cemeteries, Trees

$2,592,000

August 2011

July 2021

Under review

Total

$7,133,000

 

 

 

            *includes provisional contract sums

Challenges 

 

18.  The updated Parks Asset Management Plan will include condition assessments for the main asset groups - hard surfaces, buildings, playgrounds and park furniture. In recent years, these plans have not been fully funded due to other funding priorities, so there is insufficient funding in the current LTP to maintain these assets over their life cycle and thereby maintain current levels of service.

19.  The updated plan will also include future cost of maintaining significant assets that have been developed since 2018, including Avalon Park and Riddiford Garden. 

20.  The report for the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee will provide options and seek your guidance on how this set of assets should be managed in the future. Options will include increasing funding, culling assets, reducing levels of service, or combinations of each.

21.  Public toilets are currently not covered by any specific asset management plan. Going forward, these will be included in the Parks Asset Management Plan and sit alongside Park toilets and changing rooms both for management and long term planning.

22.  There is a difference between the public and Park toilets.  For the most part, Park toilets are open when the Park is in use whereas public toilets are open from dawn till dusk generally.

23.  Council allocated an average of $120k per annum to upgrade and/or replace public toilets in the City based on a priority list.  The funding was for a period of five years from 2016/17. There is no funding allocated in out years for further work.  The Parks AMP however, identifies the need for further funding.   

24.  A total of $440,000 has been spent on toilet upgrades since 2016/17.  The table below identifies the toilets that were upgraded or refurbished with the public toilet funding.  There is $100k in the current 20/21 Annual Plan.  The project originally designated for this funding has since been put on hold. 

Location

Scope

Williams Park Pavilion

Upgrade of women’s and men’s toilets

Lions Park Kiosk, Petone Foreshore

Refurbishment of women’s and men’s toilets – paint and replacement of basins, panels

Rona Bay Wharf, Eastbourne

Demolition and complete replacement of toilet facility

Buick Street Toilets

Refurbishment of women’s and men’s toilets – paint and replacement of basins. panels

 

25.  Toilets within the Parks group also received an upgrade.  These were separately project funded and include toilets at Avalon and Riddiford Parks.

Reserves Management Plans

26.  Officers are currently working on Reserve Management Plans (RMPs) for Williams Park, Eastbounre, and Honiana Te Puni Reserve, Petone.

27.  RMPs are a legislative requirement under the Reserves Act 1977.  They are publicly consulted and outline how a reserve or collection of reserves are managed, maintained and developed.  They provide an agreed approach between Council and community on how reserve spaces are managed.

28.  The RMP for Williams Park is scheduled for public consultation later this year. 

29.  The RMP for Honiana Te Puni is unique for Lower Hutt in that Council doesn’t own the land. The land is owned by the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust, and Council has a statutory management role under the Reserves Act 1977.  This means that Council has statutory authority to manage the land as if it were owned by Council and that generally the provisions of the Reserves Act apply.  Moreover, the plan process will be jointly lead and undertaken by iwi representatives and Council officers in a genuine partnership approach.  This work is to commence in early 2021 with a final RMP being produced in mid-2021.

Community Ranger Work

30.  Restoration work on reserve land is an ongoing activity.  The Community Ranger engages with volunteer groups and schools to provide support and assistance to upskill e.g. grow safe certification, and organise restoration activities; assists with setting up of  ‘Friends of’ groups where local communities become involved in their local reserves , and feel supported to achieve restoration goals.  There are currently 12 restoration groups active in the City.

31.  Officers have recently set up a Predator Free Hutt Valley PRHV group aimed at supporting central Governments Predator Free 2050 strategy to eradicate marsupial and mammalian introduced predators. 

32.  PFHV has helped to establish and work with local suburban groups to provide traps, advice and equipment (baits, monitoring equipment) to employ in their local spaces.  Approximately 1000 traps have been issued across the current 15 PFHV groups within the City targeting rats, mice, and mustelids.

Options

33.  The paper for the LTP Subcommittee will provide options and seek your guidance on how this set as assets should be managed in the future.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

34.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

35.  Volunteer groups aligned with the  Parks and Gardens Division undertake regular planting of dunes to improve the capability of these assets to minimise climate change impacts like sea level rise.  An average of 10,000 eco-sourced native plants and trees are planted each year through community and planting groups.  This activity contributes to carbon sequestration.

36.  Climate change principles will be included in and to the policies created in each of the Reserve Management Plans. 

37.  The Reserves contract review will include the application of wider social, economic and environmental principles including the Zero by 2050 target, which is now embedded within the corporate procurement process.  This includes contractors, for example, employing electrified machines instead of fossil fuelled equipment; contractors measuring and reporting on emission targets.  

38.  The Parks Asset Management Plan provides examples of actions to achieving strategic climate change outcomes e.g. gas heated water supply for facilities is being transitioned to electric heating.   

Consultation

39.  There has been no consultation in the preparation of this report

Legal Considerations

40.  There are no legal considerations at this time.

Financial Considerations

41.  The financial implications of the Parks Asset Management Plan will be reported through to Council in November.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Parks and Gardens Asset Type Summary

179

 

 

 

 

Author: Aaron Marsh

Team Leader Parks

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Marcus Sherwood

Head of Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Andrea Blackshaw

Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Jenny Livschitz

Chief Financial Officer

 


PARKS AND GARDENS ASSET TYPE SUMMARY

Asset Type

Description

Assets

Sports grounds

27 sports grounds comprising 303 hectares in area

200 sports fields, grandstands, amenity buildings, furniture, structures, paths, car parks, roads, irrigation, drainage, fences and signs

Horticultural/Civic Parks

18 parks comprising 8 hectares

Amenity buildings, gardens, trees, paths, car parks, roads, furniture, structures, fences and signs

Neighbourhood Parks

83 parks comprising 35 hectares

Gardens, trees, paths, furniture, structures and signs

Bush Reserves

67 reserves comprising 2074 hectares

Tracks, structures, furniture, car parks, paths, roads and signs

Cemeteries

Taita and Wainuiomata cemeteries

Lawn, gardens, paths, car parks, roads, furniture, concrete head beams and signs

Playgrounds

56 playgrounds including 3 skate parks

Play equipment, furniture, concrete skating structures

Foreshore

20 kilometres of coast line from Korokoro to Pencarrow

Wharves, jetties, boat ramps, amenity buildings, furniture, paths, car parks and roads

Street Trees and Street Gardens

11,500 street trees and 247 street gardens

Trees, shrubs, irrigation

Public Toilets

General public convenience

12 facilities not located on Parks

 


Community and Environment Committee

19 October 2020

 

 

File: (20/1269)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/281

 

Director's Report - Neighbourhoods and Communities Group

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update from the Neighbourhoods and Communities Group. 

Recommendations

That the Committee notes and receives the report.

 

Overview     

2.    We are pleased to report that community use of our spaces and places is now back at pre-Covid levels in most cases.

3.    Library attendance, levels of community participation in activity at our community hubs and Dowse and Petone Settlers Museum visitation have largely returned to normal, with a slight rise in some cases.  

4.    The return to pre-Covid numbers for pools has been slower, but visitation continues to increase.

5.    The Fitness Suites have had a spike in overall memberships since Level 2 with membership sitting at 1,573 which was higher than the same time in 2019.   

6.    All of our facilities are still encouraging contact tracing through the Covid app, and ensuring increased hygiene measures and social distancing.   

7.    For the Neighbourhoods and Communities leadership team there has been a focus in the last month on developing our strategic direction – gaining a deeper understanding of why the team was formed and how we can best deliver on Council’s emerging priorities. A significant shift is required with a focus on Neighbourhood Management and Asset Based Community Development.  We are working with the Policy and Strategy team to tell this story as part of the overall Long Term Plan narrative.

8.    On November 6 we farewelled our wonderful Head of Libraries Kat Cuttriss who has accepted an exciting new role as Associate University Librarian (Client Services) at Massey University in Palmerston North.

9.    Kat has been with us for two years and has been a passionate and dedicated leader of the Hutt City Libraries team. Shane O’Conner has been appointed Acting Head of Libraries in the interim and is already making a valuable contribution to the Leadership team.

Community Hubs and Relationships

Naenae Community Voice implementation (Town Centre Activation)

10.  Further on our new strategic direction, we are piloting our first Neighbourhood co-ordinator in Naenae with Joni Araiti working with the community to get a number of initiatives underway in response to the Voice of the Community Report. One of the first has been an exhibition by Chevron Hassett of audio visual art work in Hillary Court container which has been received very well by local community and likened to ‘Humans of New York’. This has also sparked interest by others who are also keen to activate the space for artwork, spoken word and open mic nights.

11.  Taste tester opportunities have been confirmed and will take place in three week blocks throughout November and December.  These will be used to help gauge interest in and plan regular activities throughout 2021.

12.  Joni was also on hand to help out at the recent community engagement event for the spatial plan, which was well attended and has provided rich feedback for the ongoing design process.

 

Epuni ‘Growing Together’ initiative

13.  We are continuing to work with Kainga Ora in our Epuni ‘Growing Together’ initiative, focused on new social housing in the area.  Local Epuni Kaitiaki have been engaged and are working closely with Kainga Ora towards objectives outlined in the Roadmap.  The initial focus is on connecting with whanau as they move in to the new development, so they feel a sense of belonging, safety and connectedness to the wider Epuni community.

Opening of Ti Rito Performance Centre

14.  Taiohi Morehu (Local Taita Maori Performing Arts group) have secured the old Avalon Squash Club on a two year lease to establish a performing arts centre and enable greater access to a range of performing arts for local tamariki and rangatahi.  

Community Hubs and other facilities 

15.  Two very successful community events have recently been held at Walter Nash Centre – Hutt Valley Sports Awards and Symphony in the Hutt, with over 1,000 people attending both events.  There was a huge effort from our team at WNC in supporting set‑up and pack down alongside the huge number of volunteers from the Sport Awards team and TAKA Trust.

16.  Meanwhile work is continuing on seismic strengthening of the corridor at WNC and should be completed by Christmas 2020.

17.  With recent departures and staff changes, recruitment is underway for two new Community Hub Managers, both on 12 month fixed term contracts. These positions will report to our Neighbourhood Manager, who will play a key role in the development of a neighbourhood management approach across our communities.

18.  Belmont Hall renovations are now completed and the hall is back in operation.

19.  Seismic strengthening work on Little Theatre is now underway and is expected to be completed by November 2020. It remains closed to the public.

Community Funding

20.  Community Panels have all had their first informal meetings, and this month make decisions on their Local Engagement Fund applications.  Some changes have been made to the decision process of the Community Projects Fund.  These changes are to ensure greater visibility for Council (CLT), stronger controls (in relation to ongoing financial implications in particular), clarity on roles and responsibilities and greater strategic alignment of projects.   

21.  All panel projects will require sign-off from CLT.

 

City Safety 

22.  HCC, Police, Kainga Ora, Oranga Tamariki, DHB and RPH recently supported Paparakau Tuarua Kohanga Reo in leading a Street Intervention Project in Harrison Cres, Avalon.    

23.  The intervention is to enable improved health and wellbeing of the whànau living in this street, rejuvenate the green spaces (create community gardens), improve the look and functionality of the homes, increase awareness around whànau, personal and road safety and increase awareness around sustainable living. 

24.  An initial community ‘clean-up’ took place in Sept, with Kainga Ora providing skip bins, the Kohanga Reo providing activities for tamariki whilst whànau were cleaning their properties and Well homes carrying out assessments. The City Safety Team provided traffic/pedestrian management, CPTED advice for residents, and promoted Neighbourhood Support (15 households including the Kohanga Reo have signed up).  A Road Safety assessment is also been undertaken by the Transport team, to determine whether speed calming measures can be installed.

25.  We continue to have a strong working relationship with UHCC, sharing resources and information to support the community across the Valley.  A recent joint Youth Suicide workshop was attended by more than 100 Hutt Valley kaimahi (55 at UHCC and 53 at HCC).  This workshop was to provide teachers, social workers, and community groups working with youth, the skills to identify and support high risk youth.

Libraries

26.  Work continues on allocating the central government New Zealand Libraries Partnership Programme funding, comprising $58m funding over two years for public libraries in New Zealand to play a critical roles in enabling our communities’ social and economic recovery from COVID-19.  We have the following investment in Hutt City Libraries confirmed:

·        Fee waivers for National Library subscription content.  We are exploring options for using these funds to invest in new subscriptions to online content, to support our communities with their upskilling, training and job-hunting needs.   

·        Credits for public internet revenue we have historically received at community libraries.  This is in recognition of the need for all New Zealanders to be able to access the internet for free at their local public library, to engage online with social services, central government agencies, and job-hunting support and resources. 

·        A fully funded: 

Library Diversity and Workforce Development Advisor role (fixed term through to 30 June 2022), responsible for ensuring library spaces, collections and programmes are consistently designed and provided in a way that honours the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and provides inclusive, accessible library services for all in our communities. This position also has responsibility for the further development and implementation of the Libraries Staff Learning Framework. 

Library Digital Skills Advisor role (fixed term through to 30 June 2022), responsible for supporting the development of digital skills within the Libraries team and for our communities.  The position focuses in particular on information and digital literacy skills development for our tamariki and rangatahi, and on establishing digital equity across our city. 

·        Internal recruitment for these Advisor roles is open now, with new recruits expected to be in role by end of November.

27.  Hutt City Libraries is collaborating with the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) to provide regional Career NZ ‘pop ups’ at our Petone, Naenae and War Memorial Libraries from now until Christmas. The purpose of these pop-up services is to provide face-to-face support for New Zealanders who have lost their jobs due to the impacts of COVID-19. The service is staffed by Career Practitioners employed by TEC, with in-depth one-on-one support with a career guidance professional also available via Zoom or phone. Hutt City joins Auckland Libraries, Christchurch City Libraries and two Ministry of Social Development offices as a pilot site for these services.

Museums

28.  We have opened four new exhibitions at the Dowse to very positive local, regional and national responses.

29.  The exhibition refresh of the Nuku Tewhatewha display re-opened on Friday 30 October 2020 with a moving dawn opening ceremony which brought together the many groups with an interest in the taonga. While this part of the project has been completed, the team at the Dowse will continue to work with all those involved to tell the living stories of Nukutefatefa and its significance to Maori and to Te Awa Kairangi.

30.  Our education numbers have increased significantly over recent weeks and bookings until the end of the year are up on the previous year.

31.  We have finished a refurbishment of our family space and rebranded it as Toi Hutt. It now makes a closer link between the content and activities in Toi Hutt with our exhibitions and collections. This has been very well received by families, both our regular visitors and new visitors to the Dowse.

32.  We have opened a new display at Petone Settlers Museum in partnership with local business Hills Hats and we are currently working on a display to highlight stories from local Filipino communities.

33.  We are currently working on an inventory and asset management schedule for the Civic Public Art Collection.  

Parks & Recreation


Pools + Fitness

34.  Swim City were named winners of the recent NZSCTA Innovating Swim School award. Swim City has developed a number of innovative programmes to ensure that our swim programme is accessible to all.

35.  The Naenae Pool and town centre development project is making good progress and we expect to appoint both an internal Project Manager and external project management services before the end of the year.

Recreation

36.  The Pukutakaro (play) project is having a significant impact on the lives of our tamariki and is generating approximately 115 attendances a day with some extremely positive feedback including:

·      “The sport and rec stuff coming out of council right now is easily the best external delivery that we host. This type of thing meets our kids needs a lot better than forcing soccer or cricket onto them. You guys are great.” – Avalon Primary Principal.

·      ‘’Those kids that usually get left out, here with you guys, you're disrupting the social hierarchy allowing it to evolve and change. They are bringing their experiences and identity, what already exists into this new opportunity of free play.’’ - Teacher Epuni School.

·      ”Our kids just don't play. They don't know how. I’ve taken some to the park and they're actually afraid. They don't take risks because they have never had the space to try and they don’t want to get it wrong. They are always so afraid of doing it wrong, getting in trouble.” - Teacher Naenae Primary.

·      ‘’My boy is autistic and has global delay. This is perfect. I can't let him play like this at home, we don't have space. He's so so happy- thank you!’’ – Mum Naenae Primary.

37.  The partnership with Lower Hutt Primary Schools Sports Association has resulted in securing two funding grants and hosting two events reaching 1,312 participants.

38.  The Build and Play trailer continues to be well utilised in schools and averages 2,000 uses per month with teachers commenting that their favourite aspects are: “It is totally unstructured – the kids get freedom to choose, experiment, discover, reflect, re-try.  Need more of this. Thank you.”  “Students enthusiasm and engagement.     Physical activity.  Sharing pride.” “Creativity and risk taking.  The time goes so quickly! The proud faces when they finished their creations.”  Bookings for 2021 are now filled until August.  New kits, Build & Play 2.0 is being investigated for 2021 due to the popular demand. This will be a portable kit of tools that stay with the school for a longer period of time.

39.  Naenae Bowling Club, one of our CFT-owned facilities, has received the exciting news their tender was successful to host the World Singles Champion of Champions tournament for the next two years (November 20 to 27 next year and from November 19 to 26 in 2022).

Parks and Reserves

40.  We are continuing to work with Waka Kohtai NZTA on the Ngā Ūranga to Pito-one section of the Te Ara Tupua shared path which will be built on the harbour’s edge from Ngauranga to Honiana Te Puni Reserve in Petone.  The process of issuing a concession to Waka Kotahi for land on Honiana Te Puni Reserve is underway. A report is due to Council in November.

41.  The Reserves Maintenance Contract is due to expire in August 2021 and a review is now underway.

42.  A Reserve Management Plan for Williams Park in Eastbourne is being developed and will commence public consultation in December.


 

Healthy Families Hutt Valley

43.  The following are highlights from our Healthy Families team:

·   Working with Common Unity Aotearoa to establish a local Hutt Valley Food Resilience network with funding from the Kakano Fund. 

·   They recently also hosted a meeting with representation from The Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Ministry of Social Development’s Food Secure Communities team, Kore Hiakai, ‘Food in schools’ co-ordinator from the Ministry of Education, Common Unity Aotearoa and Te Aroha Kai to share local insights and action to achieving food security and resilience.

·   Hosted a week of engagement around placemaking and active transport in Taita, engagement included temporarily reclaiming some of the car parks to showcase tactical urbanism, cycling and play.

·   Partnering on two Auaha Evolving Spaces projects to co-design more people-friendly streets and spaces. The Knights Road Connection Project has completed the first round of co-design workshops and has launched online engagement tools.

·   Launching an expanded Player of the Day initiative for the summer season including increased participation from other local Councils across the region and introduction of local sponsor Mitre 10 Mega Porirua, Petone and Upper Hutt.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

 

44.  The matters addressed in this report are being considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide by relevant business leads.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.    

 

Author: Melanie Laban, Head of Community Projects and Relationships

 

Author: Kat Cuttriss, Head of Libraries

 

Author: Karl Chitham, Museums Director

 

Author: Marcus Sherwood, Head of Parks and Recreation

 

 

Approved By: Andrea Blackshaw, Director Neighbourhoods and Communities

  


Our Reference          20/1470

TO:                      Chair and Members

Community and Environment Committee

FROM:                John Gloag

DATE:                11 November 2020

SUBJECT:           Cross Valley Transport Connections (CVTC) Update

 

Recommendation

That the Committee notes and receives the information.

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    To provide the Committee with an update on the Cross Valley Transport Connections Project.    

Background

2.    Hutt City Council (HCC) commenced development of the Programme Business Case (PBC) for the Cross Valley Transport Connections (CVTC) project in 2019, following the development of a strategic case in 2016 and the Lower Hutt Growth Story in 2018.

3.    A key feature of its development has been the contributions made by stakeholders and representatives from Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) and Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) at various workshops /meetings.

4.    Through the PBC process, problems, benefits and programmes (or packages) of transport improvements were identified and assessed. Ultimately, an emerging preferred programme was identified for further and more detailed business case assessment.

5.    The PBC, including the emerging preferred programme, was presented to Council via a briefing on 23 July 2020. 

6.    Since the briefing officers have had peer reviews carried out on three elements of the PBC, as required by NZTA.  These reviews relate to the methodology used in estimating the cost, establishing the BCR and undertaking the Multi Criteria Analysis.

7.    The relevant comments from these peer reviews are being incorporated in the PBC report before it is submitted to Waka Kotahi for review and hopefully approval to allow officers to move on to the next phase of the business case process.

8.    When officers submit the PBC to NZTA for review, officers have also committed to releasing it to the public.

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this memorandum.   

 

 

 

 

 

Author: John Gloag

Head of Transport

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 


Community and Environment Committee

04 November 2020

 

File: (20/1421)

 

 

Report no: CEC2020/6/123

 

Community and Environment Committee Work Programme

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the work programme be noted and received.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Community and Environment Committee Work Programme 2021

190

    

 

 

Author: Debbie Hunter

Acting Deomcracy Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 


Appendix 1

Community and Environment Committee – Work Programme 2021

 

 

 

Description

Author

Cycle 1

3 March 2021

Pending

Director’s Report - Neighbourhoods and Communities Group (standard item)

A Blackshaw

X

 

Director’s Report – Strategy and Engagement  (standard item)

M Boggs

X

 

Update on Council’s Climate Change Work (standard item)

J Scherzer

X

 

Update on Councillor Led Climate Change Working Group (standard item

Cr Briggs

X

 

Community Resilience Fund (standard item)

D Hunter

X

 

Hutt Minoh House Update

V West

X

 

Work Programme

Democracy Advisor

X

 

Rubbish and Recycling Implementation Plan

B Hodgins

X

 

 



[1] See Report no: LTPAP2020/6/218 Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 – purpose, vision, and engagement topics.