HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

 

 

18 November 2020

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 25 November 2020 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

Membership

 

 

 Ms Suzanne Tindal (Independent Chair)

Mayor C Barry (Deputy Chair)

Cr D Bassett

Cr J Briggs

Cr A Mitchell

Cr N Shaw

 

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 0800 HUTT CITY

 

 

 


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

AUDIT AND RISK SUBCOMMITTEE
Membership:	Independent Chair and 6 Members
	Audit and Risk Subcommittee members should be appointed so that the subcommittee has a diversity of governance skills, experiences and personal qualities. Between them, the members should bring a mix of the following attributes:
1.	Broad governance experience;
2.	Familiarity with risk management disciplines;
3.	Understanding of internal control and assurance frameworks;
4.	 An understanding of financial and non-financial performance reporting;
5.	A good understanding of the roles of internal and external audit; and
6.	A sound understanding of the local government sector.
Use of the matrix below has assisted other councils to consider the best fit for membership of an Audit and Risk Committee.
Quorum:	Half of the members
Meeting Cycle:	Quarterly or as required
Reports to:	Council

 

 

PURPOSE

To provide objective advice and recommendations around the sufficiency, quality and results of assurance over the Council Group’s financial management practices, risk management, internal control systems and governance frameworks.

 

Consider and make recommendations to Council:

The effectiveness and robustness of the internal audit, risk management and internal control systems, processes and practices of the Council for each financial year:

        Review and approve the internal audit coverage and annual work plans, ensuring these plans are based on the Council’s risk profile

        Review the adequacy of management’s implementation of internal audit recommendations

        Review the internal audit charter to ensure appropriate organisational structures, authority, access, independence, resourcing and reporting arrangements are in place

        Review whether management has in place a current, comprehensive and effective risk management framework and associated procedures for identifying, assessing and responding to the Council’s significant risks, potential opportunities and adverse effects in accordance with its risk approach

        Monitor whether appropriate action is being taken by management to respond to the Council’s significant risks, potential opportunities and adverse effects

        Review whether management has taken steps to embed a culture that is committed to probity and ethical behaviour

        Review whether management has established and maintains a sound internal control system, policies and procedures so that activities are effectively controlled and carried out as planned towards the achievement of the Council’s objectives and safeguard the Council’s financial and non-financial assets

        Review whether there are appropriate systems, processes and controls in place to prevent, detect and effectively respond to fraud

The integrity and appropriateness of internal and external reporting and accountability requirements:

        Consider the processes for ensuring the completeness, reliability and quality of financial and operational information being provided to the Council, including information provided by Council Controlled Organisations and Council Controlled Trading Organisations 

        Seek advice periodically from internal and external auditors regarding the completeness and quality of financial and operational information that is provided to the Council

        Review the appropriateness of the Council’s existing accounting policies, judgements, treatments and principles and any proposed change

        Enquire of internal and external auditors any information that affects the quality and clarity of the Council’s financial statements and statements of service performance, and assess whether appropriate action has been taken by management in response

        Satisfy itself that the financial statements and statements of service performance are supported by appropriate management signoff on the statements and on the adequacy of the systems of internal control

        Confirm that processes are in place to ensure that financial and non-financial information included in the Council’s Annual Report and Long Term Plan is consistent with the audited financial statements

Oversight of external auditor engagement and outputs:

        At the start of each audit, confirm the terms of engagement, including the nature and scope of the audit, timetable and fees, with the external auditor

        Receive the external auditor’s management letters and monitor action to be taken by management on audit recommendations raised

        Conduct a members’ only session (ie, without any management present) with external auditors to discuss any matters that the auditors wish to bring to the Subcommittee’s attention and/or any issues of independence

Review the effectiveness of systems for monitoring the Council’s compliance with laws, regulations, standards, Council policies, plans, code of conduct and good practice guidelines as appropriate.

 

Matrix of Experience, Skills and Personal Qualities

Experience, Skills and Personal Qualities

Member A

Member B

Member C

Member D

Independent Chairperson

The recommended combination of experience is:

·           financial reporting

 

 

 

 

 

·           broad governance experience

 

 

 

 

 

·           familiarity with risk management disciplines

 

 

 

 

 

·           understanding of internal control and assurance frameworks

 

 

 

 

 

·           good understanding of the roles of internal and external audit

 

 

 

 

 

·           local government expertise

 

 

 

 

 

For an “advisory-oriented” audit committee, particular emphasis should be placed on:

·           Strategy

 

 

 

 

 

·           Performance management

 

 

 

 

 

·           Risk management disciplines

 

 

 

 

 

In determining the composition of the audit committee, the combined experience, skills, and personal qualities of audit committee members is critical. Members should bring:

·           the ability to act independently and objectively

 

 

 

 

 

·           the ability to ask relevant and pertinent questions, and evaluate the answers

 

 

 

 

 

·           the ability to work constructively with management to achieve improvements

 

 

 

 

 

·           an appreciation of the public entity’s culture and values, and a determination to uphold these

 

 

 

 

 

·           a proactive approach to advising the governing body and chief executive of matters that require further attention

 

 

 

 

 

·           business acumen

 

 

 

 

 

·           appropriate diligence, time, effort, and commitment

 

 

 

 

 

·           the ability to explain technical matters in their field to other members of the audit committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Wednesday 25 November 2020 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

4.       Eastern Bays Shared Path Project Update (20/1327)

Report No. ARSC2020/6/284 by the Senior Project Engineer                             6

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained within the report be endorsed.”

5.       Kerbside Rubbish and Recycling (20/1490)

Report No. ARSC2020/6/297 by the Strategic Advisor                                     44

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained within the report be endorsed.”

6.       Risk Management Update (20/1376)

Report No. ARSC2020/6/285 by the Risk and Assurance Manager                 58

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained within the report be endorsed.”

 

7.       Internal Audit Update (20/1377)

Report No. ARSC2020/6/286 by the Risk and Assurance Manager                 66

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained within the report be endorsed.”

8.       Audit and Risk Work Programme 2020 (20/1411)

Report No. ARSC2020/6/124 by the Democracy Advisor                                69

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained within the work programme be endorsed.”

9.       Information Items

a)      Procurement Update (20/1412)

Memorandum dated 3 November 2020 by the Strategic Projects Manager 71

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained within the memorandum be endorsed.”

b)      Group Annual Report (20/1477)

Verbal update by the Chief Finance Officer.

c)       Managing COVID-19 Risks (20/1378)

Report No. ARSC2020/6/287 by the Risk and Assurance Manager       73

Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained within the report be endorsed.”

10.     QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.   

 

 

Toi Lealofi

DEMOCRACY ADVISOR

  Audit and Risk Subcommittee

29 October 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1327)

 

 

 

 

Report no: ARSC2020/6/284

 

Eastern Bays Shared Path Project Update

 

Purpose of Report

1.   To update the Subcommittee on the Eastern Bays Shared Path and confirm reporting arrangements for the project.

Recommendations

That the Subcommittee:

(i)      receives and notes the information contained in the report;

 

(ii)     notes the Project Terms of Reference (attached as Appendix 1 to the report) for the Eastern Bays Shared Path Project;

 

(iii)    notes the project will be overseen by a Project Board which will make decisions within defined limits, as delegated by Council;

 

(iv)    notes project assurance will be provided by the Audit and Risk Subcommittee, led by the Independent Chair, Suzanne Tindal;

(v)     notes the project will provide reports to the Audit and Risk Subcommittee quarterly, unless there is a specific risk(s) or other matters which require an additional meeting;

(vi)    notes the reporting requirements in the co-funding agreement in place with Crown Infrastructure Partners (attached as Appendix 4 to the report);

(vii)   notes the current Tendering and Construction Programme (attached as Appendix 2 to the report);

(viii)  notes the current Project Risk Register (attached as Appendix 3 to the report) and that this will be reviewed and updated as part of the quarterly reporting to the Audit and Risk Subcommittee; and

(ix)    notes that public consultation on funding for the Eastern Bays Shared Path project was deferred due to the COVID-19 pandemic and that funding is now being included in the draft Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021-2031 that is subject to public consultation in March 2021 prior to inclusion in the final LTP 2021-2031 to be adopted by Council on 30 June 2021.

For the reason that the report is consistent with Council policies and processes around project management.

 

Background

2.   The completion of an Eastern Bays Shared Path (the Project) has been an aspiration for Hutt City Council and its residents for many years. The shared path has featured in past strategies and is a key project in providing a safe and integrated network for commuting and recreational purposes.

3.   The Project forms a key part of the Te Aranui o Poneke (the Great Harbour Way), a walking and cycling route around Te Whanganui-a-tara, the harbour of Wellington. Work is currently progressing on a number of projects around the harbour including Waka Kotahi’s Te Ara Tupua to complete this route.

4.   A 2014 Eastbourne Community Survey identified that the completion of the Eastern Bays Shared Path as the most important local issue alongside climate change by residents.

5.   Extensive community engagement has been undertaken in 2016 and late 2017 before the Resource Consent was submitted to Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) in early 2019. Updates to the community following submission have been provided to the community via the Eastbourne Community Board and the current Chair has been involved with the Project since 2016.

6.   The Resource Consent was notified by GWRC in early 2019 and received over 200 submissions. The majority of these were supportive of the Project.

7.   Public consultation on funding for the Project was due to start in early April 2020 as part of the Annual Plan/LTP amendment process. However, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the amendment was put on hold and Council instead agreed to an emergency budget for the Annual Plan 2020/21. As part of this process funding for the Project was pushed out a number of years.

8.   In April 2020, the Government launched the Covid Response and Recovery Fund seeking infrastructure projects for potential investment to reduce the economic impact of the pandemic. The Eastern Bays Shared Path project was successful in receiving co-funding of up to $15M, which will be managed through Crown Infrastructure Projects (CIP).

9.   The Project also remains eligible for the New Zealand Transport Agency Waka Kotahi (Waka Kotahi) subsidy on the balance of the project at a Funding Assistance Rate (FAR) of 51%, subject to satisfying the gateways required.

10. Funding for the Project is now being included in the draft LTP 2021-2031, which will go to public consultation in March 2021. The final LTP 2021-2031 is planned to be adopted by Council on 30 June 2021.

11. The main benefit sought by CIP is job creation, with the Project expected to create the equivalent of 100 full time jobs. A series of project milestones have been agreed and the project will receive co-funding instalments at the completion of each milestone. The Schedule of Reporting requirements agreed with CIP are attached as Appendix 4. 

12. As a requirement of the Funding Agreement, officers have advised CIP that Council have approved co-funding of the Project which will be included in the draft Long Term Plan 2021-2031. (Minute No. LTPAP 20503)

13. In early September a ‘pre-mortem’ workshop was held on the Project to identify risks and ensure they were being appropriately managed. Two of the key risks identified were: 

a)    Consenting risks and the changing regulatory landscape and policies; and

b)    Managing the uncertainties around project cost (including consent mitigation costs, meeting the requirements of crown funding and the uncertain economic environment due to Covid-19).

 14.        The Project Team have been working with Buddle Findlay (legal counsel) who are advising and providing input on regulatory and consenting matters.

15.         As the Project is to occur within the coastal marine area, there are significant environmental matters to be considered. The Project Team have engaged a number of technical experts and specialists which cover:

a.   intertidal and subtidal ecology

b.   fish passage

c.   avifauna and flora

d.   herpetology (reptiles)

e.   penguins

f.    sea grass

g.   coastal engineering

h.   beach nourishment

16. The advice and reports provided by these experts feed directly into the production of the Assessment of Environmental Effects (AEE) and to ensure the Project achieves a no more than minor effect on the environment.

17. Considerable work has been undertaken to balance the effects of the Project with the habitat for penguins given their important to the Eastern Bays and the Wellington Harbour. This has also included workshops that have been independently facilitated with specialists and stakeholders around agreeing the best course of action to protect penguins. This has led to a refinement of consent conditions and the identification of 3 new protected areas within the Project area and which has been agreed by all parties.

Discussion

18. In October 2020 the Project Plan and Terms of Reference for the Eastern Bays Shared Path project were created. These are attached as Appendix 1. They include details on roles and responsibilities at each level of the project structure.

19. Key points include:

a)   The project will be overseen by a Project Board which will make decisions within the defined limits of the project as delegated by Council. The Project Board will meet monthly from November 2020. The Chief Financial Officer and Chief Legal Officer will attend Project Board meetings to provide advice;

b)   The Project sponsor will be Kara Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy & Development;

c)   The Project will provide reports to the Audit and Risk Subcommittee quarterly, unless there is a specific risk which requires a special meeting.

20. It is intended that an experienced industry multi-disciplinary Project Manager be engaged to assist in the management side of the project in conjunction with the HCC Project Manager and the Project Team.

 

 

Project structure

Risk

21. The current Project Risk Register is attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

Financial considerations

22. Council has budgeted $30M for the Project (including contingency) for both consenting and the construction phases. Central government is expected to co-fund $22.9M (being up to $15M from the Covid-19 Response and Recovery Fund and $7.9M from Waka Kotahi) and the balance of $7.6M to be funded by Council.

23. An independent estimate for the construction component was undertaken in October 2020 by a specialist quantity surveyor on the most recent preliminary design. The construction cost has been estimated at $28.2M (at the 90th percentile). A final cost estimate will be completed once the consent has been granted and the detailed design finalised.

24. The Financial tables 1 and 2 that follow show a comparison of the budget in the Annual Plan 2020/21(AP) to the draft LTP 2021-2031. This information was reviewed by the LTP Subcommittee on the 24 September 2020. The proposed changes to the budgets were endorsed by the LTP Subcommittee to be included in the draft LTP 2021-2031 which is currently being developed. The public consultation is planned for the period 29 March 2021 to 3 May 2021. The final LTP 2021-2031 is scheduled for adoption by the Council on 30 June 2021. 

25. In line with the Council’s Revenue and Financing policy, the Council’s share of the capital expenditure will be funded from borrowing.  The phasing of the proposed budgets for the LTP has been aligned with the signed crown funding agreement.

Table 1: Revenue/Funding sources - Comparison of AP 2020/21 and Draft LTP

Financial year

$M

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024 /25

2025-2031

Total

Annual Plan 2020/21

0.10

-

7.12

4.63

2.55

-

14.40

Draft LTP 2021-2031

 

0.51

3.78

2.64

4.53

3.78

7.67

22.91

Further details:

Waka Kotahi subsidy funding

0.51

1.28

0.89

1.53

1.28

2.42

7.91

Covid response and recovery grant funding*

 

2.50

1.75

3.00

2.50

5.25

15.00

Variance

0.41

3.78

(4.48)

(0.10)

1.23

7.67

8.50

*Covid Response and Recovery co-funding pays for $15M share of the Capital outlay of $30M

Table 2: Capital budgets – This is aligned with the signed crown funding agreement

Financial year

$M

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025-2031

Total

Annual Plan 2020/21

0.20

-

13.96

9.08

5.00

-

28.24

Draft LTP 2021-2031

1.00

5.00

3.50

6.00

5.00

9.50

30.00

Variance

0.80

(5.00)

10.46

3.08

-

(9.50)

(1.76)

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

26.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Communications and Consultation          

27. Extensive community engagement has been undertaken in 2016 and late 2017 before the Resource Consent was submitted to GWRC in early 2019. Updates to the community following submission have been provided to the community via the Eastbourne Community Board and the current Chair has been involved within the Project Team since 2016.

28. Further community engagement is planned once the project has consent to complete the detailed design and the Landscape and Urban Design Plan as noted in the proposed revised conditions of consent.

Legal and Regulatory          

29. Currently only the legal agreement entered into is with CIP, which has specific requirements for Council to meet to receive government funding.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 - Eastern Bays Shared Path Project Terms of Reference

14

2

Appendix 2 - Eastern Bays Shared Path Programme

33

3

Appendix 3 - Eastern Bays Shared Path Risk Register

34

4

Appendix 4 - Eastern Bays Shared Path CIP Reporting Requirements

36

5

Appendix 5 - Eastern Bays Shared Path HCC Procurement Policy

37

 

 

Author: Simon Cager

Senior Project Engineer

 

 

Author: John Gloag

Head of Transport

 

 

Author: Jenny Livschitz

Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 

 

 

Approved By: Jo Miller

Chief Executive

 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 

 

 

 


APPENDIX C PROGRAMME (PLEASE SEE THE NEXT PAGE)



 



 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Eastern Bays Shared Path Programme

 


Attachment 3

Appendix 3 - Eastern Bays Shared Path Risk Register

 


Attachment 4

Appendix 4 - Eastern Bays Shared Path CIP Reporting Requirements

 


Attachment 5

Appendix 5 - Eastern Bays Shared Path HCC Procurement Policy

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


                                                                                      47                                                25 November 2020

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

13 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1490)

 

 

 

 

Report no: ARSC2020/6/297

 

Kerbside Rubbish and Recycling

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report provides information on managing risks associated with the kerbside rubbish and recycling project.

Recommendations

That the information in the report be noted.

 

Background

2.    Council made a decision at its meeting on 15 September 2020 to adopt a rates-funded kerbside rubbish and recycling service.  The decision was made following comprehensive review and consultation processes.

3.    This report reviews key aspects of risk management through some of the completed stages of the project and how risks are being managed for the implementation of the new services scheduled for 1 July 2021.

Procurement

4.    A competitive procurement process was undertaken in the period February to September 2020.  Key elements of the process to mitigate risk were as follows:

a.    A Procurement Strategy was prepared to guide the process, which included a section on identifying and managing risks.

b.    A specialist waste consulting company, Morrison Low, was engaged to assist Council with the procurement. Morrison Low had worked with nearly 80% of Councils reviewing waste services, and was appointed following a competitive process.

c.     With the COVID 19 shut-down a decision was made to extend the period of the tender by two months in response to feedback from respondents.  Other changes were made to the tender, based on further feedback, to ensure as many respondents participated in the tender as possible. Six conforming tenders were received which was deemed to be a good response.

d.    Probity advice was sought as part of the tender process. This was provided by the Manager Commercial Pool from the Procurement and Property Division at the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The probity advisor attended all meetings of the project team and provided a statement following tender evaluation that the process was carried out in conformity with Council’s procurement plan and in line with good procurement practice. A copy of that advice is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

Contract Negotiation

5.    Legal advice was sought from Chapman Tripp during the contract negotiation period to assist Council with identifying any unacceptable risk arising from contract tags and finalising the contract details.  Some risks were identified and changes negotiated with Waste Management to mitigate them.  Chapman Tripp also provided Council with an overview of the contract and its key terms.  A copy is attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

Long Term Plan Amendment

6.    Legal advice was also sought with respect to the possibility of a judicial review of Council’s decision-making process.  Some preliminary work was undertaken in preparation for this eventuality. Council incurred $8,724 in legal fees to prepare to defend this action.

Implementation

7.    A project team has been assembled to coordinate the implementation of the new kerbside rubbish and recycling services.  This project has been accorded high priority by the Chief Executive with collaboration and expertise being drawn from right across the business, including technical input, business process advice, technology changes, communications and engagement, customer services and project management.  The project team meets weekly to track progress and identify issues.

8.    The Project Manager reports on a weekly basis to a Project Board comprising two Directors and the Sustainability and Resilience Manager.  The Project Manager also reports to the Corporate Leadership Team (CLT) as part of the significant projects reporting cycle.

9.    The first main task has been to identify and document all business rules and processes.  A senior business analyst has been engaged to coordinate this work which has resulted in a 38 page document that has had considerable input from across the organisation. 

10.  Scoping workshops were held to consider both the implementation and business as usual processes.  They included staff from business units identifying all steps in the process to help mitigate risk.

11.  A detailed project timeline has been drafted based on this work.  A Communications and Engagement Activities Plan has also been prepared to ensure that communication activities are embedded into and coordinated with this timeline. The key milestone events are noted as follows:

2 November 2020               Contract signed with Waste Management          

5 November 2020               Business processes identified and documented

20 November 2020             Bin selection material sent to all ratepayers

26 November 2020             Report to LTP/AP Subcommittee new fees and charges and remissions policy

Nov 2020 – March 2021     All non-standard serviced properties visited and solutions identified

31 January 2021                  Bin selection closes and order placed with bin supplier

April-June 2021                   Bins and information delivered to all households

June 2021                             Targeted rate finalised

1 July 2021                           New services commence

12.  Council and Waste Management have met on several occasions since the contract was signed to work through the details of that company’s involvement and requirements for implementation. A schedule of all non-standard serviced properties is under preparation for visits over the next 3-4 months. This will be a joint activity, with a Council officer included in the visit to document a simple waste management plan for each property as anticipated will be required by the new Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw when it has been adopted. 

13.  Meetings have also been held with some large “scheduled ratepayers”, such as Kainga Ora and Urban Plus Limited, to put in place processes for bin selection and multi-unit development requirements.  Kainga Ora, with over 3,000 housing units, has already provided its bin selections to Council.

Discussion

14.  A register is being kept to record identified risks for the implementation project.  The register is updated as further risks are identified.  The Project Board has identified the need for a pre-mortem which will be held in November to include key staff from both within and outside the working group to consider and identify risks in the widest context.  A copy of the register is attached as Appendix 3 to the report.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

15.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

16.  There will be further opportunity for consultation next year through the Long Term Plan on some details associated with the kerbside rubbish and recycling services.  These include the proposed remissions policy, fees and charges, the actual targeted rate and the proposed inclusion of school/pre-school recycling.

Legal Considerations

17.  There are no legal considerations at this time

Financial Considerations

18.  A report on the full cost of implementation is currently being worked on and will be reported to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee early next year.   

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Probity Report

48

2

Appendix 2: Title Overview of Kerbside Collection Contracts

52

3

Appendix 3: Risk Register

57

 

 

Author: Bruce Hodgins

Strategic Advisor

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Probity Report

 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Title Overview of Kerbside Collection Contracts

 


 


 


 


 


Attachment 3

Appendix 3: Risk Register

 


Audit and Risk Subcommittee

30 October 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1376)

 

 

 

 

Report no: ARSC2020/6/285

 

Risk Management Update

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to update the Audit and Risk Subcommittee on actions and activities to maintain and improve risk management at Council and to present Council’s risk register to 31 October 2020.

Recommendations

That the Subcommittee:

(i)    notes and receives the information contained in this report;

(ii)   notes the Risk Register as updated by members of the Corporate Leadership Team (CLT), attached as Appendix 1 to the report; and

(iii)  notes the Corporate Leadership Team will review and approve new criteria for assessing risk. A report, including the new criteria, will be provided to the Audit and Risk Subcommittee on 25 February 2021.

For the reason that risk reporting provides the Subcommittee with information to support its governance role.

 

Background

2.    The Risk and Assurance Manager provides an update quarterly on the actions and activities to maintain and improve Council’s risk framework. The previous Risk Management Update was last presented to Council’s Audit and Risk Subcommittee on 17 September 2020.

Discussion

Council’s Risk Register

3.    Attached as Appendix 1 to the report is the risk register to 31 October 2020, as updated by members of the Corporate Leadership Team.

4.    The risk registers were last put forward to Council’s Audit and Risk Subcommittee on 17 September 2020.

5.    A risk matrix has been used to arrive at the risk rating in the risk register. A proposal is being put forward to the Corporate Leadership Team to update the criteria for assessing risk. The updated criteria will applied to the risk ratings in the next risk register update.

Project risk

6.    There is an increased focus on improving the identification and management of project risks and expanding the visibility of financial risk exposure in Hutt City Council’s projects.

7.    Since the last Risk Management Update “pre mortem” sessions to identify project risk have been run for the Eastern Bays Shared Pathway and the proposal for electric scooter share scheme. The objective of a pre mortem is to identify pitfalls and then apply preventative measures before risks eventuates.

8.    Project risks continue to be identified and managed by the project managers and the project teams. They are expected to review them regularly as part of the project delivery process. Significant risks are reported to the respective project boards/governance groups and CLT as part of regular project reporting. Risk is identified and escalated for the purposes of visibility to project boards/governance groups and CLT.

9.    The Hutt City Council risk management approach aims to achieve a more consistent and structured approach to project management across all of Hutt City Council’s projects and lift capability and performance around projects and project risk.

Crisis Management

10.  A review of the Crisis Management Plan is underway. The plan is being reviewed by the Building Warden, Health and Safety Manager, Head of Regulatory Services and Emergency Management, Head of Environmental Consents (building offer), the Facility Manager, Chief Digital Officer, Communications and the Risk and Assurance Manager. The objective is for the final plan to align and integrate plans associated with evacuation, crisis management, business continuity plans and emergency management. The review will be completed before the next subcommittee meeting and a report will be provided.

Risk framework review

11.  A proposal is being put forward to the Corporate Leadership Team to update the criteria for assessing risk impact/consequence and likelihood. A report will be provided to this Subcommittee at the next meeting.

12.  The newly formed Risk Steering Committee and Risk Working Group will meet for the first time in December. The terms of reference for these groups were outlined to this subcommittee on 17 September 2020.

Options

13.  Not applicable.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

14.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

15.  Not applicable.

Legal Considerations

16.  Not applicable.

Financial Considerations

17.  The financial considerations are detailed in the report in the relevant areas.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: HCC Risk Register - October 2020

61

 

Author: Enid Davids

Risk and Assurance Manager

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Anna Welanyk

Director Transformation and Resources

 



                                                                                      68                                                25 November 2020

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

30 October 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1377)

 

 

 

 

Report no: ARSC2020/6/286

 

Internal Audit Update

 

Purpose of Report

1.    The purpose of this report is to update the Subcommittee on the actions and activities around the internal audit function, to maintain and improve Council’s internal control framework.

Recommendations

That the Subcommittee:

(i)    notes and receives the information contained in this report; and

 

(ii)   notes the Corporate Leadership Team will approve an Internal Audit Plan 2021-2024. A report, including the plan, will be provided to the Audit and Risk Subcommittee on 25 February 2021.

 

For the reasons that it provides the Subcommittee with information to support its governance role. Periodic reporting is stipulated in the internal audit charter and the internal audit functional reporting line to the Audit and Risk Subcommittee that supports its authority, objectivity and independence.

 

Background

2.    The Risk and Assurance Manager provides an update quarterly on the actions and activities around internal audit at Council. The Internal Audit Update was last presented to Council’s Audit and Risk Subcommittee on 17 September 2020.

Discussion

Internal Audit Planning

3.    The internal audit plan is under development in consultation with the Corporate Leadership Team. The plan will be recommended to this Subcommittee at its next meeting. The plan will consider areas of key risk identified, strategic priorities, challenges, initiatives and any management concerns.

4.    Internal audit activity is one component of a suite of total assurance activities that the Audit and Risk Subcommittee and Corporate Leadership Team look to in meeting its risk, control and governance framework objectives.

5.    Other sources of assurance operating within Council include:

-     Risk management framework           -  Legislative compliance

-     External audit                                     -  Other independent audit/reviews

-     Quality assurance, quality standards & Compliance

6.    In October 2020 business unit managers provided information about the assurance activities that are carried out in their areas. The prioritising of internal audit activity will consider all sources of assurance to manage Council’s exposures and risks. Internal audit activity aims to avoid gaps and overlaps (duplication of effort) with other sources of assurance.

7.    Internal audit activities are prioritised based on the following criteria:

-      The extent to which the activity is relied upon to mitigate key risk;

-      The extent to which the proposed review would support key process improvement initiatives;

-      The extent to which the area impacts on ability to deliver services;

-      The extent to which the area impacts on financial performance;

-      The extent to which the activity contributes to meeting key stakeholder accountability expectations;

-      The degree of assurance received from previous audits or from other assurance activity; and

-      The degree of maturity of the processes.

8.    Some other sources of assurance during the period since the last Internal Audit Update include:

-      Ernst and Young have been engaged to undertake a review of Council’s compliance with the Holidays Act 2003;

-      The procurement policy and guidelines were reviewed and updated by an external consultant, Vitruvius;

-      Asset management practice review by SOLGM Technical Advisor;

-      The solid waste collection rubbish/recycling procurement process had legal and MBIE Procurement probity specialist advice;

-      Periodic legal compliance attestations from senior management;

-      There have been no reports of suspected or detected fraud, including no reports via the online reporting Jotform.

Internal audit findings

9.    Table 1 below outlines internal audit findings from 1 July 2019 to date that have been raised, resolved, closed and are outstanding.

Internal Audit findings summary
as at October 2020

 

Internal Audit findings to October 2020

High

Medium

Low

Total

Open issues as at 1 July 2020

1 (a)

1 (b)

2

Identified during period since 1 July 2020

0

0

0

Resolved during period since 1 July 2020

0

0

0

Total Open Internal Audit Issues

0

1

1

2

Notes to table 1:

(a)        Planning is underway to replace the CM9 document management system with a cloud hosted system. This will incorporate procedures around disaster recovery of cloud backups and testing. This was raised in the Sep-2015 follow up audit of Public Records Act 2003 - Compliance Maturity Review.

(b)        The panic alarm process at the Administration Building has been reviewed and is now an appendix to the evacuation procedures. External training provider Opsec has been earmarked to deliver training prior to holding a test drill. This is anticipated to occur later in November. This physical access and security finding was raised in the Cash Handling Audit in September 2019.

Options

10.  Not applicable.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

11.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

12.  Not applicable.

Legal Considerations

13.  Not applicable.

Financial Considerations

14.  Not applicable.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

Author: Enid Davids

Risk and Assurance Manager

 

 

Approved By: Anna Welanyk

Director Transformation and Resources


                                                                                      69                                                25 November 2020

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

03 November 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1411)

 

 

 

 

Report no: ARSC2020/6/124

 

Audit and Risk Work Programme 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Work Programme be noted and received.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Work Programme November 2020

70

 

Author: Toi Lealofi

Democracy Advisor

 

 

Approved By: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Work Programme November 2020

 

 


MEMORANDUM                                                  72                                                25 November 2020

Our Reference          20/1412

TO:                      Chair and Members

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

FROM:                Allen Yip

DATE:                03 November 2020

SUBJECT:           Procurement Update

 Recommendation

That the Subcommittee receives and notes the memorandum.

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide an update on the status of Hutt City Council’s approach to procurement and staff engagement in procurement.

Background

2.    The Hutt City Council Procurement Policy was reviewed in 2019, following Audit NZ’s advice that “The City Council should review and update the procurement policy where it considers necessary. This policy should be well communicated and readily available to all relevant staff.”

3.    The review found that the policy and practices were compliant, but some updates were required to align with the Government Rules of Sourcing.

4.    Policy updates included the following:

·    Incorporation of broader outcomes (which includes environmental sustainability) in line with the new Principles of Government Procurement; and

·    Stronger reference to the Principles of Government Procurement.

5.    The audit recommendation also included widely communicating the policy and making it readily available.  To this end, officers have:

·    Met with Divisional Managers to provide information on the changed documents and promote awareness;

·    Made the new documents readily available on the intranet; and

·    Created a “Quick Guide” to procurement on the intranet, with links to the procurement documents and other useful resources.

6.    Hutt City Council is committed to developing a procurement strategy to align procurement objectives with business objectives as outlined in the Long Term Plans (LTP) and other supporting documents. 

7.    Developing the procurement strategy is an organisational priority.  This strategy is being developed in consultation with the community, procurement experts and business leaders in Hutt City Council.

8.    One of the strategic objectives is to achieve broader outcomes from government procurement.  Along with price and value for money, procurement decisions must also consider broader outcomes.  Broader outcomes are the associated benefits generated from a procurement activity and they can be environmental, social, economic or cultural.

9.    Through good procurement and considering broader outcomes, our objective is ensure that Council achieves much more than just acquiring goods, services or works.  This is especially important in this time that we must support regional economic recovery necessitated by the Covid-19 pandemic.

10.  Officers have already identified opportunities to achieve some broader outcomes and are working with the Akina Foundation (a social procurement specialist) to systemise these processes.

11.  An example is the recently completed tender for the sportsground contract, where broader outcomes were considered along with (but not at the expense of) price and quality as part of the tender criteria. 

12.  The successful tender offered many broader outcomes that the others did not. This includes local opportunities employment, experience and training, opportunities for local subcontractors and support for community led initiatives.   Carbon reduction objectives were also included, for example composting of green waste, a target to electrify vehicles and equipment, non-traditional weed control and a reduction in the use of fertiliser amongst other measures. 

13.  Officers will continue to refine and embed the approach to procurement for broader outcomes.

14.  We are also seeking to work better with our regional partners on procurement projects.  For example, we are part of the Wellington Region’s Procurement for Impact Project.  The project seeks opportunities for co-created regional COVID recovery activities led by procurement.

15.  Hutt City Council will continue to focus on good procurement practices, and improve our strategic approach to procurement.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

Author: Allen Yip

Strategic Projects Manager

 

 

Approved By: Anna Welanyk

Director Transformation and Resources


                                                                                      75                                                25 November 2020

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

30 October 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1378)

 

 

 

 

Report no: ARSC2020/6/287

 

Managing COVID-19 Risks

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide assurance to the Subcommittee that risk around Council’s response to COVID-19 is being managed appropriately.

2.    To confirm Hutt City Council has in place a methodology for continuous service delivery to seamlessly transition between alert levels 1, 2 and 3, and to manage and minimise the risk of COVID-19.

3.    To report back on the results from an all staff COVID-19 debrief survey.

Recommendations

That the Subcommittee receives and notes the information contained in the report.

 

Background

4.    The Managing COVID-19 Risks report to this subcommittee on 17 September 2020 provided a detailed report of how Council is managing the risks associated with the pandemic.

5.    This report provides an update on activity since the last report.

6.    The Chief Executive’s statement provided to each Council meeting and the quarterly performance report to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee also provides details on how Council is responding to COVID-19.

Discussion

7.    The Corporate Leadership Team meets weekly with a standard item on emergency management.

8.    If there are issues to be elevated to governance in between regular reporting these are addressed at the regular weekly meeting with the Mayor and on alternate weeks with the Deputy Mayor.

COVID-19 Planning – for resurgence, recovery, pandemic, business continuity

9.    We continue to prioritise the health and safety of our staff and community during these uncertain times and are following national guidance and our COVID-19 resurgence plan.

10.  The Chief Executive is a member of the Regional Leadership Group of the Wellington Region Emergency Management Office (WREMO). This group comprises Council Chief Executives and heads of departments including education, Te Puni Kokiri, NZ Police, CCDHB and HVDHB. The Regional Manager of Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) also attends. At the meeting on Monday 9 November the group’s terms of reference were confirmed. The group discussed and amended the region’s resurgence plan, received updates on funding and looked at the data being collected. A new data dashboard has been developed.

11.  Hutt City Council (HCC)’s operational Resurgence Plan was updated to reflect the changes in the regional plan and reviewed again in light of the confirmed case of COVID-19 in the Hutt Valley. The Resurgence Plan enables our community facilities to move quickly when needed to respond to shifts in level. It outlines the organisational response required at each alert level, and points to relevant documents. It also shows who is responsible for which actions, priorities and checklists.

12.  In addition the Hutt Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) Resurgence Plan has been developed. This plan was developed from a regional template and incorporates the learnings from the first lockdown and Lower Hutt specific tasks incorporated, for example, memorandums of understanding with foodbanks to ensure food supply at the commencement of a lockdown.

13.  Hutt City Council’s Pandemic Plan, updated in November 2020, incorporates the government’s four alert levels and learnings from the first wave of COVID-19. The purpose of the Pandemic plan is to outline the actions that will be taken within Council to ensure that critical services continue to be delivered throughout an event. Phases and triggers are informed by the Ministry of Health’s phases, which in turn are informed by the World Health Organization phases. This ensures our planning reflects the local situation and services, whilst accounting for national and international terminology and warning levels.

14.  Government advice continues to be monitored and, as required, these plans will be updated around the wearing of masks on public transport, school buses and domestic flights. The latest advice includes guidance on wearing masks, which is compulsory in some circumstances and advised in others in Level 2.

15.  The draft Hutt City Council COVID-19 Recovery Plan will be presented to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Subcommittee on 17 November 2020. It has two main areas of focus – the wellbeing of our people, especially those who are most at risk to the health and social impacts of COVID-19, and the recovery of our economy.

16.  Business continuity plans across all business units are in place and current.

17.  The emergency management training programme and professional development pathway for all staff with a role in the EOC continues. The September training was modified into an online module. In person training commenced from October. Ongoing training enables staff who work in the EOC as part of a response team to gain the skills and experience to be confident and competent in their emergency role, which is a vital part of our region’s response to an emergency.

Operations, community facilities and services

18.  Our staff and community responded quickly to the change to Alert Level 2, on Wednesday 12 August 2020. Most facilities and services continued as business as usual with heightened health and safety measures in place, physical distancing, record keeping and promotion of the COVID app. The financial impact of the change in Alert Level was minor and is being managed within base budgets.

19.  Attendance at most of our facilities has now returned to pre-COVID levels, with the exception of some pool activities.

20.  We have been promoting online services and online payments. Ratepayers who pay rates by cash or cheque have received letters explaining alternative payment options. Signage has gone up at all of our facilities as we would like to move to cashless transactions.

21.  We have supported community groups through the Community Resilience Fund to make facemasks. We picked up 350 from Common Unity, to be used by Council frontline staff and donated to school children for extra support. These community projects, enabled by Council, make a real difference for our people.

Wellbeing and Health and Safety

22.  Council continues to be vigilant and ready for any upward movement in Alert Level. The recent confirmed COVID-19 case in the Hutt Valley has been a timely reminder on this. Business is being conducted in line with government advice and rules under Alert Level 1 protocols.

23.  In addition to the heightened cleaning schedule already in place, HCC has:

§ Checked our facilities are prominently displaying the QR codes;

§ Our sanitizing products have been checked and the business knows how to request additional supplies;

§ The government’s messaging has been shared internally at HCC and on social media.

24.  Council is continuing to promote community awareness on:

§ Using NZ COVID tracer app and scanning QR codes;

§ Hand hygiene and etiquette around sneezing and coughing;

§ Using masks on public transport or in confined spaces; and

§ Staying home when unwell and call Healthline/doctor for advice.

25.  As noted in paragraph 14 above, the changing requirements around the wearing of face coverings/masks is being monitored to ensure Council protocols are compliant and to ensure staff and visitors/customers on site are kept safe and well.

Council Workforce

26.  Guidelines and protocols for flexible working arrangements are in place. The guidelines are being further developed as part of Council’s response to COVID-19 and ongoing flexible workplace initiatives.

27.  Various initiatives are in place around mental health, in acknowledgement of the strain COVID-19 is placing on people. The GoodYarn programme raises awareness and strategies to respond to signs of poor mental health.

Technology

28.  The IT infrastructure programme and digital workplace project will enhance resilience by allowing staff to work anywhere, anytime on any device (phone, tablet, laptop).

Community initiatives, welfare and funding

29.  The Community Resilience Fund was set up in April 2020 as part of our response to COVID-19 (currently $66,556 paid to community groups) to aid community resilience and wellbeing initiatives in Lower Hutt. The draft Hutt City Council COVID-19 Recovery Plan being presented to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee on 17 November 2020 recommends that the Community Resilience Fund be incorporated in the investment recommended in the Recovery Plan.

30.  In September, Council agreed to target $127K from the 2020/21 Community Funding to groups responding to COVID-19 impacts. In September $42K was allocated to a partnership with Common Unity to lead work on creating a resilient and sustainable local food system.

31.  A further $257,556 is proposed in the draft Hutt City Council COVID-19 Recovery Plan to be allocated to community initiatives responding to COVID-19 and aligned to the principles of a circular economy.

32.  Hutt City Council is to receive $42M of funding from the central government COVID Response and Recovery Fund to co-fund two projects, the Naenae Pool and the Eastern Bays Shared Path, which will support the creation of jobs and the flow-on benefits to the economy.

33.  In relation to our welfare response, we’re working on food security with providers as a group (including foodbanks) across the valley to be ready to respond in the event of a change in alert level.

Response to Business

34.  Lower Hutt’s hospitality, tourism and retail sectors continues to be impacted by COVID-19. However, overall consumer spend in Lower Hutt is slightly above consumer spend for the same period last year.

35.  Council receives regular economic insight reports from sources such as WellingtonNZ, MBIE, Marketview and Infometrics. Results from Hutt Valley Chamber of Commerce business survey shows varying levels of confidence.

36.  WellingtonNZ is part of the Government’s advisory group that was set up to respond to COVID-19. A WellingtonNZ staffer is stationed at the Hutt Valley Chamber of Commerce and provides a connection to between local and national efforts.

37.  Supporting business was key focus early on in our response to COVID-19. A range of response initiatives were put in place in conjunction with the Hutt Valley Chamber of Commerce. We have kept these response initiatives and joint team together into recovery.

38.  Businesses can access vouchers for up to $5K worth of local expert advice to adapt, re-focus or future proof their business. As at 2 October, 111 Lower Hutt businesses have already taken up advice on business continuity planning, getting set up online, employment matters, adapting for better cashflow, staff health and wellness and marketing strategies – all from business experts based in the Hutt Valley and Wellington. This is advice funded by government and provided via Regional Business Partner Network via WellingtonNZ. More about this can be found at huttvalleynz.com/business

Rates relief and payment plans

39.  As part of our response to Covid-19 Council took steps to ensure ratepayers had many options for paying their rates including the implementation of a new rates postponement policy.

40.  We are continuing to encourage anyone facing financial difficulty to get in touch with us.

41.  No ratepayers have taken up the offer of Rates relief via postponement, a few have enquired but we have been able to work through a payment plan to better suit their situation and new rates payment arrangements have been entered into with over 550 people.

42.  An additional 1,349 have opted to receive their rate accounts by email between April and November 2020, this is an increase on last years uptake over the same period and takes the total of ratepayers receiving their accounts by email to 9,300.

Risk Reporting

43.  Risks and effects on Council arising from COVID-19 have been incorporated in the HCC Risk Registers, as attached to the Risk Management Update to the Subcommittee at this meeting. This includes the changing and emerging risks and possible impacts resulting from COVID-19, such as rates affordability, reduced Council revenue, potential impacts on costs of service delivery, increasing debt, interrupted project delivery and health, safety and wellbeing of staff.

All staff COVID-19 debrief survey

44. A survey was undertaken to gather staff experiences during the lockdown and alert level restrictions. The results provided insights in how staff found things over that time, how we might be able to do better, be stronger and better prepared should alert levels rise again, or for other events in the future.

45.  The survey ran for 12 days, from Wednesday 26 August to Sunday
6 September 2020 and 140 people responded.

46. The survey consisted of opened questions covering five categories:

§ Leadership and communication;

§ Technology;

§ Employee wellbeing and health and safety;

§ Operations, service delivery and facilities management; and

§ Financial management.

47. The results have been used to inform into the work we’re doing to improve and strengthen our recovery, emergency operations activities, business process and HR practices.

A high level summary of the responses

48. What worked well:

§ Chief Executive communications – regularity and content; All staff zoom meetings;

§ Team Manaakitanga and the community welfare response;

§ Managers availability and keeping in touch with staff;

§ The roll out of new communications channels and OurSpace tool kit;

§ Communications within EOC clear and structured;

§ Working from home – benefits and issues;

§ The rollout out of new VPN remote access and Microsoft Teams;

§ Feedback on the electronic invoice sign off (mostly positive);

§ Support and help from IT, Finance and Facilities (the areas the survey specifically covered).

 

49. Areas/opportunities for improvement:

§ Separation of priorities for staff between EOC and business as usual activities;

§ The necessity to have multi channels for communicating with staff, particularly where staff do not have sufficient access to technology;

§ Lack of access to resources, equipment and technology to complete tasks efficiently and effectively remotely;

§ Information communicated – sometimes conflicting information from different sources;

§ Clarity for each area as to what the levels meant operationally;

§ Manager unavailability where managers were picking up EOC responsibilities;

§ Workload for organisation not well spread across the organisation;

§ Distractions at home; ineffective balance of work/life responsibilities;

§ Being distanced from their team was challenging for some;

§ Recognition was appreciated but not everyone was recognised who should have been;

§ Workloads post-COVID lockdown continue to be high;

§ Stress and apprehension.

50. A separate EOC debrief workshop was held with EOC management and function managers at the end of July 2020. Some takeaways include:

§ Fatigue/stress for those who worked EOC (and/or ECC) and continued with business as usual;

§ The requirement for clear messaging from single source;

§ IT support and some additional equipment requirements noted;

§ Informing staff about what the EOC is doing;

§ Hygiene and on site cleaning protocols worked well;

§ The potential requirement for additional training and support for welfare staff and those intersecting with local service providers; and

§ Readiness to respond to a secondary event and its impact on resources.

51.  Themes, learnings and suggestions identified from the feedback received from the survey have been taken up to improve HCC’s understanding and improve our plans, procedures and protocols.

52. Responses to action areas/opportunities for improvement:

Improvements subsequent to the survey include:

§ A stream-lined IT Computer Equipment Request Policy and procedures has since been implemented to support staff working from home;

§ Further development of ongoing flexible workplace initiatives and guidelines and protocols for flexible working arrangements;

§ The GoodYarn resilience programmes have been subsequently rolled to ensure staff support the mental wellness and awareness of employee assistance programmes;

§ Clarification around expectations between EOC and business as usual;

§ Awareness of the necessity to have multi channels for communicating with staff;

§ The Electronic Purchase Order Project will result in more modernised processes and an improved user experience. Roll out of training is currently underway;

§ The Digital Workplace project will provide staff greater flexibility and will allow for better communication and collaboration internally and with external partners.

Options

53.  Not applicable.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

54.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

Consultation

55.  Not applicable.

Legal Considerations

56.  Not applicable.

Financial Considerations

57.  Not applicable.

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

Author: Caryn Ellis

Senior Advisor to the Chief Executive

 

Author: Enid Davids

Risk and Assurance Manager

 

 

 

Approved By: Anna Welanyk

Director Transformation and Resources