HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_BLACK_AGENDA_COVER

 

 

Regulatory Committee

 

 

8 September 2020

 

 

 

Order Paper for the meeting to be held in the

Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt,

on:

 

 

 

Tuesday 15 September 2020 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

 

Membership

 

 

Cr D Hislop (Chair)

Mayor C Barry

Cr J Briggs

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

Cr S Edwards

Cr A Mitchell (Deputy Chair)

Cr S Rasheed

Cr N Shaw

Cr L Sutton

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the dates and times of Council Meetings please visit www.huttcity.govt.nz

 

Have your say

You can speak under public comment to items on the agenda to the Mayor and Councillors at this meeting. Please let us know by noon the working day before the meeting. You can do this by emailing DemocraticServicesTeam@huttcity.govt.nz or calling the Democratic Services Team on 04 570 6666 | 0800 HUTT CITY

 

 


HuttCity_TeAwaKairangi_SCREEN_MEDRES

REGULATORY COMMITTEE
Membership:	10
Meeting Cycle:	Meets on an eight weekly basis, as required or at the requisition of the Chair
Quorum:	Half of the members
Membership RMA Hearings:	An independent Commissioner plus a minimum of either 3 or 4 elected members (including the Chair) and alternates who have current certification under the Making Good Decisions Training, Assessment and Certification Programme for RMA Decision-Makers. 
Reports to:		Council

PURPOSE:

To consider matters relating to the regulatory and quasi-judicial responsibilities of the Council under Council’s bylaws and relevant legislation including the following:

·         Local Government Act 1974

·         Public Works Act 1981

·         Reserves Act 1977

·         Resource Management Act 1991

·         Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012

Determine:

 

      Undertaking the administration of all statutory functions, powers and duties within its terms of reference, other than those specifically delegated to any other committee or subcommittee, or retained by Council.

      Consideration of matters related to the preparation and ongoing monitoring of the City of Lower Hutt District Plan, with the exception of a full review of the Plan.

      Preparation of required Changes and Variations to the City of Lower Hutt District Plan for Council approval to call for submissions.

      Recommending for Council approval any Proposed District Plan, Plan Changes and Variations recommended from the District Plan Hearings Subcommittee prior to notification.

      Make recommendations to Council on private District Plan Change requests for Council to accept, adopt or reject.

      Approve Council’s list of hearings commissioners under the Resource Management Act 1991, including councillors sitting as hearings commissioners and independent commissioners.


       

      Conduct statutory hearings on regulatory matters and make decisions on those hearings2, excluding those conducted under the Resource Management Act 1991, which are delegated to the Hearings Subcommittee and District Plan Hearings Subcommittee.

      Authorise the submission of appeals to the Environment Court on behalf of Council.

      Hear objections to specified traffic matters where the community board wishes to take an advocacy role.

      Make decisions under Clause 11(e) of the Tenth Schedule of the Local Government Act 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965 in respect of temporary road closures, including making decisions on any ancillary matters including, without limitation, approval of temporary “No Stopping” restrictions under Hutt City Council Traffic Bylaw 2017. 

      Undertake hearings on road stopping under the Local Government Act 1974.

      Make recommendations to Council whether to proceed with a road stopping and the disposal of stopped road, including (where the proposal includes or involves a related acquisition, disposal or land exchange) a recommendation to Council on the acquisition, disposal or exchange.

      Consider and recommend to Council any request to the Crown that a road is stopped under section 116 of the Public Works Act 1981, and the disposal of the stopped road.

      Make any resolution required under section 319A of the Local Government Act 1974 regarding the naming of new roads and alterations to street names (other than those in the Harbour and Wainuiomata Wards, which are delegated to the community boards in those areas).

      Make decisions on applications required under the Development Contributions Policy for remissions, postponements, reconsiderations and objections.  

      Recommend to Council the list of members approved to be members of the District Licensing Committee under section 192 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

 

The Chair of the Regulatory Committee, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, is authorised to appoint a subcommittee of suitably qualified persons to conduct hearings on behalf of the Committee.

The Chair of the Regulatory Committee is authorised to appoint three people from the list prepared under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 to specific meetings (Chair and two members).

 

General:

      Maintain an overview of work programmes carried out by the Council’s regulatory activities.

      Approval and forwarding of submissions on matters related to the Committee’s area of responsibility.

      Any other matters delegated to the Committee by Council in accordance with approved policies and bylaws.

 

 

2 When acting in this capacity the committee has a quasi-judicial role.


 

NOTE 1:

 

Council makes decisions to notify District Plan Changes and Variations and call for submissions, on the recommendation of the Regulatory Committee.

District Plan Hearings Subcommittee members are appointed by the Chair, in conjunction with the Chief Executive, and comprise elected members and/or independent commissioners. All District Plan Hearings Subcommittee members must be certified under the Making Good Decisions programme.

District Plan Hearings Subcommittee makes recommendations to the Regulatory Committee for recommendation to Council on proposed District Plan provisions and matters raised in submissions.

Council makes its decision on the provisions and matters raised in submissions. The Council decision may be appealed to the Environment Court.

Council gives final approval to make District Plan changes operative, in accordance with clause 17 of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

 

NOTE 2:

 

The Ministry for the Environment advocates that Councils offer specialist RMA training in areas of law which are difficult to grasp or where mistakes are commonly made. This is to complement the Good Decision Making RMA training that they run (which is an overview and basic summary of decision making, rather than an in-depth training in specific areas of the RMA). Therefore in order to facilitate this, the RMA training run for councillors that wish to be hearings commissioners is mandatory.

 

Reasons for the importance of the training:

1.     Hearings commissioners are kept abreast of developments in the legislation.

2.     Legal and technical errors that have been made previously are avoided (many of which have resulted in Environment Court action which is costly, time consuming and often creates unrealistic expectations for the community).

3.  The reputation of Council as good and fair decision makers or judges (rather than legislators) is upheld.

 

    


HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Regulatory Committee

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Tuesday 15 September 2020 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

ORDER PAPER

 

Public Business

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

No apologies have been received.

2.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Generally up to 30 minutes is set aside for public comment (three minutes per speaker on items appearing on the agenda). Speakers may be asked questions on the matters they raise.       

3.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.     

4.       Minutes of the Proposed Appearance Industries Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee dated 3 August 2020 (20/1015)

Report No. RC2020/5/100 by the Senior Democracy Advisor                            7

5.       Recommendation to Council - 29 September 2020

Updating District Plan to remove minimum car parking rate requirements in accordance with the National Policy Statement-Urban Development (20/885)

Report No. RC2020/5/199 by the Senior Environmental Policy Analyst 13

DEPUTY Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

  

 

 

 

6.       Proposed Road Closures for Events (20/786)

Report No. RC2020/5/200 by the Traffic Engineer - Network Operations      41

DEPUTY Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

7.       Regulatory Matters (20/951)

Report No. RC2020/5/201 by the Executive Assistant, Environment and Sustainability  61

DEPUTY Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

8.       Information Items

a)      Dog Control Activities Report (20/991)

Report No. RC2020/5/97 by the Head of Regulatory Services and Emergency Management                                                                                                                       95

DEPUTY Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendations contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

b)      Work Programme 2020 (20/1004)

Report No. RC2020/5/98 by the Head of Democratic Services             100      

DEPUTY Chair’s Recommendation:

“That the recommendation contained in the report be endorsed.”

 

9.       QUESTIONS

With reference to section 32 of Standing Orders, before putting a question a member shall endeavour to obtain the information. Questions shall be concise and in writing and handed to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting.   

 

 

Kathryn Stannard

HEAD OF DEMOCRATIC SERVICES

 

          


                                                                                       7                                                15 September 2020

Regulatory Committee

07 September 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1015)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/5/100

 

Minutes of the Proposed Appearance Industries Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee dated 3 August 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the minutes of the meeting held on 3 August 2020 be adopted.

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Minutes of the Proposed Appearance Industries Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee dated 3 August 2020

8

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 

 

  


Attachment 1

Minutes of the Proposed Appearance Industries Bylaw Hearings Subcommittee dated 3 August 2020

 

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

PROPOSED APPEARANCE INDUSTRY BYLAW Hearings Subcommittee

 

Minutes of a Meeting held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor,
30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Monday 3 August 2020 commencing at 9.00am

 

 

 

PRESENT:

Cr D Hislop (Chair)

Cr S Edwards

 

Cr A Mitchell

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  There were no apologies.

 

IN ATTENDANCE:       Mr G Sewell, Principal Policy Advisor

Mr D Bentley, Team Leader Environmental Health

Ms S Van Mil, Environmental Health Officer

Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

1.       APOLOGIES 

 There were no apologies.

 

 

2.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS      

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

3.

Proposed Appearance Industries Bylaw (20/259)

Report No. HSC2020/3/13 by the Principal Policy Advisor

 

Dr Annette Nesdale, Regional Public Health was present for the item (part meeting).

The Chair thanked officers for the extensive work undertaken on the preparation of the proposed bylaw.  She explained that today’s hearing replaced the 26 March 2020 postponed hearing, due to the Covid-19 lockdown, adding that that situation had heightened the awareness of a need for high standards of personal hygiene.  She further added that she was surprised to discover that other than hairdressers, there had been no real regulations governing the appearance industry.  She stressed that the purpose of the proposed bylaw was to ensure public hygiene was important and she thanked all submitters.

The Principal Policy Adviser provided an overview of the process of the proposed bylaw to date.

In response to a question from a member, Dr Nesdale explained that any operation which broke or pierced the skin or could lead to infection should be included in the proposed bylaw. 

In response to a question from a member, the Environmental Health Officer explained that alternative names for the proposed bylaw had been considered, and that ‘Appearance Industries bylaw’ was appropriate.

In response to a question from a member regarding publicity of the proposed bylaw, the Principal Policy Adviser advised that over the next 12 months, a series of workshops would be held for all practitioners.

In response to a question from a member concerning patients giving an informed decision to proceed with a particular procedure, Dr Nesdale stated a practioner should not continue with the procedure if the patient was impaired in any way, whether from drugs, alcohol or prescription medicines, or from a concussion.  It was noted the proposed bylaw currently used the wording “under the influence” rather than “was impaired”.

In response to a question from a member concerning age restrictions for different procedures, including piercing of intimate areas, the Environmental Health Officer explained the proposed bylaw used one age limit across all procedures, rather than a different limit for different procedures.

In response to concerns raised by a member that traditional Māori tattooing procedures were to be excluded from the proposed bylaw, Dr Nesdale stated the Regional Public Health’s preferred requirement was for all procedures which break or pierce the skin or could lead to infection be included in the proposed bylaw.  She added that with regards to Pasifika practices, she had been involved in investigations concerning the high level of injury and infections arising from those practices.  She further added that in terms of partnership with Māori and the lack of evidence of harm caused by traditional Māori tattooing procedures, she could accept that marae based practices were exempt from the proposed bylaw.  She requested that marae be included in the proposed 12 month education process, to enable them to understand and appreciate the value of training around infection prevention and control.

Dr Nesdale advised that many appearance industry personnel were not wilfully operating unsafely, but they were ignorant of correct procedure.  She stressed the value of education.  Dr Nesdale thanked officers for their considerable work on the proposed bylaw, adding that the consultation process to date had been well received.

In response to a question from a member, the Team Leader Environmental Health explained the details of the proposed education programme were still to be finalised.  He noted that it would include officers shadowing Masterton District Council officers on their inspections and development of an inspection form and of a new licence certificate.  He added that in terms of publicising the proposed bylaw and the education programme, the use of Facebook, advertising in the Hutt News and direct contact with operators, including the marae, would occur.  The Principal Policy Planner added that customer pressure to view a licence certificate would also aid in ensuring operators were licensed.   He added that many operators in this industry were transient, and that a 12 month education programme was proposed to ensure as much information to as many operators as possible could occur.

The Environmental Health Officer added that officers regularly accessed Facebook and Community Social Media links to check on new food premises.  She envisaged this technique would also be utilised for monitoring of the appearance industry.

In response to a question from a member, the Team Leader Environmental Health confirmed all licence certificates would have to be visible to all customers, and that there would be an annual registration and inspection process for all appearance industry premises.  The Environmental Health Officer added that each certificate would be specific to the specific procedures and services each premises provided.

In response to a question from a member, the Principal Policy Advisor confirmed most submissions had been received from industry bodies and product suppliers.  He noted that there was a broad acceptance amongst practitioners for a bylaw or regulation of some kind.  He acknowledged there would be a compliance and regulatory cost to each business.

In response to a member’s questions concerning possible costs to each business, the Team Leader Environmental Health explained that there would be a set regulation fee, with the cost of inspections being time dependent.  He added that the first inspection would probably be the most expensive, with subsequent annual inspection fees reducing as a business became more aware of compliance requirements.  He confirmed that if a complaint was justified, the business would be charged the inspection fees.

In response to a question from a member regarding the status of eye lash tinting and glueing, the Environmental Health Officer advised she would seek clarification from Dr Nesdale as to whether such a procedure would fall under the proposed bylaw.   The Principal Policy Advisor added that the wording of the bylaw was such that new procedures could be dealt with under the broad wording, including answering the question: “What is the public health risk?”  He further added that the Code of Practice was a separate document from the proposed bylaw.

In response to a question from a member, the Team Leader Environmental Health outlined the procedure for dealing with complaints concerning a business, and that a record of the investigation would be held on Council records.  The Principal Policy Advisor added that in researching for the proposed bylaw, officers had liaised with Accident Compensation Corporation to determine the incidences that had been claimed from appearance industries.

In response to concerns from members regarding the separation of the proposed bylaw and the Code of Conduct, the Principal Policy Advisor drew member’s attention to paragraph 12 of the officer’s report, and agreed to obtain a legal opinion such that the proposed bylaw contain the phase “If a breach of the Code of Conduct occurs, it is considered that a breach of the Bylaw has also occurred.”  He acknowledged concerns that the bylaw might not have any enforcement powers if the Code of Conduct sat outside of it.  He advised this was also the situation in Auckland, where no concerns with enforcement had been raised.  He added that in the future, government might introduce regulation or an Act to regulate the industry, but at present, local authority bylaws were the only way to regulate the industry.  The Team Leader Environmental Health added that prosecutions under the Health Act could also occur, and that officer best practice was to assist, warn and then prosecute.

In response to a member’s concerns regarding the exclusion of marae based operations, and questions concerning why that exclusion had been proposed, the Principal Policy Advisor reminded members of the legal test of identifying a perceived problem that a bylaw was designed to alleviate.  He reiterated that in the consultation stages, no submissions had been recevied from marae based operations.  He noted that often the operators could also be practicing their craft outside of marae in which case they would have to become licensed under the proposed bylaw.  He further directed member’s attention to paragraphs 35-38 of the officer’s report, and highlighted that 122 individuals had been sent the letters mentioned, with no responses received.

The Environmental Health Officer advised that Tikanga Maori was practiced on marae, and acknowledged this did not specifically address infection risks.  The Chair reminded member’s of the comments of Dr Nesdale regarding the marae based operations exclusion from the proposed bylaw.  She requested officers ensure all such operations be invited to the proposed workshops.  The officers acknowledged they had no information concerning the extent of marae based tattooing operations.

In response to a question from a member, the Principal Policy Advisor advised Upper Hutt City Council (UHCC) was no longer part of the proposed bylaw.  The Team Leader Environmental Health added that if the proposed bylaw was a joint Hutt Valley one, that officers would undertake the UHCC inspections under contract.

In response to a question from a member, the Environmental Health Officer confirmed the submitters had had their concerns addressed.

The meeting adjourned at 9.56am and resumed at 10.12am.

In discussion, the Principal Policy Advisor outlined the process going forward, noting a report would be presented to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee on 7 September 2020.  He agreed to send a copy of the report, including the proposed final bylaw, to members for review.

Members agreed to amend the words “under the influence” to read “was impaired” in the proposed bylaw.  Members also agreed to individually email the Principal Policy Advisor with any further suggested changes to the proposed bylaw.

In response to a request from a member, the Principal Policy Advisor agreed to also present a final copy of the proposed Bylaw to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee, for ease of reading.

 

Resolved:      (Cr Hislop/Cr Edwards)                               Minute No. HSC 20501

That the Proposed Appearance Industries Bylaw Subcommittee:

 

(i)      notes the Summary and Statement of Proposal, attached as Appendices 1 and 2 to the report;

 

(ii)     notes the draft proposed Bylaw and draft proposed Code of Practice that was part of the special consultative procedure attached as appendices 3 and 4 to the report;

(iii)    agrees to accept and consider Emma Fraser’s late submission attached as appendix 14 to the report;

 

(iv)    considers the submissions received (attached as appendices  5 – 13 and 18 to the report);

 

(v)     considers the recommended changes to the Bylaw and Code of Practice attached as appendices 16 and 17 to the report;

 

(vi)    notes the key issues outlined in the report; and

 

(vii)   agrees that officers present a report to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee on 7 September 2020 outlining any changes made to the proposed Bylaw.”

     

 

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 10.22am.

 

 

 

 

 

Cr D Hislop

CHAIR

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 7th day of September 2020

 

 


                                                                                      17                                                15 September 2020

Regulatory Committee

10 August 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/885)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/5/199

 

Updating District Plan to remove minimum car parking rate requirements in accordance with the National Policy Statement-Urban Development

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To obtain the approval of Council to remove all provisions of the district plan that set minimum car parking rate  requirements, other than for accessible car parks, to give effect to Policy 11 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020. 

Recommendation

That the Committee recommends that Council removes all provisions of the district plan that set minimum car parking rate requirements, other than for accessible car parks as set out in Appendix 1 attached to the report. 

For the following reason that Policy 11 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 comes into force on 20th August 2020 and requires council to remove any provisions from the district plan that set minimum car parking rate requirements, other than for accessible car parks.

 

Background

2.    The National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 (NPS-UD) was gazetted on 23 July 2020 and comes into force on 20 August 2020. The NPS-UD 2020 requires councils to plan well for growth and ensure a well-functioning urban environment for all people, communities and future generations. 

3.    Under the NPS-UD Hutt City Council is a ‘Tier 1’ local authority, with different policies applying depending on the Council tier in the NPS.

4.    Policy 11 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development states:

In relation to parking:

(a)   the district plans of tier 1, 2, and 3 territorial authorities do not set minimum car parking rate requirements, other than for accessible car parks; and

(b)   tier 1, 2, and 3 local authorities are strongly encouraged to manage effects associated with the supply and demand of car parking through comprehensive parking management plans.

5.    Clause 3.38 of the NPS-UD provides further direction on implementing policy 11:

If the district plan of a tier 1, 2, or 3 territorial authority contains objectives, policies, rules, or assessment criteria that have the effect of requiring a minimum number of car parks to be provided for a particular development, land use, or activity, the territorial authority must change its district plan to remove that effect, other than in respect of accessible car parks.

6.    The operative City of Lower Hutt District Plan currently sets minimum car parking rate requirements through Chapter 14A Transport. These provisions will need to be removed from the District Plan in order to give effect to policy 11 of the NPS-UD.  

7.    Under the NPS-UD local authorities must make the necessary changes to their plans to give effect to Policy 11 without using schedule 1 of the RMA. This means that the relevant provisions of the District Plan can be simply deleted without going through the usual plan change process including public consultation, submissions and hearings.   

8.    Council is required to comply with Policy 11 of the NPS-UD by making the relevant changes to the district plan no later than 18 months after the commencement date of the NPS  (February 2022). 

Discussion

9.    According to the Ministry for the Environment the purpose of the direction set out in policy 11 is:

to enable more housing and commercial developments, particularly in higher density areas where people do not necessarily need to own or use a car to access jobs, services, or amenities. It will enable urban space to be used for higher value purposes other than car parking, and remove a significant cost for higher density developments. Developers may still choose to provide car parking in many areas, but the number of car parks will be driven by market demand.

10.  Under section 104(1)(b) of the RMA territorial authorities considering resource consent applications must have regard to the car parking policy in the NPS-UD from the date of commencement (that is, even before district plans have been amended to remove car parking minimums). This consideration requirement creates a level of uncertainty for applicants and council’s resource consent planners in the time between when the NPS-UD comes into effect, and when the existing minimum car parking rate requirements are removed from the district plan.

11.  Given the requirement to take the direction of the NPS-UD into account, council’s resource consent planners would be likely to grant any resource consents for breaches of district plan minimum car parking rate requirements in the intervening period before these are removed from the district plan. However, this requirement for a resource consent will place an ongoing compliance cost on both applicants and council that adds little value considering the likely outcome. 

12.  Under Policy 11(b) local authorities are strongly encouraged to manage effects associated with the supply and demand of car parking through comprehensive parking management plans. The intention of this policy is that if there are issues around parking that need addressing in the absence of district plan on-site parking minimums, then a plan outside the district plan should be prepared to manage parking through means such as time limits, resident’s parking schemes, or pricing.

13.  Council is currently reviewing its parking policy and as part of this work will consider how potential parking issues can be addressed through the management of parking in accordance with the direction of policy 11(b) of the NPS-UD. Central government is current preparing guidance for Councils on preparing comprehensive parking management plans. Council’s transport team has noted that there is no reason to delay the removal of district plan minimum parking provisions until this work is completed and the prompt removal of the parking minimums would provide greater certainty for proceeding with the review of the parking policy.

14.  It is important to note that the removal of parking minimums does not limit the ability of developers to continue to provide on-site car parking if they choose, and it is anticipated many will continue to do so. Also, as the removal of parking minimums will generally only affect new development any change that results will be gradual.

15.  The NPS-UD does not limit the ability of council to set design standards around the parking that is provided, to consider the traffic effects of activities, to set minimums requirements for disabled parking, or to set minimum loading space requirements. The operative district plan currently has provisions that do all of the above. These provisions will be retained and are not affected by the proposed removal of on-site minimum parking requirements from the district plan. 

16.  The operative district plan currently has no on-site minimum parking provisions in the Central Commercial and Petone Commercial activity areas. Therefore removing on-site minimum parking provisions is not an entirely new concept for the district. 

Options

17.  The alternative option to removing the minimum car parking rate requirements from the District Plan now is to remove them at a later date but no later than February 2022.

18.  This option would create a prolonged period of uncertainty and place ongoing compliance costs on resource consent applicants and council in the intervening period before the on-site car parking requirements are removed from the district plan.

19.  Additionally, the reviewed district plan will not be ready for notification within 18 months so there will be no advantage to delaying the removal of parking minimums in terms of achieving alignment with the full district plan review.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

20.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide.

21.  Removing parking minimums from the district plan will have a positive effect on reducing greenhouse gas emissions as parking minimums mandate an oversupply of parking that acts as an incentive for driving motor vehicles.

22.  Removing parking minimums dis-incentivises driving motor vehicles, supports active and public transport, and supports compact urban development which in turn promotes lower energy use.   

Consultation

23.  Under the NPS-UD local authorities must make the necessary changes to their plans to give effect to Policy 11 without using schedule 1 of the RMA. This means that this change can be made without the usual consultation required for a district plan change.

24.  However, the change will be communicated to the public through public notice and on Council’s website. 

25.  Council’s resource consents team has received a number of enquiries about the NPS-UD and the removal of parking minimums. The general feedback from these enquiries is that there is a desire for certainty over when this change will be implemented.   

Legal Considerations

26.  Under section 75 of the RMA 1991 a district plan must give effect to any national policy statement.

27.  As mentioned above council is required to comply with Policy 11 of the NPS-UD by making the relevant changes to the district plan no later than 18 months after the commencement date of the NPS (February 2022). 

Financial Considerations

28.  There are no financial considerations.

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Proposed amendments to District Plan Chapter 14A Transport

18

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Joseph Jeffries

Senior Environmental Policy Analyst

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Hamish Wesney

Head of District Plan Policy

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environment and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Proposed amendments to District Plan Chapter 14A Transport

 

Proposed Amendments to Chapter 14A Transport

 

Proposed deletions to Chapter 14A Transport are struck through.

 

Proposed amendment reference
 

 

 

 

 


Amendment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

14A   Transport

14A 1   Introduction

A safe, efficient transport network is essential for the social and economic wellbeing of Hutt City.  The Hutt City transport network comprises the following components and transport modes:

·          all road corridors (including both State Highways and Local Roads);

·          pedestrian and cycling facilities within the road corridor, and off-road where primarily for transport purposes;

·          all railway corridors;

·          car and cycle parking facilities;

·          loading facilities; and

·          public transport services and their associated infrastructure (including bus, train and ferry services, and their associated train stations, harbour ferry wharfs, bus stops and Park and Ride car parks at train stations).

The transport network is administered by four different agencies. The New Zealand Transport Agency is responsible for designated State Highways.  KiwiRail is responsible for designated railway corridors. Greater Wellington Regional Council provides public transport services including buses and trains that use the infrastructure provided by these agencies. Hutt City Council is responsible for the remainder of the transport network. 

Hutt City Council road reserves are managed as overlays that lay on top of the underlying zones:  when a road is stopped under a Local Government Act or Public Works Act process, the underlying zone is revealed. Where the road reserve is between two different activity areas, the centre line of the road reserve is the boundary between such activity areas.

To achieve sustainable development, the transport network must be integrated with land use, so that people can easily move around the City, and businesses can move goods efficiently.  Appropriate integration also manages effects on and from the operation of the transport network, particularly regionally significant transport infrastructure.

This transport chapter contains city-wide objectives, policies and rules relevant to the transport network.

The approach of the chapter is to identify a transport network hierarchy, promote the integration of land use with the transport network and specify key standards for the design and construction of transport network infrastructure. All activities are permitted if they meet the specific standards and thresholds. In general, recognised industry standards are used, unless there is reason to use a specific local standard.  Activities that do not meet the standards or that generate significant volumes of traffic are assessed on a case by case basis through the resource consent process.

14A 2   Issues

Issue 14A 2.1

A safe, efficient, resilient, multi-modal transport network that is well integrated with land use and development is essential for both sustainable development and social and economic wellbeing.

Issue 14A 2.2

The construction, operation and maintenance of the transport network can have adverse effects on the surrounding environment, including noise, vibration and visual effects.

Issue 14A 2.3

Noise sensitive activities can have reverse sensitivity effects on the transport network, potentially affecting the construction, operation and maintenance of the network.

Issue 14A 2.4

Land use and development can adversely affect the safety and efficiency of the transport network through the generation of additional traffic.

Issue 14A 2.5

Land use and development can adversely affect the safety and efficiency of the transport network through inappropriate design of on-site transport facilities (vehicle access, parking, manoeuvring and loading facilities).

14A 3   Objectives

Objective 14A 3.1

A safe, efficient resilient and well-connected transport network that is integrated with land use patterns, meets local, regional and national transport needs, facilitates and enables urban growth and economic development, and provides for all modes of transport.

Objective 14A 3.2

Adverse effects from the construction, maintenance and development of the transport network on the adjacent environment are managed.

Objective 14A 3.3

Reverse sensitivity effects on the transport network from sensitive activities are managed.

Objective 14A 3.4

Adverse effects on the safety and efficiency of the transport network from land use and development that generate high volumes of traffic are managed.

Objective 14A 3.5

Adverse effects on the safety and efficiency of the transport network from on-site transport facilities (vehicle access, parking, manoeuvring and loading facilities) are managed.

14A 4   Policies

Policy 14A 4.1

Additions and upgrades to the transport network should seek to improve connectivity across all modes and be designed to meet industry standards that ensure that the safety, efficiency and resilience of the transport network are maintained.

Policy 14A 4.2

Land use, subdivision and development should not cause significant adverse effects on the connectivity, accessibility and safety of the transport network, and, where appropriate, should:

•      seek to improve connectivity within and between communities; and

•      enable walking, cycling and access to public transport.

Policy 14A 4.3

The transport network should be located and designed to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects on the adjacent environment.

Policy 14A 4.4

Land use, subdivision or development containing noise sensitive activities should be designed and located to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects which may arise from the transport network.

Policy 14A 4.5

Any activity that is a High Trip Generator must be assessed on a case by case basis. Adverse effects of High Trip Generators on the safety and efficiency of the transport network should be managed through the design and location of the land use, subdivision or development.

Policy 14A 4.6

Vehicle access, parking, manoeuvring and loading facilities should be designed to standards that ensure they do not compromise the safety and efficiency of the transport network.

Policy 14A 4.7

The transport network, land use, subdivision and development should provide for all transport modes.


 

14A 5   Rules

Rule 14A 5.1

(a)     Any activity is permitted if it:

i.        Complies with the standards listed in Appendix Transport 1; and

ii.       Does not exceed the high trip generator thresholds specified in Appendix Transport 2.

NOTES:

Where an activity is associated with a subdivision, the provisions of “Chapter 11 – Subdivision” also apply.

Where an activity will be undertaken by a network utility operator (as defined by Section 166 of the Resource Management Act), the provisions of “Chapter 13 – Network Utilities” also apply.

(b)     Any activity that does not comply with the standards listed in Appendix Transport 1 is a Restricted Discretionary Activity.

Discretion is restricted to:

i.        The effects generated by the standard(s) not being met.

(c)     Any activity that exceeds the high trip generator thresholds specified in Appendix Transport 2 is a Restricted Discretionary Activity.

Discretion is restricted to:

i.        The effects of the activity on the transport network including impacts on on-street parking.

An Integrated Transport Assessment, prepared by a suitably qualified traffic engineer/planner, must be submitted with any resource consent application under this rule.

NOTE: The New Zealand Transport Agency guidelines “Research Report 422: Integrated Transport Assessment Guidelines, November 2010” should be used to inform any Integrated Transport Assessment. 

Links to:

All Objectives and Policies

 

Appendix Transport 1 - Standards

Standard 1 - Standards for New Roads

(a)      Road Classification

Roads are classified under the One Network Road Classification described in Table 1-1 and are listed in Appendix Transport 3.  Any road not listed in Appendix Transport 3 is defined as an Access Road.  Any change to Appendix Transport 3 to add or reclassify a road requires a Plan Change.

Roads overlay zones, as shown in the Planning Maps.  When a road is stopped under a Local Government Act or Public Works Act process, the underlying zone is revealed.

Table 1-1:  Transport Network Hierarchy

One Network Road Classification

Description

Category from NZS 4404:2010

National

These roads make the largest contribution to the social and economic wellbeing of New Zealand by connecting major population centres, major ports or international airports, and have high volumes of heavy commercial vehicles or general traffic.

-

Regional

These roads make a major contribution to the social and economic wellbeing of a region and connect to regionally significant places, industries, ports and airports.  They are major connectors between regions and, in urban areas, may have substantial passenger transport movements.

Major Arterial Road

Arterial

These roads make a significant contribution to social an economic wellbeing, linking regionally significant places, industries, ports or airports.  They may be the only route available to important places in a region, performing a ‘lifeline’ function.

Major Arterial Road / Minor Arterial Road

Primary Collector

These are locally important roads that provide a primary distributor/collector function, linking significant local economic areas or population areas.

Minor Arterial Road / Connector/Collector Road

Secondary Collector

These roads link local areas of population and economic sites.  They may be the only route available to some places within this local area.

Connector/Collector Road

Access

These roads link local areas of population and economic sites.  They may be the only route available to some places within this local area.

This is often where your journey starts and ends.  These roads provide access and connectivity to many of your daily journeys (home, school, farm, forestry etc). They also provide access to the wider network.

Local Road

Access Road (low volume)

Lane

 

 

(b)      Engineering Standards

All roads must be designed and constructed in accordance with NZS 4404:2010 Land Development and Subdivision Infrastructure.

(c)      Service Lanes, Private Ways, Pedestrian Accessways and Walkways

Service lanes, private ways, pedestrian accessways and walkways must be designed and constructed in accordance with Section 3 of NZS 4404:2010 Land Development and Subdivision Engineering, except that Table 2-1 replaces the formation requirements for private ways detailed in NZS 4404.

No. of Potential Dwellings

Legal Width

Formation Width

1

3m

No specific requirements

2

3m

No specific requirements

3

4m

3m carriageway

4-6

6m

5m carriageway

7-10

7m

5m carriageway plus 1m footpath

 

Standard 2 - Site Access and Manoeuvring Area

(a)     Vehicle Access (excluding separation distances from intersections)

No more than two separate crossings for any front site.  The total width of such crossings must not exceed 50% of the road frontage.

There must be a separation distance of at least 1 metre between crossings measured at the kerb/carriageway edge.

Site access must be designed and constructed in accordance with Section 3 of AS/NZS 2890.1:2004 Parking facilities Part 1: Off-street car parking.

Where a vehicle access serves three or more dwellings, it must have a minimum width of 4 metres to allow for fire service vehicles.

(b)      Separation Distances from Intersections and Rail Level Crossings

The distance between new vehicle accesses and all intersections must be at least:

·           National or Regional:  30m

·           Arterial or Primary Collector:  20m

·           Secondary Collector:  15m

·           Access Road:  10m

The distance between new vehicle accesses and all rail level crossings must be at least 30m.

These distances are to be measured between the intersecting points of the site boundaries as shown in Diagram 2-1 below, and also apply to new vehicle accesses on the opposite side of the road from an intersection.

Diagram 2-1: Separation Distance from Intersection

(c)      Manoeuvring Area

Sufficient area must be provided for vehicles to stand, queue and make all necessary manoeuvres without using the public road reserve, and without using the area provided for parking, servicing, loading or storage purposes.

Sufficient area must be provided to allow vehicles to enter and exit the site in a forward direction except where the access is to a single dwelling and accesses an Access, Secondary Collector or Primary Collector road (as listed in Appendix Transport 3).

(d)      Additional Provision for Service Stations

Site access and manoeuvring space for service stations must also be designed, constructed and maintained in accordance with RTS13 Guidelines for Service Stations.

Standard 3 - Minimum Sight Distances at Railway Level Crossings

(a)      Minimum Sight Distances at Railway Level Crossings

New buildings, structures and activities that would obstruct drivers seeing approaching trains must be designed, located and constructed in accordance with New Zealand Transport Agency Traffic Control Devices Manual 2008, Part 9 Level Crossings and the Australian Level Crossing Assessment Model (ALCAM).

 

Standard 4 - Car and Cycle Parking and End of Trip Facilities

Amendment 1

(a)      Car Parking Requirements

For all new activities and changes to existing activities, car parking spaces must be provided in accordance with the minimums calculated under Table 4-1.

In calculating the number of car parking spaces to be provided, fractional numbers must be rounded up to the next whole number.

For developments that involve a range of different activities (for example, Integrated Retail Developments) the car parking requirement must be determined on an aggregate basis.

Space needed for manoeuvring, loading, unloading, queuing, or standing at a service booth, must not be used for carparks counted towards meeting the requirement.

Table 4-1:  Minimum Parking Standards

Activity

Minimum Parking Spaces

Any activity in Central Commercial Activity Area

Nil

Any activity in Petone Commercial Activity Area

Nil

Residential:

 

Dwelling house

1 per unit

Home occupation

1 per home occupation (in addition to the Residential requirement)

Housing for the elderly

0.7 per unit/apartment and

0.3 per rest home bed

Residential facility

1 per staff member* and

0.3 per bed

Boarding house

0.5 per resident


Education:

 

Childcare facility

1 per staff member* and

0.2 per child that the facility is designed to accommodate*

Primary and intermediate school

1 per staff member*

Secondary school

1 per staff member* and

0.1 per student 16 and over

Tertiary or adult education (outside the Tertiary Education Precinct)

1 per staff member* and

0.2 per student

Tertiary Educational Precinct

[(1 parking space per 1.33 staff members* + 1 parking space per 2.5 students) – 300] ÷ 0.76

Medical:

 

Health care service, hospital and veterinary surgery

5 per 100m2 GFA

Community Health Activity Area

3 per 100m2 GFA

Retail:

 

Retail activity and licensed premises within the Suburban Commercial and Special Commercial Activity Areas

Nil for the first 400m2 GFA

2 per 100m2 for GFA greater than 400m2

Retail activity and licensed premises outside the Commercial Activity Areas

Nil for the first 100m2 GFA

5 per 100m2 for GFA greater than 100m2

Vehicle sale

1 per 300m2 site area

Commercial garage

4 per service bay

Service station

5 per 100m2 GFA

Trading Warehouse

3 per 100m2 GFA

Commercial:

 

Commercial activity

2 per 100m2 GFA

Industrial:

 

Industrial activity

2 per 100m2 GFA

Warehouse

2 per 100m2 GFA

Network Utility Operation

Nil for the first 200m2 GFA

2 per 100m2 for GFA greater than 200m2 **

Emergency facility

2 per 100m2 GFA

Accommodation:

 

Visitor accommodation, motor camp and camping ground

The greater of:

1 per unit or

0.2 per occupant

Cultural and Sporting:

 

Place of assembly and Sporting facility

1 per 5 people based on the maximum number of people that the site is designed to accommodate.

*    The number of staff members is the maximum number of full or part time staff members on the site at any one time.

 

(b)      Off-street Car Parking for People with Disabilities

Off-street car parking for people with disabilities must be provided in accordance with Section 5 of NZS 4121:2004 Design for Access and Mobility – Buildings and Associated Facilities.

Amendment 2

 

(c)      Location of Car Parking Spaces

Car Parking spaces must be provided on site, except for tertiary education activities within the Tertiary Education Precinct, for which car parking spaces must be located on any site within the Precinct.

(d)      Car Parking Design Standards

Car parking spaces and facilities must comply with the requirements of AS/NZS 2890.1:2004 Parking facilities Part 1: Off-street car parking.

(e)      Cycle Parking and End of Trip Facility Requirements

For all activities in new buildings and developments (including the redevelopment of existing buildings), cycle parking and showers must be provided in accordance with the minimums stated in Tables 4-2.

Table 4-2:  Minimum Cycle Parks and Showers

Number of Staff Members

Number of Cycle Parks

Number of Showers

1-5

0

0

6-10

1

1

10 or more

1 per 10 staff members

1 per 100 staff members

* The number of staff members is the maximum number of full or part time staff members on the site at any one time.

At every place of assembly or sporting facility cycle parking must be provided clear of footpaths and roadways, not more than 50m from the public entrance, at the rate of 1 cycle park per 20 persons based on the maximum number of persons the facility is designed to accommodate.

Cycle parking facilities required under this standard must meet the following minimum specifications:

1     Stands must be securely anchored to an immovable object.

2     Stands must support the bicycle frame and front wheel.

3     Stands must allow the bicycle frame to be secured.

4     Cycle parking facilities must be located so it they are easily accessible for staff.

5     Cycle parking facilities must be located so as not to impede pedestrian thoroughfares including areas used by people whose mobility or vision is restricted.

6     Cycle parking facilities must be located so that the bicycle is at no risk of damage from vehicle movements within the site.

7     Cycle parking facilities must be available during the hours of operation and must not be diminished by the subsequent erection of any structure, storage of goods, landscape planting or any other use.

8     Cycle parking facilities for staff must be located in a covered area.

9     Cycle parking facilities for staff must be located in an area where access by the general public is generally excluded.

Advisory note: Plan users are referred to the Council’s Cycling Parking Design Guide to assist in the design and provision of cycle parking facilities.

Standard 5 - Loading and Unloading

(a)      Loading and Unloading Requirements for Non-Residential Activities

For non-residential activities the number of loading spaces to be provided on-site must not be less than that shown in Table 5-1.

(b)      Design Requirements

Loading facilities must be designed, constructed and maintained in accordance with AS 2890.2:2002 Parking facilities Part 2: Off-street commercial vehicle facilities, based on the minimum vehicle design stated in Table 5-1.

Table 5-1:  Minimum Loading Space Requirements

 

Gross Floor Area

No. of Spaces

Minimum Design Vehicle

Up to 500m2

Nil

-

501 - 1000m2

1

Small Rigid Vehicle

1001 - 3000m2

1

Medium Rigid Vehicle

Greater than 3000m2

1

Heavy Rigid Vehicle

 

(c)      Rubbish Collection Facilities for Residential Activities

For residential developments of 20 or more dwelling houses, an on-site loading facility must be provided for rubbish collection vehicles. For the purpose of determining the design of the loading facility (under Standard 5(c)), the minimum design vehicle for the loading facility is a Small Rigid Vehicle.

Standard 6 - Development within the State Highway and Railway Corridor Buffer Overlays

Within the 40-metre wide State Highway and Railway Corridor Buffer Overlays, all new buildings containing noise sensitive activities, or existing buildings with new noise sensitive activities*, must be designed, constructed and maintained (at the level of installation) to meet the following standards:

(a)      Vibration

Buildings must comply with class C of Norwegian Standard 8176 E:2005 (Vibration and Shock - Measurement of Vibration in Buildings from Land based Transport and Guidance to Evaluation of Its Effect on Human Beings).

(b)      Noise

(i)    Indoor design noise level as a result of noise from road and rail state highway traffic must not exceed 45dB LAeq(24h).

(ii)    Indoor design noise level as a result of noise from rail traffic must not exceed the following levels:

Residential Activities, Visitor Accommodation, Boarding Houses or other premises providing residential accommodation for five or more travellers:

Bedrooms:  35dB LAeq(1h)

Other habitable spaces:  40dB LAeq(1h)

Childcare Facility:

All spaces:  40dB LAeq(1hr)

(c)      Ventilation

If windows must be closed to achieve the design noise levels in (b), the building must be ventilated to meet clause G4 of the Building Code (Schedule 1 of the Building Regulations 1992). The sound of the ventilation system must not exceed 30dB LAeq(30s) when measured 1m away from any internal grille or diffuser.

Compliance with the above performance standards for Noise and Vibration can be achieved by ensuring buildings are designed and constructed in a manner that:

1.       Accords with the building schedule in Appendix Transport 4; or

2.       Accords with an acoustic and vibration design certificate, signed by a qualified acoustic engineer, that states that the proposed design will achieve compliance with the above performance standards.

 

*    For the avoidance of doubt, this requirement does not apply to alterations or additions to existing buildings in which no new noise sensitive activity is proposed.

 


 

Appendix Transport 2 - High Trip Generator Thresholds

Activity

Threshold

Residential

Any residential development or subdivision enabling more than 60 dwelling houses

Education:

 

Child Care Facilities

More than 30 Children

Primary, Intermediate and Secondary Schools

More than 150 Students

Tertiary Education Providers

More than 250 Full Time Equivalent students

Health Care Services:

 

All Health Care Services

More than 500m2 GFA

Retail:

 

All Retail Activities (including Integrated Retail Developments)

More than 1,000m2 GFA

Licensed Premises

More than 500m2 GFA

Commercial Garages

More than 500m2 GFA

Vehicle Sales

More than 2,000m2 site area

Commercial:

 

Offices, Financial Institutions

More than 2,000m2 GFA

Veterinary Clinics

More than 500m2 GFA

Visitor Accommodation, Motor Camps and Camping Grounds

More than 50 beds

All other Commercial Activities

More than 1,000m2 GFA

Industrial:

 

Industrial Activities

More than 5,000m2 GFA

Warehouses

More than 10,000m2 GFA

Emergency Facilities

More than 1,000m2 GFA

Service Stations

Any Service Station

Places of Assembly and Sporting Facilities

More than 200 persons on the site at any one time

Any combination of Health Care Services, Retail and Commercial

More than 1,000m2 GFA

Any Activity Not Listed Above

More than 500 vehicle trips per day


 

Appendix Transport 3 - Transport Network Hierarchy


REGIONAL

Road

Start

Finish

Wainuiomata Hill Rd

Parkway

Rishworth St

 

ARTERIAL

Road

Start

Finish

Bell Rd

Gracefield Rd

Parkside Rd

Block Rd

Pharazyn St

SH2

Connolly St

Melling Rd

Harcourt Werry Dr

Cuba St

Esplande

Victoria St

Daysh St

Park Ave

Naenae Rd

Eastern Hutt Rd

High St

District Boundary

Ewen Bridge (incl. on and off ramps)

Railway Ave

Queens Dr

Fairway Dr

High St

SH2

Gracefield Rd

Gracefield Rd on ramp / off ramp

Bell Rd

Harcourt Werry Dr

Connolly St

Taita Dr

High St

Queens Dr

Eastern Hutt Rd

Hutt Rd

Sh2

Railway Ave

Jackson St

Hutt Rd

Cuba St

Ludlam Cres

Randwick Rd

Woburn Rd

Main Rd

Wainuiomata Rd

Moohan St

Marine Dr

Port Rd

97 Marine Dr

Melling Link

SH2

Rutherford St

Naenae Rd

Cambridge Tce

Vogel St

Parkside Rd

Seaview Rd

Bell Rd

Pharazyn St

Marsden St

Block Rd

Queens Dr

Ewen Bridge

Rutherford St

Railway Ave

Hutt Rd

Ewen Bridge

Randwick Rd

Croft Gr

Ludlam Cres

Rutherford St

Connolly St

Margaret St

Seaview Rd

Waione St

Port Rd

Taita Dr

Harcourt Werry Dr

High St

The Esplanade

Hutt Rd

Waione St

Udy St

Hutt Rd

Cuba St

Victoria St

Valentine St

Marsden St

Wainui Hill Rd on and off ramps

Wainui Hill Rd

Gracefield Rd

Wainui Rd

Whites Line East

Wainuiomata Hill Rd

Wainuiomata Road

Parkway

Fitzherbert Road

Waione St

Marine Pde

Seaview Rd

Waiwhetu Rd

Whites Line East

Naenae Rd

Waterloo Rd

Queens Dr

Oxford Tce

Whites Line East

Randwick Rd

Wainui Rd

Woburn Rd

Ewen Bridge

Bellevue Rd

 

PRIMARY COLLECTOR

Road

Start

Finish

Bell Rd

Parkside Rd

Whites Line East

Bellevue Rd

Woburn Rd

Laings Rd

Belmont School Slip Rd

Fairway Dr

Belmont School Access Rd

Bloomfield Tce

Laings Rd

Kings Cres

Bridge St

Parliament St

Marsden St

Bunny St

Queens Dr

Knights Rd

Cambridge Tce

Whites Line East

Wingate Overbridge

Cambridge Tce Turnoff

Cambridge Tce

Waterloo Rd

Cornwall St

Knights Rd

Pretoria St

Daly St

High St

Rutherford St

Daysh St

High St

Park Ave

Dudley St

Margaret St

Andrews Ave

Eastern Hutt Rd

Cambridge Tce

High St

Fitzherbert Rd

Main Rd

Nelson Cres

George St

Stokes Valley Rd

Evans St

Gracefield Rd

Bell Rd

Seaview Rd

Hutt Park Rd

Parkside Rd

Gracefield Rd

Kings Cres

Queens Dr

High St

Knights Rd

Laings Rd

Oxford St

Korokoro Rd Bridge

Korokoro Rd

Hutt Rd

Laings Rd

High St

Bellevue Rd

Main Rd

Moohan St

Hine Rd

Major Dr

SH2

Ilam Gr

Manuka Ave

Ludlam Cres

Puriri St

Margaret St

Rutherford St

Queens Dr

Marine Dr

97 Marine Dr

Muritai Rd

Marsden St

Victoria St

Pharazyn St

Melling Rd

High St

Rutherford St

Muritai Rd

Marine Pde

Makaro St

Myrtle St

Knights Rd

Woburn Rd

Naenae Rd

Vogel St

Rata St

Nelson Cres

Fitzherbert Rd

End Of Road

Normandale Rd

Bridge St

SH2 Overbridge

Oxford Tce

Knights Rd

Oxford Tce

Park Ave

High St

Daysh St

Parkway

Nelson Cres

Wainuiomata Rd

Parliament St

Railway Ave

Bridge St

Penrose St

Ludlam Cres

Knights Rd

Petone Ave

Hutt Rd

Gear St

Pharazyn St

Block Rd

Melling Link

Pharazyn St

Bridge St

Marsden St

Pohutukawa St

End of Road

Knights Rd

Port Rd

Seaview Rd

Seaview Rd

Puriri St

Massey Ave

Pohutukawa St

Queen St

The Esplanade

Jackson St

Randwick Rd

Seaview Rd

Croft Gr

Rata St

Treadwell St

Naenae Rd

Richmond St

The Esplanade

Jackson St

Scholes Ln

Jackson St

Udy St

Seddon St

Vogel St

Grierson St

Stevens Gr

Knights Rd

End of Road

Stokes Valley Rd

Eastern Hutt Rd

Manuka St

The Strand

Wainuiomata Rd

Fitzherbert St

Thirlmere St

Wise St

Castlerea St

Toop St

Port Rd

Marchbanks St

Treadwell St

Naenae Rd

Rata St

Vogel St

Cambridge Tce

Seddon St

Waterloo Rd

High St

Queens Dr

Waterloo Rd

Oxford Tce

Waiwhetu Rd

Wellington Rd

Nelson Cres

Enfield St

Whites Line East

Wainui Rd

Godley St

Wingate Cres

Cambridge Tce

Eastern Hutt Rd

Wise St

Nelson Cres

Donnelly Dr

Witako St

Waterloo Rd

Epuni St

 

SECONDARY COLLECTOR

Road

Start

Finish

Aglionby St

Railway Ave

Bridge St

Andrews Ave

High St

Dudley St

Awamutu Gr

40 Awamutu Gr

Leighton Ave

Barnes St

Port Rd

Seaview Rd

Beaumont Ave

Kiwi St

Victoria St

Birch St

Waterloo Rd

Oxford Tce

Birdwood Rd

Waiwhetu Rd

Haig St

Bolton St

The Esplanade

Jackson St

Bouverie St

Cuba St

Udy St

Bowers St

Stokes Valley Rd

George St

Britannia St

Jackson St

Udy St

Brook St

Grenville St

Vincent St

Brunswick St

High St

Kings Cres

Buick St

Elizabeth St

The Esplanade

Burcham St

High St

Taita Dr

Burden Ave

Main Rd

Peel Pl

Burnside St

Waiwhetu Rd

Riverside Dr

Bush St

Treadwell St

Naenae Rd

Campbell Tce

Petone Ave

Nelson St

Carter St

Owen St

End of Road

Castle Cres

Lord St

End of Road

Castlerea St

Wise St

Ruthven Rd

Churton Cres

Taita Dr

Taine St

Cleland Cres

Seddon St

Seddon St

Coast Rd

Hine Rd

End of Road

Collingwood St

Waiwhetu Rd

Trafalgar Sq

Colson St

Oxford Tce

Oxford Tce

Copeland St

Kings Cres

Oxford Tce

Cornish St

SH2

End of Road

Davis Gr

Wainuiomata Rd

End of Road

Downer St

High St

Bristol Sq

Dowse Dr

Hutt Rd

Miromiro Rd

Elizabeth St (Moera)

Randwick Rd

End of Road

Elizabeth St (Petone)

Jackson St

Kensington Ave

Epuni St

Kings Cres

Oxford Tce

Evans St

Stokes Valley Rd

George St

Everest Ave

Vogel St

Treadwell St

Fairway Dr on and off ramp

Fairway Dr

Harcourt Werry Dr

Ferry Rd

Marine Dr

End of Road

Fitzherbert St (Petone)

The Esplanade

Jackson St

Fleet St

Rata St

Kowhai St

Fraser St (Wainuiomata)

Main Rd

Holland St

Frederick St (Wainuiomata)

Nelson Cres

Derwent St

Gear St

Jackson St

Petone Ave

Glen Rd

Stokes Valley Rd

Tawhai St

Godley St

Guthrie St

Whites Line East

Grounsell Cres

End of Road

SH2

Guthrie St

Cambridge Tce

Riverside Dr

Hair St

Moores Valley Rd

End Of Road

Hall Cres

Witako St

Mitchell St

Harbour View Rd

SH2

Viewmont Dr

Hardy St

Trafalgar Sq

Waiwhetu Rd

Harrison Cres

Daysh St

Oxford Tce

Hautana St

Bellevue Rd

Sherwood St

Hawkins St

Cambridge Tce

Whites Line East

Hawthorn Cres

Stokes Valley Rd

Glen Rd

Hebden Cres

Fernlea Cottage

End of Road

Herbert St

Railway Ave

Bridge St

Hewer Cres

Treadwell St

Cambridge Tce

Hill Rd

Grounsell Cres

92 Hill Rd

Hinau Gr

Rata St

End of Road

Hine Rd

Main Rd

Willis Gr

Holborn Dr

George St

Logie St

Hollands Cres

Horlor St

Vogel St

Horlor St

Naenae Rd

Hollands Cres

Horoeka St

Glen Rd

Tawhai St

Huia St

Myrtle St

Bellevue Rd

Jackson St

Cuba St

Halford Pl

Jessie St

The Esplanade

Jackson St

Judd Cres

Ingram St

Waddington Dr

Jutland St

Craddock St

Waiwhetu Rd

Kensington Ave

Jackson St

Atiawa St

Kirkcaldy St

Marine Pde

East St

Korokoro Rd

Korokoro Road Bridge

Singers Rd

Kowhai St

Cambridge Tce

Rimu St

Laery St

Parliament St

Herbert St

Langford St

Fleet St

Rimu St

Leighton Ave

Whites Line East

Meadows Ave

London Rd

Korokoro Rd

Te Whiti Gr

Mabey Rd

High St

Taita Dr

Mahina Rd

Marine Dr

End of Road

Major Dr

Ilam Gr

Kaitangata Cres

Manor Dr

Thomas St

Lord St

Marchbanks St

Port Rd

Toop St

Marina Gr

Kings Cres

End of Road

Market Gr

Woburn Rd

End of Road

Massey Ave

Puriri St

Manuka Ave

Mckenzie Ave

Pito-One Road

End of Road

Meachen St

Port Rd

Barnes St

Meremere St

Parkway North

Matariki Gr

Mills St

Ropata Cres

Connolly St

Miromiro Rd

Normandale Rd

Mulberry St

Miromiro Rd

Dowse Dr

Martin Gr

Mitchell St

Brees St

Oxford Tce

Molesworth St

Tocker St

High St

Moohan St

Main Rd

Nelson Cres

Moores Valley Rd

Main Rd

End of Road

Mulberry St

Chestnut Gr

Miromiro Rd

Muritai Rd

Makaro St

Kowhai St

Naenae Rd

Rata St

Kowhai St

Nevis St

The Esplanade

Hutt Rd

Nikau Gr

Ludlam Cres

End of Road

Norfolk St

Wellington Rd

Wise St

Normandale Rd

SH2 Overbridge

108 Normandale Rd

Old Haywards Rd

SH58

End of Road

Orr Cres

Epuini St

Epuni St

Owen St

SH2

Norfolk St

Park Rd

Grounsel Cres

End of Road

Percy Cameron St

High St

Harcourt Werry Dr

Peterkin St

Eastern Hutt Rd

Eastern Hutt Rd

Petone Ave

Gear St

Jackson St

Petrie St

Moohan St

Bull Ave

Pilmuir St

Kings Cres

Copeland St

Pito-One Road

Korokoro Road

Cornish Street

Poto Rd

Pokohiwi Rd

Stratton St

Pretoria St

High St Rab

Kings Cres

Priests Ave

SH2

Pito-One Rd

Rainey Gr

High St

End of Road

Raroa Rd

High St

Cornwall St

Rata St

Wainuiomata Rd

Totara St

Rata St

Naenae Rd

Hay St

Redvers Dr

Park Rd

Meadowbank Dr

Regent St

Hutt Rd

Nelson St

Reynolds St

Taita Dr

Molesworth St

Richmond Rd

Mahina Rd

End of Road

Rimu St

Rata St

Kowhai St

Rishworth St

Wainui Rd

End of Road

Riverside Dr

Waitui Cres

Guthrie St

Riverside Dr

Bell Rd

Wainui Rd

Rodney St

Cambridge Tce

Waiwhetu Rd

Ropata Cres

Mills St

High St

Rossiter Ave

Waiwhetu Rd

Wyndrum Ave

Saulbrey Gr

Wai-Iti Cres

Whites Line West

Scholefield Street

Jackson St

East St

Seddon St

Grierson St

Judd Cres

South St

Cuba St

William St

St Ronans Ave

Waiwhetu Rd

Riverside Dr

Stellin St

High St

Taita Dr

Stokes Valley Rd

Manuka St

482 Stokes Valley Rd

Sydney St

The Esplanade

Regent St

Taine St

High St

Reynolds St

Taita Dr

Stellin St

Harcourt Werry Dr

Tawhai St

Glen Rd

Ngahere St

Tawhai St

Horoeka St

End of Road

Te Mome Rd

Hutt Rd

Victoria St

Te Puni St

The Espanade

Jackson St

Tilbury St

Waiwhetu Rd

Parnell St

Tirohanga Rd

SH2

Matuhi St

Tocker St

High St

Reynolds St

Toop St

Marchbanks

End of Road

Trafalgar Sq

Cambridge Tce

Cambridge Tce

Treadwell St

Rata St

Cambridge Tce

Tunnel Gr

Gracefield Rd

End of Road

Union St

Victoria St

Sydney St

Victoria St

The Esplanade

Hutt Rd

Victoria St

Wakefield St

Valentine St

Viewmont Dr

Harbour View Rd

Westpoint Ave

Waddington Dr

Naenae Rd

Rata St

Wagon Rd

Thomas St

Stokes Valley Rd

Wai-Iti Cres

Ludlam Cres

Woburn Rd

Waikare Ave

Leighton St

Bell Rd

Wakefield St

Hutt Rd

Mudie St

Walters St

High St

Oxford Tce

Wareham Place

Barnes St

End Of Road

Wellington Rd

Enfield St

Newburn Gr

Whites Line East

Godley St

End of Road

Whites Line West

Richmond Gr

Saulbrey Gr

William St

The Esplanade

Jackson St

Willoughby St

Knights Rd

Cudby St

Wise St

Donnelly Dr

Norfolk St

Witako St

Epuni St

Mitchell St

 

ACCESS ROAD

All formed roads not listed elsewhere in this Schedule are classified as Access Roads.


 

Appendix Transport 4 – Noise and Vibration Construction Schedule

For habitable rooms in buildings of single-storey framed construction

Element

Minimum construction for noise and vibration control

Note construction that complies with the New Zealand Building Code (NZBC) is assumed and implementation of any noise/vibration control shall be made to comply with the NZBC

Floor

For conformance with the Standard 6 vibration criteria, site-specific advice from a suitably qualified specialist is recommended. The vibration control required by the floor design is dependent on many factors.

However, an alternative is a constant level floor slab on full-surface vibration isolation bearing with natural frequency not exceeding 10 Hz and installed in accordance with the supplier’s instructions and recommendations. There must be no rigid connections between the building and the ground, including that any interface between the sides of the floor slab and the ground must be separated by vibration isolation.

External walls

Wall cavity infill of fibrous insulation, batts or similar (minimum density of kg/m3 )

Light cladding: timber weatherboard or sheet materials with surface mass between kg/m2 and 30 kg/m2 of wall cladding

Internal lining of minimum 17 kg/m2 plasterboard, such as two layers of 10mm thick high density plasterboard, on resilient/isolating mountings

Medium cladding: surface mass between 30 kg/m2 and 80 kg/m2 of wall cladding

Internal lining of minimum 17 kg/m2 plasterboard, such as two layers of 10 mm thick high density plasterboard

Heavy cladding: surface mass between 80 kg/m2 and 220 kg/m2 of wall cladding

No requirements additional to NZBC

Roof/ceiling

Ceiling cavity infill of fibrous insulation, batts or similar (minimum density of kg/m3)

Skillion roof with light cladding: surface mass up to 20 kg/m2 of roof cladding

Internal lining of minimum 25 kg/m2 plasterboard, such as two layers of 13 mm thick high density plasterboard

Pitched roof with light cladding: surface mass up to 20 kg/m2 of roof cladding

Internal lining of minimum 17 kg/m2 plasterboard, such as two layers of 10 mm thick high density plasterboard

Roof with heavy cladding: surface mass between 20 kg/m2 and 60 kg/m2 of roof cladding

No requirements additional to NZBC

Ceiling penetrations, such as for recessed lighting or ventilation, shall not allow additional noise break-in.

Glazed areas

Aluminium frames with fixed panes and/or full compression seals on opening sashes

Glazed areas up to 35% of room floor area

Double-glazing with one pane laminated glazing,

minimum 6L/12/4;

or other glazing with minimum performance Rw 33dB

Glazed areas greater than 35% of room floor area

Conformance with the Standard 6 noise criteria must be certified by a suitably qualified specialist.

Note, the Standard 6 ventilation system requirements must be conformed to

Exterior doors

Solid core exterior door, minimum surface mass

24 kg/m2 with edge and threshold compression seals; or other doorset with minimum performance Rw 30 dB

Exterior door shielded by building from State Highway and railway tracks

Exterior door with edge and threshold compression seals

For other building or element types or construction materials not included in this schedule, conformance with the Standard 6 vibration and noise criteria shall be shown and certified by a suitably qualified specialist.

 

  


                                                                                      46                                               15 September 2020

Regulatory Committee

28 July 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/786)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/5/200

 

Proposed Road Closures for Events

 

Purpose of Report

1.    This report seeks the Regulatory Committees approval for the temporary closure of roads to enable events to take place.

Recommendations

That the Regulatory Committee:

(i)    receives the information;

(ii)   agrees to temporarily close the following sections of road for the events (as listed below), subject to the conditions listed in the attached Traffic Impact Reports:

(a)  Cam County (Inc.) Port Road Drags – 2020: Sunday 29th November 2020 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm – (Appendix 1)

1)   Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection)

2)    Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road);

(b)  Hutt Valley Motorsport Club (Inc) -  Port Road Sprints – 2020/21: Sunday 25th October 2020 and Sunday 24th January 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm – (Appendix 2)

1)   Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection) ;

2)   Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Port Road, for 100 metres towards the intersection of Marchbanks Street);

3)   Meachen Street, Seaview
(the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road); and

4)   Barnes Street, Seaview
(the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and Wareham Place);

(c)  Wellington Triumph Sports Car Club - Coast Road Sealed Sprint 2020: Sunday 8th November 2020, between 7:30am and 4:00pm – (Appendix 3); and

1)   Coast Road, Wainuiomata
(the section from the East Harbour Bridge intersection (-41.36427° lat : 174.88336° long) to the end of the sealed section (-41.41467° lat : 174.89532° long));

(iii)  agrees to temporarily close the following sections of road (if required) for the reserve days associated with the events (as listed below), subject to the conditions listed in the attached  Traffic Impact Reports:

(a)  Cam County (Inc.) Port Road Drags – 2020: Sunday 6th December 2020 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm

1)   Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection)

2)    Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road);

(b)  Hutt Valley Motorsport Club (Inc.) -  Port Road Sprints – 2020/21: Monday 26th October 2020 and/or Monday 25th January 2021, between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm

1)   Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection) ;

2)   Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Port Road, for 100 metres towards the intersection of Marchbanks Street);

3)   Meachen Street, Seaview
(the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road); and

4)   Barnes Street, Seaview
(the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and Wareham Place);

(iv)  agrees to temporarily rescind the existing parking restrictions during the listed events, and impose ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions on sections of the following roads:

(a)        Cam County (Inc.) Port Road Drags – 2020: Sunday 29th November 2020 or  Sunday 6th December 2020 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm

1)         Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection); and

2)            Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road);

(b)        Hutt Valley Motorsport Club (Inc.) -  Port Road Sprints – 2020/21: Sunday 25th October 2020 or Monday 26th October 2020 and Sunday 24th January 2021 or Monday 25th January 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm

1)         Port Road, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection) ;

2)         Toop Street, Seaview
(the section of road from the intersection of Port Road, for 100 metres towards the intersection of Marchbanks Street);

3)         Meachen Street, Seaview
(the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road); and

4)         Barnes Street, Seaview
(the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and Wareham Place);

(c)        Wellington Triumph Sports Car Club - Coast Road Sealed Sprint 2020: Sunday 8th November 2020, between 7:30am and 4:00pm

1)         Coast Road, Wainuiomata
(the section from the East Harbour Bridge intersection (-41.36427° lat : 174.88336° long) to the end of the sealed section (-41.41467° lat : 174.89532° long));

(v)   notes that recommendations in this report should not be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties and verification from the Council’s Traffic Engineer that the amendment is not likely to cause unreasonable impact on traffic; and

(vi) notes that the closure of the section of Coast Road will cause disruption to users, and will require a comprehensive communication / notification plan to mitigate the effects.
____________________________________________________________________

For the reason that the proposed temporary road closures are necessary to accommodate the safe and efficient running of events for organisers, participants, spectators and the general public.

 

Background

2.    The Council receives numerous requests throughout the year for public roads to be closed for public and private events. In order for the closures to have an effect, under Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974, Council approval is required.

3.    2020 Port Road Drags: Council Officers received an application from Cam County (Inc.) for approval to hold their annual drag event which involves the temporary closure of sections of Port Road and Toop Street in Seaview.

a.  This is an annual event, which has been running for the past 40 years.

b.  Details of the proposed temporary closures and the expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 1 to this report.

c.  The proposed closures associated with this event were endorsed by the Petone Community Board at its meeting held on Monday 24th August 2020.

4.    2020-21 Port Road Sprints: Council Officers received an application from the Hutt Valley Motorsport Club (Inc.) for approval to hold their annual street sprint events which involves the temporary closure of sections of Port Road, Toop and Barnes Streets, along with the full closure of Meachen Street and its associated Service Lane in Seaview.

a.  This is an annual event, dating back to the early 1960’s.

b.  Details of the proposed temporary closures and the expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 2 to this report.

c.  The proposed closures associated with this event were endorsed by the Petone Community Board at its meeting held on Monday 24th August 2020.

5.    2020 Coast Road Sealed Sprint: Council Officers received an application from the Wellington Triumph Sports Car Club (Inc.) for approval to hold their annual sealed sprint event which involves the temporary closure of a section of Coast Road, Wainuiomata.

a.  Details of the proposed temporary closure and the expected impact on traffic are attached as Appendix 3 to this report.

b.  The proposed closures associated with this event were endorsed by the Wainuiomata Community Board at its meeting held on Wednesday 26th August 2020.

6.    At its meeting of 12 August 2008, Council approved a procedure for Council to follow to comply with the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) provisions for temporary road closures for events.

7.    Processes have been established to implement these procedures, including the required communication and consultation prior to any approval of a closure.

8.    This report has been prepared in accordance with the approved procedures.

Discussion

9.    The Councils Traffic Engineer – Network Operations, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, has assessed the proposed closures with regards to their expected impact on traffic. The Traffic Engineer has provided a professional opinion as to whether the resulting impact on traffic is likely to be reasonable or unreasonable:

a.  2020 Port Road Drags: The proposed closures, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by NZHRA), are not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably.
This year additional focus will be placed on the efficient and safe management of parking associated with, and spectators attending the event.

b.  2020-21 Port Road Sprints: The proposed closures, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by Motorsport NZ), are not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably.
This year additional focus will be placed on the efficient and safe management of parking associated with, and spectators attending the event.

c.  2020 Coast Road Sealed Sprint: The proposed closures, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by MotorSport NZ), can be managed.
The proposed closure will
cause disruption to users of Coast Road, requiring a comprehensive communication / notification plan.

d. The authority to approve requests for road closures is made under Schedule 10, clause 11e, of the Local Government Act 1974 and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965. This authority is delegated to the Regulatory Committee.

Options

10.  The Regulatory Committee can;

a.  Approve the proposed temporary road closures (including reserve days) and the associated ‘no stopping’ parking restrictions.

b.  Amend and Defer all or part of the Committee’s decision to the Ordinary Council meeting on 29th September 2020.  

11.  Officers recommend Option a, as the effects of the events can be effectively managed through the conditions of the road closure approvals, as proven in previous years.

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

12.  The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide

13.  The three proposed motorsports events will increase city wide greenhouse gas emissions to an unknown extent. The contribution to greenhouse gas emissions will be limited by the short term nature of the events.

14.  The decision will not be affected by a changing climate.

Consultation

15.  A public notice advising that Council is proposing to consider these closures was published in the classifieds section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 7 July 2020 – No correspondence was received.

16.  At its meeting on Monday 24th August 2020, The Petone Community Board endorsed the proposed closures associated with the Cam County (Inc.) – Port Road Drags and the Hutt Valley Motorsport Club (Inc.) – Port Road Sprints.

17.  At its meeting on Wednesday 26th August 2020, The Wainuiomata Community Board endorsed the proposed closures associated with the Wellington Triumph Sports Car Club Inc. – Coast Road Sealed.

Legal Considerations

18.  Approval is required from either Council or the Regulatory Committee to allow for the temporary closure of roads, and for the imposition of temporary No Stopping restrictions. This will ensure that Council is complying with the requirements of both the Local Government Act 1974 (Schedule 10) and the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965 for the temporary closure of roads within its jurisdiction.

Financial Considerations

19.  For community events, the cost of the public notices in The Hutt News is paid from Council budgets. For commercial events, the cost of the public notices is passed onto the appropriate event organiser. These events are deemed to be commercial in nature.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report - Port Road (Cam County Inc) - 2020

47

2

Appendix 2: Traffic Impact Report - Port Road (HVMSC) - 2020/21

52

3

Appendix 3: Traffic Impact Report - Coast Road (WTSCC) - 2020

57

    

 

 

 

Author: Charles Agate

Traffic Engineer - Network Operations

 

 

 

 

Reviewed By: Damon Simmons

Traffic Asset Manager

 

 

Approved By: John Gloag

Head of Transport


Attachment 1

Appendix 1: Traffic Impact Report - Port Road (Cam County Inc) - 2020

 

Hutt City Council homeAppendix 1

 

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure Impact Report:

Port Road and Toop Street, Seaview - (Cam County –Port Road Drags 2020)

1.       Description of Event

The Cam County Inc (Wellington)has applied to temporarily close;

·    Port Road, Seaview
the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection)

·    Toop Street, Seaview
the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to the intersection of Port Road,

on Sunday 29th November 2020 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm for the Annual Port Road Drags.

The event has the following reserve day;

Sunday 6th December 2020 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm

This event is sanctioned by the New Zealand Hot Rod Association (NZHRA)

The event claims to be the longest running street drags in Australasia, and has been around for the past 40 years.

2.       Council Promotions and Events Team

The City Promotions and Events Division have assessed the proposed event with regard to its contribution towards Council’s strategies and policies, and the event is consistent with the objectives and outcomes of these strategies.

3.       Public Notice

The public notice advising that the Council is proposing to consider this closure was published in the Classifieds Section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 7th July 2020.

 

4.       Consultation

This event has the requirement of the event organiser providing proof of consultation prior to the report being presented to the Petone Community Board by 13th August 2020.
The consultation for this event will be presented to both the Petone Community Board on the 24th August 2020 and the Regulatory Committee on the 15th September 2020.
Details of all consultation received will be presented as part of the report to Regulatory Committee meeting on 15th September 2020.

As at the date of writing this report, the organisers have gained the signatures of 36 directly affected businesses on Marchbank and Toop Streets, along with Port Road. (a verification copy for the support gained is contained as an addendum to the report.

 

5.        Traffic Impact Assessment

Prior Closures

The proposed closure will not result in the road being closed for an aggregate of more than 31 days in any year as set down in Schedule 10, Section 11e of the Local Government Act 1974.

Traffic Impact

In the opinion of Charles Agate, Network Traffic Engineer – Transport, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, the proposed closure, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan, and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by NZHRA), the proposed closures are not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably, subject to the conditions listed below.
This event has become well established within the Seaview area and appears to be generally well accepted by the local retail and commercial businesses who accept the traffic effects as a reasonable trade-off for the benefits provided by the event.
This year additional focus must be placed on the efficient and safe management of parking associated with, and spectators attending the event.
The successful running of the event requires a high level of communication / advertising prior to and during the closures.  
It is noted that the Council reserves the right to modify this opinion at any time.


6.        Conditions of Closure
Subsequent to approval, the applicant will be notified of the decision, and if approved, required to adhere to the following conditions;

·    The access requirements of residents, businesses, emergency services must be taken into account, with suitable policies and procedures documented.

·    The event is to be run in accordance with the NZHRA rules.

·    The insurance requirements (as set out in the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965) and NZHRA a met a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled commencement of the event and copies provided to the Councils’ Traffic Engineer – Network Operations.

·    The organiser, in conjunction with Councils’ Road and Transport Division will arrange for an inspection of the road surface prior to, and after the event. Any significant defects resulting from the event shall be repaired by the Council, at the full cost of the applicants.

·    Appropriate notification is to be provided to regular users of Port Road and its surrounds. This will include (but not limited to);

Road Closure Notification Boards to be installed at all closure points a minimum of 14 days prior to the event,

Notification to local Resident Associations of the event, with relevant contact numbers for organisers and on the ground staff.

Signs clearly indicating Port Road is closed to through traffic be erected at its intersections with Marine Drive and in Port Road adjacent to the Seaview roundabout, Meachen Street, and Barnes Street.

Keeping those businesses directly affected by the closures up-to-date with any changes in a timely manner.

·    Provision of marshals (permanently throughout the event) at every closure point along the entire circuit to provide crowd control.

·    Ensure that adequate radio communication is established from all controlled closure points to the central control.

·    That the applicants comply fully with the directions of the Police to cancel or suspend all events if in the Police’s opinion public safety measures are inadequate or any of the foregoing conditions are not being complied with. All events are to remain suspended until the Police are satisfied the public safety measures are adequate and the foregoing conditions are being complied with.

·    The applicant will act as directed by the Police or by officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The applicant shall allow access for all emergency vehicles

·    The event organiser must apply for a Corridor Access Request (CAR) via Submitica (www.submitica.com) no less than 30 days prior to the event

·    The event organiser must provide to Council a compliant Temporary Traffic Management Plan (TTMP) prepared by a suitably qualified person and be appropriate for both the level of road and the nature of the closure, no less than 30 days prior to the event.

·    All Temporary Traffic Management (TTM) must comply with NZTA’s Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM) and any conditions set down by Councils’ Corridor Manager and/or Traffic Management Coordinator (TMC)

·    The event organiser must gain both CAR and TTMP Approvals a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled event date to ensure the event can proceed.

·    All TTM is to be installed by suitably qualified personnel, under the supervision of a NZTA qualified Site Traffic Management Supervisor (STMS).   

·    The closure is restricted to the roads,  dates and hours as approved by Council.

·    The event organiser must have a valid Health and Safety plan which details how emergency vehicles can gain access to the closure area during the event.

·    The event organiser is required to comply with the directions of both the Police and authorised officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The event organiser is responsible for the management of all work relating to the physical closure of roads and maintaining both the closure and public safety within the closure area.

·    The event organiser is responsible for ensuring closed roads are left in a suitably clean and tidy state following the completion of the event.

 

7.  Aerial


Attachment 2

Appendix 2: Traffic Impact Report - Port Road (HVMSC) - 2020/21

 

Hutt City Council homeAppendix 2

 

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure Impact Report:

Port Road, Seaview - Hutt Valley Motorsport Club – Port Road Sprints 2020-2021

1.       Description of Event

The Hutt Valley MotorSport Club (HVMSC) have applied to temporarily close;

·    Port Road, Seaview
the section of road from the intersection of Marchbanks Street, to a point 500 metres north of the Barnes Street intersection)

·    Toop Street, Seaview
the section of road from the intersection of Port Road, for 100 metres towards the intersection of Marchbanks Street,

·    Meachen Street, Seaview
the entire length (including service lanes) between Barnes Street and Port Road,

·    Barnes Street, Seaview
the section of road between its intersection of Port Road and Wareham Place,

on Sunday 25th October 2020 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm, and Sunday 24th January 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm, for their Bi-Annual Port Road Sprints.

The events have the following reserve days;

·    Monday 26th October 2020 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm, and,

·    Monday 25th January 2021 between the hours of 7:00am to 6:00pm.

The HVMSC have been running these events since 1966 on Port Road, and is sanctioned by MotorSport NZ.

2.       Council Promotions and Events Team

The City Promotions and Events Division have assessed the proposed event with regard to its contribution towards Council’s strategies and policies, and the event is consistent with the objectives and outcomes of these strategies.

3.       Public Notice

The public notice advising that the Council is proposing to consider this closure was published in the Classifieds Section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 7th July 2020.

 

4.       Consultation

This event has the requirement of the event organiser providing proof of consultation prior to the report being presented to the Petone  Community Board by 13th August 2020.
The consultation for this event will be presented to both the Petone Community Board on the 24th August 2020, and the Regulatory Committee on the 15th September 2020.
Details of all consultation received will be presented as part of the report to Regulatory Committee  meeting on 15th September 2020.

As at the date of writing this report, the organisers have gained the signatures of XX businesses who are directly affected by the proposed closures. (a verification copy for the support gained is contained as an addendum to the report.

 

5.        Traffic Impact Assessment

Prior Closures

The proposed closure will not result in the road being closed for an aggregate of more than 31 days in any year as set down in Schedule 10, Section 11e of the Local Government Act 1974.

Traffic Impact

In the opinion of Charles Agate, Network Traffic Engineer – Transport, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, the proposed closure, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan, and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by NZHRA), the proposed closures are not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably, subject to the conditions listed below.
This event has become well established within the Seaview area and appears to be generally well accepted by the local retail and commercial businesses who accept the traffic effects as a reasonable trade-off for the benefits provided by the event.
This year additional focus must be placed on the efficient and safe management of parking associated with, and spectators attending the event.
The successful running of the event requires a high level of communication / advertising prior to and during the closures.  
It is noted that the Council reserves the right to modify this opinion at any time.


6.        Conditions of Closure
Subsequent to approval, the applicant will be notified of the decision, and if approved, required to adhere to the following conditions;

·    The access requirements of residents, businesses, emergency services must be taken into account, with suitable policies and procedures documented.

·    The event is to be run in accordance with the NZHRA rules.

·    The insurance requirements (as set out in the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965) and NZHRA a met a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled commencement of the event and copies provided to the Councils’ Traffic Engineer – Network Operations.

·    The organiser, in conjunction with Councils’ Road and Transport Division will arrange for an inspection of the road surface prior to, and after the event. Any significant defects resulting from the event shall be repaired by the Council, at the full cost of the applicants.

·    Appropriate notification is to be provided to regular users of Port Road and its surrounds. This will include (but not limited to);

Road Closure Notification Boards to be installed at all closure points a minimum of 14 days prior to the event,

Notification to local Resident Associations of the event, with relevant contact numbers for organisers and on the ground staff.

Signs clearly indicating Port Road is closed to through traffic be erected at its intersections with Marine Drive and in Port Road adjacent to the Seaview roundabout, and Barnes Street.

Keeping those businesses directly affected by the closures up-to-date with any changes in a timely manner.

·    Provision of marshals (permanently throughout the event) at every closure point along the entire circuit to provide crowd control.

·    Ensure that adequate radio communication is established from all controlled closure points to the central control.

·    That the applicants comply fully with the directions of the Police to cancel or suspend all events if in the Police’s opinion public safety measures are inadequate or any of the foregoing conditions are not being complied with. All events are to remain suspended until the Police are satisfied the public safety measures are adequate and the foregoing conditions are being complied with.

·    The applicant will act as directed by the Police or by officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The applicant shall allow access for all emergency vehicles

·    The event organiser must apply for a Corridor Access Request (CAR) via Submitica (www.submitica.com) no less than 30 days prior to the event

·    The event organiser must provide to Council a compliant Temporary Traffic Management Plan (TTMP) prepared by a suitably qualified person and be appropriate for both the level of road and the nature of the closure, no less than 30 days prior to the event.

·    All Temporary Traffic Management (TTM) must comply with NZTA’s Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM) and any conditions set down by Councils’ Corridor Manager and/or Traffic Management Coordinator (TMC)

·    The event organiser must gain both CAR and TTMP Approvals a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled event date to ensure the event can proceed.

·    All TTM is to be installed by suitably qualified personnel, under the supervision of a NZTA qualified Site Traffic Management Supervisor (STMS).   

·    The closure is restricted to the roads,  dates and hours as approved by Council.

·    The event organiser must have a valid Health and Safety plan which details how emergency vehicles can gain access to the closure area during the event.

·    The event organiser is required to comply with the directions of both the Police and authorised officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The event organiser is responsible for the management of all work relating to the physical closure of roads and maintaining both the closure and public safety within the closure area.

·    The event organiser is responsible for ensuring closed roads are left in a suitably clean and tidy state following the completion of the event.

7.        Aerial


Attachment 3

Appendix 3: Traffic Impact Report - Coast Road (WTSCC) - 2020

 

Hutt City Council homeAppendix 3

 

 

Proposed Temporary Road Closure Impact Report:

Coast Road, Wainuiomata - (Wellington Triumph Sports Car Club – Sealed Sprint)

1.       Description of Event

The Wellington Triumph Sports Car Club Inc (WTSCC) has applied to temporarily close;

·    Coast Road, Wainuiomata
the section from the East Harbour Bridge (-41.36427° lat : 174.88336° long) to the end of the sealed section (-41.41467° lat : 174.89532° long) on Sunday 8th November 2020 between the hours of 7:30am to 4:00pm for a sealed sprint event.

This event is promoted and run by the WTSCC under the New Zealand Motor Sport Manual – National Sporting Code

The event has been run since 2017.

2.       Council Promotions and Events Team

The City Promotions and Events Division have assessed the proposed event with regard to its contribution towards Council’s strategies and policies, and the event is consistent with the objectives and outcomes of these strategies.

3.       Public Notice

The public notice advising that the Council is proposing to consider this closure was published in the Classifieds Section of the Hutt News on Tuesday 7th July 2020.

 

4.       Consultation

This event has the requirement of the event organiser providing proof of consultation prior to the report being presented to the Wainuiomata Community Board by 14th August 2020.
The consultation for this event will be presented to both the Wainuiomata Community Board on the 26th August 2020, and the Regulatory Committee on the 15th September 2020.
Details of all consultation received will be presented as part of the report to Regulatory Committee meeting on 15th September 2020.

 

5.        Traffic Impact Assessment

Prior Closures

The proposed closure will not result in the road being closed for an aggregate of more than 31 days in any year as set down in Schedule 10, Section 11e of the Local Government Act 1974.

Traffic Impact

In the opinion of Charles Agate, Network Traffic Engineer – Transport, acting as Council’s Traffic Engineer, the proposed closure, if implemented in conjunction with a compliant temporary traffic management plan, and in conjunction with an appropriate safety management plan (endorsed by MotorSport NZ) and an effective travel plan for cyclists and pedestrians affected by the proposed closure is not likely to impede vehicle traffic unreasonably, subject to the conditions listed below.
It is noted that the Council reserves the right to modify this opinion at any time.


6.        Conditions of Closure
Subsequent to approval, the applicant will be notified of the decision, and if approved, required to adhere to the following conditions;

·    The access requirements of residents, businesses and specific users affected by the closure must be taken into account, and provided with an escort within the closed event area.

·    The insurance requirements (as set out in the Transport (Vehicular Traffic Road Closure) Regulations 1965) and MotorSport NZ a met a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled commencement of the event and copies provided to the Councils’ Traffic Engineer – Network Operations.

·    The organiser, in conjunction with Councils’ Road and Transport Division will arrange for an inspection of the road surface prior to, and after the event. Any significant defects resulting from the event shall be repaired by the Council, at the full cost of the applicants.

·    Appropriate notification is to be provided to regular users of Coast Road, and the surrounding cycle and walking tracks. This will include (but not limited to);

Road Closure Notification Boards to be installed at the intersection with the East Harbour Bridge, and at the intersection of Coast Road and Parenga Street,

Advertising in local cycling newsletters and webpages, along with Love Wainuiomata’s Facebook Page,

Placing notices along the Heartland Ride route, and liaising with Hutt Valley NZ in the weeks leading upto the event.

·    Provision of marshals (permanently throughout the event) at every closure point along the entire circuit to provide crowd control.

·    Ensure that adequate radio communication is established from all controlled closure points to the central control.

·    That the applicants comply fully with the directions of the Police to cancel or suspend all events if in the Police’s opinion public safety measures are inadequate or any of the foregoing conditions are not being complied with. All events are to remain suspended until the Police are satisfied the public safety measures are adequate and the foregoing conditions are being complied with.

·    The applicant will act as directed by the Police or by officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The applicant shall allow access for all emergency vehicles

·    The event organiser must apply for a Corridor Access Request (CAR) via Submitica (www.submitica.com) no less than 30 days prior to the event

·    The event organiser must provide to Council a compliant Temporary Traffic Management Plan (TTMP) prepared by a suitably qualified person and be appropriate for both the level of road and the nature of the closure, no less than 30 days prior to the event.

·    All Temporary Traffic Management (TTM) must comply with NZTA’s Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM) and any conditions set down by Councils’ Corridor Manager and/or Traffic Management Coordinator (TMC)

·    The event organiser must gain both CAR and TTMP Approvals a minimum of 7 days prior to the scheduled event date to ensure the event can proceed.

·    All TTM is to be installed by suitably qualified personnel, under the supervision of a NZTA qualified Site Traffic Management Supervisor (STMS).   

·    The closure is restricted to the roads, dates and hours as approved by Council.

·    The event organiser must have a valid Health and Safety plan which details how emergency vehicles can gain access to the closure area during the event.

·    The event organiser is required to comply with the directions of both the Police and authorised officers of the Road Controlling Authority (HCC).

·    The event organiser is responsible for the management of all work relating to the physical closure of roads and maintaining both the closure and public safety within the closure area.

·    The event organiser is responsible for ensuring closed roads are left in a suitably clean and tidy state following the completion of the event.

7.  Aerial


                                                                                      70                                               15 September 2020

Regulatory Committee

20 August 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/951)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/5/201

 

Regulatory Matters

 

Purpose of Report

1.    To provide the Committee with an update of regulatory matters arising from the work of the Environment and Sustainability Group. 

Recommendation

That the Committee notes and receives the report.

 

Background

2.    The report covers the regulatory activities associated with the divisions in the Environment and Sustainability Group.  In particular, the Environmental Consents, Regulatory Services and Sustainability and Resilience Divisions.

3.    Environmental Consent data is attached as Appendix 1 to the report.  Enforcement Actions data for Animal Services is attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

4.    The Environmental Consents division processes consent applications under the Resource Management Act, the Food Act, the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act and the Building Act (resource and building consents, liquor and food licences and District Licensing reports), as well as LIMs and property enquiries under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act.  The Environmental Consents division offers an Eco Design Advisor service across the city.

5.    Environmental Health services are provided for Upper Hutt City Council as well as Lower Hutt.

6.    The Regulatory Services Division deals with trade waste applications, bylaws, animal services, parking and emergency management. 

7.    This division provides Animal Services for Wellington City Council as well as Lower Hutt.

8.    That part of the Sustainability and Resilience Division’s work reported here is confined to the Whaitua project.

 

Discussion – Environmental Consents

 

Covid-19 response

9.    The recent move back to Alert Level 2 has not affected our ability to deliver the services we provide. This is largely due to the learnings we have taken from the previous lockdown period; our staff are able to work remotely, we have also developed business continuity plans and service plans in preparation for any alert level change.

10.  Wherever possible, the teams in Environmental Consents are taking a regional approach to their work.  The Council website and individual communication with service users is being used to disseminate information relevant to the alert level.

11.  An amendment to the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2020 in April affected the processing of liquor licenses by Council.  This is addressed in detail in paragraph 29 of this report.  Changes were made, as a result of Covid, to increase the choices available to service users in advertising of public notices – good feedback has been received around this.

 

Building Team

12.  The number of building consents received in July 2020 was 202 with a total value of work $46,249,315.00.  This is compared to July 2019 when Council received 173 with a total value of $41,820,190.00. This is an increase of 19 building consents and a 10.5% increase in the value of work.

13.  There has been a noticeable spike in the number of building consents received post lockdown and in particular the last 2 months. We received 202 building consents in July was the highest number of consents we have received in the month of July in the last 5 years. Similarly the number of consents received in June (178) was also the highest in the last 5 years.

14.  We are continuing to receive a steady stream of building consent applications lodged as a result of subdivisions across the city; ranging in size per development from 12 to 89 new dwellings.

15.  We continue to look at opportunities and efficiencies that can be achieved in the processing of consents and undertaking building inspections, with applications such as Zyte. We have commenced a two week trial using Zyte which is a customised application that allows remote inspections to be completed.

16.  The benefits of carrying out remote inspections include reduced running costs, reduced Co2 emission from less frequent use of Council vehicles and an increase in available time for inspection officers.

17.  Notable building consents received

·      Little Theatre: Seismic strengthening, value of work $25k

·      Shona McFarlane Retirement Village, 1-66 Mabey Road: stage 2 for refurbishment of the interior, value of work  $3.2m

·      Self-service fuel station, 129 The Esplanade: $500k

 

Earthquake prone buildings

18.  We have had a number of building consent applications for seismic strengthening recently, and have worked with the applicants and their engineers to issue these consents.  We are pleased that property owners are working to resolve the earthquake prone status of their buildings.

19.  Recently issued building consents for seismic strengthening include both the Mobil service stations at 659 High Street and 3 Hutt Road Petone; as well as the seismic strengthening of two blocks at the Open Polytechnic in Waterloo.

 

Swimming Pools

20. We have undertaken 65 swimming pool inspections from 1 July 2020 and have been working with property owners to resolve any outstanding issues. We have seen general non-compliance with Indoor pools that were previously exempt under the Fencing of Swimming Pool Act 1987 but now captured by the Residential Pool provisions of the NZ Building Code.

Eco Design service

21.  We have undertaken 29 assessments of existing buildings from 1 July 2020 and one pre-design consultation.  We continue to work closely with other organisations including Regional Public Health, Sustainability Trust, and NZ Green Building Council to promote healthy homes.

22.  We have been working as part of the Wellington Regional Healthy Housing Group to input into a  briefing for the incoming Government on better housing outcomes

Resource Consents Team

23.  Consent numbers have remained constant.  In June we received 26 consents and issued 37 consents.  In July we received 34 consents and issued 34 consents.

 

24.  A hearing was held for 80 Meremere Street, Wainuiomata on 25 May 2020. The decision was made by the commissioner to approve the development of nine new houses on 26 June 2020.

25.  Notable resource consents lodged:

·      128 Molesworth Street, Taita - Urban Plus Limited development proposing 29 dwellings. This development is in partnership with Kahungunu Whānau Services, Te Rūnanganui o Te Āti Awa, and, is the first of its kind in the country. It sets out a framework for building and delivering warm, safe and affordable homes to those Lower Hutt households in desperate need of a home.

·      38 Tyndall Street, Waiwhetu – Comprehensive development of 23 new townhouses at the rear of the existing house.

26.     Recently granted resource consents:

·   97 Whites Line East, Waiwhetu – eight one-bedroom townhouses

·   176 Cambridge Terrace, Fairfield – seven townhouses

·   27 Waiwhetu Road, Waiwhetu – six townhouses

·   37A Nelson Street, Petone – eight dwellings close to Jackson Street.

·   338 Oxford Terrace, Avalon – comprehensive development of 12 townhouses

·   147 Holborn Drive, Stokes Valley – Comprehensive Development of 15 houses.

27.     RMA compliance updates

·     “Tiny house” – 14 Molesworth Street, Taita

       The tiny house remains on site.  Compassionate consideration due to Covid-19 was given to extend the timeframe for compliance until 24th December 2020.  A revised abatement notice is being issued to ensure this is clear.

 

·     Chilton St James School

Noise complaints have been received whilst sports activities occur at Chilton St James School. A resource consent was issued for a canopy over the playing courts.  As part of the resource consent application, information supplied by an acoustic consultant predicted that noise levels would be elevated only slightly by the canopy construction.  This was to be mitigated by the construction of an acoustic fence along the boundary with residential properties. Noise monitoring has been carried out and further noise mitigation measures are recommended to be adopted by the school.

 

·     Wainuiomata Cleanfill

The cleanfill operation is being regularly monitored by Council’s RMA Monitoring and Enforcement Officers to assess consent compliance with the resource consent.  A table listing complaints received and the action taken is shown below.

 

To date, there is compliance with all but one resource consent condition.

 

Condition 25 of the resource consent requires a six monthly independent audit of the site to ensure it is operating in accordance with consent conditions.  It requires that the consent holder invites the Team Leader, Resource Consents and representatives of the Community Liaison Group to observe the audit process. 

 

The Independent Auditor, Dr Marie Doole, completed her assessment and provided a report to Council and the Community Liaison Group (CLG) on 13 August 2020.  The report concluded that, at the time of the audit, the site was complying with conditions of consent, excepting a minor breach of condition 25, as the consent holder did not give the required notice to the Team Leader Resource Consents or the CLG about the audit occurring. 

 

The non-compliance was discussed with the consent holder, and mitigation was determined by agreement.  The agreed mitigation was to provide the name and contact details of the independent auditor to CLG members and the Team Leader, Resource Consents.  The consent holder also invited CLG members to visit the site to observe operations for themselves, and then to contact the auditor to discuss any concerns.  As a result of the mitigation, enforcement action was not deemed necessary. 

 

Noise monitoring is being undertaken by Council to ascertain compliance with the noise limits listed in consent condition. This is in response to complaints being made regarding machinery and truck movements at the site, concerned that consented noise levels are being exceeded.  Currently, noise levels have been taken by Council and are being peer reviewed.

 

Table of complaints received from July 2019

Received 

Actioned

Complaint 

Action taken

28/8/19

28/8/19

Material on road

No material on road.

30/7/19

30/9/19

Material on road

Some material on road. Consent holder had road cleaned.

30/9/19

1/10/19

Material on road

Some material on road. Consent holder had road cleaned.

18/10/19

18/10/19

Trucks on site early

Consent holder viewed documentation and confirmed first truck on site at 0750 hours.

21/11/19

22/11/19

Trucks on site after hours

Emails to complainant requesting time stamped photos/movie clip. Requested it again. Nothing provided.  Not able to verify complaint.

28/5/20

28/5/20

Tracking on the road

Small amount of material on road. Advised operator that wheel wash must be used all the time. Some installation problems which have now been fixed.

10/08/20

10/08/20

Noise from activities on site.

Several attempts were made by officer to contact complainant to understand the nature of the activities that were occurring at the time of the compliant. Noisy activity now past, details of activities occurring on site was not supplied by complainant.  Not able to verify complaint.

24/08/20

24/08/20

Noise from activities on site.

Too windy to undertake noise measurements today.  Noise measurements taken next day. Ensure next round of noise monitoring includes the type of activities (2x diggers, a dozer and general truck movements) that were occurring on site today to check compliance. Awaiting peer review.

 

Land Information Memoranda (LIMs) Team

28.     In April and May the numbers of LIMs were negatively by COVID.  However they have completely bounced back since then.  Council issued 102 LIMs in July 2020, compared to 70 in July 2019; 102 LIMs is the highest number LIMs issued in the month of July in the last five years.  

Environmental Health Team

 

Alcohol

29.  Compliance Visits/Controlled Purchase Operations (CPO)

After hours compliance visits were carried out during July, with all eight premises checked being generally compliant.

 

30.  Contested Applications

Park Avenue Foodmarket, High Street Avalon

·      This application for renewal was opposed by the Medical Officer of Health (MoH) and the licensing inspector, and was set down for a hearing with the District Licensing Committee. The reason for the opposition was that the premises did not meet the definition of a grocery store, due to its size, layout and range and depth of food items sold. There was also a question as to the validity/accuracy of the accounts (sales figures) provided by the applicant.

·      A few days prior to the hearing, the applicant advised that they wished to surrender the license, thereby negating the need for a hearing. This was most likely due to the overwhelming evidence against the proposal, provided by the licensing inspector and Ministry of Health.

Fusion Bar and Grill, High Street, Central Hutt

·      The hearing set down for the renewal of this on-license has also been cancelled. The applicants did not respond to requests to proceed with the hearing, and the premises are now under new management.

Cutler’s Entertainment, High Street, Central Hutt

·      An application for a new tavern style on license (new operator) received objections from two members of the public. The basis for the objections was regarding potential noise levels and that the premises may operate as a strip club and brothel. A meeting was held with the applicant and objectors to see if the matters of objection could be adequately resolved, which they ultimately were, with all objections being withdrawn. The license has now been issued.

Manager’s Certificate Renewal

·      A hearing has been scheduled in September for the renewal of a manager’s certificate. The applicant has convictions for excess blood alcohol and therefore both the Police and Licensing Inspector have opposed the application, questioning the suitability of the applicant to hold a certificate.

31.     Granting and Issuing of Licences

On 17 April, Central Government announced an amendment to the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2020. This means that we are unable to issue new liquor licences, or renew existing licenses without reports from the New Zealand Police and the Medical Officer of Health. Those agencies have an additional 30 days to report, after the epidemic notice is lifted.

 

The Notice has now been extended to 24th September 2020, however thus far, reports have been received from the agencies in a timely manner, resulting in no delays in the issuing of licenses.

 

25.     Public Notices

During Level 3 and 4, the Hutt News temporarily closed. This meant that no public notices were able to be published. The secretary of the DLC therefore nominated the Hutt City Council website as an alternative medium for the advertising of public notices. Applicants can now opt to advertise with council for the competitive fee of $140, and many are now placing their notices via this option.

 

Food 

27.     Verifications

The EH Team has been making good progress in reducing the back log of food control plan/national programme verifications. During Covid 19 Alert Level 2, most verifications can only be undertaken remotely, which may hamper progress.

28.     Quality Management System/Recognised Persons

The annual audit of Hutt City Council’s Food Quality Management System was carried out by an independent auditing firm on behalf of the Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI), in June.  The auditor gave good comments about the work of the Environmental Health Team, and this resulted in only one non-conformance, which will be closed out before the due date.

 

Three staff also had witness assessments undertaken by the same independent agency on behalf of the Ministry of Primary Industries. This is a requirement to enable them to continue as verifiers of food control plans, and to verify national programmes. Only one verifier received a non-conformance, which has since been closed out.

 

Litter

 

29.     The number of complaints received in August has decreased slightly. Community associates are continuing to report issues directly to our Environmental Investigations Officer at a sustained rate.

30.     There have been numerous occurrences of larger dumping volumes recently, due to multiple people using the same location. Recycling issues from post-lockdown have now been resolved as OJI (contractor) has been able to collect more recycling.

31.     We are still seeing a large amount of rubbish and recycling being dumped at the Naenae recycling station site, whilst the material dumped at Kelson, Wainuiomata and Alicetown have decreased. Infringements resumed mid-June.  We have issued $9,000 worth of infringement fines, since the start of this financial year.

32.     Community groups have been busy since lockdown, and have continued to be active. There is an increase in activity recently due to “Keep NZ Beautiful clean up week” which runs from 7-13 September 2020.

Discussion - Regulatory Services

 

Animal Services

33.     Dog registration started on 8 July 2020. The discount fees apply through to 31 August. 

34.     We have 10,100 dogs to be registered this year. To date (25/8/2020) 6607 dogs have been registered with around 790 opting for the doggone tag.

35.     The fees for all categories of dogs except responsible dog owners (RDO’s) went up by $15.

36.     Council is in the process of asking the community how we should manage cats within Hutt City. An immediate action to fall out of the process was the concerns of the Eastbourne community around the protection of the banded dotterels that are common around the south end of the beaches.

37.     Of 17 nesting dotterels last year, none of the eggs/chicks made it to fledgling due to predation.

38.     Council was asked to assist MIRO to alert the community to the critical situation faced by the Dotterels in the Eastbourne area and encouraging responsible cat ownership, in particular, keeping cats in between dawn and dusk. Doing this is critical to the safety of these birds.

39.     During the lockdown dog boarding ceased. Council used the time to get the floor of the shelter sand blasted and repainted.  Boarding restarted on 13 August only to be closed again until the end of the Covid lockdown under level 2 on 30 August.

 

Trade Waste

40.     690 premises have discharge consents and this is the most Council has issued at the start of any registration period.

41.     We note that five businesses have closed down but these were all reducing their volumes prior to Covid.

42.     Laundry services have seen a dramatic drop in the volume of custom from hotels, Airbnb’s and motels and hence their discharge volumes are well down.

Parking Services

43.     The New Zealand Transport Agency wrote to all local authorities on 15 May 2020 advising that warrants of fitness and certificates of fitness that expired on or after the 1st January 2020 are temporarily extended until 11.59pm 10th October 2020.

44.     That means parking enforcement can resume normal activity from the 11th October. Please note, any vehicle that expires after this date will have the normal two months grace period applied with the exception of Certificates of fitness for heavy motor vehicles and passenger service vehicles. These are subject to only seven days grace period.

Bylaws

Hutt City Council Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020

45.     Consultation is underway on the proposed “Hutt City Council Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020” and is running until 25 September.

46.     This is the regional bylaw for waste management and minimisation, which is being replicated across all Council’s in the Wellington region.

Appearance Industries Bylaw

47.     The proposed Appearance Industries Bylaw was heard by the hearings subcommittee in August.  None of the submitters chose to speak at the hearing and the report was accepted. The matter will be considered at the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee in September. 

Climate Change Impact and Considerations

48.     The matters addressed in this report have been considered in accordance with the process set out in Council’s Climate Change Considerations Guide

Consultation

49.     Consultation was undertaken when statutorily necessary.

Legal Considerations

50.     Legal considerations are undertaken under the appropriate legislation.

Financial Considerations

51.     No financial considerations needed.

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Appendix 1 Environmental Consents Graphs at 31 July 2020

71

2

Appendix 2 - Enforcement Actions Animal Services

93

    

 

 

 

Author: Karen Piper

Executive Assistant, Environment and Sustainability

 

 

 

Author: Derek Kerite

Head of Environmental Consents

 

 

 

Author: Geoff Stuart

Head of Regulatory Services and Emergency Management

 

 

 

Author: Jekkie Suwanposee

Executive Assistant

 

 

 

Author: Hamish Wesney

Head of District Plan Policy

 

 

 

Author: Dave Dews

Contracts Solid Waste Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environmental and Sustainability

 


Attachment 1

Appendix 1 Environmental Consents Graphs at 31 July 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Attachment 2

Appendix 2 - Enforcement Actions Animal Services

 

 

REGULATORY SERVICES – ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS to 30 June 2020

ANIMAL SERVICES                                              April                                            May                                June

Dogs euthanased

3

0

0

Infringements issued

0

0

0

Microchipping

0

0

10

 

                                                                                 April                                        May                                  June

Impounded

7

29

27

Dogs released /sold

4

33

21

 

 

 

 

PARKING  SERVICES                              April                                        May                                  June

Infringements

0

820

1995

Stationary offences(WOFs,tyers)

0

668

470

 

 

 

 


                                                                                      99                                               15 September 2020

Regulatory Committee

27 August 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/991)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/5/97

 

Dog Control Activities Report

 

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

1.    Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996 requires each territorial authority to report on its dog control policy and practices, and provide specific statistical information.

 

Recommendations

That the Committee:

 

(i)    notes and received the report; and

 

(ii)   notes the requirement under section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996 to publish its Dog Control Policy and dog control practices and provide statistical information on Council’s website by 30 October 2020.

 

 

Animal Services Teams

2.    The Hutt City Council Animal Services Team operates for Lower Hutt, and has since 2012 delivered animal services functions for Wellington City under contract.

3.    The Hutt team comprises of an Operational Team Leader, two Senior Animal Control Officer and two Animal Control Officers.

4.    The Administration Team is made up of an Administration Manager, two Administration Officers and the Shelter Supervisor.

5.    The Wellington Team comprises of a Team Leader, a Senior Animal Control Officer and three Animal Control Officers.

6.    The Administration Team carries out administration functions, and data base management for both Councils.

7.    The Head of Regulatory Services is responsible for all animal services staff in both councils.

8.    Within the teams there are specialist officers dedicated to specialist duties which comprise of education, an in schools dog awareness programme, regulatory compliance, and emergency management preparedness.

9.    All animal control officers are assigned to individual wards so that they gain good local knowledge and can engage with the community at a local level.

10.  Both Councils’ after hours animal services are contracted to a local provider who has contracted to both councils for some seven years, delivering excellent customer service to our communities after hours.

11.  We are very fortunate in that we have 10 experienced and long serving Animal Control Officers available to deliver quality service to our communities and this has been reflected in a recent survey.

Community Engagement and Education

12Greater emphasis has been placed on community education over the years.     As a result the community engagement programmes that have been organised by the Animal Services Team this past year have received enormous support and following on social media and face book pages with dog owners and others acknowledging support and appreciation for the Animal Services Team in going out into the community.

13.  These include Christmas parades, public dog walks, an event  held at the Wainuiomata swimming pool “ Pups parade and Paddle.” This was well attended and fun for all involved.

14.  The Team has also provided dog safety awareness programmes by speaking to groups that interact with dogs during the course of their work such as Council officers, probation officers, meter readers, HNZ tenancy managers, postal workers, Police. This is part of their employment training in Health and Safety.

15.  One of the most rewarding programmes that Hutt City has been providing to our primary schools is the keeping safe around dogs programme. We have a specialised education officer who visits the schools teaching children how to approach and behave safely around dogs. The children love these visits and meeting the Golden Retriever Floyd that goes along too.

16.  We have continued with our very successful adoption programme shared with Wellington City Council and enjoy a very large participation on facebook. We network with other rescue organisations to rehome dogs also and our profile for this programme is very high nationwide.

17.  The Animal Services Team also provide free community dog training sessions throughout the year available to Lower Hutt and Wellington dog owners who may be experiencing obedience problems with their dogs. These sessions run for two hours where dog owners undergo basic training from our qualified staff. This programme has proved very popular, particularly in Lower Hutt with sessions booked out within days of being advertised.

18.  The groups include nursing staff, community workers, Police, Court staff and other Council staff and other groups.

19During the Covid 19 Lock down period, Animal Control Officers responded to emergency calls and worked remotely from home via email and by phone to  resolve any breaches. Due to the increase in people walking their dogs there was an increase in dog roaming/ threatening and attack reports which kept our Animal Control Officers very busy. Impounded dogs were returned to their owners as soon as possible without charge and registration details were taken to follow up.

20.  Animal Services teams in both cities also participate in community Christmas parades in local suburbs, and run microchipping clinics and registration events at dog exercise parks and areas where dogs are regularly exercised.

21.  It is important to gain the cooperation of our dog owners and by participating in community events we feel we have certainly achieved that as the feedback via our Facebook page has been extremely favourable.

22.  Our online registration system for new and previously registered dogs has received positive feedback as it is simple and effective to use.

23.  We will continue with our cellphone text alerts to dog owners for registration reminders and river algae warnings in summer months.

24.  We are currently offering a Bluetooth tracking system to be able to locate lost dogs through a cellphone application. This is in partnership with a private company and had 3100 registered this year, 5100 people downloaded the app and 628 dogs and owners were reunited through the Doggone service.

Customer satisfaction

25.  The recent independent customer satisfaction survey conducted for Council by Key Research showed an overall satisfaction level of 96 percent for those that had engaged with Animal Services, which is the highest that can be recalled in many years.

26.  We believe that by reaching out to our dog owners and showing we are there to help, it has shown the community that we are proactive and will assist where we can by keeping those that have requested service engaged and informed.

Dog welfare

27.  We have responsibilities under the Dog Control Act to ensure all dogs are cared for and provided with the basic necessities at all times.

28.  We work alongside SPCA officers in most cases to ensure that dogs are receiving the care required and in some cases will seize those dogs where owners have failed to adhere to warnings previously.

Animal shelter

29.  There have been recent minor alterations at our main shelter in Meachen Street, Seaview where we are required to hold not only dogs but some impounded stock, such as goats, sheep, pigs and other animals.

30.  The dog boarding facility operating from the shelter is continuing to prove popular as we have one of the best exercise areas available for dogs in the region and our boarding clientele remains steady, which provides additional income when space is available.

31.  We continue to rehome of dogs, with a fantastic following on Facebook. A number of our rehomed dogs are placed outside of Lower Hutt and all dogs are assessed and monitored before being placed in respective homes.

Future projects

32.  We look forward to early next year when the dog park in Waiu St, Wainuiomata is able to be finally opened and the prospect of being able to hold events with our dog owning community at that facility.

33.  We also believe that dog owners will walk the Wainuiomata Hill and over to the dog park to enjoy facilities that we are going to create there in early 2021.

34.  Continued engagement working with our dog owning community to improve dog management and behavioural knowledge.

35.  Continue to monitor our community engagement programmes to ensure they are delivering up to date first class service to our dog owning communities.

36.  Enhance our mobile eftpos facilities for animal control officers so that dog owners are able to pay dog registration on a more portable basis.

Legal Considerations

37.     The Dog Control Act 1996, requires the Council’s Section 10A report for 2019/20 to be published on your website by 30 October.

 

2017-18

2018-2019

2019-20

Barking dog requests for service

891

787

576

Dogs attacking persons

72

73

73

Dogs attacking animals

113

99

71

Uncontrolled dog complaints

2180

2023

1654

Dogs rehomed

36

31

52

Welfare/SPCA dogs transferred

69

21

36

Education talks

28

25

42

Community behavioural training classes

6

49

38

Welfare investigations

115

142

74

Dogs boarded at shelter

247

198

204

Infringements issued

59

195

83

Dogs classified menacing by deed, bread or dangerous (started Nov 2016)

38

42

52

 

 

Appendices

There are no appendices for this report.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Geoff Stuart

Head of Regulatory Services and Emergency Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Helen Oram

Director Environmental and Sustainability

 


                                                                                     100                                              15 September 2020

Regulatory Committee

31 August 2020

 

 

 

File: (20/1004)

 

 

 

 

Report no: RC2020/5/98

 

Work Programme 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the report be noted and received.

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Regulatory Committee Work Programme 2020

101

    

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Kathryn Stannard

Head of Democratic Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Kate Glanville

Senior Democracy Advisor

 


Attachment 1

Regulatory Committee Work Programme 2020

 

Regulatory Committee – Work Programme –2020

 

 

Description

Author

Cycle 5

15 September

Cycle 6

23 November

Work Programme

Committee Advisor

 

Road Closure for Events

C Agate

 

Regulatory Matters (Standard Item)

 

H Oram

 

Dog Control Activities Report

C Agate

 

Updating District Plan to remove minimum car parking rate requirements in accordance with the National Policy Statement Urban Development

J Jefferies

 

Request to close a Road – Petone Rotary Fair 2021

C Agate