1                                                  28 July 2020

HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Minutes of an ordinary meeting of The Hutt City Council held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Tuesday 28 July 2020 commencing at 2.00pm

 

 

PRESENT:

Mayor C Barry (Chair)

Deputy Mayor T Lewis

 

Cr D Bassett (from 2.02pm)

Cr J Briggs

 

Cr K Brown

Cr B Dyer

 

Cr S Edwards

Cr D Hislop

 

Cr C Milne (from 2.02pm)

Cr A Mitchell

 

Cr S Rasheed

Cr N Shaw

 

Cr L Sutton

 

 

APOLOGIES:                  There were no apologies.

 

IN ATTENDANCE:       Ms J Miller, Chief Executive

Ms A Blackshaw, Director, Neighbourhoods and Communities

Ms H Oram, Director, Environment and Sustainability  

Mr K Puketapu-Dentice, Director Economy and Development

Ms J Livschitz, Chief Financial Officer

Ms W Moore, Head of Strategy and Planning (part meeting)

Mr B Cato, Chief Legal Officer

Mr G Craig, Head of City Growth (part meeting)

Ms K Glanville, Senior Democracy Advisor

Ms H Clegg, Minute Taker

 

 

 

PUBLIC BUSINESS

 

 

1.       OPENING FORMALITIES - Karakia Timatanga 

Kia hora te marino

Kia whakapapa pounamu te moana

He huarahi mā tātou i te rangi nei

Aroha atu, aroha mai

Tātou i a tātou katoa

Hui e Tāiki e!

May peace be wide spread

May the sea be like greenstone

A pathway for us all this day

Let us show respect for each other

For one another

Bind us together!

 

2.       APOLOGIES 

 There were no apologies.

3.       PUBLIC COMMENT

Comments are recorded under the item to which they relate.      

 

Crs Bassett and Milne joined the meeting at 2.02pm.

 

4.

MAYORAL STATEMENT (20/732)

Mayor Barry read out his Mayoral Statement attached as pages 30-31 to the minutes.

Mayor Barry added that there was a lot of community consultation to come on the Cross Valley Transport Connections project.  He explained that the supplementary report on this issue was not available sooner due to a Council briefing only taking place on 23 July 2020.  He acknowledged the requests for immediate communications from Council.  He confirmed that the community would be taken on the journey with Council.

Deputy Mayor Lewis requested that the passing of Mr David McDougall be acknowledged.  She explained Mr McDougall was a long term Eastbourne resident and helper of dune restoration. 

Cr Mitchell requested the passing of Mr Aaron Tokona, a noted Lower Hutt musician, be acknowledged. 

5.

Chief Executive's Statement (20/733)

The Chief Executive read out her statement attached as pages 32-34 to the minutes.

She added that the Management Team Challenge held by the Society of Local Government Managers had recently been undertaken virtually.  She noted that she was awaiting feedback as to success of the Council team.  She thanked Cr Bassett for his work undertaken to date with the Wellington Water Committee.  She acknowledged the work of Ms Blackshaw as acting Director Neighbourhoods and Communities.  She confirmed that Ms Blackshaw had been offered and accepted the role.

6.       CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS

There were no conflict of interest declarations.

7.       Committee Minutes with Recommended Items

a)      Audit and Risk Subcommittee

 

16 June 2020

 

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Mitchell)                              Minute No. C 20401(3)

“That the report of the meeting held on 16 June 2020, with the exception of item 5i), be adopted.”

 

 


 

 

Recommended Item

Item 5i)

Treasury Risk Management Policy review and update (20/9)

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Briggs)               Minute No. C 20402(3)  

“That Council approves the updated Treasury Risk Management Policy, attached as Appendix 2 to Report No. ARSC2020/4/114.”

b)      Traffic Subcommittee

 

30 June 2020

 

 

Resolved:    (Cr Sutton/Cr Briggs)                                     Minute No. C 20403(3)

“That the report of the meeting held on 30 June 2020, with the exception of items 4i)-4xi), be adopted.”

 

 

Recommended Items

Item 4i)

Greater Wellington Regional Council Bus Stop Modifications (20/425)

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Shaw)                                Minute No. C 20404(3)  

“That Council:

(i)         rescinds the current traffic resolutions associated with the following bus stops:

(a)        Cuba Street (#’s 92 – 100) – Bus Stop #8008;

(b)        Cuba Street (outside Weltec) – Bus Stop #9008;

(c)        Jackson Street (#’s 428 – 430) – Bus Stop #8018;

(d)        Jessie Street (outside #446 Jackson Street) – Bus Stop #8019;

(e)        Jessie Street (outside #448 Jackson Street) – Bus Stop # 9019;

(f)         Jessie Street (#’s 7 – 13) – Bus Stop #8020;

(g)        Gracefield Road (opposite #’s 112 – 118) – Bus Stop #8780;

(h)        Gracefield Road (#’s  112 - 118) – Bus Stop #9780;

(i)         Gracefield Road (opposite # 240) – Bus Stop #8782;

(j)         Gracefield Road (# 240) – Bus Stop #9782;  and

(k)        Randwick Road (#’s 25 – 29) – Bus Stop # 9153; and

(ii)        approves the installation of the following bus stop modifications and parking restrictions:

(a)        Cuba Street (#’s 92 – 100) – Bus Stop #8008;

(aa)     9 metres of ‘No Stopping At All Times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(b)        Cuba Street (outside Weltec) – Bus Stop #9008;

(aa)    15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’ parking restriction as shown in Appendix 2 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(bb)      5 metres of ‘No Stopping At All Times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 2 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(c)        Jackson Street (#’s 428 – 430) – Bus Stop #8018;

(aa)     15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 3 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)     9 metres of ‘No Stopping At All Times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 3 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)     8 metres of ‘No Stopping At All Times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 3 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(d)        Jessie Street (outside #446 Jackson Street) – Bus Stop #8019;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 4 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)      9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 4 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)       9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 4 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(e)        Jessie Street (outside #448 Jackson Street) – Bus Stop #9019;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 5 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)      9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 5 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)       9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 5 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(f)         Jessie Street (#’s 7 – 13) – Bus Stop #8020;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 6 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)      9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 6 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)       13 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 6 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(g)        Gracefield Road (opposite #’s 112 – 118) – Bus Stop #8780;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 7 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)      2 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 7 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)       9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 7 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(h)        Gracefield Road (#’s  112 - 118) – Bus Stop #9780;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 8 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)      9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 8 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)       9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 8 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(i)         Gracefield Road (opposite #240) – Bus Stop #8782;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 9 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(bb)      9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 9 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(j)         Gracefield Road (outside # 240  ) – Bus Stop #9782;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 10 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)      9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 10 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)       9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 10 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(k)        Randwick Road (#’s 25 – 29) – Bus Stop # 9153;

(aa)      15 metre ‘Bus Stop – At All Times’, no parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 11 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129;

(bb)      9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (entry taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 11 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129; and

(cc)       9 metres of ‘no stopping at all times’ (exit taper) parking restriction as shown in Appendix 11 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/129.”

For the reasons that the proposed restrictions would reduce the risk of vehicle conflict at the listed on-road bus stop locations; improve visibility and safety for the benefit of all road users; promote compliance with the NZTA’s draft Guidelines for Public Transport Infrastructure and Facilities; reduce the instances of ‘pole strikes’; and meet the requirements as set out in Council’s Traffic Bylaw 2017.

Item 4ii)

Campbell Terrace - Proposed Loading Zone Parking Restriction (20/296)

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20405(3)  

“That Council:

(i)    approves the rescinding (removal) of the existing P120 parking restrictions on Campbell Terrace, as shown in  Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/130;

(ii)   approves the rescinding (removal) of a portion of the existing ‘No Stopping At All Times’ parking restriction, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/130; and

(iii)  approves the installation of a ‘Loading Zone – P30 , Monday to Sunday 8am to 6pm’ parking restriction on Campbell Terrace, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/130.”

For the reasons that the loading zone is a required condition of Resource Consent RM180417. It is needed for the delivery of goods during construction phase of the development, as well as allowing delivery vehicles, couriers and rubbish trucks to service the building and its new residents once built. The loading zone would also make deliveries to nearby local businesses easier.

Item 4iii)

Hebden Crescent - Proposed 'No Stopping At All Times' Parking Restriction (20/300)

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20406(3)

“That Council approves the installation of a ‘No Stopping At All Times’ stopping restriction on the section of Hebden Crescent, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/131.”

For the reason that the proposed restriction will improve the safety of the driveway given the road’s posted speed limit, and high proportion of heavy vehicles using this section of Hebden Crescent.

 

Item 4iv)

Ricoh Sports Centre Carpark - Confirmation of Existing Parking Restrictions (20/470)

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                  Minute No. C 20407(3)

“That Council:

(i)    approves the current ‘No Stopping At All Times’ parking restrictions within the Ricoh Sports Centre Carpark, defined by the broken yellow lines and yellow hatching, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/132;

(ii)   approves the current ‘P180 Electric Vehicle – At All Times’ parking restrictions within the Ricoh Sports Centre Carpark, defined by EV Charging Symbol, as shown in the Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/132; and

(iii)  approves the current ‘mobility’ parking restrictions within the Ricoh Sports Centre Carpark, defined by Mobility Parking Symbol, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/132.”

For the reason that the parking restrictions will assist in effectively managing the operation of the facility’s parking resource for users of both the sports centre and the surrounding Fraser Park Sportsville facility, while meeting the requirements of the Council’s Parking Policy 2017.

Item 4v)

London Road - Proposed No Stopping At All Times Parking Restrictions (20/289)

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20408(3)  

“That Council:

(i)    approves the installation of No Stopping At All Times Restrictions on London Road, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/133; and

(ii)   asks officers to investigate pedestrian improvements on London Road and report back to the next Traffic Subcommittee meeting to be held on 1 September 2020.”

For the reasons that the proposed restrictions would improve the safety within the street for the benefit of all road users; would promote compliance with the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004; support Council’s Parking Policy 2017 and are supported by a majority of the local residents who responded to the consultation documents.

 

 

Item 4vi)

Gracefield Road - Proposed No Stopping At All Times Parking Restrictions (20/290)

 

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20409(3)  

“That Council approves the installation of No Stopping At All Times Restrictions on Gracefield Road, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No.  TSC2020/4/134.”

For the reasons the proposed restrictions would improve the safety within the street for the benefit of all road users and would promote compliance with the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.

 

Item 4vii)

William Street, Graham Street and North Street - No Stopping At All Times Parking Restrictions (20/291)

 

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                 Minute No. C 20410(3)  

That Council approves the existing No Stopping At All Times Restrictions on William Street, Graham Street and North Street, as shown (in yellow) in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/135.”

For the reasons the proposed restrictions would retain the improved safety and accessibility within the street for the benefit of all road users and would promote compliance with the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.

Item 4viii)

Trafalgar Street - Proposed P15 Parking Restrictions (19/1207)

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20411(3)  

“That Council approves the installation of P15 (8.15am-9.30am and 2.00pm-3.30pm Monday-Friday School Days Only) parking restrictions on Trafalgar Street, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/2/22.”

For the reasons the proposed restrictions would improve accessibility and parking availability within the street for the benefit of all road users; would support Council’s Parking Policy 2017; and are supported by a majority of the local residents who chose to respond to the consultation documents.

 

 

Item 4ix)

Waddington Drive - Proposed No Stopping At All Times Parking Restrictions (20/429)

 

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20412(3)  

“That Council approves the installation of No Stopping At All Times Restrictions on Waddington Drive, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/136.”

For the reasons that the proposed restrictions would improve accessibility and safety for local residents; would promote compliance with the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004, and are supported by the immediately affected residents.

 

Item 4x)

Market Grove - Proposed No Stopping At All Times Parking Restrictions (20/430)

 

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20413(3)  

“That Council approves the installation of No Stopping At All Times Restrictions and ‘No Parking’ marking at the Stop Bank Entrance on Market Grove, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/137.”

For the reasons the proposed restrictions would promote compliance with the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004 and improve accessibility to the stop bank service road.

Item 4xi)

Mills Street - Proposed No Stopping At All Times Parking Restrictions (20/431)

 

Resolved:   (Cr Sutton/Cr Bassett)                   Minute No. C 20414(3)  

“That Council approves the existing No Stopping At All Times Restrictions at the Stop Bank Entrance on Mills Street, as shown in Appendix 1 attached to Report No. TSC2020/4/138.”

For the reasons that the proposed restrictions would maintain accessibility to the stop bank entrance and would promote compliance with the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.

 

c)       Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee

 

7 July 2020

 

 

Resolved:    (Cr Edwards/Cr Mitchell)                             Minute No. C 20415(3)

“That the report of the meeting held on 7 July 2020, with the exception of items 4i)-4iii), be adopted.”

 

 

Recommended Items

Item 4i)

Management of Cats in Lower Hutt (20/584)

 

Speaking under public comment, Mr Frank Vickers, representing Eastbourne Community Board explained that protection of wildlife from cats was not the only objective of controlling cats.  He added that evidence of over 100 cats in one household was presented to the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee meeting on 7 July 2020, and that Palmerston North City Council’s (PNCC) long standing Cat Control Bylaw had not been subject to legal challenge.  He questioned the sum of $85,000 for control of beaches from roaming cats.  He believed volunteers already performed that function.  He further questioned the $25,000 cost of a public education exercise.

 

Under public comment, Cr Edwards read out a written submission from Mr Quentin Duthie, representing Pareraho Forest Trust (‘the Trust’), attached as page 35 to the minutes.  

 

Item 8a was discussed under this item.  The item is recorded in the order in which it was listed on the Order Paper.

 

The Director, Environmental and Sustainability advised that the focus of the report and of the legal opinion, was the protection of wildlife from cats, as that was the main issue that had arisen from the Policy, Finance and Strategy meeting on 7 July 2020.  She explained that this area of law was very complicated, and that the PNCC Cat Control Bylaw was not focussed on protecting wildlife from cats.  She clarified that the table on page 137 of the Order Paper was out of alignment, and that there was no budget allocated for beach patrols, that the majority of the $25,000 for the education programme was allocated to the publicity caravan and that $60,000 was for salaries. 

 

With regard to the case of 100 cats in a single household, the Director, Environmental and Sustainability advised that prosecutions could occur under the Health Act 1956 if a health hazard existed.

 

The Chief Legal Officer advised that the PNCC Cat Control Bylaw was focussed on cat welfare rather than the protection of wildlife. He added that it appeared the desire for controlling cats in Lower Hutt was more than solely for the protection of wildlife.  He explained a bylaw could initially require microchipping, desexing and household limits of cats, with possible prohibition areas to be assessed and added at a later date if required.   He reminded members the legal test required for a bylaw to be enacted was for a perceived problem to be clearly identified and a bylaw was the only option to address the problem.

 

In response to a question from a member regarding the process of dealing with a complaint concerning a cat or cats, the Director, Environmental and Sustainability clarified that if a public nuisance or safety issue was occurring, officers could act under the Public Health Act.  She added that officers would work alongside the houseowner, offering contact details of services, if required, and the cats would probably be referred to the SPCA or Kitten Inn.

The Chief Legal Officer reminded members that stray or feral cats could not be controlled by a bylaw as there was no one person responsible for them.  He added pest control programmes could be implemented on public owned land and that once caught, a cat would be transferred to the SPCA or Kitten Inn.

In response to questions from members, the Chief Legal Officer advised that the SPCA did not patrol areas looking for stray cats, rather SPCA was contacted if there was a complaint about a cat.  He agreed that requiring all cats to be desexed may aid in reducing the number of stray cats.  He further advised that the general power under the Local Government Act to seize something that was causing an offence was unclear.  He noted that pest rats could be caught on private property, as they were generally not a pet, or owned by anyone.

Cr Brown and Deputy Mayor Lewis left the meeting at 3.13pm.

Deputy Mayor Lewis rejoined the meeting at 3.15pm.

 

In response to a further question from a member, the Chief Legal Officer advised that cats may be able to be seized under the Parks and Reserves Bylaw if they were on a reserve.

Cr Brown rejoined the meeting at 3.16pm.

 

Cr Milne requested urgent action be taken immediately to protect the dotterel during the current breeding season.  The Director, Environmental and Sustainability advised that should the process for a Cat Control Bylaw be commenced now, it would not be completed before the dotterel breeding season finished.  She further advised that officers would undertake an education programme in association with existing volunteer groups in Eastbourne, and with the Eastbourne Community Board, regarding keeping cats indoors at night-time.

Cr Briggs acknowledged the work of officers to date on the issue and believed a cultural change to cat ownership was also required which would take time.

Cr Milne left the meeting at 3.25pm.

 

Cr Dyer commented that community input into the proposed bylaw was necessary.

Mayor Barry reminded members of the legal advice received regarding the issue, and the practicalities of enforcement of any rules of a bylaw.

Mayor Barry notified members of his intention to move an amendment to recommendation (v) to include asking officers to seek evidence from Lower Hutt stakeholders including Kitten Inn, Outpawed and any other organisation which may or may not support a limit.   He also notified members of his intention to move an additional recommendation asking officers to clearly explain how a bylaw for microchipping, desexing and potentially limits of cats would be implemented at an operational level.  This information should form part of the draft bylaw process.

Cr Sutton left the meeting at 3.26pm.

Cr Milne rejoined the meeting at 3.27pm.

Cr Sutton rejoined the meeting at 3.28pm.

 

Cr Edwards believed it was good practice to introduce a bylaw with a small number of rules, and then add more at a later date.  He did not support a night-time curfew being part of the initial bylaw.

Cr Mitchell requested that all options to control all cats be investigated now.

Cr Milne supported Cr Mitchell’s comments.  He believed there were biodiversity issues especially the dotterel population in the Eastbourne area which needed immediate protection.  He requested investigations be made into a night-time curfew for cats.

Cr Brown thanked officers for their work to date.  She believed asking the public to support night-time cat curfews was a step too far in the initial stage of cat control.

Cr Dyer added that public education might assist with keeping cats inside.

The motions were taken in parts and all parts CARRIED on the voices. 

 

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Edwards)            Minute No. C 20416(3)

“That Council:

(i)          notes the results of the public survey seeking feedback on five options around the management of cats attached as Appendix 1 to Report No. PFSC2020/4/143;

 

(ii)        notes the legal advice and cost breakdown that has been received subsequent to the recommendations passed by the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee on 7 July 2020;

 

(iii)      as set out in the legal advice received, notes the evidentiary test that is required for developing a new bylaw;

 

(iv)      has the view that the evidentiary test for compulsory de-sexing, microchipping and registration of cats would likely be met and should form part of a draft bylaw for consultation; and

(v)    has the view that the evidentiary test for limiting the number of cats is inconclusive at this stage, and directs officers to seek evidence from Lower Hutt stakeholders including Kitten Inn, Outpawed and any other organisation which may or may not support a limit.  Any academic research on this matter should also be considered. Officers can then assess whether there is sufficient evidence to support this measure being part of a draft bylaw, as per the required legal test.”

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Dyer)                   Minute No. C 20417(3)

“That Council:

 

(vi)   acknowledges a number of legal and practical challenges in developing a bylaw, which creates ‘prohibited areas’ for cats within the city, and resolves this not be included as part of a draft bylaw.”

 

Crs Mitchell and Milne requested that their votes be recorded against the above matter.

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Edwards)             Minute No. C 20418(3)

“That Council:

(vii) requests officers clearly explain how a bylaw for microchipping, desexing and potentially limits of cats would be implemented at an operational level.  This information should form part of the draft bylaw process; and

(viii)     asks officers to consider in preparation of a bylaw, any method (through a bylaw or otherwise) that would assist with challenges like the decimation of dotterels in Eastbourne.”

 

 

Item 4ii)

District Plan Review Subcommittee (20/648)

 

 

Mayor Barry advised that a number of members were currently undertaking the Resource Management Good Decision Making Training.  He highlighted that the naming of the membership of the District Plan Review Subcommittee would be delayed until the training had been completed.

 

 

Resolved: (Mayor Barry/Deputy Mayor Lewis)   Minute No. C 20419(3)

“That Council:

(i)     establishes a District Plan Review Subcommittee;

(ii)    delegates to the Mayor the power to appoint members to the District Plan Review Subcommittee; and

 

(iii)   adopts the Terms of Reference for the District Plan Review     Subcommittee, attached as Appendix 1 to Report No. PFSC2020/4/152.”

Item 4iii)

Delegations for deciding remission of rates and economic development grants for economic development (20/655)

 

Resolved:    (Cr Edwards/Cr Briggs)               Minute No. C 20420(3)

“That Council:

 

(i)            agrees that the rates remission policy for rates remission and economic development grants 2017 is included in the overall Council Rates Remission Policy; and

(ii)     agrees that applications for remission of rates and economic development grants for economic development will be considered by the Policy, Finance and Strategy Committee, acting under delegated authority from Council.”

Cr Shaw left the meeting at 3.36pm.

8.       Miscellaneous    

a)

Cat Management – responding to requests from Elected Members for further information (20/747)

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Edwards)           Minute No. C 20421(3)

 “That Council notes the contents of the memorandum.”

 

b)

Local Government New Zealand – Remits for Annual General Meeting August 2020 (20/723)

 

The Head of Strategy and Planning elaborated on the report.  She added that Mayor Barry and Deputy Mayor Lewis were Council’s representatives at the Annual General Meeting.  She confirmed that the representatives could make a judgement call on Council’s behalf for each remit if it was altered during debate.

Cr Shaw rejoined the meeting at 3.39pm.

 

Members discussed the remits as follows:

·         supported Remit 1;

·         the Head of Strategy and Planning advised that Remit 2 was supported by the Head of District Planning.  The Head of District Planning believed any tool which assisted in addressing housing affordability was advantageous.  Cr Brown agreed;

·         agreed that Remit 3 would probably not gain government support, but that Council would not oppose it;

·         the Head of Strategy and Planning noted officers’ proposed amendment to Remit 4. Cr Briggs requested that Hauraki District Council be contacted to advise of Council’s support of the remit with a proposed amendment;

·         agreed not to support Remit 5;

·         discussed the merits of also proposing a limit on mayoral terms and whether ratepayers should have an input into the topic of Remit 6;

·         in discussing Remit 7, Cr Milne requested the Council resolution supporting both Petone and Eastbourne Community Boards on this issue be circulated to all members. 

The Head of Strategy and Planning agreed to send full wording of all remits to all members. 

Cr Hislop left the meeting at 3.59pm.

 

·         Cr Brown commented that all water useages and on-selling needed to be investigated. 

Cr Hislop rejoined the meeting at 4.01pm.  Cr Brown left the meeting at 4.01pm.

 

·              agreed to support Remit 7;

·              it was noted that Remit 8 was a logical step given the Covid-19 lockdown situation and members supported the remit.

            Cr Brown rejoined the meeting at 4.02pm.

 

The Head of Strategy and Planning agreed to liaise with the Traffic Division concerning the process for correcting street signs in relation to Remit 9;

·         agreed to support Remit 10 with a proposed amendment to introduce threshholds;

·         in regard to Remit 11, members discussed the possible existence of other models.  It was agreed that Council’s representatives would support the remit in principle, and make a judgement if the debate changed the remit.

The Chief Executive advised Council’s representatives would also be required to cast votes for election of Local Government New Zealand’s President and Vice President.

 

Resolved:    (Mayor Barry/Cr Dyer)               Minute No. C 20422(3)

That Council:

(i)       notes that all proposed remits meet the LGNZ National Council’s Remits Screening Policy criteria;

(ii)      notes the officers’ comments on the proposed remits;

(iii)     agrees to support the remits as follows:

Remit 1

Asking that central government support for public transport during Covid-19 be extended through the recovery period;

Remit 2

Housing affordability: Recommends introducing legislation to fully enable councils to address housing affordability through a range of tools, one such tool being ‘inclusionary zoning’;

Remit 3

Request to central government to return GST on rates for Councils to spend on infrastructure projects;

Remit 6

That the local government electoral cycle is extended from three to four years;

Remit 7

Water bottling. Asks that government amend legislation to stop water bottling and exports;

Remit 8

Quorum when attending local government meetings – including remotely connected members in the quorum; and

Remit 9           

Use of macrons for local government. Focused on simplifying the legal requirements around the addition of macrons to council names;

 

(iv)     agrees to support the following remits with the proposed amendments:

Remit 4

Natural hazards and climate change adaptation with a proposed amendment to broaden the definition of “coastlines” to “coastal environment”;

Remit 10

That the Government lift the level of rates rebates for low and fixed income property owners – with yearly increases taking into account the cost of inputs into local government services with a proposed amendment to introduce thresholds;

 

(iv)     agrees to not support the following remit:

Remit 5

Development of an annual regional balance of transfer register to show how much each region contributes in taxes; and

 

(v)      agrees to support the following remit in principle:

Remit 11

That the Government implement an independent scheme, based on the United Kingdom model operated by the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, to measure and report on carbon emissions at a district level.

c)

Requesting Power of Attorney for Directors (50/581)

 

Resolved:    (Mayor Barry/Cr Bassett)             Minute No. C 20423(3)

“That Council:

(i)     grants powers of attorney to any person in the role of Chief Executive or Director to execute deeds on behalf of Council;

(ii)    approves the form of power of attorney attached as Appendix 1 to the report (the Deed); and

(iii)   authorises the Mayor and Deputy Mayor to execute the Deed to give effect to the power of attorney for any person in the role of Chief Executive or Director.”

The meeting adjourned at 4.09pm and resumed at 4.22pm.

 

d)

Cross Valley Transport Connections Programme Business Case (20/748)

 

Speaking under public comment, Mr Sigurd Magnusson supported the Cross Valley Transport Connections Programme (CVTC) in principle.  He expressed concern at the lack of public consultation on the matter.  He requested that affected Moera and Waiwhetu residents be given the opportunity to provide feedback on the proposal prior to Council making a decision.  He suggested efforts should also be directed at reducing overall traffic volumes to assist with reducing carbon emissions.  He questioned the proposed alignment of the road.

 

In response to a question from a member, Mr Magnusson acknowledged the four decade process to date.  He was not aware of any recent consultation that may have occurred.

 

Speaking under public comment, Ms Kaz Yung requested transparency and integrity with the CVTC project.  She stressed that residents wanted to be part of the process and were keen to partake in discussions regarding future transport, sea level rise and climate change.  She requested the Petone 2040 Plan, the Climate Change Emergency declaration and efforts to move to carbon zero be included in the project.  She further requested access to all background material leading to the preferred option.

 

Ms Yung read out written comments from concerned residents who could not attend the meeting.  They all supported a CVTC, however requested full community consultation.  They did not support the preferred option.  They listed issues such as road alignment, location of interchange, effect on green house gas emissions, integrated transport systems, sea level rise, promotion of suburbs to be more self sufficient rather than dormitory areas for Wellington city, and promotion of walking and cycling tracks.   

 

Mayor Barry assured the meeting that work with communities would now begin.

 

Speaking under public comment,  Mr Matt Young expressed  disappointment with the CVTC process to date.  He questioned the legalities of the Supplementary Order Paper, which he believed did not comply with Council’s Standing Orders or with the requirements of the Local Government Act.  He asked that climate change be a major consideration of any CVTC discussions.  He questioned the timing of the release of the project, given that the Council’s Integrated Transport Plan had yet to be finalised.  He did not support the officer’s recommendations.  He requested thorough community consultation prior to any decisions being made.

 

The Director Economy and Development elaborated on the report.  He explained the Council briefing last week enabled this report to be discussed, in accordance with the New Zealand Transport Agency’s (NZTA) requirements, that a strategic business case be developed prior to a programme business case, and that extensive public consultation would now commence.  He further explained that further work was required to align the project with NZTA priorities in order to be eligible for government funding, and that interconnections between Council, Greater Wellington Regional Council, NZTA and the community were important.  He acknowledged the Integrated Transport Plan would provide opportunities to explore and understand strategic level transport priorities.

Cr Bassett rejoined the meeting at 4.31pm.

 

In response to questions from members, the Director Economy and Development confirmed variations on the possible options could come to light, once detailed consultation and design began.  He added details concerning the public consultation exercises had yet to be finalised, and would be brought before the appropriate committee.  He advised the work to date had been of a technical nature and that from now on, a full public consultation process would occur.

 

In response to a question from a member, Mayor Barry explained that Council was not endorsing a preferred proposal, but that it was endorsing the project to proceed.

 

In response to a question from a member regarding risk analysis particularly with regard to the Wellington faultline, the Director Economy and Development advised resilience was one factor taken account of in analysis of options and that the CVTC offered an alternative route for all forms of traffic.

 

In response to a question from a member regarding the late release of the Supplementary Order Paper, Mayor Barry explained the Council briefing had only occurred on Thursday 23 July 2020, with the report released publicly on Friday 24 July 2020.

 

In response to a question from a member, the Director Economy and Development confirmed climate change was a key pillar of the Integrated Transport Plan and that future reports would refer to impacts of climate change.

 

Mayor Barry confirmed that communications regarding CVTC would come from the Mayoral office, and would occur shortly. 

 

Cr Edwards supported widespread public consultation, promotion of the use of public transport and cycleways, and the development of an alternative transport route to alleviate congestion and for resilience reasons.  He also supported lobbying central government for assistance with funding the CVTC.

 

 

 

Cr Hislop supported the CVTC as it would help to move traffic and people and took into account resilience and carbon emissions issues.  She cautioned careful management would be required as the construction phase would be disruptive for many residents.

 

Cr Mitchell endorsed the project moving forward and welcomed more information being made available in the near future.  He stated full engagement with the public needed to be carefully managed.

 

Deputy Mayor Lewis stated the Harbour Ward residents would be pleased to see reduced traffic congestion along The Esplanade, and an alternative route across the valley developed which took into account climate change and sea level rise.  She supported full public consultation and believed the CVTC project was an ideal multi-modal resilient route.

Cr Brown left the meeting at 4.51pm.

 

Cr Milne believed the CVTC project should be investigated and constructed simultaneously with the Petone 2 Grenada (P2G) project, as the two projects had clear links.  He believed P2G would enable efficiencies between Lower Hutt and Porirua to be realised.  He asked that carbon emission calculations be undertaken.

Cr Brown rejoined the meeting at 4.53pm.

 

 

Cr Briggs supported the proposed multi-modal traffic route. He looked forward to the detailed community consultation programme and further details of the CVTC being developed.

 

Cr Dyer believed Stages 1 and 2 of the CVTC project would generate great benefits for the city.  He considered that improvements to SH58 would help alleviate traffic congestion at Ngauranga Gorge, without the need to rely on P2G.

 

Mayor Barry stated that whilst CVTC would not solve all traffic congestion problems, it would provide a multi-modal, alternate cross valley link which eased congestion on The Esplanade.  He looked forward to extensive community consultation and to lobbying of central government for funding assistance.  He proposed to delete the word ‘preferred’ from recommendations (iv), (v) and (vii).

 

 

Resolved:    (Mayor Barry/Cr Bassett)               Minute No. C 20424(3)

“That Council:

(i)        notes the Cross Valley Transport Connections project (formerly the Cross Valley Link) is a key transport priority for Council as part of the current Long Term Plan, and has been mooted since the early 1960s;

(ii)       notes the substantial completion of the Programme Business Case for the Cross Valley Transport Connections project;

(iii)      notes the significant benefits that come with progressing the Cross Valley Transport Connections project, including improved transport network resilience, improved transport choices and encouraging mode shift, improving accessibility and safety, and supporting development and urban growth;

(iv)      endorses, in principle, the emerging programme for the Cross Valley Transport Connections project as set out in the Programme Business Case;

(v)       agrees to explore options to accelerate stage three of the emerging programme for the Cross Valley Transport, recognising that the construction of a new east to west corridor will be the most impactful part of the programme;

(vi)      directs officers to regularly report to the Community and Environment Committee on progress of the Cross Valley Transport Connections project, and reporting to occur no less than four times per year (quarterly);

(vii)     agrees to lobby major political parties for a commitment to fast track and fund the emerging programme for the Cross Valley Transport Connection project, ahead of the New Zealand general election on 19 September 2020; and

(viii)   directs officers to report to the next Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee on the Cross Valley Transport Connections project in order to progress decisions in the drafting of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031.”

9.       HEARING BY INDEPENDENT COMMISSIONER 80 MEREMERE STREET, 25 MAY 2020 (20/671)

Report No. HCC2020/4/22 by the Head of Democratic Services

Resolved:    (Mayor Barry/Cr Dyer)                         Minute No. C 20425(3)

 “That the decision of the Hearing Commissioner held on 25 May 2020 for 80/102 Meremere Street, Wainuiomata be noted and received.”

10.     COUNCIL Minutes

Resolved:    (Mayor Barry/Cr Brown)                                Minute No. C 20426(3)

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Hutt City Council held on Tuesday, 26 May 2020, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

 

Resolved:    (Mayor Barry/Cr Rasheed)                             Minute No. C 20427(3)

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Hutt City Council held on Thursday, 18 June 2020, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Edwards)                             Minute No. C 20428(3)

“That the minutes of the meeting of the Hutt City Council held on Tuesday, 30 June 2020, be confirmed as a true and correct record.”

11.     Committee Minutes without Recommended Items

a)      Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Hislop)                               Minute No. C 20429(3)

“That the minutes of the meeting held on 29 May 2020 be adopted.”

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Deputy Mayor Lewis)           Minute No. C 20430(3)

“That the minutes of the meeting held on 18 June 2020 be adopted.”

b)      Community and Environment Committee

Resolved:   (Deputy Mayor Lewis/Cr Shaw)                  Minute No. C 20431(3)

“That the minutes of the meeting held on 8 July 2020 be adopted.”

12.     MINUTES OF THE LONG TERM PLAN SUBCOMMITTEE AMENDMENT WORKING GROUP DATED 13 JULY 2020  (20/765)

Report No. HCC2020/4/17 by the Head of Democratic Services

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Edwards)                    Minute No. C 20432(3)

“That the minutes of the Long Term Plan Subcommittee Amendment Working Group dated 13 July 2020 be adopted.”

13.     QUESTIONS   

          There were no questions.

14.

Sealing Authority (20/520)

Report No. HCC2020/3/6 by the Executive Assistant Transformation and Resources

 

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Brown)                                          Minute No. C 20433(3)  

“That Council approves the affixing of the Common Seal to all relevant documents in connection with the items set out in Schedule 1 and 2 contained in the report.

 

SCHEDULE 1 - General Sealing Authority

 

Subdivision related documents – including Easements to Council

Standard easements and related requirements granting rights to Council as part of the subdivision process:

 

a)                  Hutt City Council and Aaron Phyllip Stephens and Julia Anne Stephens
235 Riverside Drive, Lower Hutt, L19/361

b)                  Hutt City Council and Lowry Bay Limited Partnership
82-106 Moohan Street, Wainuiomata, Lower Hutt, L20/24

c)                   Hutt City Council and M & C Developments Limited
14 Korau Grove, Stokes Valley, Lower Hutt, L20/45

d)                  Hutt City Council and First Class Builders (2007) Limited , NMT Nominee Limited and Lois Jean Holmes and NMT Nominee Limited
95-97 Cuba Street, Petone, Lower Hutt, L20/5

e)                   Hutt City Council and Benjamin Robert Graham
58 Colson Street, Lower Hutt, L20/56

f)                    Hutt City Council and T&T Leighton Avenue Developments Limited
Kauamo Close, Lower Hutt, L20/49

g)                  Hutt City Council and Bloom 2018 Limited
7 and 7A Bloomfield Terrace, Lower Hutt, L20/79

h)                  Hutt City Council and Fitzerbert Developments Limited and Hutt City Council and Wayne Brian Draper and Nicolle Parker
196C & 206 Wise Street, Wainuiomata, Lower Hutt, L20/75

Memorandum of Agreement dated 11 October 2016 for land to be declared road

i)                    Hutt City Council and Catherine Mura Poihipi
Wainuiomata Hill Road, Lower Hutt, L20/71

j)                    Hutt City Council and Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Limited
108 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, L20/71

Transmission of title and registration of easement

k)                  Hutt City Council and Wellington Institute of Technology Limited
Petone Recreation Ground, off Buick Street, Petone, Lower Hutt, L20/77

Memorandum of agreement – land to be declared road

l)                    Hutt City Council and Catherine Mura Poihipi 
Gracefield Road and Wainuiomata Hill Road, Wainuiomata, Lower Hutt, L20/71

m)                Hutt City Council and Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Limited 
Gracefield Road and Wainuiomata Hill Road, Wainuiomata, Lower Hutt, L20/71

SCHEDULE 2

Deed of Sublease

n)                  Hutt City Council and Urban Plus Limited (Subtenant)
RKM House, 1-9 Knights Road, Lower Hutt, L20/67

Deed of Lease

o)                  Hutt City Council and Pro Clima NZ Limited
7 Daly Street, Lower Hutt, L20/78

p)                  Hutt City Council and Te Paepae Arahi Trust
7-9 Daly Street, Lower Hutt, L20/84

Lease of Reserve Land

q)                  Hutt City Council and Wainuiomata Squash Club 
Williams Jones Park, 99 Main Road, Wainuiomata, Lower Hutt, L20/81

WARRANTS

 

Alicia Todd – HCC WARRANT-20-8

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)
2. Resource Management Act 1991
Enforcement Officer pursuant to s38(1)

Bailey Tumanuvao – HCC WARRANT-20-61 (RECON)

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)
2. Land Transport Act 1998
Parking Warden pursuant to s128D
3. Resource Management Act 1991

Enforcement Officer (noise control only) pursuant to s38(2)

Joanne  Wilson – HCC WARRANT-20-60 (RECON)

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)
2. Land Transport Act 1998
Parking Warden pursuant to s128D
3. Resource Management Act 1991

Enforcement Officer (noise control only) pursuant to s38(2)

Flash Frost – HCC WARRANT-20-59 (RECON)

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)
2. Resource Management Act 1991

Enforcement Officer (noise control only) pursuant to s38(2)

Trush Amin – HCC WARRANT-20-64

1. Local Government Act 2004
Authorised person pursuant to s222

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s371B

Kimberley Jean Russell – HCC WARRANT-20-65

1. Local Government Act 2004
Authorised person pursuant to s222

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s371B

Jordon Potaka – HCC WARRANT-20-62 (RECON)

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)
2. Resource Management Act 1991

Enforcement Officer (noise control only) pursuant to s38(2)

 

Tom Moody – HCC WARRANT-20-63 (RECON)

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)
2. Resource Management Act 1991

Enforcement Officer (noise control only) pursuant to s38(2)

Zac McLennan – HCC WARRANT-20-70 (RECON)

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)

2. Land Transport Act 1998
Parking Warden pursuant to s128D
3. Resource Management Act 1991

Enforcement Officer (noise control only) pursuant to s38(2)

Charlie Deed – HCC WARRANT-20-72

1. Local Government Act 2002
Authorised person pursuant to ss171, 173 (powers of entry in general)

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s177 (including additional powers of entry)

2. Building Act 2004
Authorised Officer pursuant to s222

Enforcement Officer pursuant to s371B

 


 

15.     EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

Resolved:   (Mayor Barry/Cr Mitchell)                                   Minute No. C 20434(3)

“That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely:

16.     Committee Minutes with Recommended Items

Audit and Risk Subcommittee - 16 June 2020

17.     COUNCIL Minutes - 30 June 2020

 

18.     FURTHER INFORMATION ON AGREEMENT TO LEASE EVENTS CENTRE AND DEVELOP A HOTEL (20/750)

 

18a.   CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S PERFORMANCE REVIEW 2019/20

 

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

 

(A)

(B)

(C)

 

 

 

General subject of the matter to be considered.

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter.

Ground under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution.

 

 

 

Report of the Audit and Risk Subcommittee held on 16 June 2020 – Further Information on Agreeement to Lease Events Centre and Develop a Hotel

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities(s7(2)(h)).

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)(s7(2)(i))

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

 

 

Minutes of the Hutt City Council held on 30 June 2020

Further Information on Agreement to Lease Events Centre and Develop a Hotel

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities(s7(2)(h)).

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)(s7(2)(i))

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

Further Information on Agreement to Lease Events Centre and Develop a Hotel

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities(s7(2)(h)).

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)(s7(2)(i))

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

Chief Executive’s Performance Review 2019/20

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons. (s7(2)(a)).

That the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exist.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as specified in Column (B) above.”

 

 

 

  

Resolved:      (Mayor Barry/Cr Sutton)                              Minute No. C 20435

“That Mr Kevin Podmore from Cambridge Asset Management Limited and Ms Katy Anquetil from Sheffield be permitted to remain after the public section of the meeting for Items 18 and 18a as they have knowledge of the matters that will assist Council in relation to the items.”

 

There being no further business the Chair declared the meeting closed at 5.10 pm, and the non-public portion of the meeting closed at 8.48pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

C Barry

MAYOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMED as a true and correct record

Dated this 29th day of September 2020


 

 

 

Mayoral Statement - 28 July 2020 

 

Introduction

 

Kia ora koutou, and good afternoon.  

 

Acknowledgments 

 

Let me start by acknowledging Matariki, which is now coming to a close. 

 

As we come into the Māori New Year, it’s a time to reflect on the year past, and start to look ahead to our future.  As much as that can be a personal reflection, I think we’re able to reflect as a Council as well.

 

I imagine like many people I’ve been thinking a lot about our experience through COVID-19 and the contributions of people right across our city and country that have helped us get through.

 

Recently I had the pleasure of acknowledging our own staff who worked in the Emergency Operations Centre during the COVID-19 response, as well as conferring my first Mayoral Citation upon Dr Ashley Bloomfield - someone who I think we can all be extremely proud to celebrate as a local resident. 

 

Because of the efforts of Dr Ashley, our EOC staff, and the rest of the team of five million - we are able to attend large events like the rugby match last Saturday between the Parliamentary Team and the Centurions.  I was proud to play alongside many more skilled players than me - and during the day reflect on just how lucky we are to be in New Zealand during these challenging times worldwide.   

 

I’d like to publicly recognise our local Queens Birthday Honours recipients.  Bill Sharp, Ella Regina, Donald Long, and Billy Graham.  I thank them for their extraordinary contributions in their respective fields, and on behalf of our entire city wish to congratulate them on being recognised in such a special way.

 

And finally, let me acknowledge, David Selig, who sadly passed away a few weeks ago. David was a force in Wainuiomata, and was a massive supporter of the local community. My thoughts go out to his family, friends, and colleagues.  

 

Visits to businesses and organisations

 

As Mayor, it has been a priority for me to get our right across our city and visit business and organisations that are navigating their way through these uncertain economic times.

 

Businesses I visit speak to me about their recovery from COVID - and what they’re doing to innovate, keep people in work, and where they can grow their offerings in the current circumstances.

 

In return, they expect us to get the basics right and ensure we’re nailing our core functions.  Like people right across Lower Hutt, infrastructure investment is top of mind for many of our businesses and I’m proud to speak to them about our recent Annual Plan which was all about getting the basics right, and getting us through.

 

As you all know, I have been a longstanding and vocal supporter of the Living Wage.  That’s why it has been a particular pleasure to visit a number of our local Living Wage employers locally — Seashore Cabaret in Petone, Waglands up in Normandale, and Paysauce on Andrews Avenue.

 

It’s a reminder, for me, that in New Zealand we should never aim or settle for our competitive advantage to be our comparatively low wages.  It’s possible to be successful in business, and pay people fair wages that enable them to live their lives with dignity.  

 

Rubbish and Recycling 

 

Of course, Council is currently consulting on options on a big upgrade to our city’s rubbish and recycling services.  

 

So far we have had over 2000 submissions.  It is a great achievement to have this high amount of numbers so early in the process, but we will not stop our efforts in engaging our people and encouraging them to make their proposals. 

 

These are big changes we have for our city, and I’m really encouraged to see local people make their voice heard.  Their feedback will be crucial to make sure we get this decision right.

 

Conclusion

 

I want to finish by saying a thank you again to everyone for your efforts to date. While a lot has happened over the past 9 months, there is even more to come as we start to work on our Long Term Plan.

 

Before we get stuck into this meeting, I would like to invite CE Jo Miller to say a few words. 

 


 

28 July 2020

 

Chief Executive’s Statement to Council

Thank you Mayor Barry for acknowledging the contribution of our staff who worked in the Emergency Operations Centre responding to COVID-19. It was a pleasure to see these staff recognised at a recent ceremony where you presented them with commemorative coins.

 

Management Challenge

For the first time in a number of years, Council entered a team in the SOLGM Management Challenge.  Our Kapa Toa team consists of Taitu Lemessa, Lisa Rofe, Parvati Rotherham, Jarred Griffiths, Shane O'Connor and Hazel McColl and I was honoured to be their mentor. 

 

SOLGM Executive

I previously announced to you that I have been elected onto the SOLGM Executive as the Wellington area representative and I attended my first meeting of this group last Friday. I will be attending these meetings 4 times per year. The role enables me to link in with my colleagues across the region to ensure there is a strong voice for the Wellington region at the executive level.

 

Annual Plan Published and Rates set for 2020/21

The Annual Plan 2020-2021 Mahere ā-Tau 2020-2021 Getting us through | Kia tae ki tua has been published to our website on the Annual and Long Term Plans page here.

Ratepayers have received their first rates instalment notice for the new financial year. Our staff are supporting ratepayers with queries raised.

 

Three Waters Reforms

The Mayor, Deputy Mayor alongside other Councillors and I with colleagues attended a central and local government workshop on the newly announced reforms to Three Waters (stormwater, wastewater and drinking water) last Thursday. The reforms concentrate on the equitable access to quality drinking water, moving the Three Waters to financially sustainable and transparent delivery across the country, increasing resilience and looking at new ways of doing things. It’s exciting to be part of a transformational programme like this.

Over the next four weeks Councils have been asked to consider a Memorandum of Understanding that reflects a high level agreement on the principles of working together. On signing the Memorandum the Crown will undertake to provide some funding for Council on high priority Three Waters areas.  This funding of $761M across New Zealand has been set aside as a response to Covid and the need to invest in water infrastructure.

A meeting will be scheduled for 26 August to consider the Memorandum and the plan for how the funding will be utilised which is currently being developed by Wellington Water on behalf of their member Councils.

 

Rubbish and Recycling Consultation

Consultation on rubbish and recycling started on 16 July and runs through until 16 August. Over 2,130 submissions have been received so far from our consultation site haveyoursay.huttcity.govt.nz/rubbishandrecycling, paper and email.

 

Corporate Leadership Team/Directors

As you know the Corporate Leadership Team is largely in place. I’ve been working through the implications of immigration controls and border restrictions in terms of Chris Marsh being able to move from the UK to New Zealand to take up the role of Director Neighbourhoods and Communities. Given this ongoing situation and the need to have some certainty around the role, Chris and I have agreed that he will not be taking up the position as Director Neighbourhoods & Communities. This is a decision not taken lightly by Chris and his family as he was professionally very excited about joining Council and the Leadership Team and his family were relishing a move to New Zealand. Chris has the skills and attributes to make a significant contribution in the role and made a lasting positive impact on the interview panel.

While I’ve been working through this with Chris, Andrea Blackshaw has been more than ably covering the Neighbourhoods & Communities portfolio and I’ve been keeping in touch with the recruitment consultants who helped us with the Director appointments to ensure we have plans in place if Chris was unable to relocate.

With the financial challenges Council is facing I also considered whether there was a need for a replacement Director or if the work could be shared amongst the current Directors. With the sizable workload ahead of us and over the next triennium, particularly in the areas of strategy and engagement, I have decided that a further appointment for an initial fixed term period is needed to get us to where we need to be.

I’ve made the decision to offer the role of Director Neighbourhoods & Communities to Andrea Blackshaw on a permanent basis. I am very pleased to advise that Andrea has accepted this role. Andrea has done a fantastic job in the caretaker role she has been doing over many months and I know she’s looking forward to the opportunity to bring leadership to those areas on a long term basis. I’m sure you’ll join me in offering your congratulations to Andrea.

In terms of the Director Strategy & Engagement role I expect to be in a position to make an announcement on this in the coming fortnight with a view to having someone on board by September. Given the thorough recruitment process we undertook, we’re in the extremely fortunate position where we had more than one person who was suitable for the role. We are currently working through the arrangements to make an appointment. In the meantime the existing interim arrangements will continue with Andrea Blackshaw and Anna Welanyk overseeing the business units within the Strategy & Engagement Group.

 

Base budget review and the Long Term Plan 2021-2031

Preparatory work is underway on the base budget review. We are starting to engage with the organisation and a leadership workshop is scheduled this week to start work on plans which focus on getting the basics right and contribute to a thriving city. At the upcoming planning hui with Councillors in mid-August we will be progressing conversations on priorities for the next Long Term Plan and seeking direction from members.

 

Remuneration

Members will be aware that the 2020/21 budget included personnel savings of around $1M. This required me to vary the collective employment agreement with our union colleagues. In order to reach agreement we had to modify our original proposal and they’ve now agreed to a flat increase of 1.5% from 1 January 2021 for all eligible staff that applies to union and non-union members.

We’ll also be increasing rates that are below the 2020 living wage rate of $22.10 from 1 January 2021, for permanent and fixed term employees. We expect to be in a position to review pay rates for our casual staff as part of the 1 July 2021 remuneration review process.

The total cost of this is 20% of what had originally been budgeted for the full remuneration review process and equates to $165k. The cost of this will be met by reprioritising within existing operating budgets.

 

External reviews

Our Environmental Health Team was recently audited by Jasanz (an independent body) on behalf of the Ministry for Primary Industries. The audit was to allow Hutt City Council to continue as a recognised agency to undertake food safety verifications. The auditor commented that our quality management system as well as the standard of our verifiers’ report writing is “excellent”. Well done to Dean Bentley, Amber Pacheco and the team.

 

Probus

I had the pleasure of attending the combined Hutt Probus Club meeting last week where I talked about our city’s response to Covid-19 to 130 attendees. My presentation was well received as I covered the major challenges like housing and infrastructure, and successes including our work with mana whenua. I received a small gift which I have donated to the Remakery in Naenae.

 

HQN – Housing Quality Network Back from the Brink annual conference

I presented at the opening session of the annual symposium of the Housing Quality Network where 350 people attended online. The symposium was held from 9.00pm NZ time and I discussed the differences in how New Zealand responded to Covid-19 and particularly how we dealt with housing and homelessness. I was joined by speakers from Australia, Ireland and South Africa. A donation for my contribution was made to the Lower Hutt Women’s Refuge.


 

 

Ngā mihi mahana.

 

In June, our Trust and two residents groups in Belmont jointly hosted a community conversation on cats in order to test the level of community concern and consensus. The aim was to assist both community and council navigating issues of responsible cat ownership and restoring nature in our city.

 

We reached consensus on council regulating for microchipping, registration and desexing, and it is pleasing to see this reflected in the Mayor’s recommendations. One of the purposes of microchipping and registration is to ensure cats can be safely returned to their owners, should they be rescued or caught for some reason. I encourage you to ensure that council officers have the necessary powers to do so.

 

Thanks to input from Susan of Kitten Inn and Hamish of Outpawed, we heard evidence of nuisance, social and ecological problems when there are too many cats in one household, with the cost falling on residents and charities. We were persuaded and reached consensus on regulating a household limit. I encourage you to further interrogate this problem, and consider the role of a bylaw in supporting residents and charities.

 

In our conversation we did not specifically discuss prohibited areas, but I think it is important we do so soon, not least because Greater Wellington is considering such for regional parks. It is a challenging question, both practically and socially; yet it may be a valuable tool to protect wildlife in special places. Key to acceptability and effectiveness will be plenty of community conversation.

 

Thank you all for your perseverance on this topic. We can all be proud to have stepped up to improve the welfare of our beloved cats and our beloved wildlife.

 

 

Quentin Duthie

Convenor, Pareraho Forest Trust

28 July 2020