HUTT CITY COUNCIL

 

Ordinary meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, 30 Laings Road, Lower Hutt on

 Tuesday 28 July 2020 commencing at 2.00pm.

 

 

SUPPLEMENTARY ORDER PAPER

 

 

Public Business

 

 

 

     

  8.       Miscellaneous               

d)      Cross Valley Transport Connections Programme Business Case (20/748)

Memorandum dated 24 July 2020 by the Head of Transport                      3

Mayor’s Recommendation:

That Council:

i)          notes the Cross Valley Transport Connections project (formerly the Cross Valley Link) is a key transport priority for Council as part of the current Long Term Plan, and has been mooted since the early 1960’s;

ii)         notes the substantial completion of the Programme Business Case for the Cross Valley Transport Connections project;

iii)        notes the significant benefits that come with progressing the Cross Valley Transport Connections project, including improved transport network resilience, improved transport choices and encouraging mode shift, improving accessibility and safety, and supporting development and urban growth;

iv)       endorses, in principle, the emerging preferred programme for the Cross Valley Transport Connections project as set out in the Programme Business Case;

v)        agrees to explore options to accelerate stage three of the emerging preferred programme for the Cross Valley Transport, recognising that the construction of a new east to west corridor will be the most impactful part of the programme;

vi)       directs officers to regularly report to the Community and Environment Committee on progress of the Cross Valley Transport Connections project, and reporting to occur no less than four times per year (quarterly);

vii)      agrees to lobby major political parties for a commitment to fast track and fund the emerging preferred programme for the Cross Valley Transport Connection project, ahead of the general election on September 19; and

viii)     directs officers to report to the next Long Term Plan/Annual Plan Subcommittee on the Cross Valley Transport Connections project in order to progress decisions in the drafting of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031.

 

 

 

 

 

Kate Glanville

SENIOR DEMOCRACY ADVISOR


MEMORANDUM                                                   3                                                              28 July 2020

Our Reference          20/748

TO:                      Mayor and Councillors

Hutt City Council

FROM:                John Gloag

DATE:                24 July 2020

SUBJECT:           Cross Valley Transport Connections Programme Business Case

 

 

Recommendation

That Council notes the substantial completion of the Programme Business Case for the Cross Valley Transport Connections project.

 

Purpose of Memorandum

1.    To present the basis and key features of the Programme Business Case for the Cross Valley Transport Connections project, as summarised in the attached Executive Summary.

Background

2.    The Programme Business Case (PBC) for the Cross Valley Transport Connections (CVTC) project sets out the investment case for improving the transport system in southern Lower Hutt for the next 20 years.  The PBC is informed by a Strategic Business Case (SBC) which is developed by Council (2016) and endorsed by the New Zealand Transport Agency Waka Kotahi (Waka Kotahi) in order to access their funding. The PBC also aligns with the Lower Hutt Growth Story formulated in 2018. 

3.    The following Investment Objectives were developed for the PBC which were informed by the Problem and Benefit Statements for the SBC.

Ø  To improve the resilience of southern Lower Hutt by enhancing the transport networks ability to withstand and respond in a timely manner to High Impact Low Probability (HILP) and Low Impact High Probability (LIHP) events

Ø  To improve access to and from key destinations and key urban growth areas in southern Lower Hutt

4.    To achieve the investment objectives, a long list of 60 transport improvement alternatives/options were identified which included network optimisation (e.g. bus priority measures) through to physical improvements (e.g. upgraded roadway). Through a multi-criteria assessment (MCA) evaluation process the long list of 60 options was reduced to a short list of 45. The 45 options were then packaged into four “themed” transport programme options. 

 

5.    The four programmes were assessed via another MCA process and an Emerging Preferred Programme was identified which achieves the investment objectives and supplements the transport improvements already being developed. 

6.    The Emerging Preferred Programme for CVTC and its proposed timeline is noted in the table below.

Stages

Timing

Key activities

Stage 1

2021/22 to 2024/25

Active mode improvements on The Esplanade, Hutt Road and Ewen Bridge (Jacobs Micromobility SSBC)

New active mode connection between Woburn and the new Petone to Melling section of the Te Ara Tupua Walking and Cycling Project

Bus priority improvements at following key intersections:

►   The Esplanade / Hutt Road

►   Hutt Road / Jackson Street

►   Jackson Street / Cuba Street

►   Randwick Road / Waione Street

►   Randwick Road / Whites Line East

Train station access plans to improve active mode and micro-mobility access to the Petone, Ava and Woburn Train Stations

Stage 2

2025/26 to 2027/28

Improvements to the existing Gracefield Interchange to allow for full movements for all road based vehicles

Stage 3

2028/29+

New east / west multi-modal transport corridor on a Wakefield Street to Whites Line / Randwick Road alignment, including:

►  An upgraded or replaced Ava Rail Bridge

►  New or upgraded road connections to Seaview / Gracefield

►  Cuba Street connections (e.g. on / off ramps)

►  Connections to the Dowse Interchange / Hutt Road

►  Bus priority (e.g. bus lanes) on The Esplanade (once the new east-west multi-modal transport corridor is in place).

 

7.    The rationale for the timeline is;

Ø To spread the financial burden

Ø To better accommodate the disruption to the Transport Network during implementation

Ø To align with the timing of related projects, such as the P2G Link Road, which enable full delivery of the investment objectives

Ø To allow each stage to be evaluated by the investment partners before committing to the next stage.

8.    The Emerging Preferred Programme is estimated to cost between $100m and $160m. This wide estimate range is a result of the high level of uncertainty of these types of projects and the fact the costs are only indicative until further design work is undertaken during the next stages of the business case. The costings by stage are shown in the following table.

Stage

Expected Cost

Upper Cost Estimate

Stage 1 - Active mode and bus priority improvements

$17,000,000

$26,000,000

Stage 2 – Gracefield Interchange upgrades

$8,000,000

$15,000,000

Stage 3 – New multi-modal transport corridor and wider bus priory improvements

$75,000,000

$114,000,000

Emerging preferred programme cost

$100,000,000

$160,000,000

 

Discussion

9.    The next steps for the Emerging Preferred Programme are summarised in the table below. These stages are only indicative and as we progress there will be opportunities to review timing in order to align with priorities and future funding decision making processes of HCC, Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) and Waka Kotahi.

 

Stage

Next Business Case Stage

(including leads)

Expected Implementation Timing

Stage 1

2021-2024: Active Mode and Bus Priority Single Stage Business Cases (HCC to lead)

2021-2024: Train Station Access Plans for the Petone, Ava and Woburn Train Stations (GWRC / HCC to lead)

2024 to 2027

 

2021 - 2024

Stage 2

2024-2027: Gracefield Interchange Single Stage Business Case (HCC to lead)

2028 to 2031

Stage 3

2028-2030 (plus): East-West Multi-Modal Transport Corridor Single Stage Business Case, including Bus Priority on The Esplanade (HCC to lead)

2029+ (to align with “Ngauranga Triangle” state highway improvement projects)

 

 

 

Appendices

No.

Title

Page

1

Executive Summary CVC PBC

7

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: John Gloag

Head of Transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved By: Kara Puketapu-Dentice

Director Economy and Development

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Executive Summary CVC PBC

 

1         Executive Summary

1.1        Introduction

This Programme Business Case (PBC) sets out the investment case for improving the transport system in southern Lower Hutt (the Project Study Area) for the next 20 years. 

Hutt City Council (HCC) commenced development of the PBC in 2019, following the development of a strategic case in 2016 and the Lower Hutt Growth Story in 2018.  A key feature of its development has been the contributions made by stakeholders and representatives from Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) and Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) at various workshops / meetings.

Through the PBC process, problems, benefits and programmes (or packages) of transport improvements were identified and assessed.  Ultimately, an emerging preferred programme was identified for further and more detailed business case assessment.

1.2        Problems, Benefits and Investment Objectives

The key problems, benefits and investment objectives were identified through a stakeholder workshop process as well as through direct engagement with NZTA and GWRC.  Through this engagement process it was agreed that the problem and benefit statements identified in the Petone Esplanade Strategic Case (2016) needed updating.  It was also agreed that investment objectives needed to be identified to support the development of the PBC.

The problems

The first problem identified through the engagement process is as follows:

Problem Statement One:       Lack of transport network resilience (75% weighting)

Southern Lower Hutt’s transport network lacks resilience to major natural events, future sea level rise, and regular network interruptions, which will cause economic and / or social disruption for Lower Hutt and the Wellington region.

The majority of the Project Study Area is at significant risk from large earthquakes and earthquake related risks, such as, liquefaction and tsunami.  Flooding and sea level change have also been identified as significant risks for the Project Study Area.  The evidence supporting this problem statement identified that if any of these risks were to occur, it was likely that the transport system would be significantly damaged or out of action for an extended period.  In the case of a large earthquake, it is predicted that the road network within the Project Study Area would take weeks or months to be repaired.  Such an outage would have significant impacts on the Area’s ability to recover from both a lifeline, social and economic perspective.

The Wellington Lifelines PBC (2019), estimated that a 7.5 magnitude movement on the Wellington Fault line would render key transport connections within the Project Study Area, such as The Esplanade, unusable for weeks, due to the physical damage that would be sustained.  Such an outcome would greatly hinder lifeline emergency service responses in the short term. In the longer term, social and economic recovery would be significantly delayed for the local communities within the Project Study Area, as well as for its surrounding communities (e.g. Eastbourne and Wainuiomata).

The economic losses following a large earthquake event in the Wellington region have been estimated to be significant.  For example, the Wellington Lifelines PBC estimated that such an event would result in the New Zealand economy losing about $16B over a 5-year period.  It is likely that a significant proportion of this predicted economic loss would result from severed transport connections within the Project Study Area. 

Significant social and well-being impacts could also be expected following a large earthquake.  Such impacts would result from restricted access to lifeline / community services as well as people becoming isolated from families and friends for long periods of time. 

The second problem identified through the engagement process is as follows:

Problem Two: Limited access (25% weighting)

The existing transport system in southern Lower Hutt:

►    limits modal choice

►    constrains access to social and economic opportunities

►    creates safety issues for active mode users

For Problem Statement Two, the supporting evidence indicates that high traffic volumes on the key arterials within the Project Study Area at peak travelling times is causing travel time variability issues for all transport modes.  In particular, travel times for buses, heavy commercial vehicles and private motor vehicles is unpredictable.  The evidence identifies that Hutt Road, and in particular The Esplanade, are the main arterials that have the most unpredictable travel times.  For The Esplanade, travel time variability is expected to further deteriorate over time due to population and employment growth, and it is currently predicted that this road’s level of service (affecting all road based modes of transport) will decline from E to F by 2036. 

Despite the travel time variability issues on key arterial roads, travel by private motor vehicle remains the preferred mode of choice (e.g. 73 percent of journey to work trips are made by car).  Key reasons why travel by car remains the first choice include: 

►    Lack of alternative travel options

►    Layout of the existing transport network

►    Connectivity with public transport and multi-modal travel options

►    Public transport is seen as less attractive in comparison to the private vehicle, particularly during peak times, when public transport services are often operating at or above capacity.  As such, the private vehicle is seen as more affordable, reliable and convenient.

Through the development of the PBC, key stakeholders identified that unpredictable travel times were resulting in the Project Study Area becoming less attractive as a place for potential residents and businesses to remain in or to re-locate to.  This is because travel time variability impacts directly on people’s commute times (whether they are travelling to or from work or to community services), and on businesses commercial bottom lines.  To this end, HCC has expressed concern that if travel time variability on key arterials is not addressed, it may lead to a decline in residential / business investment in the Project Study Area.

For vulnerable road users, the PBC identified that The Esplanade was a key crash “hot spot” for cyclists and to a lesser extent pedestrians.  A key contributing factor in many of the crashes has been the high number of private motor vehicle turning movements on The Esplanade.  Through development of the PBC, it has been highlighted that high traffic volumes on The Esplanade has led to a perception that the road is unsafe for walking and cycling. In turn, discouraging people from walking, cycling and / or using micro-mobility devices to travel either along or across The Esplanade or to access the Petone Foreshore.  In addition, the PBC also identified that a lack of active mode options for crossing the Hutt River and Hutt Valley Rail Line was preventing the greater uptake of walking and cycling within the Project Study Area.

Estuary (Waione Street) Bridge 
Through the problem statement development process, the Estuary (or Waione) Bridge was identified as being susceptible to both resilience and access problems.  For example, the Wellington Resilience PBC 2018 identified that this bridge would be subject to significant lateral movement (and therefore damage) following a large earthquake.  In addition, the evidence collected for this PBC has identified that the limited capacity of the bridge was causing a “bottleneck” on the road network, which was expected to deteriorate in the future, and the existing active mode facilities on the bridge were considered to be of poor quality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Figure 1 summarises the key problems affecting the transport network in the Project Study Area.


Figure 1 Key Problems, Risks or Issues


Through the engagement process, the following key benefit statements were identified:

►    Improved transport network resilience (50% weighting)

►    Improved transport choices to encourage mode shift (25% weighting)

►    Improve accessibility and safety (15% weighting)

►    Improved development opportunities for urban growth areas in southern Lower Hutt (10% weighting)

The Investment Objectives

Following development of the problem and benefit statements, two investment objectives were identified through the engagement process. These included:

►    To improve the resilience of southern Lower Hutt by enhancing the transport networks ability to withstand and respond in a timely manner to HILP and LIHP events

►    To improve access to and from key destinations and key urban growth areas in southern Lower Hutt

1.3        The Opportunities

The Project Team identified the following opportunities for the Project Study Area, if the above resilience and access problems were to be addressed:

►    Lower Hutt and the wider Wellington region would be better prepared for High Impact Low Probability (HILP) events, such as large earthquakes, and for the long-term effects of climate change (e.g. sea level rise).  Preparing for such events will help to mitigate their likely adverse economic impacts, improve people’s access to lifeline services, and reduce the likely social costs that will result from long-term isolation from friends and family

►    Lower Hutt would be better prepared for Low Impact High Probability (LIHP) events such as crashes, road accidents (spills) and construction works.  Increasing the redundancy of the transport network throughout the Project Study Area would help to mitigate the economic impacts and network delays that can be expected from such an event

►    Improved travel time reliability on the key arterial roads for buses, heavy commercial vehicles and general traffic is likely to further support economic development in Lower Hutt, and encourage increased use of bus services

►    More viable / reliable transport choices for people within the Project Study Area, including reducing travel obstacles that some people may experience (e.g. elderly and lower socio-economic cohorts).

Addressing the resilience and access problems will also help to realise the vision, objectives and goals of key strategic documents, such as, HCC’s Petone Spatial Plan 2040 and the Wellington Lifelines PBC 2019.

1.4        Developing Responses to the Challenges

To address the problems and to realise the investment objectives, a long list of transport improvement alternatives / options was first identified.  The long list included network optimisation through to physical improvements.  The long list was then subjected to a Stage 1 multi-criteria assessment (MCA) evaluation process in order to identify a short list of options. 

The short listed alternatives / options were then packaged into four “themed” programmes, as well as identifying a do-minimum programme.  Each programme’s theme was based on an “anchor resilience project” – an additional crossing of the Hutt River to improve both resilience and east-west multi modal connections.  Additional multi modal interventions that weren’t already included in the do-minimum were then added to each programme in order to ensure all aspects of the investment objectives were achieved.  Each programme was then assessed through a Stage 2 MCA evaluation process, which ultimately resulted in an emerging preferred programme – or package of transport improvements - being identified as the best performing combination of alternatives / options.

There were two key features of the Stage 2 evaluation process.  Firstly, it was recognised that there were a number transport improvement activities identified in the do-minimum programme that were “already in place” to improve the transport system within the Project Study Area.  As such, the emerging preferred programme needed to build upon these activities, rather than to replicate or duplicate them.  Secondly, following the identification of the preferred programme, it was recognised that a number of the individual interventions that had been included in the lesser performing programmes could add value in achieving the investment objectives.  Accordingly, these “value add” interventions were included in the emerging preferred programme. 

1.5        The Emerging Preferred Programme

The emerging preferred programme is proposed to be staged over a 20-year time frame.  The programme is expected to address the problems and achieve the investment objectives, whilst strategically supplementing the transport improvements that are already being developed – the do-minimum programme. 

In addition to aligning with the committed improvements within the Project Study Area, the emerging preferred programme also aligns with the broader transport improvements that are being considered.  For example, the staging of the programme aligns with the timing of NZTA’s potential improvements to the Ngauranga Triangle state highway network, and in particular the Petone to Grenada Link Road project.  If this project is to be progressed as the preferred solution, then significant additional benefits, beyond those identified in this PBC, could be expected from the emerging preferred programme.

Table 1 outlines the emerging preferred programme and its proposed staging.

Table 1  Emerging Preferred Programme Staging

Stages

Timing

Key activities

Stage 1

2021/22 to 2024/25

Active mode improvements on The Esplanade, Hutt Road and Ewen Bridge (Jacobs Micromobility SSBC)

New active mode connection between Woburn and the new Petone to Melling section of the Te Ara Tupua Walking and Cycling Project

Bus priority improvements at following key intersections:

►   The Esplanade / Hutt Road

►   Hutt Road / Jackson Street

►   Jackson Street / Cuba Street

►   Randwick Road / Waione Street

►   Randwick Road / Whites Line East

Train station access plans to improve active mode and micro-mobility access to the Petone, Ava and Woburn Train Stations

Stage 2

2025/26 to 2027/28

Improvements to the existing Gracefield Interchange to allow for full movements for all road based vehicles

Stage 3

2028/29+

New east / west multi-modal transport corridor on a Wakefield Street to Whites Line / Randwick Road alignment, including:

►  An upgraded or replaced Ava Rail Bridge

►  New or upgraded road connections to Seaview / Gracefield

►  Cuba Street connections (e.g. on / off ramps)

►  Connections to the Dowse Interchange / Hutt Road

►  Bus priority (e.g. bus lanes) on The Esplanade (once the new east-west multi-modal transport corridor is in place).

 

A key feature of Stage 3 is the recommendation that its implementation coincides with the implementation of major improvements to the “Ngauranga triangle state highway system”,[1] such as, the P2G Link Road project.  The key reasons for this recommendation are as follows:

►    the transport benefits (resilience, access and increased capacity) of the new east-west multi-modal transport corridor are not likely to be fully realised until the level of service improves on SH2, between the Melling and Ngauranga Interchanges, during peak traveling times

►    without a new east-west multi-modal transport corridor in place, east-west through traffic will continue to use The Esplanade, which in turn significantly limits the ability to implement major bus priority measures (or placemaking measures) in Petone.

Taking a staged approach allows for each phase of the programme to be evaluated / assessed by the investment partners before committing to the next stage (e.g. Stages 2 and / or 3). 

Taking such an approach also provides the investment partners with the option to bring forward a component of Stage 2 or 3 if required. For example, if NZTA decide to advance its business case for improving the Ngauranga Triangle state highway system, then the business case(s) identified for Stage 3 could also be brought forward.  Despite generating standalone transport benefits, it is also noted that taking a staged approach provides the investment partners with the option of progressing both Stages 2 and 3 as a package rather than separately as currently proposed.

Figure 2 summarises the emerging preferred programme.



Figure 2 Emerging Preferred Programme


 

1.6        What will the Emerging Preferred Programme cost?

The cost to implement the entire emerging preferred programme is estimated to be between $100M and $160M. 

Table 2 sets out the expected and 95th percentile cost estimates (i.e. risk adjusted) for each stage of the emerging preferred programme. 

Table 2  Expected and 95th Cost Estimates for the Emerging Preferred Programme

Stage

Expected Cost

95th Cost Estimate

Stage 1 - Activity mode and bus priority improvements

$17,000,000

$26,000,000

Stage 2 – Gracefield Interchange upgrades

$8,000,000

$15,000,000

Stage 3 – New multi-modal transport corridor and wider bus priory improvements

$75,000,000

$114,000,000

Emerging preferred programme cost

$100,000,000

$160,000,000


It is important to note that the cost estimates for implementing the
emerging preferred programme are indicative only.  Confidence in the programme costs will be improved following the completion of each investigation stage.

1.7        What are the Transport and Economic Benefits?

The emerging preferred programme’s benefit cost ratio (BCR) ranges between 3.6 and 5.3. The higher BCR including wider economic benefits (WEBs), land value uplift and resilience benefits. 

Sensitivity testing was undertaken to ensure the BCR was robust under different scenarios.  This testing process showed that the sensitivity of the standard BCR (i.e. 3.6) ranged from 2.2 to 8.3, and the sensitivity of the BCR with WEBs ranged from 3.2 to 12.1.

1.8        The Key Investment Outcomes

Table 3 sets out how each stage of the emerging preferred programme is expected to address each investment objective.


Table 3  Anticipated Investment Outcomes

Key investment outcomes

How the investment outcomes will be achieved?

Investment Objective 1

Investment Objective 2

Stage One

►    Improved walking and cycling facilities, including ensuring connections to and from the Te Ara Tupua Walking and Cycling Project are safe and efficient.  Such an outcome will also provide health and climate change benefits

►    Key “crash hot spots” for vulnerable road users will be improved

►    East-west travel time variability improved as a consequence of improved / new bus priority measures at key intersections

►    Walking, cycling and micro-mobility access improvements at the Petone, Ava and Woburn Train Stations.  Such an outcome will also provide health and climate change benefits

 

►    By improving active mode facilities along The Esplanade, Hutt Road and across Ewen Bridge.  In addition, a new active mode route could be provided that will connect with the Te Ara Tupua walking and cycling project

►    By reducing the number of pedestrian (75) and cycling (77) crashes that have been recorded over the past 5 year period.  This will be achieved through addressing the key causal factors for these crashes

►    By improving bus travel time variability through implementing new or additional bus priority at key locations, including; Randwick Road / Whites Line East, Randwick Road / Waione Street, Jackson Street / Cuba Street, Jackson Street / Hutt Road and The Esplanade / Hutt Road

►    By completing Train Station Access Plans to improve the ability of people to walk, cycle or use micro-mobility devices to access train stations within the Project Study Area

 

 

Stage Two

►    Improved travel efficiency for all road based vehicles travelling to and from Wainuiomata as a result of enabling full movements to occur at the Gracefield Interchange

►    By improving travel times between Wainuiomata and Gracefield

Stage Three

►    Improved response and recovery to HILP events through providing additional network redundancy and ensuring that access to vital lifeline services, such as, the Seaview Fuel Depot, is resilient

►    Assists in responding to the predicted impacts of long-term sea-level change

►    Improves active mode and micro-mobility access to the Petone Foreshore, which has health benefits and climate change benefits

►    Improves access to and through Petone (in particular, The Esplanade), Seaview / Gracefield and North Park.  It also improves access to the Wainuiomata and Eastbourne areas, which are heavily reliant on the performance of the transport connections through the Project Study Area

►    Creating a new east-west multi-modal transport connection (outside of the HILP risk areas) will enable Lower Hutt and the wider Wellington region to better respond to, and recover from, HILP events.  There is the option of connecting the new east-west route through to Seaview / Gracefield, which would provide additional resilience benefits for this area as well as for Eastbourne and Wainuiomata

►    By providing a new east-west multi-modal transport connection, travel times on the new road, as well as on the existing network (i.e. The Esplanade) are expected to be more predictable and reliable

►    By improving safety for all transport modes using The Esplanade as well as improving access to the Petone Foreshore.  These benefits will be realised as it is expected that vehicle traffic will transfer from The Esplanade to the new east-west multi-modal transport connection


In addition to the outcomes identified above, the emerging preferred programme will give effect to the development and growth aspirations set out in various HCC strategic documents, such as, the Petone Spatial Plan 2040.  It also helps to give effect to the objectives and recommendations identified in the Wellington Lifelines and Wellington Transport Resilience PBCs.

1.9        What are the key Programme Risks?

Technical, operational, financial and stakeholder risks were identified during development of the PBC.  Most of these risks stem from the high-level nature of the PBC assessment in general.  As such, there will be an improved understanding of these risks once they undergo more detailed examination during the next steps of the prescribed business case process. 

It is recommended that further stakeholder engagement is undertaken prior to finalising the emerging preferred programme.  This will help to ensure that stakeholders are in full support of the final business case.

1.10      Where to Next?

The next steps for the emerging preferred programme are summarised in Table 4.  The exact timing of the next steps is subject to future funding decision making processes, including those to be made through the future HCC’s long-term plans, GWRC’s regional land transport plans, and NZTA’s national land transport plans.

Table 4  Emerging Preferred Programme Implementation Strategy

Stage

Next Business Case Stage

(including leads)

Expected Implementation Timing

Stage 1

2021-2024: Active Mode and Bus Priority Single Stage Business Cases (HCC to lead)

2021-2024: Train Station Access Plans for the Petone, Ava and Woburn Train Stations (GWRC / HCC to lead)

2024 to 2027

 

2021 - 2024

Stage 2

2024-2027: Gracefield Interchange Single Stage Business Case (HCC to lead)

2028 to 2031

Stage 3

2028-2030 (plus): East-West Multi-Modal Transport Corridor Single Stage Business Case, including Bus Priority on The Esplanade (HCC to lead)

2029+

(to align with “Ngauranga Triangle” state highway improvement projects)

 

The next immediate step is to develop detailed scopes for the proposed Bus Priority SSBC and train station access plans, and then to include their relevant funding requirements in both HCC’s Long Term Plan and GWRC’s Regional Land Transport Plan to be developed in late 2020.  For the Active Modes SSBC, it is noted that Jacobs are currently undertaking a micromobility SSBC for the Lower Hutt region. The proposed active mode options / alternatives identified on The Esplanade, Hutt Road and Ewen Bridge in this PBC, will be aligned and included within Jacobs micromobility SSBC. In addition, it will be important to monitor the progress of the resource consent process for the Te Ara Tupua Walking and Cycling Project (for the Petone to Ngauranga section), and timing of when NZTA might re-start its investigation work for improving the Ngauranga Triangle state highway system (specifically Petone to Grenada Link Road).

In addition, it is recommended that a governance group (consisting of HCC, NZTA and GWRC) be established to oversee delivery of the emerging preferred programme.



[1] The Ngauranga triangle state highway network currently comprises of SH2 (between the SH58/2 and Ngauranga interchanges), SH1 (Ngauranga and Plimmerton) and SH58